Schedule and Room Assignments

Classes meet Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, or Fridays in Herndon, VA. Filter by subject or grade below. You can see key dates in our Google calendar or view our Academic Calendar.

Quarter beginning January 18, 2021

Art / MusicScience / TechnologyHumanities / Social SciencesLanguage Arts
ExtracurricularMathForeign Language(Full Classes)
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Wednesday Classes

9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00
Room 1

Integrated Middle School Science

Integrated Middle School ScienceClosed

Quarter(s):

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 3

This year-long, lab-based course is a survey of key concepts in the fields of physical science, Earth science, and life science which will give students the foundational knowledge to succeed in high school level Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Environmental Science. Each class period will involve approximately 25 minutes of lecture and 60 minutes of lab time.

Weekly lab work will allow students to apply the scientific concepts studied, improve laboratory techniques, record observations, take a variety of measurements, use different lab equipment, record and interpret data, convert units of measure, and write lab reports. An effort is made to incorporate recent scientific discoveries and new technologies in class discussions. The background covered in this course will enable a teen to become an educated reader of scientific news and a more knowledgeable consumer.

The life science topics in this class are designed to give the student general knowledge in biology, zoology, botany, genetics and ecology. General themes in the class include life cycles, food webs, and an understanding that living things depend on each other. Microscope work will be used in life science labs. Students may want to dual register with this course and the fall Dissection Lab classes for a more robust introduction to biology and for further lab experience. The physical science portion of the class will overview fundamentals of chemistry and physics such as the properties and classification of matter, the Periodic Table, basic chemical reactions, energy, forces, work, motion, simple and compound machines, waves, light, sound, and electricity. Earth science concepts include the water cycle, weather patterns, climates, and water/air quality.

This class is appropriate for a tween or teen who had limited middle school level science and who expects to pursue high school level Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Earth Science, or Environmental Science on a college-preparatory track. This class is also appropriate for a homeschooled teen who will likely pursue an arts- or vocational- focused path and for whom an overview of high school science concepts is sufficient.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.

Assignments: will be given in class and repeated in the weekly e-mail to parents and students. In addition, students will have some take-home labs to complete observations and measurements longer term at home.

Assessments: The instructor will provide a quarterly student evaluation form which includes metrics on a student's class participation, homework, and general understanding of concepts for the parent's use in assigning a grade.

Textbook: Students should purchase or rent Miller & Levine Biology, 2010 edition (red macaw cover, ISBN # 978-0133669510). Students should also purchase Everything You Need to Ace Science in One Big Fat Notebook: The Complete Middle School Study Guide by Workman Publishing (ISBN # 978-0761160953)

Lab/Supply Fee: A lab fee of $125.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in general science for purposes of a homeschool transcript.

9:30 am-10:55 am

7th-9th

Kids' Engineering Lab: Aviation Challenge (11am)

Kids' Engineering Lab: Aviation Challenge (11am) Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 4

In Engineering Lab, students will explore the physics of airplanes, parachutes, and gliders! They will experiment with wing shapes, the geometry of nose cones, and the volume of parachutes, for example. Students will test various class-built craft to understand the mechanics of lift, drag, and thrust, and they will build with a variety of materials to understand how weight affects flight performance. Newton's Laws of Motion are introduced and tested in hands-on experiments.

Each aviation project will incorporate the engineering-design process of brainstorm, design, build, test, and modify as students tweak their creations to achieve improved performance. As examples, students will build gliders, test various weights and adjust components to perform loops. They will learn about the physics of flight for helicopters and then experiment with 'how high' could propellers fly at Compass and how to make a controlled landing with a paper helicopter.

Topics in this Series: Inventors' Lab: Eureka (Quarter 1); Inventors' Lab: Going Green (Quarter 2); Kids' Engineering Lab: Aviation Challenge (Quarter 3); and Kids' Engineering Lab: Rocket Race (Quarter 4)

11:00 am-11:55 am

5th-6th

Science Kids: Chemistry Sampler (WED)

Science Kids: Chemistry Sampler (WED)Closed

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 0

Science Kids is a lab-based science sampler program where our youngest scientists will be exposed to the concepts, acquire scientific vocabulary, and learn hands-on skills to needed to be comfortable with more advanced science classes as they get older. Your first or second grader will come home with an understanding of concepts like phases of matter, melting point, buoyancy, and life cycles. Most importantly, young students will gain confidence discussing science concepts and working with science equipment. Labs will teach students how to use a thermometer, take linear measurements, weigh items on a scale, peer into a microscope, record elapsed time, and make scientific sketches, for example.

Each quarter will reinforce principles and lab skills around a central, unifying theme. In Chemistry sampler students will learn about acids and bases, melting point, physical properties, solutions, polymers, and simple reactions that give off heat, gas, etc. Topics in this Series: Living World (Quarter 1), Earth/Space (Quarter 2), Chemistry (Quarter 3), and Physics (Quarter 4).

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

1st-2nd

Kids' Engineering Lab: Aviation Challenge (1PM)

Kids' Engineering Lab: Aviation Challenge (1PM) Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 2

In Engineering Lab, students will explore the physics of airplanes, parachutes, and gliders! They will experiment with wing shapes, the geometry of nose cones, and the volume of parachutes, for example. Students will test various class-built craft to understand the mechanics of lift, drag, and thrust, and they will build with a variety of materials to understand how weight affects flight performance. Newton's Laws of Motion are introduced and tested in hands-on experiments.

Each aviation project will incorporate the engineering-design process of brainstorm, design, build, test, and modify as students tweak their creations to achieve improved performance. As examples, students will build gliders, test various weights and adjust components to perform loops. They will learn about the physics of flight for helicopters and then experiment with 'how high' could propellers fly at Compass and how to make a controlled landing with a paper helicopter.

Topics in this Series: Inventors' Lab: Eureka (Quarter 1); Inventors' Lab: Going Green (Quarter 2); Kids' Engineering Lab: Aviation Challenge (Quarter 3); and Kids' Engineering Lab: Rocket Race (Quarter 4)

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

3rd-4th

CSI Forensic Science Lab (WED)

CSI Forensic Science Lab (WED)Closed

Quarter(s): 3, 4

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 0

Students will delve into the world of crime scene investigators (CSIs) as seen each week on Law and Order, NCIS, and the CSI television series! Students will be introduced to the field which combines knowledge of biology, chemistry, and physics! They will learn how to examine a crime scene and collect evidence. They will perform labs and hands-on activities such as different kinds of fingerprinting, finger print patterns, and learning how to find and lift latent fingerprints. The class will practice identifying footprints and making molds. They will further their skills in collecting and analyzing evidence through labs and hands-on activities that demonstrate fiber and hair analysis. They will test different fabrics, and learn how to use pollen and insects to determine the location of a crime. Students will use equipment similar to CSI analysts and FBI detectives such as microscopes and chromatography and combine those techniques along with logic, deductive reasoning, and the scientific method to solve mock crimes and CSI mysteries. Students will take notes and record their findings in science journals/notebooks.

Notes: (1) Portions of this class were taught in winter 2020, and some activities will be repeated. (2) For sensitive students, please note that while actual crime scene details and graphic photographs will not be shown to students, the nature of forensic science will suggest and reference crime scenarios.

Prerequisites: Students must be able to read at grade level and have age/grade-level dexterity and fine motor skills for the detailed instrument work in this class.

Topics in this Series: Comparative Anatomy Dissection Lab (Semester 1) and CSI Forensic Science Lab (Semester 2).

Workload: Students should expect to spend 0.5 -– 1.0 hours per week outside of class.

Assignments: Some weeks, students will be given pre-lab work that must be completed before they can start the week's lab activities.

Lab/Supply Fee: A lab fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

6th-8th

(Semester Long)

Ultimate Magic Academy: Perplexing Purple Wand

Ultimate Magic Academy: Perplexing Purple Wand Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 4

Curious coins, baffling balls, confounding cards, and puzzling papers! Students will learn tricks of the trade from a professional magician using the Discover Magic curriculum! This class will present tricks from the Purple Wand curriculum.

Each week, kids will learn how to perform a unique magic trick, and students will practice and perfect the illusion in class so they can come home and mystify their friends and family. Students will unlock the secrets to eight special magic tricks: Heads-Up, Bermuda Papers, Mind Trip, Baffling Bandana, Acrobatic Jacks, Magic IOU, IncrediBall and Presto Print. For each trick, students will receive a custom magic prop and full color instructions, and at the end of each class, every magician will take home a Top Secret file folder with additional tricks they can practice. Student magicians will be given a secret password each week to gain access to an additional magic trick on the Discover Magic website (parents will need to work the magic to set up the child's online account.) Along with the actual magic, students will discuss a life skill each week that is essential to a good magician (and student) such as public speaking, presentation skills, practicing, being prepared, and reading your audience. Magicians who complete the class will receive a certificate and magic wand. There is a $45.00 supply fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Look for Groovy Green Wand (Quarter 4).

3:00 pm-3:55 pm

3rd-6th

Room 2

French with Friends

French with Friends Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 1

Salut! French with Friends is an introductory class for elementary aged beginner. The class will be taught in a predominantly immersion environment. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students or explain difficult concepts. French language instruction will be presented in a natural learning sequence beginning with nouns (such as colors, numbers, clothing, foods, animals, family members, days/dates, etc), adjectives, beginning verbs, greetings, and simple phrases. Songs, games, stories, and hands-on activities will be used in class to review vocabulary and phrases. Emphasis will be on conversation, but students will be encouraged to learn to spell and sound out written French. Aspects of Francophone culture such as holidays, foods, and traditions will be incorporated in the classes.
Each quarter introduces new themes and new vocabulary in French, so continuing students can continue to build their language basics. However, themes and units are non-sequential, so students may enroll in this level in any quarter. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, and simple phrases while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Fluency should not be expected at this level.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

3rd-5th

Spanish Amigos

Spanish AmigosClosed

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 0

Hola! Spanish Amigos is a fun, play-based, Spanish immersion class for young children. Much like learning their native language, children will be exposed to the sounds, vocabulary, and phrases in Spanish through songs, games, stories, interactive and hands-on activities. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students in the first few weeks. Spanish language instruction will be presented in a natural learning sequence beginning with themes about colors, numbers, clothing, foods, animals, family members, days/dates, parts of the house, common objects, body parts, etc. Greetings and simple phrases will be woven into the day's activities, as well as cultural traditions when applicable. Writing, spelling, and grammar will not be emphasized in this class. Each quarter introduces new themes and new vocabulary in Spanish, so continuing students can continue to build their language basics. However, themes and units are non-sequential, so students may enroll in this level in any quarter. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, and simple phrases while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Fluency should not be expected at this level. Students may join Spanish Amigos during any quarter.

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

K-2nd

Spanish Club for Kids

Spanish Club for Kids Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 4

Students will learn beginning Spanish through games, songs, stories, and skits in a predominantly immersion environment (limited cues in English). Each week students will work on the "basics" such as greetings, colors, numbers, adjectives and weather and will explore focused themes. Through age-appropriate games and activities, students will learn and practice the vocabulary and simple phrases related to the week's theme. Basic, beginners-level spelling, reading, and grammar will be introduced. Since the class is taught in "themes", or units, students may join during any quarter. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, and simple phrases while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Fluency should not be expected at this level.

Topics in this Series: About Me (Quarter 1); My Family (Quarter 2); Around Town (Quarter 3); and Fun Times (Quarter 4).

3:00 pm-3:55 pm

3rd-5th

Room 3

Robot Fab Lab: Maze Runner

Robot Fab Lab: Maze RunnerClosed

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 0

Student engineers will be given the challenge of designing, building, and programming a robot to complete several unique mazes in the fastest possible time. Students will learn to program their robots to make "decisions" when exploring an unfamiliar maze such as "go straight until you encounter a wall" and "turn to the right if you run into an obstacle."

Students will use the LEGO MINDSTORMS Education EV3 robotics sets. They will build with motors, wheels/axles, gears, levers, and special components. Students will have to install touch, sound, color, gyro, ultrasonic, and/or infrared sensors while also learning to program sequences and commands that use input/output devices for controlled movements and precise turns. Using the drag-and-drop EV3 programming menu, students will learn to program their robots while experimenting with key concepts such as fixed values, variables, loops, and logic constructs.

This course integrates science, engineering and computational thinking while introducing physical constraints, units of measurement, and coordinate systems. But, don't worry, this is a beginning robotics class. Prior experience is not expected, but returning students are welcome. Each student will build his/her own robotic project, so students can progress and customize at their own pace. In general, in this class, students will spend two weeks assembling, three weeks programming, and two weeks testing and re-designing. Topics in this Series: Robotic Arms (Quarter 1), Spider Bots (Quarter 2), Maze Runner (Quarter 3), and Tomb Explorer (Quarter 4).

10:00 am-10:55 am

4th-5th

Electronics Workshop: Personal Arduino Projects

Electronics Workshop: Personal Arduino ProjectsClosed

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 0

Students will continue to learn about electronics in this practical, hands-on workshop! Electronics are fundamental to lots of things that kids want to build such as automated toys, robots, and computers. In this electronics lab, students will design, build, and test an individual project powered by an Arduino microprocessor. Will it be a robot, a rover, a game, or something never-before-seen? Students will use their prior knowledge of electronic circuits, the Arduino microprocessor, and motion, temperature, light, humidity, and tilt sensors. They will add new components such as motors and shields combined with mechanical construction.

Topics in this Series: Circuit Basics (Quarter 1); Circuits + Programming (Quarter 2); Individual Arduino Projects (Quarter 3); and Build a Drone (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $65.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for new and returning student for an Arduino processor and robotics kit and take-home materials.

11:00 am-11:55 am

7th-9th

Simulation Lab: Astronautical Engineering- Space Station Design

Simulation Lab: Astronautical Engineering- Space Station Design Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 1

Would you live in a long-term space habitat? Space stations, such as the ISS, are ambitious projects, but will be necessary staging sites for humans to travel to Mars- or beyond. This simulation class will focus on designing, launching, constructing, and re-supplying a modular, multi-player space station- on screen. Students will tackle the specification and design of modules for command, housing, scientific research, storage, and support for long-term space exploration. Each week, students will also learn about the science of astronautical engineering and challenges of long-term space habitation.

The class will use KerbalEDU simulation software on laptops to immerse themselves in a realistic, simulated environment to complete a series of challenging missions. In the KerbalEDU environment, students can design and build different space station modules, launch them, and use mission data to improve their designs.

Topics in this Series: Aeronautical Engineering- High Altitude Space Planes (Quarter 1); Aerospace Engineering- Space Missions (Quarter 2); Astronautical Engineering- Space Station Design (Quarter 3); Marine Engineering- Ships & Submarines (Quarter 4) .

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

6th-7th

Dynamic Dioramas: Prehistoric Series- Ice Age Survival (2.6...

Dynamic Dioramas: Prehistoric Series- Ice Age Survival (2.6 million - 4000 BCE)Closed

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 0

Brrrr, it's cold! Travel back to the Ice Age, a world filled with wilderness and wonder that began 2.6 million years ago. Learn about early man and the animals that were among the megafauna of the Pleistocene era through an Ice Age Safari, in which students will hunt Mammoths and other prehistoric beasts using their own miniature hunters simulating authentic prehistoric cooperative hunting tactics that allowed our ancestors to take down mighty mammoths with pointy sticks and rocks! Students will also make a miniature prehistoric human settlement complete with primitive huts, mega-fauna, people, and Ice Age animals, and play competitive games to hunt and gather food and grow their tribe. Over the course of the class, students should be able to explain the lifestyle of early man and the adaptations of the animals he lived with and the environment that necessitated them.

Each student will create an individual diorama. Students will craft and hand-shape their scene on a 10 x 16 inch foam board using artistic, model-making techniques. They will customize their dioramas with landforms, waterways, plant life, and paint. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature figures and combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to create a larger terrain. Students will then compete in a history-based survival strategy game. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them. Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $15.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include Prehistoric Seas Survival (1st quarter), A Jurassic Survival Challenge (2nd quarter), Ice Age Survival (3rd quarter), and Sumerian Settlement (4th quarter).

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

3rd-5th

Battle Strategies & Dioramas: Modern Warfare- WWII The USMC...

Battle Strategies & Dioramas: Modern Warfare- WWII The USMC at Guadalcanal, 1942 (WED) Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 1

Students will engage in a hands-on 3D battle strategy game using the military dioramas that they make!

The opening stage of the Pacific Theater of WWII was a painful lesson for the United States, especially the Navy. Starting with the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor that crippled much of the fleet, Japan continued with devastating and coordinated strikes across the whole Pacific that pushed the US and its allies back across thousands of miles of ocean. That changed at Midway, when the outnumbered US fleet ambushed and wrecked the Japanese on their way to take yet another isolated island. This opened the way for the US to go on the offensive and regain the initiative, starting between Hawaii and Allied Australia, in the Solomons at Guadalcanal. Rather than focus solely on the ground campaign, this class will also include a naval component, using models of the ships that fought the many naval battles of Guadalcanal at the infamous Iron Bottom Sound.

Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will each form a 10" X 16" shaped, foam diorama with landscape elements (hills, valleys, rivers, ridges, vegetation, airfields, etc) to represent a scene of a famous historical engagement. Students will each receive scale miniature naval ships to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate the larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Axis and Allies War at Sea gaming rule system for moving ships and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices.

The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical background and circumstances leading up to the specific battle. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include: WWII from the Russian Perspective, Stalingrad/Berlin (1st quarter), WWII The Battle of the Bulge, 1944 (2nd quarter), WWII The USMC at Guadalcanal, 1945 (3rd quarter), and Korean War, 1950-1953 (4th quarter).

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

6th-8th

Dynamic Dioramas: Virginia History- The War of 1812

Dynamic Dioramas: Virginia History- The War of 1812 Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 5

After the American war of Independence, the young nation of the United States struggled to gain its footing internationally, especially in the eyes of its former colonial masters, Great Britain. The class will discuss the lead-up to the War of 1812, from the perspectives of the young American nation and the British Empire, how America's first political parties opposed or supported the war, and the national consequences that would result. Once the diorama boards are completed, students will re-enact battles like the burning of Washington.

Each student will create an individual diorama. Students will craft and hand-shape their scene on a 10 x 16 inch foam board using artistic, model-making techniques. They will customize their dioramas with landscape elements, waterways, structures of the time, and paint. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature figures and combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to create a larger terrain. Students will then compete in a history-based strategy game. This will reinforce lessons about the culture, economy, warfare, and politics of the time. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them. Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $15.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include Virginia History: Jamestown and the Powhatan Confederacy, 1607 (1st quarter), The American War of Independence (2nd quarter), The War of 1812 (3rd quarter), and The Civil War 1861-1865 (4th quarter).

3:00 pm-3:55 pm

4th-6th

Room 4

Junior Art Studio: Cultural Art Creations (WED-10am)

Junior Art Studio: Cultural Art Creations (WED-10am) Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 2

This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art or artist, view sample works, and then will create a project in the style of the artist using a wide variety of materials and representative colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.

Third quarter, junior artists will create art with influences from African Art, Mexican Art and Folk Art. As examples, we will make Mexican bead brackets, African masks, recreate Folk Art from the famous El Salvadoran artist Fernando LLort, and design our own folk art cat. Additional project materials this quarter will include beads, raffia, paints, and clay.

Topics in this Series: Artists and their Animals (Quarter 1); Famous Abstracts (Quarter 2); Cultural Art Creations (Quarter 3), and Scenic Seascapes (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

10:00 am-10:55 am

K-2nd

Junior Art Studio: Cultural Art Creations (WED-11am)

Junior Art Studio: Cultural Art Creations (WED-11am) Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 2

This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art or artist, view sample works, and then will create a project in the style of the artist using a wide variety of materials and representative colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.

Third quarter, junior artists will create art with influences from African Art, Mexican Art and Folk Art. As examples, we will make Mexican bead brackets, African masks, recreate Folk Art from the famous El Salvadoran artist Fernando LLort, and design our own folk art cat. Additional project materials this quarter will include beads, raffia, paints, and clay.

Topics in this Series: Artists and their Animals (Quarter 1); Famous Abstracts (Quarter 2); Cultural Art Creations (Quarter 3), and Scenic Seascapes (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

11:00 am-11:55 am

K-2nd

Jr. Engineering with LEGO: Winter Workshop (WED)

Jr. Engineering with LEGO: Winter Workshop (WED)Closed

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 0

Students will use LEGO to design and build simple engineering projects out of everyone's favorite building toy! In this 90 minute class, students will explore concepts and vocabulary in physics, mechanical engineering, structural engineering, aerospace engineering, and architecture while playing with their creations.

Third quarter, students will build for an icy winter environment and explore constructions like a bobsled course, snow plows, snow mobiles, a Polar Express train, and gondola ski lifts!

Each class begins with 10-minutes of free build from tubs of LEGO components followed by a short discussion and demonstration of the day's project and concepts. Students build individually or in groups. Instructors will provide individual assistance, facilitate challenges, performance testing, competitions, and modifications to projects. Some projects may have been introduced in prior year's sessions, but each new build is unique, and student's building skills and understanding will have grown.

Notes:(1)Students must be minimum age 5 and able to separate from their parents for this class. (2) Projects are built from shared, Instructor-owned components, so students will not bring completed projects home. Parents, however, can step into class 15 minutes before the end of each session to photograph their child's construction.

Topics in this Series: Fantastic Fliers & Space Racers (Quarter 1); Animal Architects (Quarter 2); Winter Workshop (Quarter 3); Amusement Park (Quarter 4)

12:30 pm-1:55 pm

K-2nd

Master Engineering with LEGO: Star Wars Challenge

Master Engineering with LEGO: Star Wars Challenge Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 3

Use the Force in this advanced engineering course for young Jedi! Each week students will "visit" a galaxy far, far away and construct Star Wars-themed projects such as shield generators, settlements, spacecraft, and droids. Each project incorporates key mechanical and structural engineering elements like gear trains, worm drives, and eccentric motion. This approach taps in to the "forces" of imagination and engineering design concepts!

2:00 pm-3:30 pm

3rd-5th

Room 5

Algebra I

Algebra IClosed

Quarter(s):

Day(s): Wed, Fri

Open Spots: 4

This is a complete course in high school Algebra I which will cover fundamental concepts in algebra and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. This course is designed to emphasize the study of algebraic problem-solving with the incorporation of real-world applications. Topics in Algebra I include number systems, linear systems, rational numbers, complex numbers, exponents, roots, radicals, quadratic equations, polynomials, factoring, absolute values, ratios, and proportions. In addition, the course will cover solving and graphing systems of functions, linear equations, and inequalities. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem-solving.

Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation in pre-algebra topics in order to take this class.
Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Friday (day 1), lecture on Wednesday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Friday (day 8), and homework due the next Wednesday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Wednesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work.
Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.
Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by checking that weekly homework sets are complete and giving periodic take-home tests; class participation is also strongly encouraged. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade.
Textbook: Students should purcashe or rent the required textbook for this class: Algebra I: Expressions, Equations, and Applications by Paul A. Foerster. It is available in a few different editions, each of which is virtually identical: 2nd edition (ISBN-10 020125073X, ISBN-13 978-0201250732), 3rd edition (ISBN-10 0201860945, ISBN-13 978-0201860948), and Classic edition (ISBN-10 020132458X, ISBN-13 978-0201324587). It is also available under the title Foerster Algebra I, Classics edition (ISBN-10 0131657089, ISBN-13 978-0131657083). A calculator is not needed for this course.
Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Algebra I for purposes of a high school transcript.

10:00 am-10:55 am

7th-10th

Geometry

GeometryClosed

Quarter(s):

Day(s): Wed, Fri

Open Spots: 2

This is a complete course in high school Geometry which will cover fundamental concepts and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. Students will learn deductive reasoning, and logic by completing geometric proofs. Topics in geometry include: lines, angles, congruence, concurrence, inequalities, parallel lines, quadrilaterals, transformations, area, similarity, right triangles, circles, regular polygons, and geometric solids. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem- solving.

Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation Algebra I in order to take this class.
Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Friday (day 1), lecture on Wednesday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Friday (day 8), and homework due the next Wednesday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Wednesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work.
Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.
Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by checking that weekly homework sets are complete and giving periodic take-home tests; class participation is also strongly encouraged. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade.
Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Geometry: Seeing, Doing, Understanding, 3rd edition (ISBN-10 0716743612, ISBN-13 978-0716743613) A calculator is not needed for this course.
Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Geometry for purposes of a high school transcript.

11:00 am-11:55 am

8th-11th

Calculus (Honors or AP A/B)

Calculus (Honors or AP A/B)Closed

Quarter(s):

Day(s): Wed, Fri

Open Spots: 3

This is a complete course in high school Calculus which will cover fundamental concepts and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. Topics in Calculus include limits of functions (one-sided and two-sided limits, limits at infinity and infinite limits, limits of sequences, and continuity of functions), derivatives (various definitions of derivatives, estimating derivatives from tables and graphs, rules of differentiation, properties of derivatives, separable differential equations, and the Mean Value Theorem), applications of derivatives (related rates, optimization, and exponential growth and decay models), integrals (basic techniques of integration including basic antiderivatives and substitution), applications of integrals (in finding areas and volumes, describing motion, and as accumulation functions), and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem-solving.

Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation PreCalculus in order to take this class.
Level: This course is offered at two levels, Honors and Advanced Placement (AP). The scope and sequence are identical, however AP students may have additional practice problems. Students who wish to take the AP exam must register and pay for their own exam through the College Board in fall 2020 for the May 2021 exam.
Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Friday (day 1), lecture on Wednesday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Friday (day 8), and homework due the next Wednesday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Wednesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work.
Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.
Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by checking that weekly homework sets are complete and giving periodic take-home tests; class participation is also strongly encouraged. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade.
Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Calculus: Single Variable/Early Transcendentals, 8th edition by James Stewart (ISBN-13 9781305270336). A scientific calculator similar to the Casio fx-115ES PLUS is required for this class, and it is highly recommended that students preparing for the AP exam have a graphing calculator similar to the TI-83. Students without a graphing calculator must have access to desmos.com and/or wolframalpha.com for graphing assignments.
Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Calculus for purposes of a high school transcript.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

11th-12th

Algebra II

Algebra IIClosed

Quarter(s):

Day(s): Wed, Fri

Open Spots: 2

This is a complete course in high school Algebra II which will cover fundamental concepts and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. Topics in Algebra II include linear functions, systems of equations and inequalities, quadratic functions and complex numbers, exponential and logarithmic functions, rational and irrational algebraic functions, and quadratic relations and systems. In addition, this course will cover higher degree functions with complex numbers, sequences and series, probability, data analysis, and trigonometric and circular functions. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem solving.

Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation Algebra I in order to take this class.
Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Friday (day 1), lecture on Wednesday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Friday (day 8), and homework due the next Wednesday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Wednesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work.
Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload. In lieu of a graphing calculator, students should have access to websites desmos.com and wolframalpha.com for graphing assignments.
Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by checking that weekly homework sets are complete and giving periodic take-home tests; class participation is also strongly encouraged. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade.
Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Algebra and Trigonometry: Functions and Applications- Prentice Hall Classics (ISBN-10 0131657100, ISBN-13 978-0131657106). A scientific calculator similar to the Casio fx-115ES PLUS is required for this class.
Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Algebra II for purposes of a high school transcript.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

9th-12th

Room 6

Chess: Advanced Beginners 3

Chess: Advanced Beginners 3 Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 4

In Advanced Beginner Chess 3, students will learn skills and strategies that build upon each other, including: Later than beginning pins; Using more or better attackers; Using more or better defenders; Finding the forcing moves when they are also the best moves; Queen and bishop teams for attacking; Queen and knight teams for attacking; and Queen and rook teams for attacking. Experts suggest that the game of chess teaches analytical and disciplined thinking skills, while raising self esteem, teaching motivation and determination, and sportsmanship (Kasparov Foundation). Each class will be spent half on technique and half in practice matches with classmates while the instructor coaches. Students should have 15-20 hours of chess instruction prior to enrolling in Advanced Beginner Chess, or a working knowledge of most skills taught in the Compass Beginner Chess level.

10:00 am-10:55 am

3rd-6th

Chess: Beginners 3

Chess: Beginners 3Closed

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 0

In Beginning Chess 3, students will learn fundamental skills such as: discovered checks and attacks; pins and double checks; counting: center squares, squares of control with attackers and defenders; checkmate drills; keeping the King safe in the opening; tactics lesson 1 forks; tactics lesson 2 skewers and x-rays; reviewing opening principles. Experts suggest that the game of chess teaches analytical and disciplined thinking skills, while raising self esteem, teaching motivation and determination, and sportsmanship (Kasparov Foundation). Each class will be spent half on technique and half in practice matches with classmates while instructor coaches. A student can enroll in Beginning Chess 3 as his/her first class.

11:00 am-11:55 am

2nd-5th

Beginning Guitar II

Beginning Guitar II Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3, 4

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 3

Students will continue to learn the fundamentals of playing the guitar! In this class, students will continue to learn basic melodies, chords, and strumming patterns for familiar songs chosen by the instructor and students. Students are encouraged to bring in music they are interested in learning. New chords and new songs will be added each week as students also learn to read music and basic music theory. Students will also learn how to hold, tune, and care for their guitars. Students should be able to read at grade level for this class, and should plan to practice at home several times each week. Each student will need a least a beginner level acoustic guitar. New students who wish to enroll 2nd semester should have at least 12-15 hours of prior instruction in order to match the pace of the enrolled students.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

5th-8th

(Semester Long)

Little Medical School: Wilderness Medicine (2PM)

Little Medical School: Wilderness Medicine (2PM)Closed

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 0

Spring is around the corner, and students should know how to stay safe outdoors! Our young wilderness doctors will learn about snake bites, insect stings, mosquito-borne illnesses, and staying safe in the forest. They will learn about hypothermia symptoms and prevention, how to clean water so it is safe to drink, what plants are edible and which must be avoided, and what to do in the event of forest fires, floods, and lightning. They will learn what should be in an emergency supply kit and how to treat an injury in the wilderness. All topics are covered through role-playing and hands-on activities in an age-appropriate way so students feel empowered, rather than scared, away from home.

Topics in this Series: Doctor, Doctor (Quarter 1); Calling All Doctors (Quarter 2); Wilderness Medicine (Quarter 3); and Nutrition Science (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $35.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a set of high quality, take-home class materials including: a disposable lab coat, model snake, thermal blanket, bandana, spray bottle, emergency supply kit project, handy worksheets and charts on temperature, water, edible/inedible plant identification, fires, floods, lightning, bleeding and broken bones, and a class diploma.

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

2nd-3rd

Little Medical School: Wilderness Medicine (3PM)

Little Medical School: Wilderness Medicine (3PM)Closed

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 0

Spring is around the corner, and students should know how to stay safe outdoors! Our young wilderness doctors will learn about snake bites, insect stings, mosquito-borne illnesses, and staying safe in the forest. They will learn about hypothermia symptoms and prevention, how to clean water so it is safe to drink, what plants are edible and which must be avoided, and what to do in the event of forest fires, floods, and lightning. They will learn what should be in an emergency supply kit and how to treat an injury in the wilderness. All topics are covered through role-playing and hands-on activities in an age-appropriate way so students feel empowered, rather than scared, away from home.

Topics in this Series: Doctor, Doctor (Quarter 1); Calling All Doctors (Quarter 2); Wilderness Medicine (Quarter 3); and Nutrition Science (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $35.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a set of high quality, take-home class materials including: a disposable lab coat, model snake, thermal blanket, bandana, spray bottle, emergency supply kit project, handy worksheets and charts on temperature, water, edible/inedible plant identification, fires, floods, lightning, bleeding and broken bones, and a class diploma.

3:00 pm-3:55 pm

K-1st

Park

Nature Quest: Winter Explorers (WED- 10am)

Nature Quest: Winter Explorers (WED- 10am) Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 4

Witness the wonders of winter! Bundle up and look for signs of how animals live in the cold. Discover tracks in the snow, uncover nests and borrows, and find out who munched on twigs or bark. Observe transformations in plant life, moss, and fungus, and witness the changes to the watershed.

Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 5 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

10:00 am-10:50 am

K-1st

Nature Quest: Winter Adventurers (WED- 11am)

Nature Quest: Winter Adventurers (WED- 11am) Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 1

Witness the wonders of winter! Bundle up and look for signs of how animals live in the cold. Discover tracks in the snow, uncover nests and borrows, and find out who munched on twigs or bark. Observe transformations in plant life, moss, and fungus, and witness the changes to the watershed.

Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

11:00 am-11:50 am

2nd-3rd

Nature Quest: Winter Pathfinders (WED- 12pm)

Nature Quest: Winter Pathfinders (WED- 12pm) Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 1

Witness the wonders of winter! Bundle up and look for signs of how animals live in the cold. Discover tracks in the snow, uncover nests and borrows, and find out who munched on twigs or bark. Observe transformations in plant life, moss, and fungus, and witness the changes to the watershed.

Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

12:00 pm-12:50 pm

4th-5th

Nature Quest: Winter Explorers (WED- 1pm)

Nature Quest: Winter Explorers (WED- 1pm)Closed

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 0

Witness the wonders of winter! Bundle up and look for signs of how animals live in the cold. Discover tracks in the snow, uncover nests and borrows, and find out who munched on twigs or bark. Observe transformations in plant life, moss, and fungus, and witness the changes to the watershed.

Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 5 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

1:00 pm-1:50 pm

K-1st

Nature Quest: Winter Adventurers (WED- 2pm)

Nature Quest: Winter Adventurers (WED- 2pm) Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 1

Witness the wonders of winter! Bundle up and look for signs of how animals live in the cold. Discover tracks in the snow, uncover nests and borrows, and find out who munched on twigs or bark. Observe transformations in plant life, moss, and fungus, and witness the changes to the watershed.

Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

2:00 pm-2:50 pm

2nd-3rd

Activity Room

Krav Maga Self Defense for Tweens & Teens- Brown Stripe

Krav Maga Self Defense for Tweens & Teens- Brown Stripe Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 1

Krav Maga is the Israeli martial art which teaches self defense and fitness. Students of Krav Maga are taught a series of strategies to assess and respond to common situations, such as facing a bully. Kids are always taught first and foremost to get away, to get help, and to try to deescalate the situation. When that fails, students practice a technique that includes a warning strike followed by escape, and finally, they learn how to stand up for themselves and how to counterattack if a situation escalates and becomes threatening. Kids are empowered and gain confidence when they rehearse how to handle real-life situations. Exercises and in-class practice incorporate balance, coordination, energy, and other key elements of fitness along with life skills such as confidence, teamwork, respect, discipline, and respect.

Students may enroll in Krav Maga at any time, and everyone will begin as a white belt. Each quarter, students will practice the full range of skills, but there will be two "featured" moves that a student can earn a belt stripe for being able to demonstrate. Featured moves will include a combative strike and a defensive escape technique. No one stripe is a prerequisite for any other color, and color stripes can be earned in any order.

Third quarter, students will have the chance to earn a Brown Stripe. Featured moves include: cover defense and wrist locks (red stripe); straight punch defense and bear hugs (orange stripe); head movement defense and front 2-handed choke (yellow stripe); round kick defense and back 2-handed choke (green stripe); front kick defense and guillotine choke (blue stripe); clinch defense and rear choke (purple stripe); ground striking defense and head lock defense (brown stripe); and 360 defense and full Nelson (black stripe).

Students will be able to test for belt promotions to move through the ranks of white belt, yellow belt, orange belt, etc. On average, it is estimated that a student will be ready for a belt test after four quarters/four color stripes. Belt testing will be by coach approval.

Topics in this Series: Blue Stripe (1st Quarter), Purple Stripe (2nd Quarter), Brown Stripe (3rd Quarter) and Black Stripe (4th Quarter). Assessments: Belt testing for promotion will be by coach recommendation, but on average will take 4 quarters. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for the t-shirt and white belt (new students) or $5.00 for the white belt (returning students). A belt test fee of $25.00 is due payable to the instructor when a student is ready to test for promotion. What to Bring: Refillable water bottle. What to Wear: In lieu of a full martial arts uniform, participants should wear their class t-shirt and belt along with shorts, leggings, or loose, comfortable athletic pants, and comfortable athletic shoes or sneakers.Non-Meeting Days: None

11:00 am-11:55 am

6th-12th

FUNctional Fitness: Homeschool PE (WED)

FUNctional Fitness: Homeschool PE (WED) Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 4

FUNctional Fitness is a dynamic kids' homeschool PE program that incorporates well-rounded exercises to get kids up and moving mid-day! No two workouts are the same, but each day's activities incorporate exercises that target 10 areas: cardio-vascular endurance, stamina, strength, flexibility, power, speed, coordination, agility, balance, and accuracy. FUNctional Fitness focuses on functional movements that are fundamental to all aspects of play and exercise- pulling, pushing, running, throwing, climbing, lifting, and jumping. Work-outs are scalable and adaptable to different individual's own level, and the emphasis is on fun, safety, and personal accomplishment rather than competition among classmates. When the weather permits, some exercises may be taken outdoors. The physical challenges of FUNctional Fitness will foster self-confidence, focus, and help instill a foundation for a lifetime of fitness. All equipment is furnished. Students are asked to wear loose, comfortable clothing, such as running pants or sweatpants, and comfortable, supportive athletic shoes. FUNctional Fitness continues each quarter, and students may repeat the class to continue to improve fitness. No two workouts are the same! Students must be minimum age 7 to take this class.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

2nd-6th

Music Makers: Movement & Melodies

Music Makers: Movement & Melodies Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 3

Music Makers explores many facets of the musical experience- singing, moving, dancing, listening, and playing instruments. The class will explore musical stories, famous composers, and different genres of music while playing a variety of percussion instruments (drums, sticks, triangles, woodblocks and more!). Students will learn to play a beginning pitched instrument on glockenspiels (a small barred instrument like the xylophone). Using an Orff-based approach, students will learn to read and write beginning musical notation and learn musical terminology all in the context of fun and play. Music Makers classes provide a fun, pressure-free environment to experience music and movement with the goal of general musicianship and excellent preparation for further, individual instrument lessons if desired. Music Makers helps every child acquire the essential building blocks for a future of musical learning! Students may join Music Makers at any quarter, and they may return again and again since new music, themes, and skills are constantly introduced.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

K-2nd

Fencing for Beginners & Advanced Beginners

Fencing for Beginners & Advanced Beginners Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 1

Fencing is the clashing of steel and competitive spirit combined with the battle of the wits. Apply the rules of Olympic fencing, and you have a physically and mentally challenging game of strategy, often called, "physical chess." In Beginning Fencing, students will learn the rules of the sport as well as footwork, attacks, parries, responses, and how to judge matches. Beginning students will use the epee, a thin, lightweight sword with broad hand guard and will wear a wireless electronic scoring sensor over layers of protective gear. Returning students will work with both the epee and foil. The physical benefits of fencing are an increase in agility, balance and coordination. Fencing also provides mental benefits such as improved focus, strategy and confidence. Fencing is safety-oriented with blunt tip weapons, chest protectors, chest/sleeve pads, fencing jacket, gloves, and face mask. All equipment is provided by the instructor. Students are asked to wear comfortable athletic pants such as running pants or sweatpants (no jeans, no dresses), and low-heeled athletic shoes.

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

5th-8th

Virtual 1

Spy Games RPG, The History of Espionage in The Cold War *ONLINE ONLY*

Spy Games RPG, The History of Espionage in The Cold War *ONLINE ONLY*Closed

Quarter(s): 3, 4

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 0

This class will pull aside the Iron Curtain, and uncover the secrets of spying during the Cold War, learning about far more than spying in the process- using an RPG (role playing game).

When the world's last two superpowers faced off for fifty years, the intelligence battle had to go incognito. It was the USA vs the USSR, and any advantage could mean the difference between life and nuclear annihilation. No expense was spared as spying went Space Age. The real stories of espionage were just as interesting as James Bond and Q, and the stakes just as high. Computers worked on large scale to obscure secrets from invasion plans and to nuclear codes and knowing just who is really on your side. Field agents subtly advised potential allies and sometimes outright topples whole regimes with well (or poorly) placed assassinations.

The class will use a Role-Playing Game system, designed by the instructor for the Spy Games series of classes, to allow for "Dungeons and Dragons" style game play. The class will examine the lives and techniques of real Cold War spies, adopt their methods and replicate them for ourselves, pitting one half of the class against the other. Once students have the enemy's secrets, they will attempt to make use of this stolen information and learn just how much power there is in knowledge.

Note: This section will be held entirely ONLINE in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for the full year.

Topics in this Series: Early American Spying in The Civil War (Semester 1), Modern American Spying in the Cold War (Semester 2)

Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.

Assignments: Period maps, photographs, and re-creations will be posted on a class Google Drive, and video links from YouTube will be e-mailed to parents and students for homework or supplemental investigation.

Assessments: Will not be given.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript

11:00 am-11:55 am

8th-12th

(Semester Long)

Around the World: Geography of the Middle East & North Afri...

Around the World: Geography of the Middle East & North Africa *ONLINE ONLY*Closed

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 0

Around the World is a creative, interactive examination of world geography! Geography is much more than just maps and mountain ranges! Students will make an in-depth investigation of all aspects of geography region-by-region. Third quarter will explore the geography of the Middle East and North Africa, from Nazareth and the Nile to Marrakesh and Medina.

Students will engage in hands-on activities, such as games and scavenger hunts, to learn about the lands, features, inhabitants, and phenomena and five themes of geography (location, place, human and environment interaction, movements, and regions) for each area that they study. For each major region, the class will look at aspects of human geography: political boundaries, cities and communities, cultural, social, and economic themes (dominant languages, religions, ethnic groups, agriculture, and trade), along with aspects of physical geography such as landforms, waterways, climate zones, biomes, etc. The class will also touch on the geographic specialties of meteorology and hydrology to understand how these impact physical and human geography.

Note: Map basics, including reading maps, types of maps, latitude and longitude, and understanding representations on maps, will only be covered during the first quarter of each year. Any student enrolling in the course after the first quarter will be expected to review map basics from a class packet of map information.

Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for the full quarter.

Topics in this Series: North America (Quarter 1); Central and South America (Quarter 2); Middle East & North Africa (Quarter 3); Sub-Saharan Africa (Quarter 4). Second year (2021-22) Europe (Quarter 5); Russia & East Asia (Quarter 6); South & Southeast Asia (Quarter 7); and Oceania, Antarctica & Earth's Oceans (Quarter 8). Lab/Supply Fee: Included in the course fee. Non-Meeting Dates This is an-week class that does not meet on March 10 due to instructor's travel, but the class will meet on Wednesday, March 17.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

6th-8th

Civics Critics: Know Your Rights (WED) *ONLINE/TRANSITION*

Civics Critics: Know Your Rights (WED) *ONLINE/TRANSITION* Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3, 4

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 1

Civics Critics will explore themes related to the US Bill of Rights through guided inquiry and evidence-based analysis. These topics are posed as a series of thought-provoking questions that students will research, debate, discuss, and form opinions about. Second semester will examine themes such as the first ten amendments, the justice system, and Supreme Court cases in a relevant, approachable, and interactive context. The class will apply this knowledge to analyze three big DBQ inquiries: Should Schools Be Allowed to Limit Students' Online Speech? Search and Seizure: Did the Government Go Too Far? Is the American Jury System Still a Good Idea?

Civics Critics is an interactive, multi-disciplinary examination of some of the key issues in American Government using sources from The DBQ Project. DBQs, or document based questions, are derived from AP History exams and help develop high school level critical thinking skills. Students will review an array of primary sources such as letters, journal entries, inventories, ship's manifestos, newspaper articles, period maps, and court documents along with selected secondary sources like excerpts, charts, and graphs. Students will be guided through analyzing the documents, interpreting the data, drawing inferences, and forming conclusions. In some historical scenarios, the class will consider conflicting perspectives and be able to defend and debate multiple sides of a key issue. To demonstrate comprehension and a deeper understanding of the class themes, students will use factual findings to develop structured, evidence-based essays. Students will also complete additional short and interactive assignments throughout the semester.

Note:Class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for 3rd quarter. At the instructors' option, the class may transition to in-person instruction for 4th quarter as COVID-19 scenarios improve.

Topics in this Series: Constitution Connection (Semester 1) and Know Your Rights (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Prerequisites: Students should be able to read and write at grade level.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week on homework, investigation, or reading for this class.

Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates.

Assessments: The instructor may offer parent conferences to provide feedback on the student's work and participation.

Lab/Supply Fee: The fee for course documents is included in the class tuition.

What to Bring: Class notebook, paper, and pen or pencil.

Schedule: This class will not meet on Wednesday, March 10, but will instead meet on Wednesday, March 17, a Compass make-up day.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

7th-9th

(Semester Long)

Virtual 2

English: Introduction to Literary Analysis & Writing- Forms...

English: Introduction to Literary Analysis & Writing- Forms of Literature *ONLINE ONLY* Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3, 4

Day(s): Wed, Fri

Open Spots: 1

Overview

The Introduction to Literary Analysis & Writing is a high school student's first look at the higher-level relationship between literature and personal writing. Literary analysis and critical writing move a teen from being merely a good reader- a middle school skill- to becoming a scholarly reader and diagnostic writer which are the foundations of high school and college level inquiry into all forms of written works.

In this seminar-style course, literature is not restricted to a particular genre or form, and writing is not limited to a common five-paragraph composition. Instead, literature is presented as a survey, sampling many different types of works, and composition is approached as the development of a student's personal responses to what he reads. During the second semester, students will examine forms and genres to create a "big picture" of the development of literature.

Literature

Second semester Literary Analysis will focus on forms of literature- novels, short stories, essays, plays, poems, etc.- and the different ways they tell a story. Some well-known literature will be used to introduce students to the different forms. Some well-known literature will be used to introduce students to the various literary elements, and new works will be studied to demonstrate the best examples of a vivid fictional universe, a strong narrator, beloved (or feared) characters, and other literary components. Examples of some literature that students may read in this course are The Alchemist (Paulo Coelho), Journey to the Center of Earth (Jules Verne), Fahrenheit 451 (Ray Bradbury), All the Light We Cannot See (Anthony Doerr), Brown Girl Dreaming (Jacqueline Woodson), and Their Eyes Were Watching God (Zora Neale Hurston). The full reading list will be presented in the course syllabus at the beginning of the term.

Composition

Second semester writing will continue to incorporate the personal response to literature, through a personal writing journal. The students' journals will be a place to record what they think and feel about what they are reading. Students will learn to annotate, to cite passages from text, and to format. Notes made in the journals will be used to develop short, informal written pieces about the literature read in the course. Observations from the student's journal will also be used to collect supporting, textural evidence to support the reader's opinions which will be formulated into a thesis (personal position). Written assignments will include summaries, compare/contrast analyses, and parallel structure writings that focus on character, setting, plot, conflict, etc., to further underscore and assess student's understanding of the building blocks of literature. First semester will conclude with a culminating project on a subgenre of the student's own choosing which will analyze works for character, plot, setting, and other literary elements studied.

Class Structure

This course is part of a custom curriculum developed and team-taught by Anne Sharp and Melanie Kosar. The courses are designed in a sequential program that complements the developmental skills of the adolescent learner. It is a seminar-style approach that mirrors university literature and writing classes. Mrs. Kosar will teach the literature components of the course on Wednesdays, and Mrs. Sharp will teach the writing portion of the class on Fridays.

Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for the remainder of the year.

Topics in this Series: Elements of Literature (Semester 1) and Forms of Literature (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at grade level, and it is recommended that students have had a middle school writing class.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class. In addition, students should complete the summer assignments consisting of the literature identified above and a hand-out of literary terminology to learn.

Assignments: will be posted on a Google Classroom.

Assessments: are portfolio-based. Students will create a digital portfolio that incorporates annotated reading lists, reflects individual interests and accomplishments and showcases a variety of writing. See the Compass memorandum for more information on assessments in Language Arts.

Textbook: Students should purchase or borrow the assigned literature. In some cases, specific editions will be identified with ISBN numbers so students can be on the "same page" (literally!)

What to Bring: Students should bring paper or notebook, pen or pencil, current literature selection, and personal writing journal to both class meetings each week.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

11:00 am-11:55 am

9th-10th

(Semester Long)

English: Advanced Literary Criticism & Composition- Survey ...

English: Advanced Literary Criticism & Composition- Survey of Themes in Literature *ONLINE ONLY* Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3, 4

Day(s): Wed, Fri

Open Spots: 1

Overview

Advanced Literary Criticism & Composition is a seminar-style course that introduces the high school student to a deeper investigation into literary movements and literary themes throughout the ages. Like art, literature is a writer's response to his world and a reflection of his society and contemporary culture. Literary genres evolved in response to significant events, prevailing philosophies, and impactful innovations and discoveries in the writer's lifetime. Literary movements create a timeline that reflects those influences. In this course, students will read and evaluate selections from a number of literary movements such as: Romanticism, Dark Romanticism, Gothic, Transcendentalism, Realism, Naturalism, Magical Realism, Stream of Consciousness, Expressionism, Harlem Renaissance, Modernism, Beat, etc., and make connections to significant effects of the period.

Advanced composition in this course will move beyond personal interpretation of the work ("What do I think?") and transition into two Schools of Literary Criticism: Biographical Criticism, which views literature through the personal world of the writer ("What did the writer think?"), and Historical/Societal Criticism which views literature through the society/times of the writer ("What was going on around the writer?")

Literature

Second semester of Advanced Literary Criticism will include a grouping of literature in "themes" and a study of how themes combine to create genre. Students will be assigned brief, weekly mini-research assignments on history, geography (if applicable), music and art of the period, politics, religion, philosophy, author biography, etc, to establish a foundation and background information on the literary movement. Students will discover how literature reflects the people, events, discoveries, and ideology of the time and how literary movements provide clues to the philosophical, scientific, and societal climate. The class will look at wars and conflict as a creative element that drives evolution in literary movements. The types of literature used to examine movements will span novels, short stories, poetry, letters, political writings, slave narratives and analytical essays. Examples of works that will be read second semester include complete texts or selections from Wordsworth, Byron, Keats, Shelley, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Mark Twain, Charles Dickens, Virginia Woolf, and more recent writers. Other selections include The Importance of Being Ernest (Oscar Wilde), The Great Gatsby (F. Scott Fitzgerald), and The Metamorphosis (Franz Kafka). The full reading list will be presented in the course syllabus at the beginning of the term.

Composition

First semester Composition will apply the Schools of Literary Criticism to craft essays that demonstrate and understanding of themes in the broader context of literature- across eras, across genre/form, across writers and across the world. Teens will write a series of short essays that use different "filters" or "lenses" to view literary genres. Students will develop skills in notetaking, adding research to their literary essays, and managing their writing portfolios. They will also perform parallel, independent research in literature to develop a presentation on a literary theme culminating a semester project.

Class Structure

This course is part of a custom curriculum developed and team-taught by Anne Sharp and Melanie Kosar. The courses are designed in a sequential program that complements the developmental skills of the adolescent learner. It is a seminar-style approach that mirrors university literature and writing classes. Mrs. Kosar will teach the literature components of the course on Wednesdays, and Mrs. Sharp will teach the writing portion of the class on Fridays.

Topics in this Series: Overview of Literary Movements (Semester 1) and Survey of Themes in Literature (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for the remainder of the year.

Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at grade level. Students should have had a prior course in literature to have established a firm foundation in basic literary elements and form.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class. In addition, students should complete the summer assignments consisting of the literature identified above and a hand-out of literary terminology to learn.

Assignments: will be posted on a Google Classroom.

Assessments: are portfolio-based. Students will create a digital portfolio that incorporates annotated reading lists, reflects individual interests and accomplishments and showcases a variety of writing. See the Compass memorandum for more information on assessments in Language Arts.

Textbook: Students should purchase or borrow the assigned literature. In some cases, specific editions will be identified with ISBN numbers so students can be on the "same page" (literally!)

What to Bring: Students should bring paper or notebook, pen or pencil, current literature selection, and personal writing journal to both class meetings each week.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

10th-11th

(Semester Long)

English: Nobel and Pulitzer Prize-Winning Non Fiction *ONLINE ONLY*

English: Nobel and Pulitzer Prize-Winning Non Fiction *ONLINE ONLY* Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3, 4

Day(s): Wed, Fri

Open Spots: 2

Overview

Nobel and Pulitzer Prize-Winning Non Fiction is a seminar-style course that focuses on the incorporation of style, voice, and tone in literature and in writing. Viewing literature as "published writing", students will examine the products and processes of other writers in order to understand and refine their own. Through the analysis of professional and student works, students will explore what makes truly great writing.

Literature

Second semester will examine Nobel and Pulitzer-Prize winning non-fiction. Examples of some essays that may read in this course include Long Day's Journey Into Night (Eugene O'Neill), The Old Man and the Sea (Ernest Hemingway), The Bluest Eyes (Toni Morrison) and other prize-winning poets and journalists. In addition, the class will use style manuals and classic writing texts such as Strunk & White's The Elements of Style and William Zinsser's On Writing Well. The full reading list will be presented in the course syllabus at the beginning of the term. In addition, students will be asked to read several selections over the summer. Students will be assigned brief, individual research assignments and take turns leading the class discussion on topics related to the featured author or event.

Composition

Second semester Senior Composition will focus on criteria for the assessment of writing, the writing that fulfills that criteria, and how a writer can meet those expectations. Students will develop a variety of non-fiction writings that reflect communication in the "real world" such as writing boards, contests, ads/solicitations conveying criteria, awards, letters of acceptance and rejection, press releases, announcements, decisions. Finally, students will set their own writing goals called, Personal Writing Agendas (PWAs) and design the criteria for exploration of a genre such as poetry, personal narrative, op-ed, or articles. Going beyond the five-paragraph template that encourages "cookie cutter" essays, students will create a unique architecture embedded with personal style, voice, and narrative structure. In short, students will uncover not just who they are as individuals, but who they are as writers... and how to fuse these two identities into a creative, organized, clear, and elegant essay.

In the process, students will master their writing process and identify personal writing strengths. These strengths will be developed into a writing workshop that they will present to classmates and the Compass community. Portfolios (now a potential college resume addition) will be expanded to include essays, research papers, and extracurricular support (artwork, performances, PowerPoints, etc.).

Class Structure

This course is part of a custom curriculum developed and team-taught by Anne Sharp and Melanie Kosar. The courses are designed in a sequential program that complements the developmental skills of the adolescent learner. It is a seminar-style approach that mirrors university literature and writing classes. Mrs. Kosar will teach the literature components of the course on Wednesdays, and Mrs. Sharp will teach the writing portion of the class on Fridays.

Topics in this Series: Modern Narratives in Nonfiction Works (Semester 1) and Nobel and Pulitzer Prize Writings (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for the remainder of the year.

Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at grade level.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class.

Assignments: will be posted on a Google Classroom.

Assessments: are portfolio-based. Students will create a digital portfolio that incorporates annotated reading lists, reflects individual interests and accomplishments and showcases a variety of writing. See the Compass memorandum for more information on assessments in Language Arts.

Textbook: Students should purchase or borrow the assigned literature. In some cases, specific editions will be identified with ISBN numbers so students can be on the "same page" (literally!)

What to Bring: Students should bring paper or notebook, pen or pencil, current literature selection, and personal writing journal to both class meetings each week.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

11th-12th

(Semester Long)

Virtual 3

The History of WWII: The Defeat of Germany and Wars Against Japan *ONLINE ONLY*

The History of WWII: The Defeat of Germany and Wars Against Japan *ONLINE ONLY* Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3,4

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 2

Students will be immersed in detail and fully engaged in this intensive history course led by well- known homeschool instructor and historian Hugh Gardner. This history class is unlike other high school history course. Instead of learning a sequential set of names, dates, and battles, students will learn how to analyze and interpret history. Much like a college seminar, this approach to American History incorporates historiography (the history of the history.) Mr. Gardner does not teach a narrow view from a single textbook or static set of prepared notes. Instead, he presents the back story and multiple interpretations for the "why" questions in American history. Class discussion considers interpretations from a wide array of scholars and is updated as new sources are published. Rather than running through a timeline of outcomes, students will evaluate contributing factors (the "how" questions) and will learn about the personalities, prejudices, and biases of the people involved ("who").

Second semester, students will continue to examine the Eastern Front in World War II and the match-up between Hilter and Stalin as the Germans attempted an invasion of Russia. Students will also learn about the Holocaust and the enslavement of Europe. The class will look at the US Army's involvement in the European Theater of Operations (ETO) and the progression from D-Day to VE Day with a special examination of strategic warfare and the weapons and machines of war. Next, the class will turn its attention to Asia and study Japan's long road to Pearl Harbor followed by the Japanese onslaught and wars against Japan in World War II. The class will discuss the effects on the political, social, and economic climate as well as influences on the arts, science, literature, religion, and warfare. This is no ordinary history class as Mr. Gardner surrounds the students with vivid posters, maps, charts, primary sources, and artifacts to supplement his story-telling style. Students will be able to examine and handle period pieces such as antique and replica weapons and military accoutrements of the era while learning how these tools helped shape the battlefields and turning points in history. With an emphasis on primary sources, students will scrutinize historical atlases and original writings, all in a collaborative and interactive setting. Just for fun, students earn historical trading cards for class participation.

Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for the remainder of the year.

Topics in this Series: WWII: From Looming War through Stalingrad (Semester 1), WWI: The Defeat of Germany and the Wars Against Japan (Semester 2). Continuing students from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class on assigned readings.

Assignments: are given in class and e-mailed to parents and students.

Assessments: Will not be given

Textbook: Continuing students will continue to use the atlases from first semester. New students should purchase: (1) Atlas of World War II by Richard Natkiel, published by The Military Press, 1985. (Note: hardback or paperback editions from the 1980s are preferred over more recent small format editions from 2011 -– on. Used copies available on Amazon.) (2) Collins Atlas of the Second World War, by John Keegan ed., published by HarperCollins, 2003. (Note: This is a very large format atlas in different editions with some titled Times instead of Collins; key is John Keegan as editor. Used copies available on Amazon.) For those families who want to investigate the course themes at a deeper level, an optional reading list will be furnished.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count two semesters of this course as a full credit in American or World History for purposes of a high school transcript.

9:30 am-11:55 am

8th-12th

(Semester Long)

The History of WWII: The Defeat of Germany and Wars Against Japan *ONLINE ONLY*

The History of WWII: The Defeat of Germany and Wars Against Japan *ONLINE ONLY* Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3,4

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 4

Students will be immersed in detail and fully engaged in this intensive history course led by well- known homeschool instructor and historian Hugh Gardner. This history class is unlike other high school history course. Instead of learning a sequential set of names, dates, and battles, students will learn how to analyze and interpret history. Much like a college seminar, this approach to American History incorporates historiography (the history of the history.) Mr. Gardner does not teach a narrow view from a single textbook or static set of prepared notes. Instead, he presents the back story and multiple interpretations for the "why" questions in American history. Class discussion considers interpretations from a wide array of scholars and is updated as new sources are published. Rather than running through a timeline of outcomes, students will evaluate contributing factors (the "how" questions) and will learn about the personalities, prejudices, and biases of the people involved ("who").

Second semester, students will continue to examine the Eastern Front in World War II and the match-up between Hitler and Stalin as the Germans attempted an invasion of Russia. Students will also learn about the Holocaust and the enslavement of Europe. The class will look at the US Army's involvement in the European Theater of Operations (ETO) and the progression from D-Day to VE Day with a special examination of strategic warfare and the weapons and machines of war. Next, the class will turn its attention to Asia and study Japan's long road to Pearl Harbor followed by the Japanese onslaught and wars against Japan in World War II. The class will discuss the effects on the political, social, and economic climate as well as influences on the arts, science, literature, religion, and warfare. This is no ordinary history class as Mr. Gardner surrounds the students with vivid posters, maps, charts, primary sources, and artifacts to supplement his story-telling style. Students will be able to examine and handle period pieces such as antique and replica weapons and military accoutrements of the era while learning how these tools helped shape the battlefields and turning points in history. With an emphasis on primary sources, students will scrutinize historical atlases and original writings, all in a collaborative and interactive setting. Just for fun, students earn historical trading cards for class participation.

Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for the remainder of the year.

Topics in this Series: WWII: From Looming War through Stalingrad (Semester 1), WWI: The Defeat of Germany and the Wars Against Japan (Semester 2). Continuing students from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class on assigned readings.

Assignments: are given in class and e-mailed to parents and students.

Assessments: Will not be given

Textbook: Continuing students will continue to use the atlases from first semester. New students should purchase: (1) Atlas of World War II by Richard Natkiel, published by The Military Press, 1985. (Note: hardback or paperback editions from the 1980s are preferred over more recent small format editions from 2011 -– on. Used copies available on Amazon.) (2) Collins Atlas of the Second World War, by John Keegan ed., published by HarperCollins, 2003. (Note: This is a very large format atlas in different editions with some titled Times instead of Collins; key is John Keegan as editor. Used copies available on Amazon.) For those families who want to investigate the course themes at a deeper level, an optional reading list will be furnished.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count two semesters of this course as a full credit in American or World History for purposes of a high school transcript.

1:00 pm-3:25 pm

8th-12th

(Semester Long)

Virtual 4

Stellar Style: Fashion Design & History II *ONLINE ONLY*

Stellar Style: Fashion Design & History II *ONLINE ONLY* Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3,4

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 3

What's on the runways in 2020? Wide disco collars, chic trench coats, and layered skirts in simmering neons, crochet knits, and faux leather. Do you study the pages of Glamour, Vogue, Marie Claire, and wish to be involved in the world of trendy fashion? Perhaps you follow fashion influencers on Instagram. Or, do you enjoy the satisfaction of making things yourself, your way? If so, this class is for you. Each week this course will cover three parallel tracks: the history of fashion, fashion design, and sewing, with the first hour of each class being lessons and design work and the second hour dedicated to application and sewing.

Fashion trends are often cyclical, and elements of style are reimagined every few decades. Students will seek inspiration for new designs and style remixes by learning about the history of fashion in eastern and western cultures for the last century. Second semester, students will examine fashion trends by decade from the 1970s through the 2000s. The class will also highlight the work of influential designers such as Charles Frederick Worth, Gabrielle Chanel, Christian Dior, Valentino, Kenzo Takada, Prada, and others. This semester will cover chapters 4 and 5 in the textbook.

With inspiration from historical design trends, students will learn how to create fashion renderings, from initial concepts through a chic, coordinated collection. Second semester, students' design work will focus on creating a collection and sharing those designs through a collection story board. The class will also culminate with presentation of designs and a discussion of related careers including fashion design, art, graphic design, advertising, merchandising, costuming, manufacturing, retail work or virtual style influencer.)

Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for the remainder of the year.

Prerequisites: None

Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class on reading assignments

Assignments: Projects and readings will be given out in class and will also be communicated via email.

Assessments: Individual feedback is given in class. Formal assessments will not be given.

Textbook: Students should purchase Fundamentals of Fashion Design, 3rd Edition, by Richard Sorger and Jenny Udale (ISBN# 978-1474270007) before the first class. Additional information will be distributed as handouts in class.

Lab/Supply Fee: None

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts or Career Education for purposes of a high school transcript.

10:00 am-10:55 am

7th-12th

(Semester Long)

Acting- Cyber Stage: Objection! Disorder in the Courtroom *...

Acting- Cyber Stage: Objection! Disorder in the Courtroom *ONLINE ONLY* Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 1

What happens when your simple cross-country trip takes you through Berserksville? Arrested for a triple-crime you didn't commit! The level-headed lead in this made-for virtual-script discovers that the public defender is a doofus and the prosecutor is a clown in a trial filled with a colorful cast of witnesses and jocular judge. Our student actors will connect in an interactive, online platform to put on a hilarious play about a courtroom trial turned upside down!

The class will cast, practice, and perform the chosen play in a virtual setting for our online audience, yet students will communicate as if they're all in the same place together. The selected script was specifically written for virtual theater. New and returning acting students will have fun and be challenged to think on their feet with costumes, props, and backdrops when the show is literally happening in your own home.

This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, are flexible and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work in a collaborative group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class. The students will perform for family and friends at the end of the quarter online.

Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for the full quarter.

Topics in this Series: A Mystery Murdered (Quarter 2); Objection! Disorder in the Courtroom (Quarter 3), and A Selection of Skits: A series of 10-minute virtual plays (Quarter 4)

11:00 am-11:55 am

5th-8th

Virtual 5

Great Books for Girls Group *ONLINE*

Great Books for Girls Group *ONLINE* Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Wed

Open Spots: 1

Great Books for Girls offers preteen students the opportunity to read high quality literature and expand their understanding of what they read through book discussion and hands-on extension activities. Through facilitated class discussion, students will analyze plot, theme, characters, genre, and setting by citing specific examples from the story. In addition, students will complete a wide range of extension activities, such as acting out or illustrating favorite scenes, writing alternate endings or prequels, or researching specific aspects of the story. Students will be asked to read assigned chapters from their books at home, either as read-aloud, individual silent reading, or listening to the unabridged audiobook. Readers will be encouraged to take notes on key passages or questions. The first book of Quarter 3 will be "The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making" by Catherynne M. Valente. A second, follow-up book will be voted on by the students each quarter from A Mighty Girl suggested titles, Newbery Medalists and Honor Books, and the Capitol Choices book lists. For third quarter, Great Books for Girls will be conducted online, synchronously in a virtual classroom. Students who attend classes in person may meet in a physical classroom with classmates while the instructor facilitates class via Zoom.

11:00 am-11:55 am

5th-6th