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Register here to let Compass know that you are working towards the 2023-24 President's Volunteer Service Award or the American Citizenship Award. There is no cost to Compass students* to earn this award. Once registered, a Compass student will receive a link to enroll in Volunteer Scholars, an affiliate organization and online portal for tracking volunteer hours. Additional information about the PVSA can be found on the Compass award webpage.

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This registration is for homeschooled students in northern Virginia (Fairfax, Loudoun, Prince William, Arlington, Stafford, and Faquier counties, or Alexandria, Falls Church, Manassas, and Manassas Park citities) who do not attend Compass. Register here to let Compass know that you are working towards the 2023-24 President's Volunteer Service Award or the American Citizenship Award. Compass will pay for all costs associated with the award, but there is a $25.00 Compass activity fee. Once signed-up with a paid activity fee paid, students will receive a discount code which gives them membership in Volunteer Scholars at no cost.

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Fee for the design of your teen's transcript. Includes a 60-minute advising session where information is gathered on the homeschooled high school student. The homeschool family is responsible for bringing records of all completed and in-progress high school efforts. Prior to the meeting, families will receive a lists of suggested materials/records to bring for use in consolidating and clarifying homeschool experiences and crafting the transcript. In general, it will take the advisor 2 weeks to get a first draft back to the family. Then, another 30-minute advising session is suggested for review, questions, and comments. This fee includes a 2nd revision of the transcript and final submission to the family as a pdf.  Further updates will be billed at $100.00 per hour. Advising will be with Compass founder/director Jenny Grove-Bradshaw, who earned a College Admissions Specialist Certificate from the American School Counselor Association and a Certificate in College Counseling from the University of California San Diego.  The custom transcript design is for one high school student and the student's parent(s)/guardian. Once you have pre-paid for the service, you will be contacted to schedule at a mutually convenient time.  

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This is the fee for a Language Arts Skills Inventory with reading specialist Mrs. Vanlandingham. All new students who wish to be considered for enrollment in a Reading Rally language arts program must be assessed for level prior to registering. Mrs. Vanlandingham will advise families what level (Red-1, Green-2, Blue-1, Silver, etc) to register for.

Once a family has paid for a Skills Inventory, the specialist will be in touch about scheduling. Most assessments are held on  Monday or Friday afternoons. All assessments are held in person at Compass. Virtual assessments will not be offered.

The assessment is typically 20-30 minutes long for the child, with an additional 20-30 minute parent discussion. Students are given the Qualitative Reading Inventory (QRI) which takes into consideration the 5 Pillars of Literacy: Phonics, Phonemic Awareness, Vocabulary, Fluency, and Reading Comprehension. Within those categories, the QRI has more than 30 measures including vowels, blends, articulation, implicit and explicit questions, self-correction, and miscue analysis. Students will also be asked to write a brief retelling of a sample passage.

Parents will be advised which level Reading Rally their child should register for. Parents will not receive a detailed report but may take notes on the specialist's observations and recommendations. The assessment fee is non refundable if the family elects not to enroll in a Reading Rally class. Please note that 10 levels of Reading Rally are offered for Fall 2024, and the recommended level could be on a Monday or a Wednesday and may fall at a time that conflicts with other class preferences.

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Karen Shumway

This intensive, "boot camp" style workshop includes the "Greatest Hits" of high school biology lab work and introduces students to the range of concepts in high school biology. Students will investigate the activity of enzymes, the cycling of carbon in mini-ecosystems, and the movement of molecules through semi-permeable membranes. Microscopy techniques will be employed to view bacteria, protist, fungi, plant, and animal cells, through both live, wet-mount samples and prepared specimen slides. Students will observe the observation of the movement of chromosomes during mitosis and extract DNA from foods. Participants will also visualize the complex processes of cellular respiration and photosynthesis using yeast and aquatic plants; investigate the genetics of taste; explore bacterial growth and evaluate disinfectant efficacy; and simulate evolution with origami birds before dissecting a frog and a sheep's brain. This lab intensive is for high school students who are pursuing or who have recently completed a virtual or textbook-only high school biology course that did not include hands-on lab work. The course can also serve as a preview for high school students who will be taking a full course in high school biology in the fall of 2024. It is suitable for a student who had an incomplete course in biology and needs "a little extra" work to conclude the course, or any other high school student who enjoys laboratory work. Prior to beginning the workshop, students will receive a list of labs, principle topics, and corresponding videos to serve as a review or a pre-lab overview. For safety reasons, Biology Lab has a dress code more restrictive than the general Compass dress code: (1) Long hair must be tied back (male or female); (2) Shirts must have at least short sleeves (such as a t-shirt). Tank tops and sleeveless shirts are not permitted. (3) Students must wear long pants. Shorts are not permitted. (4) Students must wear closed-toe shoes. Open toe sandals, slides, and flip-flops are not permitted. There is a $75.00 supply fee due payable to the instructor on or before the first day. This is a five-day program.

Prerequisites: None

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Tia Murchie-Beyma
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This is a place-holder for the Principles of Biology lecture. Students should register for the Principles of Biology Lab, which will automatically enroll them in both class sections. A physical meeting room will be designated for on-campus students who have classes immediately before or after this virtual session.

Prerequisites: See class description

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Mylene Nyman
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Teens will learn to make simple, budget-friendly foods to feed themselves. These recipes are perfect for college students who have only a microwave or for teens preparing quick meals at home. Some even have ingredients that can be taken from campus dining halls and transformed. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

  • Homemade Pizza
  • Elevated Raman Noodles
  • Rice Pilaf
  • Loaded Baked Potato
  • Cinnamon Rolls
  • Baked Banana Blueberry Oatmeal
This engaging cooking workshop will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be introduced to ingredients and flavors they may not regularly eat. They will discover the joy of cooking while practicing skills that range from math (volume, weight, unit conversion, fractions, decimals), reading (instructions, ingredients), geography (traditions, flavors, food sources), and science (nutrition, food chemistry), and life skills. They will also learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced in class, and recipes are provided online for enrolled students to prepare their new foods at home. Notes: Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, eggs, soy, etc. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Recipes cannot be adapted to students with food allergies or dietary restrictions. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $36.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes, closed-toe shoes, and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage. This is a 2-day program.

Prerequisites: None

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Mylene Nyman
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Compass chefs will create the fast-casual fare and hand-held favorites found on food trucks across America. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

  • Fish Tacos and Slaw
  • Parmesan Chicken Tenders with Homemade Marinara Sauce
  • Beef Empanadas (2 recipes: dough and filling)
  • Loaded Cheese Fries
  • Doughnuts: Cinnamon, Strawberry Puff, and Strawberry-Glazed
This engaging cooking workshop will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be introduced to ingredients and flavors they may not regularly eat. They will discover the joy of cooking while practicing skills that range from math (volume, weight, unit conversion, fractions, decimals), reading (instructions, ingredients), geography (traditions, flavors, food sources), and science (nutrition, food chemistry), and life skills. They will also learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced in class, and recipes are provided online for enrolled students to prepare their new foods at home. Notes: Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, eggs, soy, etc. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Recipes cannot be adapted to students with food allergies or dietary restrictions. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $36.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes, closed-toe shoes, and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage. This is a 2-day program.

Prerequisites: None

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Mylene Nyman
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Taste your way across America in this cross-country culinary adventure. From diners to dining rooms, create and enjoy regional favorites on your imaginary drive across the US. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

Northeast

  • New England Clam Chowder
  • Boston Baked Beans
  • Boston Cream Pie

South

  • Southern Tomato and Cheese Pie (with homemade pie crust)
  • Pimento Cheese Spread
  • Blue Ribbon Deviled Eggs
  • Mississippi Mud Pie

New Orleans

  • Cajun Orzo with Sausage
  • Shrimp and Grits
  • Bananas Foster Cheesecake

This engaging cooking workshop will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be introduced to ingredients and flavors they may not regularly eat. They will discover the joy of cooking while practicing skills that range from math (volume, weight, unit conversion, fractions, decimals), reading (instructions, ingredients), geography (traditions, flavors, food sources), and science (nutrition, food chemistry), and life skills. They will also learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced in class, and recipes are provided online for enrolled students to prepare their new foods at home.

Notes: Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, eggs, soy, etc. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Recipes cannot be adapted to students with food allergies or dietary restrictions. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics.

Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $54.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided.

What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes, closed-toe shoes, and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

This is a 3-day program.

Prerequisites: None

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Mylene Nyman
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Taste your way across America in this cross-country culinary adventure. From diners to dining rooms, create and enjoy regional favorites on your imaginary drive across the US. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

Northwest

  • Baked Salmon with Dill Sauce
  • Cauliflower Gratin with Gruyere and Roasted Hazelnuts
  • Blackberry Cinnamon Cobbler

Midwest

  • Midwest Meatloaf
  • Mashed Potatoes
  • Roasted Lemon Green Beans with Bacon
  • Wisconsin State Fair Cream Puffs (served since 1924)

Southwest

  • Homemade Salsa and Guacamole
  • Cheesy Green Chili Cornbread
  • Chicken Enchilada Bake

This engaging cooking workshop will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be introduced to ingredients and flavors they may not regularly eat. They will discover the joy of cooking while practicing skills that range from math (volume, weight, unit conversion, fractions, decimals), reading (instructions, ingredients), geography (traditions, flavors, food sources), and science (nutrition, food chemistry), and life skills. They will also learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced in class, and recipes are provided online for enrolled students to prepare their new foods at home.

Notes: Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, eggs, soy, etc. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Recipes cannot be adapted to students with food allergies or dietary restrictions. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics.

Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $54.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided.

What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes, closed-toe shoes, and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

This is a 3-day program.

Prerequisites: None

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Mylene Nyman
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The start of school and homeschooling is around the corner. Kids' calendars will be filling up, and they will want to munch between meals. In this workshop, kids will learn to make 7 delicious, filling snacks for themselves. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

  • Nachos
  • Sticky Sesame Cauliflower Bites
  • Pomegranate Slushy
  • Strawberry Almond Protein Bars
  • Air Fried Ranch Chickpeas
  • Cinnamon Sticky Buns
  • Strawberry Cheesecake Dip
This engaging cooking workshop will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be introduced to ingredients and flavors they may not regularly eat. They will discover the joy of cooking while practicing skills that range from math (volume, weight, unit conversion, fractions, decimals), reading (instructions, ingredients), geography (traditions, flavors, food sources), and science (nutrition, food chemistry), and life skills. They will also learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced in class, and recipes are provided online for enrolled students to prepare their new foods at home. Notes: Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, eggs, soy, etc. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Recipes cannot be adapted to students with food allergies or dietary restrictions. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $36.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes, closed-toe shoes, and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage. This is a 2-day program.

Prerequisites: None

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Mylene Nyman
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Summer luaus transport us to barefoot beach barbecues under picturesque Pacific palms. Celebrate Hawaiian hospitality and tropical tastes when learning to make the favorite foods of our fiftieth state. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

  • Air Fry Hawaiian Chicken
  • Bruddah Potato Mac
  • Tropical Fruit Salad
  • Loco Moco Rice
  • Pineapple Tarts
  • Butter Mochi Cookies
This engaging cooking workshop will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be introduced to ingredients and flavors they may not regularly eat. They will discover the joy of cooking while practicing skills that range from math (volume, weight, unit conversion, fractions, decimals), reading (instructions, ingredients), geography (traditions, flavors, food sources), and science (nutrition, food chemistry), and life skills. They will also learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced in class, and recipes are provided online for enrolled students to prepare their new foods at home. Notes: Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, eggs, soy, etc. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Recipes cannot be adapted to students with food allergies or dietary restrictions. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $36.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes, closed-toe shoes, and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage. This is a 2-day program.

Prerequisites: None

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Mylene Nyman
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Celebrate the long, lazy days of summer with sweet treats featuring fresh fruits, refreshing freezes, and sticky summer splurges. Compass chefs will make sweets reminiscent of playful parties at the pool, breezy afternoons at the beach, or late nights at the lake. Recipes are selected to be fun and simple to make. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

  • Watermelon Sorbet
  • Strawberry Mousse
  • Peach Ice Cream
  • Raspberry Lemonade
  • Banana Split Bites
  • Mini Angel Food Cakes with Summer Berries
  • S'mores Cookies
  • Dole Whips
This engaging cooking workshop will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be introduced to ingredients and flavors they may not regularly eat. They will discover the joy of cooking while practicing skills that range from math (volume, weight, unit conversion, fractions, decimals), reading (instructions, ingredients), geography (traditions, flavors, food sources), and science (nutrition, food chemistry), and life skills. They will also learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced in class, and recipes are provided online for enrolled students to prepare their new foods at home. Notes: Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, eggs, soy, etc. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Recipes cannot be adapted to students with food allergies or dietary restrictions. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $36.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes, closed-toe shoes, and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage. This is a 2-day program.

Prerequisites: None

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Mylene Nyman
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Children are invited to a magical tea party that they prepare themselves! Young chefs will create a delicious menu of finger foods that they will enjoy with tea, hot chocolate, or juice. Recipes created on the first day will be refrigerated and retained for our party on the second day. The Compass Commons area will be transformed with tablecloths, tea lights, and summer centerpieces. Participants will be invited to bring one stuffed friend and one grown-up to join them for the tea party held the last 30 minutes of the second day. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

  • Cucumber Sandwiches
  • Mini Quiches
  • Asparagus Crostini
  • Mini Cream Puffs
  • Lemon Cake
  • Mini Blueberry Scones
This engaging cooking workshop will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be introduced to ingredients and flavors they may not regularly eat. They will discover the joy of cooking while practicing skills that range from math (volume, weight, unit conversion, fractions, decimals), reading (instructions, ingredients), geography (traditions, flavors, food sources), and science (nutrition, food chemistry), and life skills. They will also learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced in class, and recipes are provided online for enrolled students to prepare their new foods at home. Notes: Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, eggs, soy, etc. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Recipes cannot be adapted to students with food allergies or dietary restrictions. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $36.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes, closed-toe shoes, and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage. This is a 2-day program.

Prerequisites: None

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Mylene Nyman
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Compass Chefs will learn to make the comfort foods and family favorites featured at summer cook-outs, picnics, and pot-lucks across America. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

  • Pulled Pork BBQ with Homemade BBQ Sauce
  • Chili Dogs
  • Homemade Mac & Cheese
  • Watergate Salad
  • Corn Cakes
  • Pasta Caprese Salad
  • Red Skinned Potato Salad
  • Peanut butter Brownies
  • Raspberry-Peach Upside Down Cake
This engaging cooking workshop will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be introduced to ingredients and flavors they may not regularly eat. They will discover the joy of cooking while practicing skills that range from math (volume, weight, unit conversion, fractions, decimals), reading (instructions, ingredients), geography (traditions, flavors, food sources), and science (nutrition, food chemistry), and life skills. They will also learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced in class, and recipes are provided online for enrolled students to prepare their new foods at home. Notes: Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, eggs, soy, etc. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Recipes cannot be adapted to students with food allergies or dietary restrictions. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $54.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes, closed-toe shoes, and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage. This is a 3-day program.

Prerequisites: None

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Jessica Eastridge
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Enjoy the camaraderie and cooperation of making music with others while using the summer to build skills and boost confidence with your band instrument. Dulles Area Summer Band Camp is a half-day program for beginners (6 months or fewer on their instruments). Read complete details of the camp online.

Prerequisites: None

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David Chelf
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This is a semi-private section for students with permission of Compass and the Instructor.

This is continuing course in high school Algebra I and introduction to Geometry covering concepts in mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. This course is designed to continue the study of algebraic problem-solving with the incorporation of real-world applications. Part 1 topics in Algebra I will be reviewed such as number systems, linear systems, rational numbers, complex numbers, exponents, roots, and radicals. Algebra I, Part 2 topics including quadratic equations, polynomials, factoring, absolute values, ratios, and proportions will be covered first semester. The course will review and expand on solving and graphing systems of functions, linear equations, and inequalities.

Second semester, students will begin an introduction to Geometry covering lines, angles, congruence, concurrence, inequalities, parallel lines, quadrilaterals, transformations, area, similarity, right triangles, circles, regular polygons, and geometric solids. Geometric proofs will not be included. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem-solving.

Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation in pre-algebra and Algebra I, part 1 in order to take this class.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-1.5 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 7-day cycle, with assignments posted on Thursdays and due the following Thursday. Students are advised to start homework once it is assigned (i.e., not wait until the night before it is due). Weekly homework assignments will be of a length that a student should be able to complete them in two or three at-home work sessions. Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of their work.

Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.

Assessments: Student progress will be assessed by: (1) The instructor checking that weekly homework sets are attempted and complete and (2) detailed grading of periodic take-home tests. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. See the instructor's webpage for detailed homework and test policy, including late work and re-work.

Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Algebra I: Expressions, Equations, and Applications by Paul A. Foerster. It is available in a few different editions, each of which is virtually identical: 2nd edition (ISBN-10 020125073X, ISBN-13 978-0201250732), 3rd edition (ISBN-10 0201860945, ISBN-13 978-0201860948), and Classic edition (ISBN-10 020132458X, ISBN-13 978-0201324587). It is also available under the title Foerster Algebra I, Classics edition (ISBN-10 0131657089, ISBN-13 978-0131657083). A calculator is not needed for this course.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Algebra I for purposes of a high school transcript.

Prerequisites: None

2
Sandy Preaux
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A tsunami threatens Sumatra. A cyclone strikes the Solomon Islands. High tides hit Hilton Head. Sub-zero temps settle over Sugar Land, Texas. Atmospheric and oceanic phenomena are in the news every single day! Are there any forces on earth more powerful or influential than atmospheric and oceanic sciences? These fields affect almost every aspect of human existence, and understanding them can answer questions from, 'Should I bring an umbrella today?' to 'How deadly will this year's drought be in Dakar?' and 'How will changes in the Gulf Stream affect the migration and mating of Minke Whales?' Atmospheric science is an interdisciplinary field that applies geology, astronomy, physics and chemistry to meteorology, climatology and environmental science. In this year-long laboratory science course, students will explore the fields of Atmospheric Science first semester and Oceanic Science second semester. Atmospheric Science is the study of the physical and chemical aspects of the atmosphere which can encompass a wide variety of topics such as weather forecasting, climate change, air quality, etc. Key themes in the study of Atmospheric Science include the gas laws (temperature, pressure, volume) and air movement (buoyancy, angular momentum). Students will learn about the spectra of sunlight, reflection and refraction, and evaluate how surfaces respond to sunlight. The class will also learn about the tools of atmospheric science, such as weather instruments, rain gage, anemometer, thermometer, and barometer, and how to read weather maps and forecast hurricane paths. Oceanography is the study of the physical, chemical, and biological aspects of the ocean. Key themes in oceanography include ocean-land interaction, atmosphere-ocean interactions (such as El Nino and La Nina cycles), wave motion, tidal cycles, currents, and thermohaline circulation. The class will consider water chemistry and the oceanic carbon cycle. Finally, students will learn how we measure and map the ocean and use earth system computer models. Weekly discussions will be paired with labs. Some lab assignments will take multiple weeks, and some will use computers and a spreadsheet to analyze publicly available data. Note: This class has a Tuesday, in-person lecture section from 10:00 am - 10:55 am in addition to the Friday lab section from 9:30 am - 10:55 am. Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class. ,p>Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates. Assessments: Completed assignments will be assessed points. Parents can calculate a letter grade using the student's points earned divided by points available, in weighted categories that include assignments, labs, quizzes, tests, projects, and presentations. Parents may view all scoring and comments at any time through the Canvas site. Textbook/Materials: Students should download or purchase Practical Meteorology: An Algebra-based Survey of Atmospheric Science (2018) by Roland Stull (ISBN 978-0888652836). The textbook can be downloaded for free online or purchased for $54.00 online. The textbook for oceanic sciences section will be identified before the start of Semester 2. https://www.eoas.ubc.ca/books/Practical_Meteorology/ https://www.eoas.ubc.ca/books/Practical_Meteorology/world/print.html Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $100.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: Students will need to bring laptop computers to some class sessions for modeling and data analysis labs. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in laboratory science for purposes of a high school transcript

Prerequisites: None

2
Tia Murchie-Beyma
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This class will be taught in a Hybrid format with an online lecture on Mondays (10:00 am - 10:55 am) over a live, online platform and in-person lab and activities on Fridays (9:30 am - 10:55 am). Registration for the Lab section will automatically enroll the student in the Lecture section. This full-year lab science course introduces classic biology topics updated for the 21st century. Biology studies living things and their relationships from microscopic to massive, ancient to modern, arctic to tropic. Our survey includes: (1) cellular and molecular biology, (2) ecology, (3) genetics, (4) biology of organisms (with selected human health and anatomy topics), and (5) evolution and diversity. You will observe microscopic organisms and give monarch butterflies a health exam before tagging them for their 2,800 mile migration to Mexico. You will extract DNA, model its processes, and learn how scientists manipulate this magnificent molecule to make mice glow. You will observe animal behavior, test your heart rate, and practice identifying and debunking pseudo-science. By the end of the course, students will be able to explain the nature of science as a system of knowing; cite evidence for foundational theories of modern biology; explain basic biological processes and functions; describe structures and relationships in living systems; outline systems of information, energy, and resources; demonstrate valid experimental design; discern ethical standards; relate their values and scientific ideas to decision-making; and apply biology knowledge to their own health. Students are responsible for pre-reading and reviewing new material such as readings from the textbook and additional popular and scholarly sources, videos, and animations PRIOR to class meetings. In-person sessions focus on active discussion, clarification, exploration of content, review, modeling, and hands-on activities. Labs address not only technical skills and sequential operations, but also forming testable predictions, collecting data, applying math, drawing conclusions, and presenting findings. Hands-on dissection, always optional, is taught with preserved crayfish and fetal pigs. Sensitive issues: human reproduction is not taught separately, but mentioned as students learn about other, related topics such as sperm, eggs, stem cells, genetic disease, hormones, fetal development, breast-feeding, adolescence, and HIV. While there may be some debate-style discussion of topics such as GMO, abortion will not be debated. Birth control and sex education are not covered, but distinctions between gender and biological sex are discussed in detail in the genetics unit. Evolution is embedded in every topic, from molecular to ecological, inseparably from other content. It is addressed in a scientific context, not from a faith standpoint. Levels: The course provides a substantive, full-credit experience on either an Honors or On-Level track. All class members share core material and participate in the same labs. Honors has longer or additional readings, more analytical work, and more thorough and difficult assessments. Brief, required summer assignments are due in August for those who elect to take Honors. Students register online for the same course, but must indicate which level they wish to study via e-mail by August 15. Students may move down a level (from Honors to On-Level) at any time. Prerequisites: Students should be very strong, independent readers and able to understand graphs, tables, percentages, decimals, ratios, and averages. Workload: All students should expect to spend 4-6 hours outside of class reading and preparing homework. Homework includes term cards, brief written responses, weekly online quizzes, unit tests, occasional lab reports, and some creative assignments including sketching. Students will sometimes prepare short, in-class presentations, participate in group projects, run simulations, or conduct simple experiments at home. Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments; upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests; track grades; message instructor and classmates; and attend virtual conferences. Assessments: Completed homework, projects, quizzes, and tests receive points and narrative feedback. Parents can calculate a letter grade using the student's points earned divided by points available, in weighted categories that include assignments, reading quizzes, tests, and participation and presentations. Parents may view all scoring and comments at any time through the Canvas site. Textbook/Materials: Students must purchase or rent the textbook Biology Now: Third High School Edition (2022) published by WW Norton. A 360-day digital license directly from the publisher costs $53.00 HERE (ISBN: 978-0-393-54247-9) or $130 when bundled with a hardcover text (ISBN 978-0-393-54010-9). Used books may be available from 2022-23 students. Core textbook readings are supplemented by the instructor with updated information drawn from sources such as peer-reviewed science journals, popular science publications, and podcasts. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $130 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Supplies/Equipment: Students will need access to a computer/internet, compound microscope with 400X magnification and cool lighting, splash goggles, water-resistant/acid-resistant lab apron, kitchen or postal scale, 3-ring binder, approximately 400- 3"x5" index cards; and plain, lined, and graph paper. Some of these supplies are used at home. Weekly "Read Me First" web pages and class announcements on Canvas tell students what items to bring to class. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Lab Science for purposes of a high school transcript.

Prerequisites: See class description

2
Karen Shumway
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This class has an in-person lecture on Tuesdays (10:00 am - 10:55 am) and in-person lab and activities on Fridays (9:30 am - 10:55 am). Students must take lecture and lab together. Registration for the Lab section will automatically enroll the student in the Lecture section. Through the study of chemistry, high school students will learn the science behind things they observe every day! Chemistry explains properties of the food we eat, the beverages we drink, the medicines we take, the fibers we wear, and fuels in the cars we drive. Chemistry is a foundation to understanding the world around us and fundamental to other sciences such as biology, physics, geology, and environmental science. This full-year laboratory course makes chemistry come alive through at-home readings, practice problems, supplementary activities, and in-person hands-on labs to demonstrate key concepts. Course themes include matter, changes in state, scientific measurement, atomic structure, electrons in atoms, and characteristics of the periodic table. Students will then study ionic, metallic, and covalent bonding, chemical names and formulas, and chemical reactions. Further chemistry topics include the behavior of gases, water and aqueous solutions, acids, bases, and salts; oxidation-reduction reactions, solutions, and thermochemistry. Students will learn the skills necessary for successful study of chemical reactions and molecular phenomena, using common high school laboratory chemicals, glassware, and techniques. This is not a course done in microscale using pre-mixed solutions: students will learn to calculate molarity and use dimensional analysis to mix solutions, calculate yields, analyze errors, and construct graphs. Example labs include experiments in molar mass, hydrates, precipitates, filtration, density, distillation, reactants, single and double displacement, acid/base titration, polymers, heat of fusion, heat of vaporization, and stoichiometry. Class demonstrations will model other chemical concepts and processes, such as a radioactive cloud chamber. Prerequisites: High school Algebra I Levels: This course provides a substantive, full-credit experience on either an on-level or honors track. All class members complete the same core material and participate in the same labs. Students taking the course at the honors level are generally on a college prep or STEM track and have additional assignments and alternative scoring. Honors students' homework will be graded and recorded as part of the students' total earned points. On-level students' homework will be corrected and graded, but not factored into their total earned points. Students must identify their level prior to the start of class. At any point in the year, a student may transition from honors to on-level if the workload exceeds the students' expectations. In addition, at the parents' discretion, students may take this course as an "audit" in which they still read chapters, attend lectures, participate in labs, but do not do problem sets or laboratory reports. This approach provides an experiential and conceptual overview of chemistry, but should not be counted as a full year credit. Workload: All students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class on pre-reading and lab reports. Honors students can expect an additional 1-2 hours on weekly problem sets. Pre-reading and pre-lab work is required so in-person class time can be spent on highlights, class discussion, homework review, and labs. In addition, most weeks students should plan for additional meeting time and coordination with their lab partners in-person, by phone, shared documents, or via virtual meeting. Students will also be required to read one scientific, non-fiction book or current events article each quarter and prepare a 2-page summary and response book report. Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates. Parents can have an observer account in Canvas to review assignments and graded work. Students will have weekly readings and mandatory pre-lab assignments. The pre-lab assignment must be completed prior to lab and will serve as the student's "ticket" into the lab session each week. Assessments: Students will earn points for completed homework, unit tests, lab reports, book reports, and semester exams. Parents can calculate a letter grade using the student's points earned divided by points available. Parents may view all scoring and comments at any time through the Canvas site. Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase or rent Prentice Hall Chemistry by Wilbraham, Staley, et. al. 2008 edition (ISBN #978-0132512107). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $125 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a composition notebook, graph paper, lab equipment and supplies, and safety supplies. What to Bring: Students should bring a paper or a notebook, pen or pencil, and a scientific calculator each week. What to Wear: Students should not wear any loose, drapey clothing to lab. They should also come to class with long hair tied back and should wear closed toe shoes. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Lab Science for purposes of a high school transcript.

Prerequisites: Algebra I

2
Manal Hussein
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This class will be taught in a Hybrid format with an online lecture on Mondays (10:00 am - 10:55 am) over a live, online platform and in-person lab and activities on Wednesdays (9:30 am - 10:55 am). Registration for the Lab section will automatically enroll the student in the Lecture section.

This is a full-year, lab-based course that covers traditional concepts in physics. Physics is a college-preparatory course that encourages students to engage in scientific inquiry, investigations, and experimentation so they develop a conceptual understanding and basic scientific skills. Physics will help students understand phenomena in the physical world such as the forces on a roller coaster, wave action at the beach, speakers for their music, batteries in electric cars, and the electronics that power their favorite devices.

Students will develop an in-depth conceptual and analytical understanding of principles such as Newton's laws of motion, work and energy, momentum, circular motion, thermodynamics, sound, properties of light, electric fields and energy, and magnetism. This course will use algebra- and trigonometry- based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe mechanics. The course is designed to emphasize scientific thinking and reasoning, problem solving, and experimentation.

Meeting Dates: This is a 29-week course that will not meet during the week of May 12-16, 2025.

Prerequisites/Corequisites: Students should have completed Algebra I, Geometry, and basic, right-angle trigonometry before taking this course. Students should be concurrently enrolled in Algebra II or PreCalculus when taking this course. For those students who have not covered trigonometry or other key Algebra II topics prior to encountering them in this course, the instructor will recommend resources and videos for independent review or instruction. Students are encouraged to buy the textbook over the summer to work through the Math Review section before September. The emphasis in this course is teaching/learning physic concepts, not teaching or re-teaching mathematical concepts.

Class Expectations: For both in-person and virtual class meetings, students are expected to come prepared, have class materials, and be ready to participate in class discussions and activities. During virtual lectures (Mondays), students are expected to be seated at a desk or table and have their cameras on.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 4 - 6 hours of independent study/homework every week consisting of pre-reading chapters, taking detailed notes on concepts before class, completing problem-solving activities, analyzing data, and writing formal lab reports.

Assignments: All assignments and announcements will be posted on Google classroom management site. There, students access assignments; upload lab reports, message instructor and classmates; and attend virtual conferences. Parents can view the course instructions and materials via their students' accounts.

Assessments: The instructor will assign points for correct answers on quizzes and tests, and points/feedback for lab reports. Homework assignments will be marked as complete or incomplete. Parents can calculate a letter grade using the student's points earned divided by points available.

Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase or rent Physics by James S. Walker (2014 ed.) (ISBN #9780131371156.)

Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $100.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

Supplies/Equipment: Students will need access to a computer with working camera, internet, a graphing calculator, a ruler, writing supplies, colored pens for graphs, highlighters, plain, lined, and graph paper, a 1-inch three ring binder, and a Five Star, 8.5" X 11" Quadrille-Ruled Notebook.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component full credit in laboratory science for purposes of a high school transcript.

Prerequisites: Algebra II

2
JR Bontrager
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Students will learn to think like inventors and designers when creating 3D! 3D design is used not only for modeling and fabricating objects but is also at the heart of many cutting-edge technologies such as AR and VR, video game design, interactive exhibits, and more. 3D printing is used in nearly all industries and design fields today from art to animation, manufacturing to medicine, and engineering to entertainment.

In this class, students will first learn to use Tinkercard, a 3D modeling software that works in solid forms (like LEGO bricks). Then, students will transition to MeshMixer, a software that creates smooth, curved, organic shapes (like clay). They will learn to think about their design from all angles and how to subtract forms to create holes, voids, and concave features, and add forms to create projections, contours, appendages, and convex details. They will discover the limitations of 3D printing and how to handle overhanging elements or delicate details.

Students will practice the artistic design process with simple sketches before diving into the software. They will be encouraged to use reference material, whether photos, a model, or even by modifying existing, public domain 3D files. Students will use an iterative printing process in which they print their project, check it for design intent, functionality, or fit, make modifications, and print again. The class will learn how to save and convert between 3D solid object files (.stl) and object files (.obj) and work with metadata fields to protect the intellectual property of their designs.

To demonstrate the range and capability of 3D-printed designs, favorite student projects include D & D miniatures, cosplay props, Minecraft-designed creations, and beloved characters such as anime, baby Yoda, and Pokemon creatures.

Second semester, continuing students will progress to more complex assemblies including multiple parts and parts with hinges. Second semester, some students may wish to work with alternative filaments such as TPU (rubber), metal, or magnetized filament. Because of the studio format, new students can enroll second semester.

The class instructor is a design engineer with 3D Herndon and expert in 3D technologies and other areas of design and invention. A typical class will be structured with 5-10 minutes of lecture or demonstration of a new design skill, followed by 40 minutes of design "studio" time where students can receive trouble-shooting support and design tips from the instructor and have dedicated work time, and 5-10 minutes of sharing time at the end of class. As a studio class, students will work on individual projects at their own pace.

Topics in this Series: As an open studio for individual projects, students may continue from one semester to the next or enroll mid-year. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Prerequisites: None

What to Bring:Students will need to bring a laptop to class for design work.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1+ hours per week outside of class.

Assignments: Project criteria will be explained in class to students.

Assessments: Informal, qualitative feedback will be given in class throughout the semester as the student works.

Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $25.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for 3D printing and filament. This provides the student with 800 g of printed product per semester. Students who are prolific designers and print often will be asked to pay an additional $5.00 per 100 g or fraction thereof.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Visual Arts, Technology, or Career Exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

Prerequisites: None

2
Taliesin Knol
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Why read about key military battles on maps or in books when you can learn about them hands-on, in three dimensions, using historical miniature gaming? In 3D History, pivotal engagements come alive for new and experienced students, as they navigate a table-top terrain, deploy hundreds of miniature soldiers, ships, and tanks... all while playing a military strategy game. Each student will have the opportunity to fight a battle from both sides, allowing them to test various strategies, try multiple scenarios, predict different outcomes, and rewrite history- an effective way to gain a deeper understanding of what actually happened and why!



In 1916 The Great War had been churning through men and material for two years. Something had to be done- warring countries were driving deep into debt and losing entire generations of young men at the front. The armies had to go "Over the Top." Great Battle Plans were drawn up for massive, simultaneous attacks across the whole of Western Europe. In secret, the British built new technological horrors to drive through the German lines: land battleships bristling with guns, covered in armor and belching smoke and fire. The gears of war reached as far as Gallipoli in Turkey and the deserts of the Middle East. In the West, an untapped American giant slowly stirred to war. Provoked by unrestricted submarine warfare, diplomatic intrigue, and a righteous desire to defend democracy, would America arrive in time to decide the outcome of the Great War?



This semester will study later years of WWI, the major battles of the Western Front, where tens of thousands of men went "over the top" of their trenches to near certain death, as well as the desperate attempts to break the stalemate in other theaters of war with new technologies.



Note: This is a 1 hour, 55 minute class with a 10-minute break part way through. This is a 13-week class that will not meet on 10/18/2024.



Topics in this Series: WWI- No Man's Land 1914-1915 (Semester 1) and WWI- Over the Top 1916-1918 (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.



Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.



Assignments: Period maps, photographs, and re-creations will be posted on a class Google Drive, and video links from YouTube will be e-mailed to parents and students for homework or supplemental investigation.



Assessments: Will not be given.



Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript.

Prerequisites: None

2
Judith Harmon
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Kids take to the stage as they collaboratively write and perform their very own play with unique characters and an original storyline. Will we have a mix-up or a masterpiece when we meddle with monarchs, mischief-makers, merry men, and maidens?

Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other and start to brainstorm about their original play. Through group activities and guided discussion, the student actors will decide on characters, conflict, and conclusion, and the story they want to tell. The script will be developed and customized for this class with input from the students.

The class will learn the practical aspects of acting, as they work on script read-through, blocking, costume/prop design, and planning the show. Student actors will explore skills such as stage movement, character development, emotional expression, and observation/concentration while learning to portray their original character. Students will develop their own "actor's toolkit" of voice, body, and imagination in this creative process! Actors will grow in confidence and communication skills in preparation for a final sharing with parents on the last day of the

Once the script is fully developed with everyone's parts, it will be emailed to parents. Parents will be expected to help their children memorize their script/lines/cues and assemble a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity. Note: Students who are emerging readers (not able to read at a 3rd/4th grade level) would be better suited to the Young Actor's Playhouse class, rather than this level.

Prerequisites: None

2
Jeff Virchow
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Social dancing does not have to be slow or stuffy! There is energy in the ballroom with Action Dance! Students will learn the dynamic, rhythmic dances of the Caribbean: Salsa (Mexican-Cuban), Merengue (Dominican Republic), Rhumba (Afro-Cuban), and Cha-Cha (triple step Cuban). Emphasis in the class will be on having fun and learning techniques to help dancers be comfortable and relaxed. Social dances encourage confidence, social presence, posture, and poise in teens. Social dancing is partner-based dance; consider signing up with a friend! Please note that in order to demonstrate some steps and forms, students may occasionally be invited to partner with their instructor.

Topics in this Series: Action Dance: Caribbean & Latin (Semester 1), Action Dance: Swing & Shag (Semester 2), etc. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Prerequisites: None

Assessments: Informal feedback will be given in class. Formal assessments or grades will not be given.

What to Wear: Students should wear loose, comfortable clothing.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in fine arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

Prerequisites: None

2
Juan Urista
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Humans have been obsessed with Mars since long before Galileo Galilei first saw it with a telescope in 1610. Ancient humans recognized the orangish planet as one of the brightest objects in the night sky, and long before the ancient Romans named the planet after their god of war, ancient Egyptian and Chinese astronomers recorded the motion of the planet. More than 350 years after Galileo, America’s Mariner 4 completed the first successful fly-by of Mars on 15 July 1965. Although half of all attempted missions to Mars have failed, the US has successfully gotten several orbiters, landers, probes, rovers, and even a small helicopter to the red planet.

This semester, students will learn about scientists’ ambitious plans to reach the red planet in their lifetime! The class will review the planned US missions and overview the known challenges of a journey to Mars. While considering the exploration of the planet, the class will undertake a semester-long project to build a replica rover. Working in teams, students will hack a Power Wheels ride-on vehicle and reconfigure it into a model Mars rover chassis. They will rebuild and rewire the vehicles to be remote-controlled and add an equipment mounting platform. The class will learn about and install components like mini solar panels, LED lighting, drone launch pad, robotic arm, and camera mounts. During this project, students will learn to use a variety of small hand tools and perform simple electrical wiring and circuitry work.

During the semester, the class will host a number of virtual and in-person guest speakers on the topic of Mars exploration. The group will also hold one session off-site at the Udvar-Hazy Air and Space Museum education complex where a Smithsonian educator will lead the students through a Mars Mission workshop. In that workshop, student teams will design a mock mission to Mars using constraints such as budget, payload, fuel, power consumption, and scientific value of their planned Martian activities. Will they “return” from Mars, and what will they bring back?

This a 14-week semester class that meets 1.5 hours per week. There is a supply fee of $75.00 due payable to the instructor on/before the first week of class.

Prerequisites: None

2
Osk Huneycutt
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More than 70% of the Earth's surface is water! Understanding the planet's oceans and freshwater systems is critical to understanding life on our planet- from beginnings in the seas to the water cycle that supports ongoing life. The study of aquatic and marine biology provides a basis for understanding much of the chemistry, physics, biology, and meteorology on our planet. Budding marine biologists will travel inland to learn about freshwater systems like lakes and ponds, rivers and streams before returning to the coast to study marshes and estuaries followed by extreme marine environments. The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in several demonstrations and experiments in each class. First quarter, the class will focus on freshwater lakes and the variety of unique biomes that exist in them. Students will compare major lake systems around the world and learn about general limnological processes such as seasonal turnover and phytoplankton blooms. They will also explore the incredible range of lake biomes, from acidic, volcanic lakes and hot springs, to ancient temperate lakes like Lake Baikal. Students will learn about the extreme chemistry that occurs in some systems, like stratified lakes with toxic gas layers at the bottom, and will study the many unique, endemic species of plants and animals that have evolved in lake systems. Topics in this Series: Lakes and Ponds (Quarter 1); Rivers and Streams (Quarter 2); Marshes and Estuaries (Quarter 3); and Extreme Marine (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $20.00 is due payable to the instructor on/before the first day of class.

Prerequisites: None

2
Kerry Diederich
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Elementary artists can get in on the action as they learn about a different artist or artistic style and create representative pieces using a wide range of artistic supplies such as tempura and water color paints, pastels, pencils, cray pas, oil pastel crayons, specialty papers, sculpting media, and embellishments.


In this workshop, students will learn about the abstract masters Wassily Kandinsky and Jackson Pollock and create works in their styles using drips and splatters (Pollack) and collage and layered geometric compositions (Kandinsky). There is a $15.00 supply fee due payable to the instructor on or before the start of class.

Prerequisites: None

2
Kerry Diederich
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Elementary artists can get in on the action as they learn about a different artist or artistic style each week and create a representative piece using a wide range of artistic supplies such as tempura and water color paints, pastels, pencils, cray pas, oil pastel crayons, specialty papers, sculpting media, and embellishments.


First quarter, students will meet famous artists such as Grandma Moses, Mary Cassatt, Eric Carle, Patrick Dougherty, Alex Calder, Helen Frankenthaler and River Lobe. They will develop unique projects that highlight the methods, material and media used by each artist such as painting, sculpting, drawing, and inspired creations.


Topics in this Series: Media of the Masters (Quarter 1); Animal Artists (Quarter 2); Murals, Monuments, and Museums (Quarter 3); Stellar Celestial Subjects (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $25.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

Prerequisites: None

2
Kerry Diederich

Tween artists can get in on the action as they learn about a different artist or artistic style each week and create a representative piece using a wide range of artistic supplies such as tempura and water color paints, pastels, pencils, cray pas, oil pastel crayons, specialty papers, sculpting media, and embellishments.


First quarter, tweens will unravel the mysteries of abstract art including street and graffiti art and well-known artists of the genre including Miro, Krasner, Klint, and Carver. Some of the multimedia supplies used this quarter include specialty papers, paints, markers, and art pencils.


Topics in this Series: Mysteries of Abstract Art (Quarter 1), Watercolor Explorations (Quarter 2), French vs American Artists (Quarter 3), Origin Art (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $25.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

Prerequisites: None

0
Sandy Preaux
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This is a place-holder for the Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences lecture. Students should register for the Atmospheric & Oceanic Science Lab, which will automatically enroll them in both class sections.

Prerequisites: None

2
Alchemy Ballet
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Dancers will practice skills in musicality, balance, flexibility, and coordination as they learn to dance as a group. Each quarter, a different musical fairytale ballet will provide the inspiration and the music for the class. Dancers will become familiar with the story of the ballet and the orchestral music as they go through their own routine.

First quarter, beginning dancers will learn the story of The Little Humpbacked Horse, also known as the "Tsar-Maiden"; a ballet based on the fairy tale by Pyotr Yershov and choreographed by Arthur Saint-Leon and set to music by Cesare Pugni since 1864.. In class, they work to identify, apply, demonstrate, and integrate the following techniques from the Vaganova ballet method such as: 1st-6th positions, marching and skipping, demi plie, grand plie, saute, bourree, grand jete, and tendu, along with pas de chat, pas de bourree, arabesque, arabesque saute, and soutenu. Students will develop their physical conditioning by core leg and arm strength. A demonstration of skills learned will be showcased for parents on the last class each quarter.

Ballet students are expected to wear appropriate attire. Young ladies must wear a leotard with skirt (attached or detached), pink tights, and soft pink ballet shoes in canvas or leather. Young men must wear a slim-fitting white t-shirt, black shorts, white socks, and soft black ballet shoes in canvas or leather.

Topics in this series: The Little Humpbacked Horse (Quarter 1); The Nutcracker (Quarter 2); Swan Lake (Quarter 3); and Don Quixote (Quarter 4).

Prerequisites: None

2
Taliesin Knol
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Vicksburg was the last Confederate stronghold on the Mississippi River. Its capture cut the Confederacy in two and, in combination with the other major Union victory at Gettysburg the day before, destroyed any chance of the Confederacy achieving its war goals. Unlike Gettysburg, which lasted a few days in July, the Siege of Vicksburg lasted more than two months, from May to July. The slow, grinding attritional warfare there foreshadowed the conditions of the First World War more than the US Civil War, featuring trench lines, massive amounts of heavy modern guns, mines, and naval support. The capture of Vicksburg allowed the Union to start its all-out offensives through the Confederate heartland, and ultimately bring the war to a close, as each part of the Confederacy was systematically isolated and destroyed. This was the ultimate end of the Anaconda Plan of 1861 after the disasters at Manassas and Fredericksburg meant no quick end to the fighting. Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will each form a 10" X 14" shaped, foam diorama with landscape elements (hills, valleys, rivers, ridges, vegetation, airfields, etc) to represent a scene of a famous historical engagement. Students will each receive 1:72 scale miniature soldiers to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to create larger scenes. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical background and circumstances leading up to the specific conflict. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. This is a 4-day workshop.

Prerequisites: None

2
Taliesin Knol
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The liberation of France from Nazi control began when 156,000 allied American, British and Canadian forces landed on five beaches along the heavily fortified coast of France's Normandy region. Code-named Operation Overlord, the invasion was the largest amphibious military assault in history. Between the American beaches of Omaha and Utah, was Pointe du Hoc. The battery of heavy artillery perched atop a massive cliff and aimed directly at the American beaches had to be neutralized at all costs to ensure the success of the invasion. The attackers would have to scale the 110 foot cliff under fire, fight through heavily fortified Axis defenses, destroy the guns, and then wait for relief from nearby Omaha beach. This mission could only be entrusted to the elite raiders of the US Army Rangers. This special force was trained to operate in small units, strike where the enemy did not think it possible, and operate behind enemy lines when necessary. For the Rangers, it was victory or certain death. Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will each form a 10" X 14" shaped, foam diorama with landscape elements (hills, valleys, rivers, ridges, vegetation, airfields, etc) to represent a scene of a famous historical engagement. Students will each receive 1:72 scale miniature soldiers to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate the larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Axis and Allies gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices. The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical background and circumstances leading up to the specific battle. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. This is a 4-day workshop.

Prerequisites: None

2
Becca Sticha
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Discover the world of robotics using kids' favorite, interlocking building bricks! Students will build and program 3-4 different whimsical, mechanized projects each quarter using the WeDo 2.0 robotics system by LEGO Education.

First quarter, students will build, program, and model fascinating friends from under the sea such as a whale, shark, crab, and sea turtle.

Their robots will be built using special-shaped LEGO components from the WeDo Educational set, motors, motion sensors, tilt sensors and a programmable, Bluetooth control unit ("brain"). Student will use classroom tablets to program the control units using an intuitive drag-and-drop coding modules.

Prior experience with LEGO or coding is not required. All equipment is furnished.

Topics in this Series: Under the Sea (Quarter 1), Wings and Things (Quarter 2); Perfect Pets (Quarter 3), and Reptiles Robots (Quarter 4).

Prerequisites: None

2
Rebecca Sticha
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Discover the world of robotics using kids' favorite, interlocking building bricks! Students will build and program whimsical, mechanized projects using the WeDo 2.0 robotics system by LEGO Education. In this workshop, young builders will build two droids: one that can scoop and shove soil, such as on the Martian surface, and one that can "walk" on wheels to explore a pretend planet. Their robots will be built using special-shaped LEGO components from the WeDo Educational set, motors, motion sensors, tilt sensors and a programmable, Bluetooth control unit ("brain"). Students will use classroom tablets to program the control units using intuitive drag-and-drop coding modules. Prior experience with LEGO or coding is not required. All equipment is furnished.

Prerequisites: None

2
Rebecca Sticha
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Discover the world of robotics using kids' favorite, interlocking building bricks! Students will build and program whimsical, mechanized projects using the WeDo 2.0 robotics system by LEGO Education. In this workshop, young builders will merge modern technology with medieval times as they build a moving knight and a crushing catapult (if time permits). Their robots will be built using special-shaped LEGO components from the WeDo Educational set, motors, motion sensors, tilt sensors and a programmable, Bluetooth control unit ("brain"). Students will use classroom tablets to program the control units using an intuitive drag-and-drop coding modules. Prior experience with LEGO or coding is not required. All equipment is furnished.

Prerequisites: None

2
Michele Forsythe
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Kids are naturally curious about chemistry! Chemistry explains the properties, behaviors, and interactions of materials around us: things we eat, drink, clean with, wear, drive, and even play with. Kids can use chemistry to understand how things taste, smell, mix, melt, combust, feel, and whether they are recyclable or rubbish, helpful or harmful, nutritious or not. Chemistry is key to understanding the world around us, including other areas of science. In this class, kids begin to use scientific words to describe their observations and will become familiar with some science apparatuses.

First quarter kids will learn about chemistry using everyday ingredients and techniques from the kitchen. Students will use food products to experiment with the chemical and physical properties of matter with substances that are safe, fun, and yummy to work with! For example, learn how to make gummy bears grow and shrink! Examine the pH of everyday substances in the refrigerator, fruit bowl and in the cabinet under your sink. Did you know that a natural pH indicator comes from the produce section of the grocery store aisle and yields beautiful colors for various pH levels? Discover the chemistry involved in making mayonnaise, make some in class and bring it home to eat. Figure out the chemistry behind what meat tenderizers do, using fruit and gelatin. The class will discover the chemical behaviors of yeast, baking soda, and baking powder, and more! (Note: this is not a cooking class)

A lab fee of $20.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this series include: Chemistry in the Kitchen (Quarter 1), Chemistry in Action (Quarter 2), Chemistry at Home (Quarter 3), and Chemistry of Toys (Quarter 4).

Prerequisites: None

2
Karen Shumway
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This is a place-holder for the Chemistry lecture. Students should register for the Chemistry Lab, which will automatically enroll them in both class sections.

Prerequisites: Algebra I

2
Karl Peterson
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Students will enjoy the logic and challenge of the timeless strategy board game as they learn and play chess with classmates. In Beginning Chess 1, students will learn beginner basics such as: how all pieces move and capture, castling, pawn promotion, en passant, checks and how to get out of them, checkmate and stalemate, scholars mate, fools mate, notation, and chess etiquette. Skills are taught in progressive levels of challenge as the year progresses.

Learning and playing chess supports problem solving, decision making, critical and creative thinking, general cognitive ability, scholastic skills, and mathematical achievement (Univ. of Minnesota). Experts suggest that the game of chess teaches analytical and disciplined thinking skills, while raising self esteem, teaching motivation and determination, and sportsmanship (Kasparov Foundation). Each class will be spent half on technique and half in practice matches with classmates while the instructor coaches.

Prerequisites: None

2
Danielle Mercadal
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Can your child sit in a circle for story time? Line up for lunch? Take turns talking? This one-day, 3-hour (half-day) program is a "taste" of kindergarten for 5- year-olds. Start your child's week off right with "Mornings with Miss M" at Compass Kindergarten. Children will work in a small group with an experienced early elementary educator for this dynamic, play-based program that offers regular interaction and socialization.

This fun, activity-based program will create rhythm and routine in a homeschooled kindergartner's week and give them a sense of community and a peer group. Children will practice routines and transitions as they move through the morning. Each session will include some simple structure such as a daily arrival song/greeting, circle time, story, snack time, activity, lunch, active game, and closing/goodbyes. Through games and activities, they will also practice key childhood social skills such as sharing, taking turns, and entering play with others. Academic basics such as the ABCs, days of the week, colors, shapes, and number sense will be integrated into activities involving fairy tales, nature and art. The teacher will provide ideas for parents to work on at home with their child during the week.

Compass Kindergarten is offered in three weekly sessions: Monday, Wednesday, or Friday. Registration is stand-alone for each day so parents can register for one, two, or all three. While each kindergarten class will give children the opportunities for learning and playing in a social environment along with classroom routines, each of the three days will focus on a particular area of study and discovery of how each is connected.

On Mondays, the focus will be on Language Arts where students will be exposed to folktales, seasonal stories, and classic favorites while also practicing basic reading and writing skills such as sound blends, digraphs and long vowel sounds.

Readiness Students must be age five (5) by the start of the program or have the teacher's approval for younger. To be successful in this program, entering kindergartners must be able to do the following preschool-level skills: (1) be able to separate from parents with little discomfort; (2) be able to sit and listen to a story or stay on a task for 10 minutes; (3) be able to follow simple, age-appropriate directions from the teacher or another adult; (4) be able to write and recognize his/her first name; (5) be able to hold and use crayons and scissors correctly; (6) be completely self sufficient in a public restroom (wiping, flushing, washing hands, etc.)

Other Notes:

  • Children should bring a bagged lunch and water bottle to each session.
  • There is a $50.00 material fee for class consumables due payable to the teacher on the first day of class.
  • Parents can choose to drop children off for this program (different than Compass's school-year policies for 55 minute classes.)
  • Registration for this program is by 13-week semester.
  • Parents who are shopping around or applying to alternate kindergarten programs should review the Compass withdrawal policy.

Prerequisites: See class decription for skills needed

2
Danielle Mercadal
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Can your child sit in a circle for story time? Line up for lunch? Take turns talking? This one-day, 3-hour (half-day) program is a "taste" of kindergarten for 5- year-olds. Start your child's week off right with "Mornings with Miss M" at Compass Kindergarten. Children will work in a small group with an experienced early elementary educator for this dynamic, play-based program that offers regular interaction and socialization. This fun, activity-based program will create rhythm and routine in a homeschooled kindergartner's week and give them a sense of community and a peer group. Children will practice routines and transitions as they move through the morning. Each session will include some simple structure such as a daily arrival song/greeting, circle time, story, snack time, activity, lunch, active game, and closing/goodbyes. Through games and activities, they will also practice key childhood social skills such as sharing, taking turns, and entering play with others. Academic basics such as the ABCs, days of the week, colors, shapes, and number sense will be integrated into activities involving fairy tales, nature and art. The teacher will provide ideas for parents to work on at home with their child during the week. Compass Kindergarten is offered in three weekly sessions: Monday, Wednesday, or Friday. Registration is stand-alone for each day so parents can register for one, two, or all three. While each kindergarten class will give children the opportunities for learning and playing in a social environment along with classroom routines, each of the three days will focus on a particular area of study and discovery of how each is connected. On Wednesdays, the focus will be on Math where students will be exposed to basic mathematical concepts such as adding, subtracting, skip counting, ordinal numbers, and time through stories and play. Readiness Students must be age five (5) by the start of the program or have the teacher's approval for younger. To be successful in this program, entering kindergartners must be able to do the following preschool-level skills: (1) be able to separate from parents with little discomfort; (2) be able to sit and listen to a story or stay on a task for 10 minutes; (3) be able to follow simple, age-appropriate directions from the teacher or another adult; (4) be able to write and recognize his/her first name; (5) be able to hold and use crayons and scissors correctly; (6) be completely self sufficient in a public restroom (wiping, flushing, washing hands, etc.) Other Notes:

  • Children should bring a bagged lunch and water bottle to each session.
  • There is a $50.00 material fee for class consumables due payable to the teacher on the first day of class.
  • Parents can choose to drop children off for this program (different than Compass's school-year policies for 55 minute classes.)
  • Registration for this program is by 14-week semester.
  • Parents who are shopping around or applying to alternate kindergarten programs should review the Compass withdrawal policy.

Prerequisites: See class decription for skills needed

2
Danielle Mercadal
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Can your child sit in a circle for story time? Line up for lunch? Take turns talking? This one-day, 3-hour (half-day) program is a "taste" of kindergarten for 5- year-olds. Start your child's week off right with "Mornings with Miss M" at Compass Kindergarten. Children will work in a small group with an experienced early elementary educator for this dynamic, play-based program that offers regular interaction and socialization.

This fun, activity-based program will create rhythm and routine in a homeschooled kindergartner's week and give them a sense of community and a peer group. Children will practice routines and transitions as they move through the morning. Each session will include some simple structure such as a daily arrival song/greeting, circle time, story, snack time, activity, lunch, active game, and closing/goodbyes. Through games and activities, they will also practice key childhood social skills such as sharing, taking turns, and entering play with others. Academic basics such as the ABCs, days of the week, colors, shapes, and number sense will be integrated into activities involving fairy tales, nature and art. The teacher will provide ideas for parents to work on at home with their child during the week.

Compass Kindergarten is offered in three weekly sessions: Monday, Wednesday, or Friday. Registration is stand-alone for each day so parents can register for one, two, or all three. While each kindergarten class will give children the opportunities for learning and playing in a social environment along with classroom routines, each of the three days will focus on a particular area of study and discovery of how each is connected.

On Fridays, the focus will be on science and exploration of the natural world through stories, crafts, and observations both inside and outside the classroom. Themes include seasons, weather, local animals, and the five senses.

Readiness Students must be age five (5) by the start of the program or have the teacher's approval for younger. To be successful in this program, entering kindergartners must be able to do the following preschool-level skills: (1) be able to separate from parents with little discomfort; (2) be able to sit and listen to a story or stay on a task for 10 minutes; (3) be able to follow simple, age-appropriate directions from the teacher or another adult; (4) be able to write and recognize his/her first name; (5) be able to hold and use crayons and scissors correctly; (6) be completely self sufficient in a public restroom (wiping, flushing, washing hands, etc.)

Other Notes:

  • Children should bring a bagged lunch and water bottle to each session.
  • There is a $50.00 material fee for class consumables due payable to the teacher on the first day of class.
  • Parents can choose to drop children off for this program (different than Compass's school-year policies for 55 minute classes.)
  • Registration for this program is by 14-week semester.
  • Parents who are shopping around or applying to alternate kindergarten programs should review the Compass withdrawal policy.

Prerequisites: See class decription for skills needed

2
Jessica Eastridge
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This program has two in-person meetings each Monday: a 45-minute instrument family sectional at 10:00 am and a 55-minute all-instrument group practice session from 1:00 pm- 1:55 pm. Band students must take both sectional and group together. Registration for a sectional will automatically enroll the student in the group session.

Enjoy the camaraderie and cooperation of making music with others in a school band! Join the first homeschool concert band in the region at Compass. This band is for beginner and advanced beginner musicians of brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments.

Students in beginner percussion will learn to play the snare drum and mallet instruments (such as glockenspiel and xylophone). They will learn proper stick and mallet grip, posture, and playing position for concert percussion instrumentals. Students will learn the fundamentals of music reading. The group will practice short songs in Concert B-flat and Concert E-flat major (and their relative minors) on mallet instruments and basic rudiments on snare drum. Students will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing percussion instruments and will play both cooperatively in small ensembles and independently.

Students in beginner woodwinds will learn to play the flute or clarinet (4th-8th grade) or alto saxophone (7th-8th grade only). They will learn how to hold their instruments with proper posture and hand position and correct embouchure (mouth position and blowing technique) for the instrument. Students will receive instruction on the parts of their instruments and how to safely, correctly, and independently assemble and clean them. Students will learn the fundamentals of music reading, and the group will practice short songs in Concert B-flat and Concert E-flat major (and their relative minors). Students will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing woodwind instruments and will play both cooperatively in small ensembles and independently.

Students in beginner brass will learn to play the trumpet, trombone, or euphonium (4th-8th grade) and French horn or tuba (7th-8th grade students only). They will learn how to hold their instruments with proper posture and hand position and correct embouchure (mouth position and blowing technique) for the instrument. Students will receive instruction on the parts of their instruments and how to safely, correctly, and independently assemble and clean them. Students will learn the fundamentals of music reading, and the group will practice short songs in Concert B-flat and Concert E-flat major (and their relative minors). Students will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing woodwind instruments and will play both cooperatively in small ensembles and independently.

Students will need to rent or purchase an instrument and accessories for the band. See the linked list by instrument.

There is a $33.00 supply fee due payable to Compass on/before the start of class for the "Do It! Play (a Band Instrument)" book and workbook and the sheet music songs used for the group band performance.>

Prerequisites: None

2
Mylene Nyman
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Students will enjoy making delicious recipes and family favorites that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

  • Asparagus Gruyere Puff Pastry Bundles
  • Dumpling Soup
  • Green Bean Salad
  • Sicilian Brussels Sprouts
  • Italian Sheet Pan Chicken
  • Beef-Cheddar Mac & Cheese
  • Apple Pecan Tarts (contains nuts)
Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week. Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. For the Little Kids level, students must be minimum age six (6) by the start of class and must be developmentally on-level for fine motor skills and ability to follow directions. Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on or before the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). Cooking Class Requirements:For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

Prerequisites: None

2
Mylene Nyman
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Students will enjoy making delicious recipes and family favorites that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

  • Asparagus Gruyere Puff Pastry Bundles
  • Dumpling Soup
  • Green Bean Salad
  • Sicilian Brussels Sprouts
  • Italian Sheet Pan Chicken
  • Beef-Cheddar Mac & Cheese
  • Apple Pecan Tarts (contains nuts)

Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.

Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. For the Little Kids level, students must be minimum age six (6) by the start of class and must be developmentally on-level for fine motor skills and ability to follow directions.

Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4).

Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on or before the first day of class.

What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided.

What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).

Cooking Class Requirements:For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

Prerequisites: None

2
Anne Taranto
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In Cover-to-Cover, middle school-aged students will read renowned classics and award-winning young adult literature. This book discussion group will examine a different theme each quarter to introduce students to literary analysis. Students will read, examine, and compare two full-length novels that share similar themes through facilitated discussions and extension activities which encourage students to make personal connections to what is read. The group will evaluate themes, characters, setting, and writing style.

Second quarter, students will examine the genre of fantasy novel with A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle and When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead.

Assigned chapters are expected to be read at home, either as read-aloud, individual silent reading, or listening to the unabridged audiobook. Students should come to class prepared to discuss the reading. Classroom discussions will emphasize the use of textual evidence when explaining thoughts and opinions. Students will be assigned creative, short assignments to enhance and demonstrate their understanding of each novel such as quote explications, thematic questions, or imagining a conversation between characters from different books.

Topics in this Series: Fantasy (Quarter 1); Adventure (Quarter 2); Dystopian (Quarter 3); and Mystery & Detective (Quarter 4).

Textbook/Materials: Because students will need clean, inexpensive copies of each novel to mark in, and because they must be able to refer to the passages on the same page numbers, copies of mass market paperbacks will be pre-purchased and bundled for students. (See Supply Fee below).

Supply Fee: A class fee of $17.50 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class.

What to Bring: Students should bring the current novel, paper, pen or pencil and highlighter to class each week. Some students may wish to bring paper clips, adhesive flags or post-it notes for marking pages.

Prerequisites: None

2
Judith Harmon
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Celebrate summer through the joy of relaxed crafting which unleashes a child's inner creativity and fosters innovation. Young artists will enjoy working hands-on with a variety of crafting materials and methods to create original projects. Crafting is multi-sensory, and most children enjoy the tactile, no-pressure experience of painting, sculpting, beading, sewing, cutting, assembling, weaving, and embellishing a selection of materials to create unique, personal projects. Crafting engages a different artistic skillset than coloring, drawing, and writing, and encourages imagination and artistry to create objects in three dimensions. In this camp, children will create original hand-made pieces using a range of artistic techniques and a myriad of materials. Kids will enjoy the camaraderie of working alongside a group of friends in Creative Crafters Camp, and parents will appreciate the break! Parent Notes:

  • All the supplies are provided: No need to search high and low for the needed materials.
  • Reduce waste and clutter: No need to buy large quantities of specialty supplies for a one-time project.
  • Reduce clean-up: Leave the glue, paint, and glitter mess at Compass.
  • Kids get to experiment with a variety of materials and techniques, even if you are not crafty.
  • Crafting improves dexterity and fine motor skills, and an afterschool club makes a great social outlet.
A supply fee of $30.00 is due payable to the instructor on or before the first day of class. This is a 3-day program.

Prerequisites: None

2
Judith Harmon
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Celebrate summer through the joy of relaxed crafting which unleashes a child's inner creativity and fosters innovation. Young artists will enjoy working hands-on with a variety of crafting materials and methods to create original projects. Crafting is multi-sensory, and most children enjoy the tactile, no-pressure experience of painting, sculpting, beading, sewing, cutting, assembling, weaving, and embellishing a selection of materials to create unique, personal projects. Crafting engages a different artistic skillset than coloring, drawing, and writing, and encourages imagination and artistry to create objects in three dimensions. In this camp, children will create original hand-made pieces using a range of artistic techniques and a myriad of materials. Kids will enjoy the camaraderie of working alongside a group of friends in Creative Crafters Camp, and parents will appreciate the break! Parent Notes:

  • All the supplies are provided: No need to search high and low for the needed materials.
  • Reduce waste and clutter: No need to buy large quantities of specialty supplies for a one-time project.
  • Reduce clean-up: Leave the glue, paint, and glitter mess at Compass.
  • Kids get to experiment with a variety of materials and techniques, even if you are not crafty.
  • Crafting improves dexterity and fine motor skills, and an afterschool club makes a great social outlet.
A supply fee of $30.00 is due payable to the instructor on or before the first day of class. This is a 3-day program.

Prerequisites: None

2
Tayler Shreve

Students will delve into the world of crime scene investigators (CSIs) as seen each week on Law and Order, NCIS, and the CSI television series! Students will be introduced to the field of forensic science which is the application of science, such as biology, chemistry, pharmacology, and physics, to the criminal justice system.


First semester, students will learn the scientific methodologies used in forensic investigation and how to process a crime scene. They will practice measuring, sketching, photographing, documenting, collecting, preserving, and cataloging crime scene evidence. Students will also apply observation skills, interpret evidence, and use logic and deductive reasoning to the investigative process.


Each week, students will perform in-class labs and activities to understand common, investigative forensics such as fingerprinting, including identifying fingerprint patterns, and learning how to find and lift latent fingerprints. The class will practice techniques for collecting and analyzing blood and saliva samples, blood typing, and evaluating blood spatter. The class will expand their forensic toolbox with impression evidence, such as footprints and tire tracks, and making molds thereof. They will learn how fibers, fabrics, hair, poison, drugs, pollen, insects, and other trace evidence can be used to unravel a crime. Students will also consider arson evidence, toxicology, and toolmarks in criminal investigative analysis as well as how ballistics, such as firearms evidence and bullet trajectories, are used in investigations.


The class will use case studies and forensic data from actual crimes- both solved and unsolved- to see how forensic science is used in investigating and prosecuting cases in the criminal justice system. The class will have occasional guest speakers from the criminal justice system and at least one field trip to a police crime lab.


This course is taught by a PhD candidate and professor of Criminology, Tayler Shreve. It is an introduction to criminology for teens who are interested in becoming practitioners or professionals in the vast criminal justice system or those who enjoy true crime books, blogs, or movies.


Rating/Advisory: For sensitive students, please note that in the examination of actual crimes, violence such as assault and murder will be discussed. References may be made to illicit substances and weapons used in the commission of crimes. Course content will be filtered to be age-appropriate for high school students in the instructor's judgement. For example, real crime scene photos may be shown with evidentiary details, but not victims or body parts. Students may read autopsy reports, but they will not be shown autopsy photos, and cases of rape will be referred to as sexual assault with no intimate details.


Topics in this Series: Fundamentals of Forensic Science (Semester 1) and Cold Case Files (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester will receive priority pre-registration for second semester.


Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.


Assignments:

There are assignments both in and out of the classroom. Students have the ability to submit assignments based on their learning style(s): written assignments, presentations, spoken recordings (podcast, TedTalk, etc.).

Assessments: Students will receive feedback on all assignments. There are no exams in this course, however points will be assigned for completed assignments, participation, and attendance.


Textbook/Materials: Articles and case studies will be posted by the instructor as downloadable pdfs.


Lab/Supply Fee: A lab fee of $100 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.


Non-Meeting Days: In addition to the scheduled days-off on the published Compass schedule, this class does not meet on 9/23/24.


Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in humanities or career exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

Prerequisites: None

0
Mylene Nyman
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Students with a curiosity for culinary careers will explore many aspects of cooking for the hospitality industry and for themselves. In this advanced cooking class, students will make delicious, advanced recipes and learn skills that are the foundation for a future career in culinary arts. This class will get students excited about new foods, flavors, and techniques as they gain a working knowledge of food planning and preparation.


Each quarter, new technical, kitchen skills are introduced, and each week, a new recipe is made in class that demonstrates the featured food group or cooking style.


First quarter covers chapter Chapter 8 in the Level 1 textbook and features recipes the following recipes:


  • Chicken Pineapple Stir Fry
  • Beef and Broccoli Stir Fry
  • Chicken Roman Casserole
  • Turkey and Cauliflower Tetrazzini
  • Sheet Pan Eggplant Parmesan
  • Sheet Pan Shrimp Biryani
  • Sheet Pan Baked Feta and Vegetables
  • Culinary vocabulary will also be introduced each week. Students will leave this class with an introduction to culinary careers in the hospitality industry and a beginning foundation in culinary arts. Additionally, students will be able to take charge of a home kitchen, prepare advanced dishes, and adhere to safety and hygiene standards. They will have nutrition-planning and cooking skills that will enrich the lives of their friends and families.


    Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics.


    Topics in this Series: Mixed Up! (Stir-Fries & Casseroles)- Quarter 1; Roasted! (Grilled, Baked & Broiled Dishes)- Quarter 2; Stuffed! (Filled Meats & Vegetables)- Quarter 3; Skewered! (Kabobs & Grilled Skewers)- Quarter 4. Students continuing from the prior quarter will receive priority pre-registration for next quarter.


    Prerequisites: Students must be in 9th grade (minimum age 14) to take this class. 7th-8th graders must have Instructor's permission to enroll. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group.


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.


    Assignments: Cooking assignments, practicing skills at home, and related homework will be given in class and e-mailed to students and parents. Brief written assignments may be given, such as recipe modification or development.


    Assessments: Individual feedback will be given in class. Formal assessments will not be given. At the end of the second quarter, enrolled students will be required to complete an online Virginia Food Handler Course for food safety certification through the county health department, which will cost $25.00


    https://courseforfoodsafety.com/states/VA?gclid=CjwKCAjw7LX0BRBiEiwA__gNw4AfZHgp_eOVTeiEXudxZhhF11E2UMggiIeYo6qL33xlUaDXbUeB5RoCG1cQAvD_BwE

    Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase or rent the selected textbooks and workbooks. Used copies are acceptable.


  • Foundations of Restaurant Management & Culinary Arts: Level 1, published by National Restaurant Association (ISBN# 978-0138019389)
  • Foundations of Restaurant Management & Culinary Arts: Level 2, published by National Restaurant Association (ISBN# 978-0131380226)
  • Activity Guide for Foundations of Restaurant Management and Culinary Arts Level 1, published by National Restaurant Association (ISBN# 978-0137070503)
  • Activity Guide for Foundations of Restaurant Management and Culinary Arts Level 2, published by National Restaurant Association (ISBN# 978-0131380714)
  • Required Tools/Materials: Culinary students will be expected to begin to acquire their own tools. Students should purchase and bring with them each week the following basic, minimum tools and supplies:


  • Chef's Knife Set, Professional Quality- (purchased individually or as a starter set) Recommended model (Amazon): J.A Henckels International 31425-000 Classic Starter Knife Set, 3-Piece, Black/Stainless Steel
  • Knife Guards- Recommended model (Amazon): 3- Piece Universal Knife Edge Guards Set
  • Carrying Case- Recommended model (Amazon): Tosnail Chef Knife Case Roll Bag with 15 Slots
  • Chef's Jacket- (long sleeve, white. Brought to class clean each week) Recommended model- women's (Amazon): Chef Works Women's Le Mans Chef Coat Recommended model-men's (Amazon): Chef Works Men's Bordeaux Chef Coat
  • Chef's Cap - (student's choice of color) Recommended model (Amazon): Nanxson 3pcs Chef Hat
  • Office Supplies: Ring binder, pen or pencil, note cards and loose-leaf paper
  • Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $75.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for perishable food items, ingredients, and supplies that are used in this class. For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts or Career Education for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: Prior Tween or Teen Cooking Class or Instructor Permission

    2
    Tom Shumaker
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    From stunning stadiums and ostentatious offices to soaring skyscrapers and massive malls, public projects and humble homes, not a day goes by that you do not interact with the work of architects and builders! You may think of hardhats and shovels when you envision construction, but did you know that behind the scenes, there is a vast team of professionals who design, engineer, finance, manage, staff, schedule, estimate, insure, inspect, furnish, and build these structures in a thriving $1.1 trillion industry? Design and construction of buildings represents a dynamic, fast-paced field to consider a career in.

    First semester, students will learn about the comprehensive process from concept design to completion of construction for buildings. Students will try their hand at basic drafting and will examine simple blueprints to understand the 2D representation of building elements. Teams will build structures out of simple materials to test the strength of different shapes.

    Materials matter. The class will explore and experiment with the literal building blocks that define structures. From concrete and steel to aluminum and glass, each material has its unique properties and potentialities. Students will examine how material choices impact durability, aesthetics, cost, and environmental sustainability. The class will be challenged to think about all the components that go into buildings and will complete in-class labs and activities to test and evaluate construction materials. As examples, they will mix and test a small batch of concrete and consider the effect on strength of embedding reinforcing steel. Students will complete a lumber lab to understand dimensions and strength, and they will experiment with soil types such as stone, sand, and clay to demonstrate how these conditions dictate the design of foundations. The class will look at elements of the building envelope, finishes, and MEP (mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems) to understand these fundamental building systems.

    This course is designed to inspire tomorrow's designers and builders and create an awareness and interest in the design and construction industry. Students will gain insights into the project management, collaboration, and problem-solving critical in these fields. This class will overview trends, innovations, and sustainability practices and will meet the team of stakeholders including owners, municipalities, architects, engineers, construction managers, trade contractors, and many others.

    Topics in this Series: Building Basics (Semester 1) and Foundations to Finish (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class on assignments.

    Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, download articles, upload homework, track points earned, and message instructor and classmates.

    Assessments: Will not be given.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    What to Bring: Notebook or paper, pen or pencil.

    Non-Meeting Days: This is a 10-week course that begins on September 30. There is no class meeting on 9/9/24, 9/16/24, or 9/23/24.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Career Exploration or an Elective for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
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    Calling crooked criminals who commit creepy crimes! Convening colorful characters who corroborate clues and constables who collaborate to crack the case! Connect with a kooky cast in Detective Drama. Using materials from a commercial mystery role playing game (RPG), students will be guided through the facts of a fictitious case. Student sleuths will be follow clue cards, eclectic evidence, and phony forensics to uncover a crime. Emphasis will be on critical thinking, problem solving skills, and improvisation through the portrayal of unique characters involved in the crime. Students will be encouraged to develop a strong, compelling character, an original costume, a backstory, and of course, an alibi.


    First quarter, students will search for signs of a missing museum piece. Metropolitan master investigator Tony Malkovich learns that quiet community of Cardiff is not so quaint. He is hired to help the locals, but is seems the citizens are set on stopping him. He suspects a sneaky swindler slips through town after snatching the prized painting.


    In this workshop, students will experiment with acting and improvisation and working as a team. This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, are flexible and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and enjoy working in a collaborative group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class. Because of the age of the students in this class, only capers such as burglaries or kidnappings will be portrayed instead of murders.


    Topics in this Series: Missing from the Museum (Quarter 1), The Computer Caper (Quarter 2), Pocketing the Prized Jewels (Quarter 3), and Brazen Bank Robbery (Quarter 4). There is a class supply fee of $20.00 due payable to the instructor on the first day for the class RPG materials, printing, props, and investigation folders.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Ethan Hay
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    Middle schoolers embrace technology and easily navigate digital sources like apps, webpages, and online video platforms. In Digital Studio, they will transform from users of these tools to the designer and coders of their own content. In this cutting edge class, students will be introduced to one of the world's fastest-growing programming languages: Python. It is the programming language used by Google, NASA, YouTube, and the CIA! Middle schooleres will learn how to code with Python to create apps and games.


    Digital Studio is a computer lab environment in which students work through the Black Rocket curriculum under the direction of computer science coaches. The lab environment allows students to enroll at any quarter, fosters brand new coders, and encourages those with prior coding experience. In the "Intro" level of a course (i.e., Part 1), students will work through the fundamentals of a new digital skill. In the "Continuing" level (i.e., Part 2), students who continue from "Intro" will develop new skills and will design and code an individual project. New students who enroll in Part 2, "Intro/Advanced" will begin with the introductory lessons. In order to differentiate instruction between new and continuing students, coaches work with small pull-out groups, pairs, or individuals to provide additional support as needed. The class tuition includes a student technology fee that covers the use of instructor-provided classroom laptops loaded with the required software, applications, and licenses. At the end of the class, students will receive access to Black Rocket's interactive learning platform to continue their coding journey at home.


    Topics in this Series: Intro to Python Programming (Semester 1), and Coding Virtual Reality (Semester 2),

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Taliesin Knol
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    Students will learn about the Mesozoic flora and fauna of the prehistoric world and be introduced to the ideas of plate tectonics, species variation, and the evolution of plants. This knowledge will be applied through several games in which the students will learn the characteristics of the various dinosaurs and other creatures that lived with them and how to cooperate in a group. In the role playing game "Saurian Safari", students will simulate a cooperative hunt through a Mesozoic game park using miniature figures, and in "Try-To-Survive-Asaurus," students will try to survive in the harsh and changing environment of the dinosaurs while portraying their very own dinosaur with the options of cooperating with or eating their fellow classmates. Over the course of the class, students should be able to explain the differences in the types of dinosaurs and plants found during the period, be it Cretaceous, Jurassic, or Triassic and how these differences are reflected in their very own swamp, forest, or scrub terrain type boards. Each student will create an individual diorama. Students will craft and hand-shape their scene on a 10 x 14 inch foam board using artistic, model-making techniques. They will customize their dioramas with landforms, waterways, plant life, and paint. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with miniature figures and combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to create a larger terrain. Students will then compete in a zoology-based survival strategy game. Each student will create one board and receive a set of miniatures to take home with them. Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on or before the first day of the workshop. This is a 4-day workshop.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Taliesin Knol
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    At the twilight of the Roman Republic, facing increasing political instability caused by ineffective dictators surrounded by corruption, murder, and intrigue, it seemed only one man could "save" the Republic- by destroying it completely and founding an Empire! That man was Gaius Julius Caesar. Having taken on Rome's broken political system and using it to his own advantage, Caesar and his allies made themselves the most powerful men in Rome. There was no election he could not buy and no campaign he could not win. All that stood between Caesar and ultimate power for life, was the Senate and his former ally, Pompey the Great. Ordered to return from Gaul without his army or the legal immunity, Caesar would make the choice to fight instead. "Alea iacta est!" (The Die is Cast!) This was Caesar's call as he marched his army across the Rubicon River in Italy on his way back to Rome, with the intent to return as a conqueror, thus shattering the Republic and starting yet another Roman Civil War. The war would last years, spanning the entire Mediterranean from Spain to Egypt, and would ensure that Caesar was installed as "Dictator for Life" (however long that might be.) Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will each form a 10" X 14" shaped, foam diorama with landscape elements (hills, valleys, rivers, ridges, vegetation, airfields, etc) to represent a scene of a famous historical engagement. Students will each receive 1:72 scale miniature soldiers to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to create larger scenes. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical background and circumstances leading up to the specific conflict. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. This is a 4-day workshop.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Rebecca Sticha
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    Kids are curious about electricity- the magic that powers the toys, games, and electronics they love. In this workshop, kids will experiment with aspects of electricity- conductors, batteries, and circuits- to take the mystery out of electricity and inspire future engineers. Kids will modify simple circuits to do silly things. They will discover what happens when components such as horns, fans, motors, recording chips, motion and infrared sensors are inserted into simple circuits. They will be delighted when their engineering produces silly circuits that buzz, beep, sing, and fly!

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Rebecca Sticha
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    Kids are curious about electricity- the magic that powers the toys, games, and electronics they love. In this workshop, kids will experiment with aspects of electricity- conductors, batteries, and circuits- to take the mystery out of electricity and inspire future engineers. Kids will discover basic electrical engineering using batteries and circuits with components such as resistors, capacitors, switches, LEDs, and small lamps. Students will learn about parallel and series circuits and experiment with resistance using Snap Circuits kits. Students will learn how to wire and power lights, a fan motor, and a speaker.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Anne Taranto
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    In this introductory high school English workshop, students will be introduced to the concepts of literary genres and analytical writing. Each quarter, the class will examine one select work or genre. Students will learn to recognize figurative language, tone, subtext and diction, identify symbolism and imagery, and develop an awareness of narrative perspective and of the social-historical contexts in which these works were created. First quarter will feature The Novel: Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Sallinger.

    Composition: Students will also learn the fundamental components of academic writing, including how to construct a thesis statement that makes an argument, how to support their ideas effectively with textual evidence, how to organize an argument logically, and how to cite sources in MLA format. Some class periods will be dedicated Writing Lab session in which students write in-class in order to get on-the-spot support and feedback from the teacher. Students should bring laptops to these class sessions.

    Topics in this Series: The Novel (Quarter 1), Poetry (Quarter 2), The Play (Quarter 3), and The Epic (Quarter 4). Students who continue from one quarter to the next will receive priority registration.

    Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at grade level, and it is recommended that students have had a middle school writing class.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: All assignments will be posted in a Google Classroom management site. Students will need their own gmail accounts to access Google Classroom.

    Assessments: Students' written assignments will be graded using a rubric and assigned points that the homeschool parent can use when assigning an overall class grade.

    Textbook/Materials: Because students will need clean, inexpensive copies of each novel to mark in, and they must be able to refer to the passages on the same page numbers, copies of mass market paperbacks will be pre-purchased and bundled for students. (See Supply Fee below).

    Supply Fee: A class fee of $15.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for the select novel.

    What to Bring: Students should bring the current novel, paper, pen or pencil and highlighter to class each week. Some students may wish to bring paper clips, adhesive flags or post-it notes for marking passages/pages.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a partial credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Melissa Schaaf

    Attention
    We're sorry. Either an error occurred or the event(s) you were attempting to register for may no longer be open for registration.

    Would you know what to do if you cut yourself in the kitchen? What if a friend had an anaphylactic reaction to a food or your grandparent suddenly collapsed? Whether you play outdoors, participate in sports, go to the pool, cook at home, supervise siblings, or just hang out with friends, you should know what to do when an emergency arises! First Aid and CPR are the practical life skills you hope you don't have to use, but are thankful for if you do. Earn four American Heart Association certifications in one course in preparation for working as a camp aide, babysitter, assistant coach, counselor-in-training, or part time employee. <br>

    This workshop will be taught in two half-day workshops by a certified AHA instructor. Topics include: First Aid and Choking Relief; Adult CPR, AED (automatic external defibrillators), and Child/Infant CPR. The course will use the AHA pediatric first aid curriculum which also emphasizes safety and prevention of accidents and injury, particularly in young children. Key topics include: lacerations/bleeding, broken bones, burns, allergic reactions, breathing problems, heat-related complications, cold-related injuries, bites/stings, fainting/unconsciousness, use of AEDs, chest compressions, rescue breathing, and more. Students will have hands-on practice with many skills and will have to demonstrate competency at certain steps to be "signed off" on learned skills. <br>

    At the end of the course, students will be certified in First Aid, Adult CPR, Child CPR, and Infant CPR. The certifications will be good for two years, and students will be able to print out their certifications for coaches, employers, scout leaders, or their own records from an online AHA portal. This workshop has two class meetings: Monday, June 10 and Tuesday, June 11 from 10:00 am - 1:00 pm. Students must attend both class meetings in order to earn the certifications. Students registered in the course will receive a 185 page, full color textbook from the AHA, their own face shield for rescue breathing, and have their AHA registration fees covered. <br>

    This course is recommended for students ages 14+. At a minimum, students must be 5 feet tall and weigh at least 100 pounds to be able to properly perform chest compressions.

     

    0
    Edwige Pinover
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    Bonjour! French for Fun is a play-based, language immersion class for young students. Much like learning their native language, children will be exposed to French sounds, vocabulary, and phrases through songs, games, stories, interactive and hands-on activities. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students in the first few weeks. French language instruction will be presented in a natural learning sequence beginning with themes such as colors, numbers, clothing, foods, animals, family members, days/dates, parts of the house, common objects, body parts, etc. Greetings and simple phrases will be woven into each class. Students will learn numbers, the alphabet, and specific sounds of French pronunciation. Writing, spelling, and grammar will not be emphasized in this class. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, and simple phrases while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Fluency should not be expected at this level. Students may join French for Fun during any quarter.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Edwige Pinover
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    Bonjour and get ready for a full year of beginner level high school French! This is a conversation-focused program in which students will build their vocabulary quickly and learn essential grammar skills in French. Vocabulary will include numbers, time, dates, seasons, school, free time activities/hobbies, likes/dislikes, personal descriptions, family relationships, emotions, food/restaurants, and places/locations in town. There will be a strong emphasis on competency using regular and irregular present tense verbs and common grammar concepts such as articles, pronouns, adjectives, and comparative phrases.

    Class will be conducted primarily in French and will focus on listening and speaking skills, asking and answering questions, and correct use of grammar. At home, students will be responsible for memorizing vocabulary and grammar, completing homework assignments, and watching both grammar instruction and language immersion videos.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 30-45 minutes per day, 4 days per week on homework outside of class.

    Assignments: Are sent by e-mail to parents and students. Students must have access to a computer and internet service for computer-based videos and practice tools that are assigned as homework and are essential to success in the class.

    Assessments: Quizzes, tests, and individual performance reviews will be given to all students at regular intervals to provide parents with sufficient feedback to assign a grade.

    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Bien Dit!: Student Edition Level 1 2013 (French Edition) (ISBN-13 978-0547871790)

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Foreign Language for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Iman Castaneda
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    FUNctional Fitness is a dynamic PE program for that incorporates well-rounded exercises to get tweens up and moving mid-day! No two workouts are the same, but each day's activities incorporate exercises that target 10 areas: cardio-vascular endurance, stamina, strength, flexibility, power, speed, coordination, agility, balance, and accuracy. FUNctional Fitness focuses on functional movements that are fundamental to all aspects of play and exercise- pulling, pushing, running, throwing, climbing, lifting, and jumping. Work-outs are scalable and adaptable to different individual's own level, and the emphasis is on fun, safety, and personal accomplishment rather than competition among classmates. When the weather permits, some exercises may be taken outdoors. The physical challenges of FUNctional Fitness will foster self-confidence, focus, and help instill a foundation for a lifetime of fitness.

    The color name in the class title refers to the collectable token students will earn each quarter they take the class. Collect all 8! Students may enroll in FUNctional Fitness at any time, regardless of the color name No one color is a prerequisite for any other color, and tokens can be earned in any order.

    All equipment is furnished. Students are asked to wear loose, comfortable clothing, such as running pants or sweatpants, and comfortable, supportive athletic shoes. FUNctional Fitness continues each quarter, and students may repeat the class to continue to improve fitness. No two workouts are the same!

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
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    Learn to use your sewing machine this summer! Discover the wide world of unique creations you can sew with this essential tool: clothing, costumes, alterations, decorative items, accessories, gifts, toys, and more. This workshop is designed to demystify your sewing machine and get you started. Learn to thread your machine, understand the basic functions, adjust tension, and select and practice stitches through guided sewing activities. Each participant must bring a sewing machine with power cord, foot pedal, and at least one bobbin. Participants must provide the model number of their sewing machines prior to the start of the workshop. This enables the instructor to find practice handouts specific to each machine, otherwise they will receive a generic handout.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
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    Learn to use your sewing machine this summer! Discover the wide world of unique creations you can sew with this essential tool: clothing, costumes, alterations, decorative items, accessories, gifts, toys, and more. This workshop is designed to demystify your sewing machine and get you started. Learn to thread your machine, understand the basic functions, adjust tension, and select and practice stitches through guided sewing activities. Each participant must bring a sewing machine with power cord, foot pedal, and at least one bobbin. Participants must provide the model number of their sewing machines prior to the start of the workshop. This enables the instructor to find practice handouts specific to each machine, otherwise they will receive a generic handout.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Ney Mello
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    Students will learn more advanaced techniques of playing the guitar! In this class, students will continue to learn melodies, chords, and strumming patterns for familiar songs from a variety of genres chosen by the instructor and students. Students are encouraged to bring in music they are interested in learning. Students will learn more advanced chords, beyond pure major and minor chords. Songs with more than 3 chords will be covered, and songs in 3/4 and 6/8 will be introduced. Students should plan to practice at home several times each week. Each student will need a least a beginner level acoustic guitar. New students who wish to enroll in Advanced Beginner should have approximately 24-30 hours of prior instruction in order to match the pace of the enrolled students.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
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    You've dreamed about going to Hogwarts, and now is your chance to experience a year of magical classes! In this maker class, students will create projects inspired by their core classes at Hogwarts (Charms, Defense Against the Dark Arts, Herbology, Potions, and Transfiguration) and a Hogwarts guest professor. Students learn to work with a variety of materials and learn a broad range of crafting skills such as hand-sewing, painting, papercrafting (including precision cutting, folding, and stenciling) sculpting, and wireworking to create magical pieces inspired by the World of Harry Potter.

    Welcome to the first term at Hogwarts! In addition to your core wizarding classes, special projects will be inspired by guest Professor Quirrell such as a Time Turner, a Constellation Caster, and an Embossed Dragon Box.

    This is a great class for Harry Potter fans who love the magical world, even for those who have not read all of the books or watched all of the movies. Projects and class discussions are geared to not reveal significant series spoilers. Note: A few classes may include a Harry Potter-inspired food creation or personal care product. The ingredients will be identified in advance, and students with food or ingredient allergies or dietary restrictions will need to check before handling/consuming. Substitute ingredients cannot be provided for those with food allergies or restrictions.

    Topics in this Series: Quirrell's Creations (Quarter 1); Pomfrey's Potions (Quarter 2); Flitwick's Favorites (Quarter 3); and Lockhart's Fabrications (Quarter 4)

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $35.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    What to Bring: Students should bring good scissors for cutting paper/fabric, a ruler, and a low temp, mini hot glue gun to class each week.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Jessica Eastridge
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    Teens will enjoy the camaraderie and cooperation of making music with others in an instrument ensemble! This ensemble is for beginner and advanced beginner musicians of brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments.

    Ensemble percussion students will learn to play the snare drum and mallet instruments (such as glockenspiel and xylophone). They will learn proper stick and mallet grip, posture, and playing position for concert percussion instrumentals.

    Ensemble woodwinds students will learn to play the flute, clarinet, or alto saxophone. They will learn how to hold their instruments with proper posture and hand position and correct embouchure (mouth position and blowing technique) for the instrument. Students will receive instruction on the parts of their instruments and how to safely, correctly, and independently assemble and clean them.

    Ensemble brass students will learn to play the trumpet, trombone, euphonium, French horn, or tuba. They will learn how to hold their instruments with proper posture and hand position and correct embouchure (mouth position and blowing technique) for the instrument. Students will receive instruction on the parts of their instruments and how to safely, correctly, and independently assemble and clean them.

    All students will learn the fundamentals of music reading, and the group will practice short songs in Concert B-flat and Concert E-flat major (and their relative minors). They will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing instruments cooperatively and independently.

    Students will need to rent or purchase an instrument and accessories for the band. See the linked list by instrument.

    There is a $33.00 supply fee due payable to Compass on/before the start of class for the "Do It! Play (a Band Instrument)" book and workbook and the sheet music songs used for the ensemble.>

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Angela Goodhart
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    Reflections on a rainy day, a sheepish sister smirking, a white-washed winter wonderland- all captured in dynamic digital images. Learn the art, craft, and history of photography for hobby, home, or as a possible profession.


    Students will learn about observation, perspective, and choosing their subjects. They will discuss the exposure triangle and elements of photographic composition, including lighting and exposure. The class will review different genres of photography such as portraiture, nature, sports, black and white, etc., and discuss finding their own "voice" in their photographs.


    Students will expand on photography fundamentals with an exploration of three special topics: nature photography, portraiture, and black and white photography. For each unit, teen photographers will learn techniques and camera settings that highlight the genre. First, students will have fun taking pictures of friends and family. They will learn how to capture natural expressions and record unique personalities when photographing people. They will be introduced to the lighting, posing, and composition for creating studio and lifestyle portraiture. Students will practice as both photographers and the models.


    In the spring, students will take advantage of the buds and blooms to learn to photograph natural subjects. Students will practice seeing the world around them including details, macro-observations, close-range subjects, and elements of composition. They will learn to do isolation studies using natural light to photograph objects and plants in their environment. The class will discuss and practice techniques for landscapes, seasons, weather, water, reflections, and animals in nature and captivity.


    Finally, students will learn how to make beautiful black and white images and what elements to look for to make a stunning monochromatic composition.


    Each week, class time will be split among the review of photographic examples including works by noteworthy photographers, discussion of techniques and camera settings, and hands-on, outdoor photography exercises. The instructor will also teach photo-editing with a free web-based software


    For this class, students will be required to prepare two projects: a presentation on a photographer of their choice and a special photography showcasing their favorite photographs from the semester. On the last day, there will be an art show for the parents.


    Prerequisites: None


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.


    Assignments: In addition to the two projects described, students will have weekly homework taking photographs and occasional quizzes.


    Assessments: Students will receive ongoing, informal assessments and feedback on their photographs.


    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $20.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.


    What to Bring: Students are encouraged to bring digital SLR cameras, but any digital camera that is better than a phone camera will be adequate.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Rebecca Sticha
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    Students will use LEGO to design and build simple engineering projects out of everyone's favorite building toy! Students will explore concepts and vocabulary in physics, mechanical engineering, structural engineering, aerospace engineering, and architecture while playing with their creations. In this workshop, students will explore marine and nautical engineering with projects such as an airboat, a catamaran, a ferry, and a lighthouse. Each session begins with 10-minutes of free build from tubs of LEGO components followed by a short discussion and demonstration of the day's project and concepts. Students build individually or in groups. Instructors will provide individual assistance, facilitate challenges, performance testing, competitions, and modifications to projects. Notes: (1) Students must be minimum age 5, fable to follow directions, and be able to separate from their parents for this workshop. (2) Projects are built from shared, Instructor-owned components, so students will not bring completed projects home. Parents, however, can drop in 15 minutes before the end of each session to photograph their child's construction.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Rebecca Sticha
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    Students will use LEGO to design and build simple engineering projects out of everyone's favorite building toy! Students will explore concepts and vocabulary in physics, mechanical engineering, structural engineering, aerospace engineering, and architecture while playing with their creations. In this workshop, students will look at extraordinary engineering in cities and towns with projects such as a skyscraper, house, suspension bridge, and a rail system. Each session begins with 10-minutes of free build from tubs of LEGO components followed by a short discussion and demonstration of the day's project and concepts. Students build individually or in groups. Instructors will provide individual assistance, facilitate challenges, performance testing, competitions, and modifications to projects. Notes: (1) Students must be minimum age 5, be able to follow directions, and be able to separate from their parents for this workshop. (2) Projects are built from shared, Instructor-owned components, so students will not bring completed projects home. Parents, however, can drop in 15 minutes before the end of each session to photograph their child's construction.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Kerry Diederich
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    This workshop is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art or artist, view sample works, and then will create a projects in the style of the artist using a wide variety of materials and representative colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, chalk, fabric, and watercolor paints.


    In this session, Junior Artists will explore multi-media compositions. They will create abstract alphabet art, create a summer rainstorm with paint, tissue paper, and glue, and they will experiment with painting rocks. There is a $10.00 supply fee payable to the instructor on or before the start of the program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Becca Sticha
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    Students will use LEGO to design and build simple engineering projects out of everyone's favorite building toy! In this 90 minute class, students will explore concepts and vocabulary in physics, mechanical engineering, structural engineering, aerospace engineering, and architecture while playing with their creations.

    First quarter, junior engineers will tackle Fantastic Fliers and Space Race with projects inspired by the Space Station, Shuttle, Mars Rover, Gondola Gliders, Helicopeters, and Airplanes.

    Each class begins with 10-minutes of free build from tubs of LEGO components followed by a short discussion and demonstration of the day's project and concepts. Students build individually or in groups. Instructors will provide individual assistance, facilitate challenges, performance testing, competitions, and modifications to projects.

    Notes:(1)Students must be minimum age 5 and able to separate from their parents for this class. (2) Projects are built from shared, Compass-owned components, so students will not bring completed projects home. Parents, however, can step into class 15 minutes before the end of each session to photograph their child's construction.

    Topics in this Series: Fantastic Fliers & Space Racers (Quarter 1); Articulated Aniamls (Quarter 2); Winter Wonders (Quarter 3); Construct a Carnival (Quarter 4)

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sirdley Taborga
    Add

    Los artistas principiantes pueden participar en la acción mientras aprenden sobre un artista o estilo artístico diferente cada semana y crean una pieza representativa utilizando una amplia gama de materiales artísticos como lápices de colores, pintura acrilica, crayones pastel y papeles especiales.

    En esta clase de expresión artística, los estudiantes desarrollaran los estilos de dos artistas de renombre Latinoaméricano. Por ejemplo, estudiaremos las pinturas y técnicas de Xul Solar - Argentina y Fernando Botero - Colombia. También estudiaremos las carreras artísticas de Xul y Botero incluyendo sus comienzos, estilos y sus obras mas famosas.

    De esta manera, los estudiantes aplicaran distintas técnicas y procedimientos en la pintura. Como también despertaran, impulsaran y dinamizaran la imaginación y la creatividad.

    Hay una tarifa de $15.00 por cada estudiante. Páguele esto al maestro por los materiales de arte.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Iman Castaneda
    Add

    FUNctional Fitness es un programa dinámico de educación física para
    niños que incorpora ejercicios completos para que los niños se levanten y se muevan al mediodía. No hay dos entrenamientos iguales, pero las actividades de cada día incorporan ejercicios dirigidos a 10 áreas: resistencia cardiovascular, resistencia, fuerza, flexibilidad, potencia, velocidad, coordinación, agilidad, equilibrio y precisión. FUNctional Fitness se centra en movimientos funcionales que son fundamentales para todos los aspectos del juego y el ejercicio: tirar, empujar, correr, lanzar, trepar, levantar y saltar. Los entrenamientos son escalables y adaptables al nivel de cada individuo, y el énfasis está en la diversión, la seguridad y la realización personal en lugar de la competencia entre compañeros de clase. Cuando el tiempo lo permita, se podrán realizar algunos ejercicios al aire libre. Los desafíos físicos de FUNctional Fitness fomentarán la confianza en uno mismo, la concentración y ayudarán a sentar las bases para una vida de fitness.

    El nombre del color en el título de la clase se refiere a la ficha coleccionable que los estudiantes ganarán cada trimestre que tomen la clase. ¡Colecciona los 8! Los estudiantes pueden inscribirse en FUNctional Fitness en cualquier momento, independientemente del nombre del color. Ningún color es un requisito previo para ningún otro color y las fichas se pueden ganar en cualquier orden.

    Todo el equipamiento está amueblado. Se pide a los estudiantes que usen ropa holgada y cómoda, como pantalones para correr o pantalones deportivos, y calzado deportivo cómodo y con apoyo.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Karen Shumway
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    Why do I have to get shots? What is an appendix? Why do I get a fevers? Kids have lots of questions about their own bodies and development. Kids' Clinic answers these questions and more in the context of fun, age-appropriate medical lessons and in-class activities which will introduce children to themes in science, medicine, anatomy, and biology.

    First quarter, kids will learn how to conduct a basic medical examination using the correct tools: stethoscope, blood pressure cuff, otoscope, and thermometer. The class will learn about vaccines, ear infections, colds, and food allergies. Finally, the class will begin human anatomy by learning several major organ systems of the human body- circulatory, respiratory, and musculoskeletal.

    There is a supply fee of $18.00 due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a take-home kit consisting of a medical coat, doctor name tag, class notebook, and a real stethoscope.

    Topics in this Series: Physician (Quarter 1); Nutritionist (Quarter 2), Wilderness Medic (Quarter 3), ENT/Dentist- Hearing, Taste, Smell (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mylene Nyman
    Add

    Kinder Kitchen will get 5-year-olds excited about helping in the kitchen. Kinder cooks will enjoy simple recipes that that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Menus are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Recipes may expose students to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. The young chefs' culinary adventures will include:


  • Blueberry Ricotta Crostini
  • Oatmeal Cookie Smoothie
  • Cheese Fondue Luncheon
  • Lasagna Cups
  • Sloppy Joe Sliders
  • No-Bake Chocolate Peanut Butter Cookies (contains nuts)
  • Watermelon Pie
  • You have to learn to walk before you can run! Students will spend time in each class learning important kitchen skills. Skills acquired will include peeling, chopping, safe knife handling, measuring skills, as well as kitchen clean-up chores. Recipes are selected to practice a range of new skills.


    Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. This class is not suited for students younger than Kindergarten, and participants must be age 5 by the start of classes. (3- and 4- year olds cannot be accommodated. No exceptions.) 6 year-olds who have never taken a cooking class or have delayed fine motor skills are encouraged to take Kinder Kitchen before a Little Kids cooking class. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group.


    Topics in this Series: Fun Foods (Quarter 1), Basic Bites (Quarter 2), Easy Eats (Quarter 3), Simple Sides (Quarter 4).


    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on or before the first day of class.


    What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided.


    What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).


    Cooking Class Requirements: For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    TBD
    Add

    Everyone can learn to sing! If you want to learn to sing like Belle, Ariel, Elsa, Aladdin, or even the Beast, this class is for you! Selections from this semester come from Hal Leonard's "Disney Collected Kids' Solos" with select hits from Beauty & the Beast, Cinderella, Lion King, Alice in Wonderlanf, Little Mermaid, Peter Pan, and more. In addition, one or two Christmas favorites will be introduced mid-semester.

    Singers will be expected to memorize pieces and participate in the semester performance (December 10) along with one additional rehearsal outside of regular class hours.

    The semester's repertoire will include at least one group choral number. Students will work on other music as solos, duets, or small group numbers. This introduction to vocal development and performance includes posture, breathing, intonation, and the principles of blending vocal harmonies. Basic musical notation will be introduced as well as melodic and harmonic intervals. No previous musical experience is required- just the joy of singing!

    Topics in this Series: Best of Disney (Semester 1); Kids Musical Theater (Semester 2)

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for a class songbook.

    2
    Becca Sticha
    Add

    LEGO Robotics Training Team is a semester-long "boot camp" and training ground for future FIRST LEGO League (FLL) competitors. The Training Team allows Compass students to work through a complete FLL challenge to ensure that they understand the project and enjoy the process before joining a competition team. Training Team students are sub-divided into smaller teams that compete against each other in building and coding challenges at a more relaxed pace than FLL competition teams which may require 6-10+ hours per week.



    Compass Training Team members will complete a full FLL challenge from a previous year. They will learn 21st century skills in robotics and programming while enjoying the camaraderie of working as a team to solve challenges. Kids will gain confidence and build skills in leadership and communication. The Training Team members will compete in-house against each other, but will not participate in a regional competition in 2024-25.



    FIRST LEGO League (FLL) is an accessible, guided, beginners' robotics program that encourages teamwork, discovery, innovation, and problem-solving. The FLL competition is comprised of three components: the Robot Game, an Innovation Project, and Core Values. The Robot Game is an annual theme-based challenge that encourages kids to think of technology solutions to real-world problems. Teams design and program an autonomous robot that scores points on a themed table-top playing field. Past challenges have been inspired by environment, transportation, accessibility, and exploration. FLL team members engage in brainstorming, research, design, and coding while practicing the engineering design process of building, testing, re-building, re-testing, etc. Students will work with LEGO Mindstorms EV3 robotics components and use drag-and-drop coding blocks to program their robots on laptop computers. No robotics or programming experience is necessary to join the Training Team, but it is beneficial if students have experience building with LEGO Technics components (beams, gears, and axel pins rather than bricks with studs).



    FLL members have fun with friends, encourage and support each other, and learn the art of gracious competition. In addition to the robot challenge, FLL team members compete in short, on-the-spot challenge problems in the Innovation Project phase of the competitions. FLL is also known for its philosophies of "professionalism" and "cooperation" which are expressed in the organization's Core Values of discovery, innovation, impact, inclusion, teamwork, and fun. Teams are also judged on how well they promote and exhibit these core values.


    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Christina Somerville
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    Roundtable is a seminar-style literature analysis and discussion class for high school students. Instead of a broad, general survey of literature, Roundtable students will examine a focused, "special topic" in literature through critical evaluation and rich discussion. Written works will be selected for their contribution to a specific genre and their influence on society. First semester, the class will examine the genre of dystopian literature with a critical eye on what elements are found in all dystopian fiction works. The class will examine the role of government and society in the imagined, oppressive or apocalyptic realms through a study of works such as: Maze Runner (Book 1, 2010) by James Dashner .; Brave New World (1932) by Aldous Huxley; Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949) by George Orwell; The Lottery (1948), a short story by Shirley Jackson; Farenheit 451 (Ray Bradbury); Genre-aligned short fiction will be incorporated throughout the semester. For this course, students should be engaged readers who come to class prepared to participate in intellectual discussion. Students are also expected to take part in weekly class discussions by sharing their reflections and reactions to the readings and drawing conclusions and comparisons with other works. For each novel, the instructor will provide a guide with thoughtful questions and prompts on the reading that students must come to class prepared to discuss with textual evidence. The course instructor will serve as a facilitator-moderator to lead Socratic, "roundtable" discussions in addition to other in-class activities, such as partner and small group work, to further the class's understanding of the literature. This course will focus on comprehension and analysis through discussion rather than composition. Students will be assigned creative, short assignments to enhance and demonstrate their understanding of each novel such as rewriting a scene, imagining a conversation between characters from different books, developing a prequel or sequel scene, writing a review, etc. When discussing written works, students will be expected to give textual references such as specific quotes and examples- a higher-order high school and college-level skill that will be needed in later courses which require written analysis of literature. A key skill that will be taught in this class is how to annotate texts. Students will begin by examining samples of the instructor's own annotated novels then move to annotating the first short story in class as a group. For each novel, students will be given specific details to search for and annotate such as major plot points, character traits, interesting word choice, setting details, quotations, or questions. Later, students will be prepared to annotate automatically as they read with their own questions and reactions, a skill that can also be applied to the readings in other courses. Topics in this Series: Dystopian Discourse (Semester 1) and the Time Machine Travel (Semester 2). Continuing students from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. Prerequisites: Students should be able to read and comprehend at a minimum 9th grade level for this course. Per Compass guidelines, accelerated 8th grade students may register for this course, however, in addition to the 9th+ grade reading level, they must possess the maturity to handle high school level topics and more mature discussion. Workload: Students should expect to read approximately 100 pages per week. For students who have challenges with reading, audio books may be used, but students should still be prepared to follow along and annotate in the physical novel. Assignments: Weekly assignments will be posted in the Canvas classroom management system. Students will need their own e-mail addresses to access the system, and parents may be set up as additional "observers" to their teen's Canvas account. Assessments: Points will be assigned for preparation, participation, and short assignments, and parents may use the total points earned to calculate a grade. Textbook/Materials: Because students will need clean, inexpensive copies of each novel to mark in, and because they must be able to refer to the passages on the same page numbers, a "class bundle" of mass market paperbacks will be pre-purchased for students. (See Supply Fee below). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $54.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for the class book bundle. What to Bring: Students should bring the current novel, paper, pen or pencil and highlighter to class each week. Some students may wish to bring paper clips, adhesive flags or post-it notes for marking pages. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript. For a full credit in English, families would need to "bundle" this course with additional coursework in composition.

    Prerequisites: Reading at a high school level

    2
    Taliesin Knol
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    This class will use an interactive role-playing game (RPG) to immerse students in Medieval History. Students will be assigned land and titles to create a mock feudal system in which students collaborate and compete with classmates to better understand medieval society. By chance or choice, will they amass armies, capture castles, take titles, and repel rivals, or fail and fade into the pages of history?

    First semester begins in 1066 with the last successful occupation of Britain, the Norman Conquest by William, Duke of Normandy following the Battle of Hastings. The class will examine the history of Normandy and how the conquest eliminated the existing Saxon nobility. Students will learn how the Normans were able to maintain control of the countryside with a comparatively small occupying force, using control of language, law, and lethal force. In addition, the class will study the resistance, both the real forces and the legends the resistance inspired in the English people. Students will evaluate the history of earlier resistance by the British peoples and compare how previous conquests affected their culture.

    Students will examine case studies taken from primary source documents in art and literature to learn how warfare, architecture, politics, law, and religion interplay to create the history of the world. Students will complete a semester project on the Bayeux Tapestry. They will build on this base of knowledge to continue the study of English history in future semesters.

    In this semester's RPG, all students are Normans and assigned a medieval English county and awarded the title of title of "count" or "countess." Students will develop their own coat of arms in the unit on heraldry. Each begins with similar wealth, populations, knights, and land, and waits to see how their fates unfold each week in a custom game described as a complicated, semester-long game of Risk or Medieval Axis & Allies.

    Topics in this Series: Rise of Norman Power (Semester 1), Crusades and Conquests (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: None

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class on readings.

    Assignments: Reading assignments will be assigned in class and noted in the weekly e-mail.

    Assessments: Short, open note in-class quizzes will be given, and students will have a semester project.

    What to Bring: Paper or notebook; pen or pencil; assigned articles.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in world history for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Becca Sticha
    Add

    Students will tackle a variety of puzzles, games, and riddles each week that will develop their critical thinking, logic, math reasoning, and problem-solving skills while having loads of fun in class! Hands-on activities may use cards, dice, coins, cubes, toothpicks, math board games, math card games, and of course, lots of numbers. Every activity is in essence a math problem, and students will learn tips and techniques for tackling the challenges.

    For each new puzzle, game, and riddle, students will learn concepts and strategies that they can apply to solving ANY math challenge, such as: the phases of solving a problem, what to do when you get stuck, how to make predictions, how to generalize from specific cases, and what questions to ask yourself. Example activities include the game of Thirty One, logic grids, cryptograms, and deduction games. Through these weekly activities, students will learn that math isn't just something done at a desk with pencil and paper, but is present everywhere you look, and that the ability to think mathematically can be not only useful, but also fun!

    Students can take this class each quarter as a different selection of puzzles, games, and activities will be introduced each session. Topics in this series include: Brain Games (Quarter 1), Brain Teasers (Quarter 2), Brain Blast (Quarter 3), and Brain Busters (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Rebecca Sticha
    Add

    Student sleuths will tackle a variety of puzzles, games, and riddles while learning about ciphers and code-breaking. Hands-on activities will incorporate cards, dice, coins, cubes, toothpicks, and of course, lots of numbers. Students will discover the intriguing world of cryptology- the science of secret writing which uses math and reasoning to create and decode mystery alphabets.


    For each new puzzle, game, and riddle, students will learn concepts and strategies that they can apply to solving ANY math challenge, such as the phases of solving a problem, what to do when you get stuck, how to make predictions, how to generalize from specific cases, and how to test different outcomes. The workshop will culminate in a collaboration to solve puzzles and crack codes to flee the classroom Escape Room with challenges such as coded letters, picture clues, mirror image writings, invisible ink, puzzling word searches, and cryptograms.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Rebecca Sticha
    Add

    Student sleuths will tackle a variety of puzzles, games, and riddles while learning about ciphers and code-breaking. Hands-on activities will incorporate cards, dice, coins, cubes, toothpicks, and of course, lots of numbers. Students will discover the intriguing world of cryptology- the science of secret writing which uses math and reasoning to create and decode mystery alphabets.


    For each new puzzle, game, and riddle, students will learn concepts and strategies that they can apply to solving ANY math challenge, such as the phases of solving a problem, what to do when you get stuck, how to make predictions, how to generalize from specific cases, and how to test different outcomes. The workshop will culminate in a collaboration to solve puzzles and crack codes to flee the classroom Escape Room with challenges such as coded letters, picture clues, mirror image writings, invisible ink, puzzling word searches, and cryptograms.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mylene Nyman
    Add

    Mindful Mosaics is run as a studio art class where students create unique compositions and work at their own pace under the guidance of an experienced mosaic artist. Each quarter, students are taught new design, cutting, layout, and finishing techniques and are introduced to new mosaic materials which they can incorporate into inspired, original pieces. The instructor can suggest possible themes for projects based on the featured materials, but most students work on individual projects that reflect their own interests, hobbies, or decor.

    Students who are new to mosaics will complete a quick checkerboard project (complete with wooden checkers) to teach pattern, layout, and lines before starting an individual projects. For each project, students will choose from a variety of substrates- rectangular, square, shaped, or circular backboards (typically first-year students), or special forms or 3D objects (experienced students). Each project will expand a student's understanding of color, pattern, rhythm, texture, and spacing as they complete rich, dimensioned compositions. Students will be able to incorporate other glass, ceramic, and porcelain tiles into their projects and may select feature elements such as beautiful glass gems, millefiori, sliced stone, metallic ornaments, mirrored bits, or shells, to serve as focal points in their mosaic piece. The mosaic can be monochromatic, complimentary, or contrasting colors. A broad pallet of colors is always available, and new colors are added each quarter to reflect the season.

    Students will develop a skillset for mosaic artistry over multiple quarters or years. As each student demonstrates mastery of basic skills, safety, and artistic expression, that student will be taught advanced techniques, materials, tools, composition, and color theory. A typical progression in mosaics is: (1) Whole tiles in symmetric design on a flat, rectangular substrate with emphasis on proper spacing and adhesion; (2) Tile cut with nippers in themed design and individual color choices on a flat wood substrate; (3) Sheet glass cut with pistol grip, breaking, and/or running pliers with emphasis on composition, color, and design on a flat or curved substrate; (4) Progress to 3D substrate and advanced adhesives; (5) Learn porcelain and ceramic cutting, special adhesives, and advanced design.

    Note:There is no prerequisite for this class. The number of projects completed each quarter depends on the student's work speed and attendance in class. Compass parents are welcome to register for the class to work alongside their teens, or to work on their own, while their teen is in another Compass class.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.

    Assessments: will not be given.

    Materials Fees: All material fees are due payable to the instructor on or before the first day of class by cash, check or electronic payment. Materials used vary depending on a student's experience with mosaic.

    Beginner Material Fee: $40.00 for a selection of Beginner Materials, including:

  • vitreous glass, ceramic, mini, eco recycled glass, beach glass, glitter glass, glass gems, ceramic pebble, shells, metallic crystal, subway glass
  • Adhesive: weld bond
  • Grout: bone or charcoal color
  • Cutters: wheeled tile nippers
  • Substrate: 2D/Flat 12" x 12",10" x 10", 8" X 8", 4" X 4", framed mirrors, ornament shapes
  • Advanced Material Fee: $50.00 for a selection of Advanced Materials including:

  • All Beginner Materials plus, iridized glass, cathedral sheet glass, opaque sheet glass, color fusion, millefiori, Van Gogh glass, natural stone and minerals, special effects glass, water glass, colored mirror, illumination glass, china plates, rhinestone, ball chain
  • Adhesives: weld bond, thin-set mortar, silicone
  • Grout: Custom colors (purple, rose, green, blue, earth, orange)
  • Cutters: wheeled tile nippers, porcelain hand tool, hand file, pistol grip, beetle bits cutting system
  • Substrates: All flat shapes plus, 3D forms (egg, sphere, cone, pyramid, etc.), cut out sentiments, trays, glass bottle, mini sleds, flower pot, picture frame, sun catcher.
  • Additional Fee: There may be additional fees for premium materials such as tesserae (by request and consultation with instructor), mother of pearl, 24 kt gold tiles (market rate), or specially cut substrates.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Iman Castaneda
    Add

    Mixed martial arts is a fun physical fitness workshop for tweens that blends the Brazilian self-defense martial art of Jiu-Jitsu and Muay Thai, a combat boxing-like sport from Thailand. An experienced coach, black belt, and practitioner of mixed martial arts will lead a well-rounded physical fitness program that incorporates moves and strategies from both sports to increase strength, flexibility, conditioning, endurance, coordination, and balance. Jiu-Jitsu uses grappling and ground work, while Muay Thai introduces standing strikes with fists, elbows, knees, and shins. The latter emphasizes distance and being in or out of an opponent's range with the legs and feet being used to kick and maintain distance. Mixed Martial Arts helps tweens stay active, builds self-esteem, and encourages teamwork. Students will practice techniques for resolving conflicts, dealing with bullies, projecting confidence, and developing stranger awareness in the games and exercises they complete in class. Some partner work may be co-ed. Students must be a minimum of age 10 to enroll. Students will work on mats in socks or bare feet and should come to class wearing loose, comfortable clothing, such as running pants or sweatpants and bring a refillable water bottle.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Natural Leaders
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    Natural Leaders is an outdoor education and leadership program. Each week, the group will venture into the woods surrounding Lake Fairfax for an authentic, immersive adventure featuring hiking, outdoor skills, leadership, and camaraderie. At each meeting, students take turns in different roles that are key to the group's success, safety, and fun such as: coordinator (plan out the group's schedule for the day); navigator (following the map, practice orienteering); naturalist (investigate and present a lesson about local plants, animals or ecology); skills coaches (research, practice, and demonstrate a skill to others, such as knot tying or whittling); game master (plan and teach an group game or challenge); and safety officer (present on a safety or first aid topic) They will also learn survival skills such as fire-building, edible plants, building shelters, use of knives, and safety/first aid.

    The student-led portions of the program promote group cohesion, cooperation, and friendship, while students benefit from the positive peer pressure to come prepared for their weekly roles and responsibilities. Tweens and teens will also become more confident and comfortable as leaders and outdoor adventurers as their self-reliance skills grow. Natural Leaders is supervised by an experienced Natural Leaders mentor, trained and supported in providing a positive experience and managing safety. They typically have a passion for sharing nature with kids, and may have a background in a range of skills such as wilderness first aid, survival skills, tracking, primitive skills, and experience in hiking, camping, rock climbing, water sports, etc. Natural Leaders meets weekly rain, snow, or shine, in all temperatures. Students should always dress is layers for the forecasted weather conditions. Registered students will receive more detailed instructions about what to wear, what to bring, and where to meet prior to the start of the program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sevim Kalyoncu
    Add

    Experience the excitement of summer! Watch as the forest matures each week with fulls leaves, flowers, nests, and the stream bursting with life. It is the time for harvesting wild edibles, searching for animal tracks, identifying birds, and relishing the sights and smells of wildflowers and warm summer days. Step outdoors to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Students will take short hikes and play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 6 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class. This is a 4-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sevim Kalyoncu
    Add

    Experience the excitement of summer! Watch as the forest matures each week with fulls leaves, flowers, nests, and the stream bursting with life. It is the time for harvesting wild edibles, searching for animal tracks, identifying birds, and relishing the sights and smells of wildflowers and warm summer days. Step outdoors to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Students will take short hikes and play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 6 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class. This is a 4-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
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    Percy Jackson enthusiasts will embark on a mythical crafting adventure that will transport them to Camp Half-Blood right here in Herndon (no need to travel to Long Island!) Middle school-aged half-bloods and demi-gods will learn a variety of crafting techniques and connect with other fans of Percy Jackon as they create magical projects inspired by their favorite Rick Riordan adventures. Create your own Camp Half-Blood t-shirt, Wings of Hermes for your shoes, lightening in a bottle, and more as you discuss the adventures of the Olympians and explore key themes in mythology while exercising your imagination and unleashing your creativity. A supply fee of $50.00 is due payable to the instructor on or before the first day of class. This is a 3-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Manal Hussein
    Add

    This is a place-holder for the Physics lecture. Students should register for the Physics Lab, which will automatically enroll them in both class sections. A physical meeting room will be designated for on-campus students who have classes immediately before or after this virtual session.

    Prerequisites: Algebra II

    2
    David Chelf
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    This is a complete course in high school PreCalculus which will cover fundamental concepts and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. Topics in Precalculus include functions: polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric (right angle and unit circle). In addition, the course will cover polar coordinates, parametric equations, analytic trigonometry, vectors, systems of equations/inequalities, conic sections, sequences, and series. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem solving.

    Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry in order to take this class.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-1.5 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 7-day cycle, with assignments posted on Thursdays and due the following Thursday. Students are advised to start homework once it is assigned (i.e., not wait until the night before it is due). Weekly homework assignments will be of a length that a student should be able to complete them in two or three at-home work sessions. Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of their work.

    Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.

    Assessments: Student progress will be assessed by: (1) The instructor checking that weekly homework sets are attempted and complete and (2) detailed grading of periodic take-home tests. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. See the instructor's webpage for detailed homework and test policy, including late work and re-work.

    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Precalculus: Mathematics for Calculus, 6th edition by Stewart, Redlin, and Watson (ISBN-10 0840068077, ISBN-13 978-0840068071). A scientific calculator similar to the Casio fx-115ES PLUS is required for this class.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Precalculus for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Jen Hallworth
    Add

    Preparation for Pre-Algebra is a year-long curriculum that will teach the fundamentals a student must master before embarking pre-algebra, algebra, and beyond. The class will review arithmetic skills, operations, and number theory. Key topics include fractions, rates, ratios, decimals, and percentages. Students will learn the computational operations of adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing fractions and decimals. They will learn what decimals stand for, how they relate to fractions, and how to convert between the two. They will discover how rates and ratios are also fractions. Students will learn how to work with negative numbers including strategies for completing all four common operations with negative numbers. The class will also cover exponents and orders of magnitude to make sense of really small and really big numbers and common operations.

    This class will also emphasize real world applications of the mathematical concepts through word problems so students become comfortable switching between prose (written descriptions) and mathematical representation (numbers, symbols) of real world examples such as money, mileage, weights, percentages, and scientific measures.

    Prerequisites: This course can be considered a pre-pre-algebra class that will teach the core concepts typically covered in later elementary school/early middle school after a general arithmetic curriculum and before pre-algebra. While different curriculums and student pacing will vary, this class would be appropriate for a student who has successfully covered long division, multiplication of multiple digit numbers, and an introduction to simple fractions and who has complete mastery of multiplication facts, skills often aligned with 5th grade mathematics.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class to complete practice problems, homework, and assessments.

    Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.

    Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by: checking that weekly homework sets are complete; spot-checking the full solution 1-2 select problems in class each week, and giving quarterly take-home tests. Points will also be awarded for class participation. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade.

    Textbook: Students should rent of purchase the class text: EP Math 5/6 Workbook (ISBN# 979-8643323693).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Jessica Hall
    Add

    6 weeks X 25-minute Private Music Lesson weeks for new or returning, beginner or advanced students with Jessica Hall in:


  • Piano;
  • Voice;
  • Ukuele
  • Song/Theory Books/Sheet Music: Instructor will provide an Amazon link for parent to order the recommended music book(s).


    Cancellation/Rescheduling: In the event of a change in your schedule, Compass requires 24 hours notice to reschedule the private lessons. Every effort will be made to reschedule the session at a time that is mutually agreeable to the teacher, the student/client, and Compass. In the event of a no-show or change/cancellation occurring less than 24 hours before the scheduled instruction session, pre-paid fees will be forfeited and no refund will be offered.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Jessica Hall
    Add

    7 weeks X 25-minute Private Music Lesson weeks for new or returning, beginner or advanced students with Jessica Hall in:


  • Piano;
  • Voice;
  • Ukuele
  • Song/Theory Books/Sheet Music: Instructor will provide an Amazon link for parent to order the recommended music book(s).


    Cancellation/Rescheduling: In the event of a change in your schedule, Compass requires 24 hours notice to reschedule the private lessons. Every effort will be made to reschedule the session at a time that is mutually agreeable to the teacher, the student/client, and Compass. In the event of a no-show or change/cancellation occurring less than 24 hours before the scheduled instruction session, pre-paid fees will be forfeited and no refund will be offered.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Ney Mello
    Add

    7 weeks X 25-minute Private Music Lesson weeks with Ney Mello in:

  • Acoustic or electric guitar;
  • Bass guitar;
  • Drums;
  • Songwriting
  • Song/Theory Books/Sheet Music: Instructor will make recommendations to purchase or reimburse him, depending on instrument and level. New guitar students should purchase a tablature book from Compass for $8.00.

    1-Hour Lessons: Students who wish to have a 55-minute lesson (two consecutive 1/2 hour time slots) should contact Compass to receive a discounted rate of $100 per hour (instead of 2 X $55 per hour)

    Cancellation/Rescheduling: In the event of a change in your schedule, Compass requires 24 hours notice to reschedule the private lessons. Every effort will be made to reschedule the session at a time that is mutually agreeable to the teacher, the student/client, and Compass. In the event of a no-show or change/cancellation occurring less than 24 hours before the scheduled instruction session, pre-paid fees will be forfeited and no refund will be offered.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Catherine Vanlandingham
    Add

    Reading and writing affect a student's achievement in all aspects of schoolwork, so strong language arts skills are fundamental to success in homeschooling. This weekly class is a small group of 3-6 students who read and write at a similar level. Students follow a comprehensive language arts curriculum under the guidance of an experienced reading specialist. Each Monday class meeting will include a short story with select vocabulary words, a graphic organizer, main themes, and embedded learning objectives. Students will continue to practice language arts skills at home with easy-to-implement "page a day" workbook activities assigned by the instructor and implemented by the parents. For most early elementary learners, enrollment in Reading Rally can serve as a complete, self-contained language arts curriculum where families will not need additional resources in reading, comprehension, composition, spelling, and grammar. Weekly readings are organized around thematic units. The instructor will teach students how to approach a new story as a fun reading puzzle. For example, before reading aloud in class, students will conduct a "picture walk" to overview and predict elements of the story from the illustrations, review a graphic organizer to assist in writing sentences, define vocabulary words, and preview summary questions. Then, the instructor will read the story aloud, model good reading practices, and encourage students to read. Students will only be asked to read aloud when they feel comfortable and have built trust in their group. All follow-up activities are designed around learning objectives such as decoding, comprehension, prediction, visualization, and verbalization. READINESS: As a comprehensive language arts curriculum, a student must be at a similar grade level ability in reading, comprehension, and writing. Early readers who have not learned to write, for example, or emerging readers who struggle with comprehenion, may not be a good fit for this class. In addition, students must have the hand-eye coordination and basic handwriting skills to be able to copy the instructor's many notes, examples, and definitions from the classroom white board into their own notebook. Grade level references in Reading Rally are based on scope, sequence and pacing that correlate to the Grade Level Equivalent (GLE) standards of learning. Students who are more than one year behind in GLE in language arts or who have a difference in skill level between their reading and writing may be recommended for a second, weekly class meeting on Fridays or 1-on-1 private instruction to make up ground in reading or writing skills. Additional class meetings or private instruction will be an additional cost. ATTENTION! Parents should not register for a Reading Rally class until they have had a Language Arts Skills Inventory (i.e. brief assessment) and placement determination by the reading specialist. This must be scheduled separately through Compass at a cost of $125.00. The fee is due prior to the assessment and is not refundable in the event the child is not recommended for a reading group. The instructor has experience working with reluctant and fearful readers, those who are late bloomers, neurodivergent, dyslexic, and ESOL students. However, she might recommend a more complete evaluation by another professional if she suspects other learning differences are impacting the student's langauge arts learning. Students will work from a spiral bound copy of reading textbook and workbook by Pearson. A class fee of $72.00 is due payable to Compass for the required books. Students continuing from one semester to the next will receive priority registration to remain with their reading group.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Catherine Vanlandingham
    Add

    Reading and writing affect a student's achievement in all aspects of schoolwork, so strong language arts skills are fundamental to success in homeschooling. This weekly class is a small group of 3-6 students who read and write at a similar level. Students follow a comprehensive language arts curriculum under the guidance of an experienced reading specialist. Each Monday class meeting will include a short story with select vocabulary words, a graphic organizer, main themes, and embedded learning objectives. Students will continue to practice language arts skills at home with easy-to-implement "page a day" workbook activities assigned by the instructor and implemented by the parents. For most early elementary learners, enrollment in Reading Rally can serve as a complete, self-contained language arts curriculum where families will not need additional resources in reading, comprehension, composition, spelling, and grammar. Weekly readings are organized around thematic units. The instructor will teach students how to approach a new story as a fun reading puzzle. For example, before reading aloud in class, students will conduct a "picture walk" to overview and predict elements of the story from the illustrations, review a graphic organizer to assist in writing sentences, define vocabulary words, and preview summary questions. Then, the instructor will read the story aloud, model good reading practices, and encourage students to read. Students will only be asked to read aloud when they feel comfortable and have built trust in their group. All follow-up activities are designed around learning objectives such as decoding, comprehension, prediction, visualization, and verbalization. READINESS: As a comprehensive language arts curriculum, a student must be at a similar grade level ability in reading, comprehension, and writing. Early readers who have not learned to write, for example, or emerging readers who struggle with comprehenion, may not be a good fit for this class. In addition, students must have the hand-eye coordination and basic handwriting skills to be able to copy the instructor's many notes, examples, and definitions from the classroom white board into their own notebook. Grade level references in Reading Rally are based on scope, sequence and pacing that correlate to the Grade Level Equivalent (GLE) standards of learning. Students who are more than one year behind in GLE in language arts or who have a difference in skill level between their reading and writing may be recommended for a second, weekly class meeting on Fridays or 1-on-1 private instruction to make up ground in reading or writing skills. Additional class meetings or private instruction will be an additional cost. ATTENTION! Parents should not register for a Reading Rally class until they have had a Language Arts Skills Inventory (i.e. brief assessment) and placement determination by the reading specialist. This must be scheduled separately through Compass at a cost of $125.00. The fee is due prior to the assessment and is not refundable in the event the child is not recommended for a reading group. The instructor has experience working with reluctant and fearful readers, those who are late bloomers, neurodivergent, dyslexic, and ESOL students. However, she might recommend a more complete evaluation by another professional if she suspects other learning differences are impacting the student's langauge arts learning. Students will work from a spiral bound copy of reading textbook and workbook by Pearson. A class fee of $XX.00 is due payable to Compass for the required books. Students continuing from one semester to the next will receive priority registration to remain with their reading group.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Catherine Vanlandingham
    Add

    Reading and writing affect a student's achievement in all aspects of schoolwork, so strong language arts skills are fundamental to success in homeschooling. This weekly class is a small group of 3-6 students who read and write at a similar level. Students follow a comprehensive language arts curriculum under the guidance of an experienced reading specialist. Each Monday class meeting will include a short story with select vocabulary words, a graphic organizer, main themes, and embedded learning objectives. Students will continue to practice language arts skills at home with easy-to-implement "page a day" workbook activities assigned by the instructor and implemented by the parents. For most early elementary learners, enrollment in Reading Rally can serve as a complete, self-contained language arts curriculum where families will not need additional resources in reading, comprehension, composition, spelling, and grammar.

    Weekly readings are organized around thematic units. The instructor will teach students how to approach a new story as a fun reading puzzle. For example, before reading aloud in class, students will conduct a "picture walk" to overview and predict elements of the story from the illustrations, review a graphic organizer to assist in writing sentences, define vocabulary words, and preview summary questions. Then, the instructor will read the story aloud, model good reading practices, and encourage students to read. Students will only be asked to read aloud when they feel comfortable and have built trust in their group. All follow-up activities are designed around learning objectives such as decoding, comprehension, prediction, visualization, and verbalization.

    READINESS: As a comprehensive language arts curriculum, a student must be at a similar grade level ability in reading, comprehension, and writing. Early readers who have not learned to write, for example, or emerging readers who struggle with comprehension, may not be a good fit for this class. In addition, students must have the hand-eye coordination and basic handwriting skills to be able to copy the instructor's many notes, examples, and definitions from the classroom white board into their own notebook.

    Grade level references in Reading Rally are based on scope, sequence and pacing that correlate to the Grade Level Equivalent (GLE) standards of learning. Students who are more than one year behind in GLE in language arts or who have a difference in skill level between their reading and writing may be recommended for a second, weekly class meeting on Fridays or 1-on-1 private instruction to make up ground in reading or writing skills. Additional class meetings or private instruction will be an additional cost.

    ATTENTION! Parents should not register for a Reading Rally class until they have had a Language Arts Skills Inventory (i.e. brief assessment) and placement determination by the reading specialist. This must be scheduled separately through Compass at a cost of $125.00. The fee is due prior to the assessment and is not refundable in the event the child is not recommended for a reading group. The instructor has experience working with reluctant and fearful readers, those who are late bloomers, neurodivergent, dyslexic, and ESOL students. However, she might recommend a more complete evaluation by another professional if she suspects other learning differences are impacting the student's langauge arts learning.

    Students will work from a spiral bound copy of reading textbook and workbook by Pearson. A class fee of $XX.00 is due payable to Compass for the required books.

    Students continuing from one semester to the next will receive priority registration to remain with their reading group.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Danielle Mercadal

    Reading Rangers is a supplemental reading class for beginning readers. The class is whole language inspired with phonics and decoding games, partner reading, and vocabulary lists for home. The group will explore habits of curious readers through the examination of renowned children's picture story books from authors such as Leo Lionni, Robert McCloskey, Eric Carle, AA Milne, Michael Bond, Janell Cannon, Mem Fox, Hans Christian Andersen, Aesop, the Brothers Grimm, and others. Other books will also be selected based on the interests and level of the enrolled children. The class will discuss characters, setting, sequence of events, and predict outcomes. Children may repeat this class each quarter as new books will be introduced each session, and stories will not be repeated.

    Note:: This class is designed for students to enjoy a fun, new dimension of reading with peers and a teacher, but this will not take the place of a comprehensive language arts curriculum and daily reading practice.

    Reading/Skills Readiness; Students should be able to read Level 1 books such as Frog & Toad and Little Bear. (In other words, students in this group should have processed beyond Bob-type books.) Students should be able to read the following sight words: all, am, are, at, ate, be, black, brown, but, came, day, did, do, eat, four, get, go, good, have, he, in, into, is, like, must, new, no, now, on, our, out, please, pretty, ran, ride, saw, say, she, so, soon, that, the, there, they, this, to, too, under, want, was, well, went, what, white, who, will, with, yes.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Danielle Mercadal
    Add

    Reading Ready is a supplemental reading class for 5- and 6- year-old kindergartners. The class is whole language inspired with phonics games, partner reading, and self-created spelling lists for home. The group will explore habits of good readers through in-class read-alouds and extension activities inspired by the best examples of well-loved children's literature from authors such as Leo Lionni, Robert McCloskey, Eric Carle, AA Milne, Michael Bond, Janell Cannon, Mem Fox, Hans Christian Andersen, Aesop, the Brothers Grimm, and others. Other books may also be selected based on the interests and level of the enrolled children. Children may repeat this class each quarter as new books will be introduced each session, and stories will not be repeated.


    Note:: This class is designed for students to enjoy a fun, new dimension of reading with peers and a teacher, but this will not take the place of a comprehensive language arts curriculum and daily reading practice.


    Reading/Skills Readiness; Enrolling students must be able to (1) write and recognize his/her first name; (2) recognize each letter and corresponding sound of the alphabet; (3) familiar with simple blends; (4) know a few beginner sight words (such as I, am, and no); and (5) hold and use crayons and scissors correctly.


    Social Readiness; Students must be age five (5) by the start of the class. To be successful in this program, kindergartners must be able to do the following preschool-level skills: (1) be able to separate from parents with little discomfort; (2) be able to sit and listen to a story or stay on a task for 10 minutes; (3) be able to follow simple, age-appropriate directions from the teacher or another adult; (4) be completely self-sufficient in a public restroom (wiping, flushing, washing hands, etc.)

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Monika Dorosheff
    Add

    Learn to play the violin! Students will learn the fundamentals of playing the violin using the Suzuki method. They will begin by learning how to hold the instrument, how to correctly grasp the bow, parts of the instrument, and the names of the open strings. Students will be taught sequential techniques by adding one finger at a time to each string until they can play a complete scale. The class will be taught to play in unison from sheet music. At the end of the semester, the class will be able to play several simple tunes and will demonstrate for the parents.


    Music education enhances teamwork and cooperative learning and provides children with a path for self-expression. Scientific research has shown that music lessons not only improve organizational skills and executive functioning but that they also develop self-confidence.


    Class Expectations: Students will be asked to bring their violin, bow, and case to every class. In order to fully benefit from the in-class instruction, daily, at-home practice is expected. A student violin can be purchased or rented from most music stores and should be set up professionally by a local music store or a string luthier. The cost of the class sheet music is included. This is a 13-week semester class, and the week off will be announced by the instructor.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Taliesin Knol
    Add

    Perhaps you have heard that "knowing is half the battle." This class will realize that as we examine the roles of military intelligence and espionage in conflicts. A fundamental goal of military intelligence is to fight smarter, not harder, on the battlefield. For context and inspiration, the class will examine the history of the real spies of WWI, their methods, failures, and successes.

    This semester will start at the outbreak of the First World War and the grueling trench warfare that saw a years-long stalemate in Europe. Both sides sought every advantage they could get to break the stalemate, setting their spies to the task! Espionage was employed to hide one side's battle plans and steal the enemy's. Sabotage was staged to cripple the enemy's ability to fight before a battle had even started. All around the world, agents sought advantages for their country and exploited weaknesses in their opponents.

    The continuing mission, should students choose to accept it, is to use secret codes and a modified tabletop RPG (role playing game) system to simulate missions, discover the enemy's secret plans, and give an edge to the forces on the battlefield.

    While Compass's 3D History classes will simulate the battles in the field, this class will assume the supporting role by attempting to infiltrate enemy lines with field agents. War Room students in the "headquarters" will direct both their field agents and the missions of the frontline troops in 3D History. The decisions of War Room students on Monday will affect the play of 3D History students on Friday, and outcomes of the 3D History role play on Friday will dictate the work of the War Room the following Monday. While co-registration in both classes is not required, some students may want to dual register in order to see both the tactical and strategic aspects of a major engagement and how military intelligence affects the outcomes. This course is recommended for teens who have a passion for military history or an interest in a future career in intelligence.

    Topics in this Series: World at War (Semester 1) and Winning the War (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hour per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Course documents including period maps, photographs and recreations will be made available through a class Google Drive link emailed to parents and students, as well as a class YouTube playlist for any videos watched in class or assigned as homework.

    Assessments: Will not be given.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in World History, US History, Military History, or Career Exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Iman Castaneda
    Add

    This Women's Self Defense Workshop is for older teen girls and young adult women who are heading to college for the first time, returning to campus, working, driving, or traveling alone. First and foremost, this workshop will teach young women about situational awareness and making safe choices: critical life lessons that they would rather hear from a professional than a parent. Students will work in pairs and small groups to act out mock scenarios, rehearse strategies to get away from an attacker, and practice defensive moves and strikes. The National Center for Education Statistics reports a decline in the overall college crime rates from 2009-2019 due to falling burglary rates, but a steady increase in forcible sex offenses during the same time. If you are not sure self defense is needed or pertinent to your daughter, see the following very concerning campus assault statistics: https://students.umw.edu/counseling/sexual-assault-information/statistics/ This workshop is taught by Iman Casteneda, Compass's homeschool PE and Jiu Jitsu Fit instructor. She earned a black belt in Jiu Jitsu under Royce Gracie, a particularly grueling program that took her more than 10 years to prepare for. She is also personal trainer, Cross-Fit instructor, Muy Thai practitioner, former MMA (mixed martial arts) competitor, former EMT, and survivor of assault. Note: Minimum age: 16. This workshop is also appropriate for young women who have had previous instruction in self defense as a refresher for strategies and techniques. This is a 3-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
    Add

    Students will become immersed in the imaginary worlds they construct in this unique course that encompasses elements of fiction writing, sociology, and anthropology. Worldbuilding is the foundation of speculative fiction, such as sci-fi and fantasy, role-playing games, videos, comics, and other visual media. Countless examples of Worldbuilding exist in the movies and books we consume every day such as Tolkien's Middle Earth, the many elaborate settlements of the Star Wars franchise, and the popular RPG, Dungeons and Dragons.

    In this course, students will develop a fictional locale. Will it be a small village in a known place, a new planet, or an original universe? Students will be guided through an interactive, iterative process of "top-down" design of their unique world, determining broad characteristics first then then elaborating with increasing detail. Builders will make coherent and integrated decisions on geography, climate, ecology, flora, fauna, inhabitants, races, history, social customs, language, religion, origin story, powers/magic, legal system, currency, and technology. The class will read excerpts and watch clips of well-known fictional works which will provide strong examples of each of the elements.

    First semester, the class will create fantasy-inspired worlds. Students, along with their instructor, will develop an in-class world as an example. Students will use the lessons and exercises reviewed in class to further develop their individual world project.

    Students will be expected to keep a notebook of decisions and details as they progress through designing the elements of their world. Students will have the option to purchase a discounted student subscription to World Anvil, a web-based subscription service which allows students to create maps, timelines, and other tools to organize their made-up world. Each student will be expected to make a PowerPoint presentation at the end of the semester which addresses each of the built-world elements.

    Topics in this Series: Fantasy (Semester 1), Science Fiction (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: Reading/writing at grade level.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 2 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Will be posted in a Google Classroom.

    Assessments: The instructor will assign points for a final semester presentation and completed "Creative Sparks" which are written responses to weekly prompts. Parents may use the student's earned points versus total possible points to calculate a grade for the class.

    Textbook/Materials: Students have the option of purchasing a discounted subscription to World Anvil (worldanvil.com) for approximately $35.00.

    Lab/Supply Fee: Included

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in language arts (creative writing) for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Christina Somerville

    Write to the Point is a comprehensive writing class that will prepare 7th, 8th, and 9th grade students for high school level composition. The class will practice the fundamentals of composition through weekly writing assignments that encompass a variety of writing formats.


    First Semester, students will learn to "get to the point." Just as newspaper journalists have limited column spaceand some essayists have word limits, students will learn to make their point and provide supporting details within the criteria of their writing assignment. Students will learn techniques to define their topic, identify their audience, determine their purpose, and back it up with appropriate detail. The class will practice effective paragraph structure with openings statements, main point (or thesis), supporting details, closing sentences, and linking multiple paragraphs. The class will review writing basics such as grammar, agreement, and tense, and will learn tips for effective revision, editing, and feedback. Students will have the flexibility to select prompts and topics relevant to their own interests and will practice a variety of shorter writing styles such as paragraphs and articles.


    Part of each in-class session will be dedicated to sharing and review of writing completed at home. Sometimes, students will be paired with classmates for peer review of grammar; other times, the class will collaborate through shared GoogleDocs for review and feedback of others' writing. Students should bring a laptop and charging cord to class each week for accessing in-progress assignments.


    Topics in this series include: Paragraphs & Articles (Semester 1) and Essays & Short Stories (Semester 2).

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    YMCA Swimming Staff
    Add

    Homeschool Swim Lessons are taught at the Reston YMCA located 0.9 miles/ 3 minute drive from Compass's classroom facility. For more information on swimming lessons, see the program webpage.


    During the first lesson, students will be observed and determined to be Beginner or Advanced Beginner level, and the class will be divided accordingly among two instructors. Beginners level is for students with little to no swim experience and will cover YMCA Level 1 skills such as water acclimation, floatation, water movement, putting face in the water, swimming 5 feet without a floatation device, and becoming comfortable on back in water. Advanced Beginners level will review all skills in beginner-level class and add YMCA Level 2 skills such as stamina, swimming one length of the pool (25 yards), performing elementary backstroke, rotary breathing, becoming comfortable in deep water, and stroke introduction to include: front crawl, backstroke, and elementary breaststroke.


    Please note that these skills will be introduced and progress at different rates depending on the comfortable level and experience of enrolled students and may take more than one quarter to complete. At times, students might be moved to a different swimming group (same day, same time, different instructor) to better match the experience level of enrolled children.


    Lessons are 40 minutes long, running from 0:05 until 0:45 after the hour, leaving enough time to towel dry, change clothes, and return to Compass for your next class. Students should bring a swimsuit, towel, and change of clothes. Googles and swim caps are optional.


    A parent (or parent proxy) is required to remain on site. Parents may wait on poolside benches or lobby seating. YMCA waivers must be signed and returned for each swimmer. All registration is completed through Compass. All YMCA swimming classes are taught by certified, experienced, background-checked adult instructors with experience teaching children.


    Consider enrolling your child in both Tuesday and Thursday classes to improve their rate of learning.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    YMCA Swimming Staff
    Add

    Homeschool Swim Lessons are taught at the Reston YMCA located 0.9 miles/ 3 minute drive from Compass's classroom facility. For more information on swimming lessons, see the program webpage.


    During the first lesson, students will be observed and determined to be Beginner or Advanced Beginner level, and the class will be divided accordingly among two instructors. Beginners level is for students with little to no swim experience and will cover YMCA Level 1 skills such as water acclimation, floatation, water movement, putting face in the water, swimming 5 feet without a floatation device, and becoming comfortable on back in water. Advanced Beginners level will review all skills in beginner-level class and add YMCA Level 2 skills such as stamina, swimming one length of the pool (25 yards), performing elementary backstroke, rotary breathing, becoming comfortable in deep water, and stroke introduction to include: front crawl, backstroke, and elementary breaststroke.


    Please note that these skills will be introduced and progress at different rates depending on the comfortable level and experience of enrolled students and may take more than one quarter to complete. At times, students might be moved to a different swimming group (same day, same time, different instructor) to better match the experience level of enrolled children.


    Lessons are 40 minutes long, running from 0:05 until 0:45 after the hour, leaving enough time to towel dry, change clothes, and return to Compass for your next class. Students should bring a swimsuit, towel, and change of clothes. Googles and swim caps are optional.


    A parent (or parent proxy) is required to remain on site. Parents may wait on poolside benches or lobby seating. YMCA waivers must be signed and returned for each swimmer. All registration is completed through Compass. All YMCA swimming classes are taught by certified, experienced, background-checked adult instructors with experience teaching children.


    Consider enrolling your child in both Tuesday and Thursday classes to improve their rate of learning.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Ryan Hughes
    Add

    What are the effects of strength training versus endurance training on performance? What is the difference between aerobic and anaerobic exercise? How do you prevent- or recover from- sports related injuries?

    Questions like these can be answered by a kinesiologist! Kinesiology is the study of human movement which includes aspects of anatomy, physiology, pathology, psychology, sociology, and biomechanics. Kinesiologists look at the effects of exercise to help prevent injury or speed recovery, improve movement and function throughout life, and enhance the quality of life for their patients, clients, or athletes.

    The study of kinesiology can prepare a student for a career in preventive and rehabilitative exercise and wellness programs, such as physical therapy, occupational therapy, athletic training, or sports medicine. Some use kinesiology as the foundation for careers as physicians, nurses, first responders, nutritionists, chiropractors, osteopaths, orthopedists, personal trainers, coaches, and athletic trainers.

    First semester is an introduction to the field of kinesiology including a survey of human anatomy and overview of careers and credentialing in the field. Students will learn about the metrics used to measure progress for fitness, strength, or the rehabilitation of injury. They will learn how to check vital signs and perform the basics of a physical exam for an athlete. Students will perform in-class activities and labs such as a bone lab, strength tests, muscular endurance tests, rehabilitation lab, and practice the emergency care for injuries. Students will make at least one visit to the nearby YCMA gym to practice common exercises, including how to instruct others to do them.

    Note: This course is not a PE class, a health course, or a lab science, but contains elements of each as a career exploration course taught by an adjunct professor of kinesiology and certified athletic trainer.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Jessica Hall
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    6 weeks X 25-minute Private Music Lesson weeks for new or returning, beginner or advanced students with Jessica Hall in:


  • Piano;
  • Voice;
  • Ukuele
  • Song/Theory Books/Sheet Music: Instructor will provide an Amazon link for parent to order the recommended music book(s).


    Cancellation/Rescheduling: In the event of a change in your schedule, Compass requires 24 hours notice to reschedule the private lessons. Every effort will be made to reschedule the session at a time that is mutually agreeable to the teacher, the student/client, and Compass. In the event of a no-show or change/cancellation occurring less than 24 hours before the scheduled instruction session, pre-paid fees will be forfeited and no refund will be offered.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Jessica Hall
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    7 weeks X 25-minute Private Music Lesson weeks for new or returning, beginner or advanced students with Jessica Hall in:


  • Piano;
  • Voice;
  • Ukuele
  • Song/Theory Books/Sheet Music: Instructor will provide an Amazon link for parent to order the recommended music book(s).


    Cancellation/Rescheduling: In the event of a change in your schedule, Compass requires 24 hours notice to reschedule the private lessons. Every effort will be made to reschedule the session at a time that is mutually agreeable to the teacher, the student/client, and Compass. In the event of a no-show or change/cancellation occurring less than 24 hours before the scheduled instruction session, pre-paid fees will be forfeited and no refund will be offered.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Ney Mello
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    7 weeks X 25-minute Private Music Lesson weeks with Ney Mello in:


  • Acoustic or electric guitar;
  • Bass guitar;
  • Drums;
  • Songwriting
  • Song/Theory Books/Sheet Music: Instructor will make recommendations to purchase or reimburse him, depending on instrument and level. New guitar students should purchase a tablature book from Compass for $8.00.


    1-Hour Lessons: Students who wish to have a 55-minute lesson (two consecutive 1/2 hour time slots) should contact Compass to receive a discounted rate of $100 per hour (instead of 2 X $55 per hour)

    Cancellation/Rescheduling: In the event of a change in your schedule, Compass requires 24 hours notice to reschedule the private lessons. Every effort will be made to reschedule the session at a time that is mutually agreeable to the teacher, the student/client, and Compass. In the event of a no-show or change/cancellation occurring less than 24 hours before the scheduled instruction session, pre-paid fees will be forfeited and no refund will be offered.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Jessica Eastridge
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    This program has two in-person meetings each Monday: a 45-minute instrument family sectional at 10:50 am and a 55-minute all-instrument group practice session from 1:00 pm- 1:55 pm. Band students must take both sectional and group together. Registration for a sectional will automatically enroll the student in the group session.

    Enjoy the camaraderie and cooperation of making music with others in a school band! Join the first homeschool concert band in the region at Compass. This band is for beginner and advanced beginner musicians of brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments.

    Students in beginner percussion will learn to play the snare drum and mallet instruments (such as glockenspiel and xylophone). They will learn proper stick and mallet grip, posture, and playing position for concert percussion instrumentals. Students will learn the fundamentals of music reading. The group will practice short songs in Concert B-flat and Concert E-flat major (and their relative minors) on mallet instruments and basic rudiments on snare drum. Students will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing percussion instruments and will play both cooperatively in small ensembles and independently.

    Students in beginner woodwinds will learn to play the flute or clarinet (4th-8th grade) or alto saxophone (7th-8th grade only). They will learn how to hold their instruments with proper posture and hand position and correct embouchure (mouth position and blowing technique) for the instrument. Students will receive instruction on the parts of their instruments and how to safely, correctly, and independently assemble and clean them. Students will learn the fundamentals of music reading, and the group will practice short songs in Concert B-flat and Concert E-flat major (and their relative minors). Students will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing woodwind instruments and will play both cooperatively in small ensembles and independently.

    Students in beginner brass will learn to play the trumpet, trombone, or euphonium (4th-8th grade) and French horn or tuba (7th-8th grade students only). They will learn how to hold their instruments with proper posture and hand position and correct embouchure (mouth position and blowing technique) for the instrument. Students will receive instruction on the parts of their instruments and how to safely, correctly, and independently assemble and clean them. Students will learn the fundamentals of music reading, and the group will practice short songs in Concert B-flat and Concert E-flat major (and their relative minors). Students will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing woodwind instruments and will play both cooperatively in small ensembles and independently.

    Students will need to rent or purchase an instrument and accessories for the band. See the linked list by instrument.

    There is a $33.00 supply fee due payable to Compass on/before the start of class for the "Do It! Play (a Band Instrument)" book and workbook and the sheet music songs used for the group band performance.>

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    JR Bontrager
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    Students will learn to think like inventors and designers when creating 3D! 3D design is used not only for modeling and fabricating objects but is also at the heart of many cutting-edge technologies such as AR and VR, video game design, interactive exhibits, and more. 3D printing is used in nearly all industries and design fields today from art to animation, manufacturing to medicine, and engineering to entertainment. In this class, students will first learn to use Tinkercard, a 3D modeling software that works in solid forms (like LEGO bricks). Then, students will transition to MeshMixer, a software that creates smooth, curved, organic shapes (like clay). They will learn to think about their design from all angles and how to subtract forms to create holes, voids, and concave features, and add forms to create projections, contours, appendages, and convex details. They will discover the limitations of 3D printing and how to handle overhanging elements or delicate details. Students will practice the artistic design process with simple sketches before diving into the software. They will be encouraged to use reference material, whether photos, a model, or even by modifying existing, public domain 3D files. Students will use an iterative printing process in which they print their project, check it for design intent, functionality, or fit, make modifications, and print again. The class will learn how to save and convert between 3D solid object files (.stl) and object files (.obj) and work with metadata fields to protect the intellectual property of their designs. To demonstrate the range and capability of 3D-printed designs, favorite student projects include D & D miniatures, cosplay props, Minecraft-designed creations, and beloved characters such as anime, baby Yoda, and Pokemon creatures. Second semester, continuing students will progress to more complex assemblies including multiple parts and parts with hinges. Second semester, some students may wish to work with alternative filaments such as TPU (rubber), metal, or magnetized filament. Because of the studio format, new students can enroll second semester. The class instructor is a design engineer with 3D Herndon and expert in 3D technologies and other areas of design and invention. A typical class will be structured with 5-10 minutes of lecture or demonstration of a new design skill, followed by 40 minutes of design "studio" time where students can receive trouble-shooting support and design tips from the instructor and have dedicated work time, and 5-10 minutes of sharing time at the end of class. As a studio class, students will work on individual projects at their own pace. Topics in this Series: As an open studio for individual projects, students may continue from one semester to the next or enroll mid-year. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. Prerequisites: None What to Bring:Students will need to bring a laptop to class for design work. Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1+ hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Project criteria will be explained in class to students. Assessments: Informal, qualitative feedback will be given in class throughout the semester as the student works. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $25.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for 3D printing and filament. This provides the student with 800 g of printed product per semester. Students who are prolific designers and print often will be asked to pay an additional $5.00 per 100 g or fraction thereof. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Visual Arts, Technology, or Career Exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Jeff Virchow
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    Snappy comebacks, one-liners, sarcasm, exaggeration, irony...and teenagers. These things just go together! Improv gives kids an outlet for fun, creative stories and spontaneous humor. Teens who find amusement in the unexpected and humor in the unpredictable will enjoy improvisational acting!

    First semester, actors will explore the basics of improvisation, story-telling, and stagecraft through activities and exercises that encourage cooperation, communication, and teamwork. With fun, interactive improv games such as "Yes, and.." and "Improved Stories," students will learn how to use short form improv to play off each other to convey character, emotion, situation, setting, and to highlight their scene partners. The variety of improv activities each week will help develop the "group mind" and class dynamic. Small group and partner work will boost teens' confidence and trust in a supportive environment.

    Improvisation is the art of entertaining with connected, unpredictable twists and turns often seen from the great comedians and best live entertainers. Improv students will improve their ability to think on-their-feet, play off each other, and react with spontaneous wit, sarcasm, and irony. Actors' creative thinking and communication skills will be strengthened as they work "outside-of-the-box" and learn to read their audience.

    Improv can be for everyone! No previous experience is needed. Beginners are welcome, and experienced students will further develop their improv skills. If you have taken this class before, go ahead and take it again because no two classes are ever alike. This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, flexible, and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work collaboratively in a group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class.

    Topics in this Series: Innovative Improv (Semester 1), Immersive Improv (Semester 2. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hour per week outside of class.

    Assignments: If any, will be sent to parents and students by e-mail.

    Assessments: Informal, qualitative feedback will be given in class throughout the semester. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    David Chelf
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    This is a complete course in high school Algebra I which will cover fundamental concepts in algebra and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. This course is designed to emphasize the study of algebraic problem-solving with the incorporation of real-world applications. Topics in Algebra I include number systems, linear systems, rational numbers, complex numbers, exponents, roots, radicals, quadratic equations, polynomials, factoring, absolute values, ratios, and proportions. In addition, the course will cover solving and graphing systems of functions, linear equations, and inequalities. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem-solving.

    Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation in pre-algebra topics in order to take this class. In addition, students should be capable of copying the sample problems and solutions worked in class on the white board to his/her own notes as examples for completing homework.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-1.5 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 7-day cycle, with assignments posted on Thursdays and due the following Thursday. Students are advised to start homework once it is assigned (i.e., not wait until the night before it is due). Weekly homework assignments will be of a length that a student should be able to complete them in two or three at-home work sessions. Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of their work.

    Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.

    Assessments: Student progress will be assessed by: (1) The instructor checking that weekly homework sets are attempted and complete and (2) detailed grading of periodic take-home tests. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. See the instructor's webpage for detailed homework and test policy, including late work and re-work.

    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Algebra I: Expressions, Equations, and Applications by Paul A. Foerster. It is available in a few different editions, each of which is virtually identical: 2nd edition (ISBN-10 020125073X, ISBN-13 978-0201250732), 3rd edition (ISBN-10 0201860945, ISBN-13 978-0201860948), and Classic edition (ISBN-10 020132458X, ISBN-13 978-0201324587). It is also available under the title Foerster Algebra I, Classics edition (ISBN-10 0131657089, ISBN-13 978-0131657083). A calculator is not needed for this course.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Algebra I for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Fatimah Aziz
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    Are you interested in learning a new language that is used right here in America? Are you intrigued by a modern language that has no written form? Do you want to find out why American Sign Language is much more closely linked to French Sign Language than British Sign Language? If so, American Sign Language (ASL) is a great language for you! In this class, students will learn the basic skills in production and comprehension of ASL while covering thematic units such as personal and family life, school, social life, and community. Each unit will include presentations and readings on Deaf culture and Deaf history. Students will learn fingerspelling and numbers, developing conversational ability, culturally appropriate behaviors, and fundamental ASL grammar. Class time will be dedicated to interactive ASL activities and face-to-face signing practice with the instructor and partners. ASL students will have a Deaf instructor. She regularly teaches all-hearing classes and is an excellent role model for students to meet and interact with a native speaker of ASL and to lean natural facial expressions, gestures, and body language used in Deaf communications. ASL students will have more confidence when they encounter Deaf instructors in college or greet speakers of ASL in social settings. Because the instructor is Deaf, students are not permitted to speak aloud in class. This approach improves visual attention and encourages immersion in the language. Students will be able to ask questions of the instructor by writing on individual white boards, but they will be encouraged to sign in order to communicate with the instructor. Lessons are facilitated with Power Point presentations, and a professional ASL interpreter will assist the class on the first day of class. Enrolled students are not expected to know any sign language prior to beginning ASL I. Hundreds of colleges and universities, including all public institutions of higher learning in Virginia, accept ASL as a distinct foreign language. This allows hearing and Deaf students to fulfill foreign language requirements for admission to college. Teens who have difficulty writing, spelling, or have challenging pronunciation in English, can be successful with ASL as a second or foreign language choice. Penn State University research demonstrated that the visual and kinesthetic elements of ASL helped to enhance the vocabulary, spelling, and reading skills in hearing students. Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours each week outside of class on required vocabulary exercises, readings, and signing practice. Assignments: Homework assignments will be posted online in the Canvas digital classroom platform. There may be some brief written assignments, but for most homework assignments, students will be asked to post short videos of themselves signing. Students will need either a camera phone or webcam to complete these assignments. Assessments: The instructor will assign points using a class rubric for the parent's use in assigning a course grade. Course rubrics will evaluate students on their sign production, fingerspelling, ASL grammar, facial expressions including "above the nose" grammar (brows and body movement), and "below the nose" modifiers (lip expressions). Textbook/Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $50.00 payable to Compass for the digital access code for the interactive e-textbook, TRUE+WAY ASL. With their subscription, students may also accces a free searchable, bilingual ASL & English dictionary, called What's the Sign? Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in World Languages for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Taliesin Knol
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    This class will explore the judicial processes of Europe following the collapse of Rome. From witch trials and Viking blood feuds, then back again to the real barbarians- lawyers! Like a traditional mock trial program, the class will hear cases, and students will defend themselves. Real historical cases will be studied, and trial parts assigned to the class, which will be debated from the perspective of Royal Courts, Church Ordeals, or a Viking assembly they creatively called "a Thing." The class will serve as the jury and, if necessary, select period-appropriate verdicts and explain how they arrived at their decisions, while striving for period accuracy. Second semester will move to codified Renaissance legal systems, leading up to the direct Ancestor to American legal traditions, Common Law.

    Topics in this Series: Crime & Punishment in Medieval Times (Semester 1), Crime & Punishment in the Early Modern Era (Semester 2).

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Period maps, photographs, and re-creations will be posted on a class Google Drive, and video links from YouTube will be e-mailed to parents and students for homework or supplemental investigation.

    Assessments: A mid-term and final exam may be given.

    Textbooks: None. Case documents are provided in class.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History or Civics for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Pete Van Riper
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    Earn college credit and artistic "cred"-ibility in this studio art class! Over the course of the school year, student artists will experiment with artistic techniques, create original works in a variety of mediums and styles, and build a portfolio for submission. Students will be guided by a Compass art instructor, Pete Van Riper, who is also an adjunct art professor at Northern Virginia Community College and a reviewer for AP art portfolios.

    The three goals of AP 2D Art and Design are to (1) investigate a variety of artistic materials, methods, and ideas; (2) produce 2-dimensional art and designs; and (3) be able to describe and present art and design to others. AP Art and Design students "develop and apply skills of inquiry and investigation, practice, experimentation, revision, communication, and reflection."

    Student artists will create a portfolio with works that feature the elements of art and principles of design such as "point, line, shape, plane, layer, form, space, texture, color, value, opacity, transparency, time; unity, variety, rhythm, movement, proportion, scale, balance, emphasis, contrast, repetition, figure/ground relationship, connection, juxtaposition, hierarchy." Students will be asked to document their medium choices and keep a sketch book and art journal describing their inspiration and artistic process.

    In class, works will be done in charcoal, pencil, conte crayon, watercolor crayons, watercolor paints, acrylic paint, and collage. Like other college level classes, outside work will be expected, and art completed outside of the weekly class meetings can include graphic design, digital imaging, photography, collage, fabric design, weaving, fashion design, fashion illustration, painting, and printmaking, and other 2D formats. Students should consider how to express their ideas with selected materials and processes on a flat surface.

    The College Board has no preferred or unacceptable content or style, but all work must be entirely the student's original creation. Submissions may incorporate pre-existing photographs or others' images provided proper attribution and citations are given and the use reflects an extension of the student's vision and not just duplication or copy work. AI generated designs are strictly prohibited from portfolio submissions, but original, digitally created art is welcome.

    Students' portfolio submissions for the AP program must include two sections (1) "Sustained Investigation" which includes 15 images of the purposeful evolution of a work or works through concept sketches, practice, experimentation, and revisions, and (2) "Selected Works" which includes images of 5 completed pieces. All portfolio works will be submitted as digital images (scans or photographs) of the student's original pieces, and all images must be accompanied by a written discussion of the materials and processes used.

    Earn college credit and artistic "cred"-ibility in this studio art class! Over the course of the school year, student artists will experiment with artistic techniques, create original works in a variety of mediums and styles, and build a portfolio for submission. Students will be guided by a Compass art instructor, Pete Van Riper, who is also an adjunct art professor at Northern Virginia Community College and a reviewer for AP art portfolios.

    The three goals of AP 2D Art and Design are to (1) investigate a variety of artistic materials, methods, and ideas; (2) produce 2-dimensional art and designs; and (3) be able to describe and present art and design to others. AP Art and Design students "develop and apply skills of inquiry and investigation, practice, experimentation, revision, communication, and reflection."

    Student artists will create a portfolio with works that feature the elements of art and principles of design such as "point, line, shape, plane, layer, form, space, texture, color, value, opacity, transparency, time; unity, variety, rhythm, movement, proportion, scale, balance, emphasis, contrast, repetition, figure/ground relationship, connection, juxtaposition, hierarchy." Students will be asked to document their medium choices and keep a sketch book and art journal describing their inspiration and artistic process.

    In class, works will be done in charcoal, pencil, conte crayon, watercolor crayons, watercolor paints, acrylic paint, and collage. Like other college level classes, outside work will be expected, and art completed outside of the weekly class meetings can include graphic design, digital imaging, photography, collage, fabric design, weaving, fashion design, fashion illustration, painting, and printmaking, and other 2D formats. Students should consider how to express their ideas with selected materials and processes on a flat surface.

    The College Board has no preferred or unacceptable content or style, but all work must be entirely the student's original creation. Submissions may incorporate pre-existing photographs or others' images provided proper attribution and citations are given and the use reflects an extension of the student's vision and not just duplication or copy work. AI generated designs are strictly prohibited from portfolio submissions, but original, digitally created art is welcome.

    Students' portfolio submissions for the AP program must include two sections (1) "Sustained Investigation" which includes 15 images of the purposeful evolution of a work or works through concept sketches, practice, experimentation, and revisions, and (2) "Selected Works" which includes images of 5 completed pieces. All portfolio works will be submitted as digital images (scans or photographs) of the student's original pieces, and all images must be accompanied by a written discussion of the materials and processes used.

    The class will examine images of others' art, and students will be asked to visit at least two art museums or art exhibits. They will practice giving and receiving construction formal and informal critiques through the observation, analysis, discussion, and evaluation of their own work and that of other artists to hone the AP-required skill of communication about 2D art.

    Levels This course is only offered at the AP level, but enrollment does not obligate a student to submit a portfolio for AP review.

    Workload: Student artists should plan 2-4 hours per week outside of class on their pieces, concept drawings, practice sketches, etc.

    Assignments: All assignments will be communicated to students via email.

    Assessments: Qualitative feedback will be given weekly in class. The principal assessment in this course is the AP score earned.

    Textbooks: The instructor will furnish art and design books for students to browse in class and borrow.

    Supply Fee: A supply fee of $60.00 is due payable to the instructor for shared, in-class basics consisting of: pencils, charcoal, conte a Paris, acrylic paints, brushes, sketch journal, and canvas boards. The instructor will furnish a list of recommended supplies for alternative or premium materials that students may want to incorporate use such as watercolor or colored markers.

    About AP: "AP" is a trademark of the College Board, which owns and designs the course outline and "audits" (i.e. approves) high school instructors who employ their expertise and creativity to deliver the college freshman-level content. The College Board's summary of the AP 2D Art & Design program can be read HERE, and the instructor AP Course Audit Approval form can be viewed HERE.

    AP Fees: The fee for the College Board's AP 2D Art & Design portfolio in May 2025 is not included. Each family is responsible for scheduling and paying for their student's AP registration.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Kerry Diederich
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    Elementary artists can get in on the action as they learn about a different artist or artistic style each week and create a representative piece using a wide range of artistic supplies such as tempura and water color paints, pastels, pencils, cray pas, oil pastel crayons, specialty papers, sculpting media, and embellishments.


    First quarter, students will meet famous artists such as Grandma Moses, Mary Cassatt, Eric Carle, Patrick Dougherty, Alex Calder, Helen Frankenthaler and River Lobe. They will develop unique projects that highlight the methods, material and media used by each artist such as painting, sculpting, drawing, and inspired creations.


    Topics in this Series: Media of the Masters (Quarter 1); Animal Artists (Quarter 2); Murals, Monuments, and Museums (Quarter 3); Stellar Celestial Subjects (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $25.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Alchemy Ballet
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    Young dancers will practice skills in musicality, balance, flexibility, and coordination as they learn to dance as a group. Each quarter, a different musical fairytale ballet will provide the inspiration and the music for the class. Dancers will become familiar with the story of the ballet and the orchestral music as they go through their own routine. The music, story, and characters will serve as an inspiration for creative movement. First quarter, young (beginning) dancers will learn the story of The Little Humpbacked Horse, also known as the "Tsar-Maiden"; a ballet based on the fairy tale by Pyotr Yershov and choreographed by Arthur Saint-Leon and set to music by Cesare Pugni since 1864.In class, dancers will learn to recognize, understand, and apply techniques from the Vaganova ballet method such as: 1st - 6th positions, marching and skipping, demi plie, grand plie, saute, bourree, grand jete, and tendu. Students will also develop their physical conditioning and learn teamwork. A demonstration of skills learned will be showcased for parents on the last class each quarter. Ballet students are expected to wear appropriate attire. Young ladies must wear a leotard with skirt (attached or detached), pink tights, and soft pink ballet shoes in canvas or leather. Young men must wear a slim-fitting white t-shirt, black shorts, white socks, and soft black ballet shoes in canvas or leather. Topics in this series: The Little Humpbacked Horse (Quarter 1); The Nutcracker (Quarter 2); Swan Lake (Quarter 3); and Don Quixote (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Ney Mello
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    If you like to "Turn Up the Music" (Chris Brown, 2012), "Play That Funky Music" (Wild Cherry, 1976), or "Dance to The Music" (Sly and The Family Stone, 1967), then you know that there is an impressive variety of American music. America is the birthplace of some of the most influential genres of music and musicians in the world. Much of the world's modern music has roots in American blues, jazz, or rock, while American music has elements from West Africa, the West Indies, and diverse communities such as New Orleans, Detroit, Memphis, St. Louis, Nashville, Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and the Bronx. American music has influenced behavior and culture such as dance, entertainment, fashion, technology, popular opinion, lexicon, marketing, and more.


    This is a focused class in music appreciation for students who enjoy listening to or playing music. The class will evaluate a century of American music by listening to and discussing influential performers, writers, and producers. Students will learn to identify music elements unique to each genre- melody, rhythm, harmony- and will develop a musical vocabulary to help them think and talk about musical works. They will also explore innovations in instruments and technologies that evolved with the music, such as drums being placed in a "set" at the advent of jazz music, the rise of electric instruments, and electronic production/mixing.


    First semester will explore music from the 1920s to the 1960s encompassing the genres of blues, ragtime, jazz, boogie-woogie, swing, soul, rhythm and blues, rock-and-roll, Motown, pop, funk, disco. Featured artists will include Louis Armstrong, Miles Davis, Marvin Gaye, Chuck Berry, Elvis, James Brown, Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell, Simon and Garfunkel, Fleetwood Mack, Robert Johnson, Scott Joplin, John McLaughlin, and many others. Find out why the Rolling Stones and the Beatles claim they were influenced by Little Richard, and why the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame described Jimi Hendrix as "arguably the greatest instrumentalist in the history of rock music."


    Like other fine arts classes, music appreciation is a fun break from academics which enriches and engages students in a topic they enjoy. Genres that will not be highlighted in this course include gospel, folk, country, western, tejano, reggae, zydeco, or salsa.


    Topics in this Series: 19202-1960s (Semester 1), 1970s-2020s (Semester 2), etc. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Karl Peterson
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    Students will enjoy the logic and challenge of the timeless strategy board game as they learn and play chess with classmates. In Advanced Beginner Chess 1, students will learn skills and strategies that build upon each other such as: including a review of castling, pawn promotion, and en passant rules, notation, basic mates, drawing a game and draw rules, battery and back-rank checkmates, development of bishops and rooks in the middlegame, and overextended pieces.

    Learning and playing chess supports problem solving, decision making, critical and creative thinking, general cognitive ability, scholastic skills, and mathematical achievement (Univ. of Minnesota). Experts suggest that the game of chess teaches analytical and disciplined thinking skills, while raising self esteem, teaching motivation and determination, and sportsmanship (Kasparov Foundation). Each class will be spent half on technique and half in practice matches with classmates while the instructor coaches. Students should have 15-20 hours of chess instruction prior to enrolling in Advanced Beginner Chess, or a working knowledge of most skills taught in the Compass Beginner Chess level.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    TBD
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    In the style of "High School Musical" or a glee club, Compass Chorale is for tween singers who want to have fun taking their vocal performance to the next level. This semester-long program will focus on choral arrangements of contemporary pieces with 2- and 3- part harmonies. Singers will be expected to memorize pieces and participate in the semester performance (December 10) along with one additional rehearsal outside of regular class hours.

    This program includes instruction on vocal development and performance such as posture, breathing, intonation, and the principles of blending vocal harmonies. Basic musical notation will be introduced as well as melodic and harmonic intervals.

    Compass Chorale is for students who took Learn to Sing class(es) at Compass, those who have other musical theater experience. First time new singers and younger students who have choral experience must receive instructor approval to enroll. Students are encouraged to enroll early because the number, ages, experience, and vocal parts of the students will determine which songs selected. There is a $45.00 fee for a music notebook due payable to Compass on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: Approval of Instructor or Brief Audition

    2
    Mylene Nyman
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    Students will enjoy making delicious recipes and family favorites that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

    • Asparagus Gruyere Puff Pastry Bundles
    • Dumpling Soup
    • Green Bean Salad
    • Sicilian Brussels Sprouts
    • Italian Sheet Pan Chicken
    • Beef-Cheddar Mac & Cheese
    • Apple Pecan Tarts (contains nuts)
    Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week. Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on or before the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). Cooking Class Requirements:For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mylene Nyman
    Add

    Students will enjoy making delicious recipes and family favorites that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

    • Asparagus Gruyere Puff Pastry Bundles
    • Dumpling Soup
    • Green Bean Salad
    • Sicilian Brussels Sprouts
    • Italian Sheet Pan Chicken
    • Beef-Cheddar Mac & Cheese
    • Apple Pecan Tarts (contains nuts)
    Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week. Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. For the Little Kids level, students must be minimum age six (6) by the start of class and must be developmentally on-level for fine motor skills and ability to follow directions. Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on or before the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). Cooking Class Requirements:For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sheila Anwari
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    Don't write poetry? Think you can't draw? Maybe not, but you may still want a creative way to record your thoughts, feelings, dreams, and ideas! Journaling is an ongoing process of discovery and exploration that allows one to be conscious of and connect with his/her own thoughts, emotions and ideas. It is a form of expression that supports both academic and personal growth.


    Creative journaling is not writing daily "Dear Diary" style entries on dated pages. Instead, students will explore various journaling methods, blending self-expression and self-discovery to guide them in learning new ways to problem-solve, achieve goals, and process emotions. Students will work with several writing techniques and a range of art media to develop a personal journal throughout the quarter and will have the opportunity to expand on it in subsequent quarters. Techniques such as freeform writing, black-out poetry, stream-of-consciousness writing, and creative list making will be explored, in addition to experimenting with a wide variety of layered techniques and mixed media with collage, photography, cardstock, book pages, art markers, stencils, tempera sticks, acrylic, paints, washi tape, and stickers. Weekly prompts will cover a range of topics such as gratitude, compassion, ambitions, choices, fear, self-care, and self-esteem as they relate to the students' personal lives and current events. Conversation around the prompts will complement the students' work in their individual journals.


    Topics in this Series: Journal work is done in an open studio environment that allows students to join in any quarter throughout the year.


    Prerequisites: No formal writing or art experience is needed. All teens are welcome.


    Workload: Work outside of class is encouraged but optional.


    Assessments: Not provided.


    Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $35.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Fee covers art journal for student to use in class and shared class supplies (paints, inks, brushes, markers, collage materials, glue, washi tape, etc.)


    What to Wear: Students may wish to have an apron or old shirt to wear when working with paints.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English, Fine Arts, or general Elective for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
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    Children are full of stories and bubbling over with big ideas! In this class, students will learn how to capture their creative vision into a simple story that they will write and illustrate. This quarter, our storytellers will tell the tale of a great race. They will describe who was in the chase, what was their pace, and why the great haste.

    Students will learn how to build a Story Arc through guided, weekly activities. They will discover the key elements to composing a story such as crafting characters, posing a problem, advancing the action, constructing the climax, and writing the resolution- through brainstorming questions like, "Who is in your story?", "Where does this take place?", "What does that look like?" and "What happened after ____?"

    Students should be able to read, write, and spell at the second grade level or higher for this class. Psst- don't tell your child, but this class helps lay the foundation in language arts for more advanced creative writing and composition. Pair this class with Acting: Kids Theater or Writing Wonders to further encourage communication and storytelling skills. The supply fee is included in the class tuition.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Ethan Hay
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    In Digital Workshop, kids will become immersed in the digital universe of Minecraft! Students will learn how to create a custom map, design structures to share between worlds, build with Redstone and Command blocks, and create custom textures for you to import at home or share with friends. Minecraft projects created in this class will run on PC/laptop (i.e. Java) versions of Minecraft and will not be compatible with tablet, phone, or console versions of Minecraft.

    Digital Workshop is a computer lab environment in which students work through the Black Rocket curriculum under the direction of computer science coaches. The lab environment allows students to enroll at any quarter, fosters brand new coders, and encourages those with prior coding experience. In the "Intro" level of a course (i.e., Part 1), students will work through the fundamentals of a new digital skill. In the "Continuing" level (i.e., Part 2), students who continue from "Intro" will develop new skills and will design and code an individual project. New students who enroll in Part 2, "Intro/Advanced" will begin with the introductory lessons. In order to differentiate instruction between new and continuing students, coaches work with small pull-out groups, pairs, or individuals to provide additional support as needed. The class tuition includes a student technology fee that covers the use of instructor-provided classroom laptops loaded with the required software, applications, and licenses. At the end of the class, students will receive access to Black Rocket's interactive learning platform to continue their coding journey at home.

    Topics in this Series: Minecraft Designers (Quarters 1, 2) and Python Programmers (Quarters 3,4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
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    Imagine an elegant mansion dinner party disrupted by discovery of a dead body and numerous possible weapons: a candlestick, a lead pipe, a rope, and a wrench. Picture a saavy socialite, a courageous colonel, a wealthy widow, a plucky professor, a femme fatale, and others...all who have a motive in the murder. How would you tell this story on stage?

    Have you ever wondered what happens behind the scenes to bring a production to stage? It takes a team of people to put on a show: stage managers, specialized designers for costumes, sets, props, lighting, music, and sound. There are also choreographers, fight directors, a dramaturge, a technical director, casting director, publicist, producer, and stage director to guide them all.

    This class will explore the different roles of the production team, designers, and crew responsibilities as students analyze a script and make decisions as if they were the Director. Under the guidance of a theater professional, students will learn how the pre-production and design teams develop the director's vision to bring a production to life!

    Students will begin by reading and analyzing a script without stage directions or notes. The group will make technical and artistic decisions to formulate a vision for the production. Students will learn to notate stage directions (such as 'stumble in from downstage right') and how to block scenes. They will make aesthetic decisions on set design and props, costuming, and technical effects such as lighting, sound effects, or music. The class will consider casting requirements and discuss the audition process. Example class projects include sketching costume concepts, creating a miniature set, and preparing audition notices.

    This class is recommended for beginners as well as experienced theatre and production students. Every script is different and offers new sets of challenges. The emphasis in this course is on the vision, design decisions, and the teamwork required to bring a performance to stage, but the class will not be putting on an actual production. Students who want to further their study of theatrical production might wish to co-register for Compass courses in sewing, cosplay accessories, or one of several acting/improvisation classes.

    Topics in this Series: Clue! (Semester 1), Harry Potter and the Cursed Child (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: None

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Will be reviewed in class and posted in a Google classroom.

    Assessments: Qualitative feedback will be given throughout the semester. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided.

    Textbook/Materials: Furnished by instructor.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $25.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a copy of the licensed script and project materials. What to Bring: Script and notes.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts or Career Exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Osk Huneycutt

    Become a world-traveling eco adventurer and earth scientist without leaving Compass! Study the world's most exciting and diverse ecosystems and learn about the incredible biologic and geologic phenomena that shape them. Venture into caves and coasts, tundra and taiga, and forests and fjords. Each week, student scientists will begin by locating the fascinating features on a map before learning about these incredible habitats from the ground-up, starting with the geology of a place, then working their way through the climate, biome, flora, and fauna. Hands-on labs and in-class activities will reinforce regional and ecological diversity by examining rock types, classifying plants, observing insects, or modeling weather phenomena. First quarter, students will journey through the tundra, prairies, temperate rain forests, deciduous forests, and deserts of North and South America. The class will learn how global climate patterns form these different ecosystems, and learn about the amazing diversity of plants and animals that inhabit them. Students will investigate the rainshadow effect, and see why it forms deserts on the leeward side of coastal mountain ranges around the world. Then we will jump from the tip of Chile across the roaring 40s to explore one of our planet's most extreme ecosystems- Antarctica! Topics in this Series: The Americas and Antarctica (Quarter 1); Northern Latitudes (Quarter 2); Africa & Asia (Quarter 3); and All About Islands (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $20.00 is due payable to the instructor on/before the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Anne Taranto
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    This full-credit high school English class will focus on developing critical reading and writing skills through the study of a range of canonical and post-colonial genres and texts written in English. Through exposure to a variety of voices across time periods and geographical regions, students will investigate major themes, such as the importance of language as a locus of power, the continuity of human nature, and the role of the imagination.

    Fall semester will focus on canonical British texts such as the epic poem Beowulf, selections from Canterbury Tales (Chaucer), Shakespeare's Macbeth, and a selection of Romantic poetry.

    Writing Lab: An essential component of this course will be an in-class Writing Lab. Students will write two or three critical response papers and a full-scale literary analysis essay each term. Students will continue to hone the components of academic writing, including how to construct a thesis statement that makes an argument, how to support their ideas effectively with textual evidence, how to organize an argument logically, and how to cite sources in MLA format. Students should bring a laptop to class one day per week for in-class writing.

    Topics in this Series: British Literature, Part I (Semester 1) and British Literature, Part II (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. This is a 13.5 week course that will not meet on 11/7/23.

    Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at grade level and have completed Introduction to Genre or equivalent high school level writing class. Students are expected to take an active role in discussion and complete all writing assignments.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: All assignments will be posted in a Google Classroom management site. Students will need their own gmail accounts to access Google Classroom.

    Assessments: Students' written assignments will be graded using a rubric and assigned points that the homeschool parent can use when assigning an overall class grade.

    Textbook/Materials: Because students will need clean, inexpensive copies of each novel to mark in, and they must be able to refer to the passages on the same page numbers, copies of mass market paperbacks will be pre-purchased and bundled for students. (See Supply Fee below).

    Supply Fee: A class fee of $34.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for the class pack of books and handouts.

    What to Bring: Students should bring the current literature, paper, pen or pencil and highlighter to class each week. Some students may wish to bring paper clips, adhesive flags or post-it notes for marking passages/pages.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a half-credit (one semester) or full credit (both semesters) in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: Introduction to Genres or equivalent

    2
    Edwige Pinover
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    Bonjour and welcome to the second year of high school French. This is a conversation-focused program in which students will build their vocabulary quickly and learn essential grammar skills in French. Students will cover the broad themes and vocabular for: my family and my friends, celebrations, shopping, high school, a typical day, and the good old days. The class will begin with a review of adjective-noun agreement, negations, and regular -er, ir-, and -re verbs. They will review and continue to expand their list of irregular verbs such as avoir (to have) and etre (to be). Students will be introduced to the passe compose and Imparfait (imperfect) tenses, and they will learn how to use negations, direct and indirect pronouns, and reflexive verbs with present, past, and imperfect tenses. They will practice comparative and superlative statements, and will continue to have brief cultural lessons integrated in their units.

    Class will be conducted primarily in French and will focus on listening and speaking skills, asking and answering questions, and correct use of grammar. At home, students will be responsible for memorizing vocabulary and grammar, completing homework assignments, and watching both grammar instruction and language immersion videos.

    Prerequisite: French I

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 30-45 minutes per day, 4 days per week on homework outside of class.

    Assignments: Are sent by e-mail to parents and students. Students must have access to a computer and internet service for computer-based videos and practice tools that are assigned as homework and are essential to success in the class.

    Assessments: Quizzes, tests, and individual performance reviews will be given to all students at regular intervals to provide parents with sufficient feedback to assign a grade.

    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Bien Dit! Level II: Student Edition Level 1 2018 edition (ISBN-13 978-0544861343)

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Foreign Language for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: French I or equivalent

    2
    Edwige Pinover
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    Salut! French with Friends is an introductory French class for elementary-aged students. The class will be taught in a predominantly immersion environment. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students or explain difficult concepts. French language instruction will be presented in a natural learning sequence beginning with nouns (such as colors, numbers, clothing, foods, animals, family members, days/dates, etc), adjectives, beginning verbs, greetings, and simple phrases. Songs, games, stories, and hands-on activities will be used in class to review vocabulary and phrases. Emphasis will be on conversation, but students will be encouraged to learn to spell and sound out written French. Aspects of Francophone culture such as holidays, foods, and traditions will be incorporated in the classes.

    Each quarter introduces new themes and new vocabulary in French, so continuing students can continue to build their language basics. However, themes and units are non-sequential, so students may enroll in this level in any quarter. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, and simple phrases while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Fluency should not be expected at this level.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mylene Nyman
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    Compass cooks will enjoy a culinary tour of the world with Global Gourmet classes! Menus feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients seasoned and prepared to represent regional flavors and traditional dishes from the featured country. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. The Compass chefs' gastronomy adventures will include:

  • Maple Sriracha 'Devils on Horseback' (Dates with Blue Cheese and Bacon appetizer)
  • Irish Stew
  • Pea and Bean Salad
  • Irish Pan Haggerty
  • Welsh Anglesey Eggs
  • Bangers and Mash (tweens/teens levels)
  • Beans on Toast (kids/little kids levels)
  • Scottish Dundee Cake
  • Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.

    Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics.

    Topics in this Series: Best of the British Isles (Quarter 1), Savory Scandinavian (Quarter 2), Tasty Thai (Quarter 3), Great Greek (Quarter 4).

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on or before the first day of class.

    What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided.

    What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).

    Cooking Class Requirements: For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Christina Somerville
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    Was the Tea Party a party? What really happened on Revere's fateful ride? Meet Alexander Hamilton on a new stage! In this class, students will learn about American History through graphic novels. Kids will not realize they are absorbing factual information and learning about history through the entertaining, illustrated, short-form novels.

    Through colorful, dramatic graphics and an approachable conversational tone, graphic novels show kids that history can be thrilling! Each quarter will begin with an overview of the graphic novel genre including vocabulary unique to the illustrations and format (panels, speech bubbles, etc.) by looking at several other examples of graphic novels. Each week, students will read a portion of a graphic novel at home from the Saddleback Educational Publishing Graphic, US History Series. In class, the novels and historical content, key historical characters, and events will be discussed. Extension activities will be incorporated such as reading, listening, or watching excerpts of other accounts of the same historical events. Students will think they are talking about cool, comic-style books, but the facilitated class discussion will lay the groupwork for an understanding of US History, chronology, and critical thinking skills.

    First quarter will cover the American Revolution through the graphic novels: The New World(1500-1750), The Fight for Freedom (1750-1783), and The US Emerges(1783-1800).

    Students are expected to read approximately one half of one graphic history novel (25-30 pages) per week which they may read individually or read aloud with their families. These novels are generally considered at an ages 8-12 reading level.

    Build a graphic history library. Collect all 12 (3 per quarter)! Because students will need the same editions of all three graphic novels to be able to refer to the passages on the same page numbers, class sets of the graphic novels will be purchased for students. A supply fee of $48.00 will be due payable to Compass on or before the first day of class for three novels.

    Topics in this series include: The American Revolution (Quarter 1); Westward Ho! (Early 19th Century) (Quarter 2); The Civil War (Quarter 3); and The 20th Century (Quarter 4)

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Christina Somerville
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    Get your child to read the classics without a clash! Children will become familiar with the world's best-known authors and timeless tales through the approachable illustrated format of graphic novels. Kids will not realize they are reading literature and being introduced to literary analysis as they read these entertaining, illustrated, short-form stories.

    First quarter, students will discover some of the most extreme adventures through the early science fiction minds of HG Wells and Jules Verne. Meet ruthless Martian invaders in The War of the Worlds (HG Wells); surreal sea creatures from Captain Nemo's submersible in 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (Verne); and vicious vertebrates from a volcanic crater in Jules Verne's Journey to the Center of Earth.

    Through colorful, dramatic graphics and an approachable conversational tone, graphic novels show kids that literature can be enthralling! Each quarter will begin with an overview of the graphic novel genre including vocabulary unique to the illustrations and format (panels, speech bubbles, etc.) by looking at several other examples of graphic novels. Each week, students will read a portion of a graphic novel at home from the Saddleback Educational Publishing Graphic, Illustrated Classics Series. In class, literary elements and character analysis will be discussed. Extension activities such as reading, listening, or watching excerpts of other tellings of the same tale will take place in class. Students will think they are talking about cool, comic-style books, but the facilitated class discussion will introduce kids to classic works of literature and perhaps interest them to later read the complete novel.

    Students are expected to read approximately one half of one graphic novel (25-30 pages) per week which they may read individually or read aloud with their families. These novels are generally considered at the ages 8-12 reading level.

    Collect all 12 (3 per quarter)! Build an illustrated classic library. Because students will need the same editions of all three graphic novels to be able to refer to the passages on the same page numbers, class sets of the graphic novels will be purchased for students. A supply fee of $48.00 will be due payable to Compass on or before the first day of class for 3 novels.

    Topics in this series include: The Most Extreme Adventures (Quarter 1); Best of British Books (Quarter 2); Shakespeare Shorts (Quarter 3), and Classic Adventure Quests (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Ney Mello
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    Learn the fundamentals of playing the guitar! In this class, students will learn basic melodies such as Happy Birthday, Jingle Bells, Twinkle Twinkle Little Star, as well as classic rock favorites like Smoke on the Water, etc. Kids will learn to play chords and strumming patterns for familiar songs chosen by the instructor and students. Students are encouraged to bring in music they are interested in learning. New chords and new songs will be added each week as students also learn to read music and basic music theory. Students will also learn how to hold, tune, and care for their guitars. Each student will need a least a beginner level acoustic guitar. Students should be able to read at grade level for this class and should plan to practice at home several times each week. Students should expect to spend 20-30 minutes per day most days practicing chords and melodies from class. There is a materials fee of $8.00 payable to the Compass on the first day of class for a tablature notebook.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Monika Dorosheff

    Homeschool musicians who play violin, viola, cello, or bass are invited to join this homeschool string ensemble! Musicians will have an opportunity to develop orchestral skills and enjoy the experience of practicing, playing, and performing as a group. The ensemble will start each week with tuning and warm-ups such as playing musical scales and simple exercises. Then the musicians will work on several group songs each semester where they will improve musical literacy, learn to follow the directions from the conductor, and learn to play in different keys-- as a group. During the final session of the semester, a concert will be held for friends and family.


    This ensemble is intended for advanced beginner, intermediate, and advanced strings students who are currently and concurrently enrolled in private lessons. As a guideline, a student should be able to play a D major scale in two octaves on his/her instrument. Students are expected to be able to locate notes on their instruments, read music and be able to identify all rhythmical patterns. Students with less experience may be asked to play for the conductor or to submit a brief video to help establish placement.


    The instructor will provide the ensemble repertoires, and these arrangements will be specially composed to accommodate the range of abilities of all stringed players in the ensemble. Participants are expected to prepare and practice at home for at least 15 - 20 minutes per day. The cost of the class music is included. This is a 13-week semester program, and the week off will be announced by the instructor.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Manal Hussein
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    This class will be taught in a Hybrid format with an online lecture on Mondays (11:00 am - 11:55 am) over a live, online platform and in-person lab and activities on Wednesdays (11:00 am - 11:55 am). Registration for the Lab section will automatically enroll the student in the Lecture section.

    Why do Mentos candies in Coke make a fizzy mess? How do skateboarders survive spins on a half-pipe? What causes some lithium-ion batteries to burst into flames? Answers to these questions can be found in the study of high school science!

    Interdisciplinary Science is a year-long, introductory high school science course which examines the living and non-living worlds. This survey course introduces key concepts from Biology, Chemistry, and Physics, which will lay the foundation for students to pursue more rigorous, year-long high school science courses in each discipline.

    Students will learn about the principles of scientific investigations and engineering practices, the Scientific Method, and the basic format of a lab report. They will practice taking measurements, recording data, converting units of measure, and related mathematical concepts such as International System of Units, scientific notation, graphs, and data analysis. Students will learn how to provide evidence to support explanations and solutions for their investigations.

    Topics in biology will include molecular, cellular, classification, organisms, populations, and ecosystems. Students will explore the relationships between living things and their environments. The chemistry units will cover the composition of matter, atomic structure and periodic table, and chemical bonds and reactions, while the survey of physics will include forces and motions; conservation of energy, thermal energy, electricity and magnetism; and wave phenomena, characteristics, behavior, including electromagnetic and sound waves.

    Meeting Dates: This is a 29-week course that will not meet during the week of May 12-16, 2025.

    Format: This is a hybrid course with the lecture taught synchronously online on Mondays and hands-on experiments done in a lab on Wednesdays.

    Prerequisites: Students should have completed 8th grade math or a course in Pre-Algebra prior to taking Interdisciplinary Science. They should be familiar with ratios, rates, proportions, decimals, percents, exponents, and solving one-variable equations.

    Class Expectations: For both in-person and virtual class meetings, students are expected to come prepared, have class materials, and be ready to participate in class discussions and activities. During virtual lectures (Mondays), students are expected to be seated at a desk or table and have their cameras on.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class on reading and homework assignments.

    Assignments: All class announcements and assignments will be communicated via Google Classroom.

    Assessments: Informal, qualitative and constructive feedback will be given on submitted assignments. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided.

    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent Physical Science - Interactive Science by Pearson / Savvas Publishing (ISBN # 978-0133209266) and Biology Workbook For Dummies (ISBN # 978-1119894810)

    Materials: Students should bring the following supplies to each class: Five Star spiral graph ruled notebook, scientific calculator, colored pencils, glue stick, pens or pencils to write with, and a ruler. Students will be asked to bring a laptop to class on some days.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A lab fee of $100.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Lab Science for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: Pre-Algebra

    2
    Manal Hussein
    Add

    This is a place-holder for the Interdisciplinary Science lecture. Students should register for the Interdisciplinary Lab, which will automatically enroll them in both class sections. A physical meeting room will be designated for on-campus students who have classes immediately before or after this virtual session.

    Prerequisites: Pre-Algebra

    2
    Iman Castaneda
    Add

    Jiu-Jitsu Fit is a fun, interactive, physical fitness program for tweens incorporating the Brazilian self-defense martial art of Jiu-Jitsu. Students will follow a well-rounded physical fitness program that incorporates moves and strategies of Jiu-Jitsu to increase strength, flexibility, conditioning, endurance, coordination, balance, and fun! Students will practice techniques for resolving conflicts, dealing with bullies, projecting confidence, and developing stranger awareness in the games and exercises they complete in class. Jiu-Jitsu Fit helps tweens stay active, builds self-esteem, and encourages teamwork. Jiu-Jitsu uses grappling and ground work in addition to standing self-defense positions.


    The color name in the class title refers to the collectable token students will earn each quarter they take the class. Collect all 8! Students may enroll in FUNctional Fitness at any time, regardless of the color name No one color is a prerequisite for any other color, and tokens can be earned in any order.


    Some partner work may be co-ed. Students will work on mats in socks or bare feet and should come to class wearing loose, comfortable clothing, such as running pants or sweatpants and bring a refillable water bottle.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Kerry Diederich
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    This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week, students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art, artist, or culture and view sample works. Then, they will create a project in the style of the featured artist or culture using a wide variety of materials, colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.


    First quarter, Junior Artists will learn about French Artists from the genres of Impressionism and Post Impressionism to include Rodin, Cezanne, Seurat, Degas, Renior, Monet, Matisse and Gauguin. These artists were sculptors, painters, draftsmen, and print makers. Each artist influenced the art world with style, color study and interpretation in their own personal way. Students will discuss which artist featured dancers in his subjects, who experimented in color, and which was multi talented artist using many mediums. Junior artists' projects will vary, from painting, to doing drawings, print-making, sculpting, and color studies.


    Topics in this Series: Imitate the Impressionists (Quarter 1); Destination Art (Quarter 2); Multi-Media Masters (Quarter 3); Native American Art (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $25.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Lina Rodriguez
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    Ciencia para niños es un programa de ciencia basado en teoría y técnicas de laboratorio donde nuestros científicos más jóvenes estarán expuestos a conceptos y vocabulario de ciencia, mientras aprenden las habilidades prácticas necesarias para sentirse cómodos con clases de ciencias más avanzadas a medida que crecen. Los estudiantes obtendrán distintos conocimientos acerca de las fases de la materia, moléculas, la vida microscópica, gravedad, los tipos de energía, catapultas, geología, los patrones climáticos y la vida como astronauta. Lo más importante es que ganarán confianza al discutir conceptos científicos y trabajar con equipos y material de laboratorio. Los laboratorios enseñarán a los estudiantes cómo tomar medidas, usar un microscopio, hacer bocetos científicos y pensar críticamente.

    Cada quater reforzará los principios y las habilidades de laboratorio en torno a un tema central. En ciencia para ninos: Quimica, los estudiantes aprenderán sobre ácidos y bases, fases de la materia, densidad, flotabilidad, ósmosis y reacciones químicas simples que desprenden gas o calor. Esta clase tiene una tarifa de laboratorio de $20.00 que se debe pagar al instructor el primer día. Temas: Química (quater 1), Diversión física (quarter 2), Un Mundo vivo (quarter 3) y Tierra y espacio (quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sirdley Taborga
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    Los artistas principiantes pueden participar en la acción mientras aprenden sobre un artista o estilo artístico diferente cada semana y crean una pieza representativa utilizando una amplia gama de materiales artísticos como lápices de colores, pintura acrilica, crayones pastel y papeles especiales.

    En esta clase de expresión artística, los estudiantes desarrollaran los estilos de dos artistas de renombre Latinoaméricano. Por ejemplo, estudiaremos las pinturas y técnicas de Xul Solar - Argentina y Fernando Botero - Colombia. También estudiaremos las carreras artísticas de Xul y Botero incluyendo sus comienzos, estilos y sus obras mas famosas.

    De esta manera, los estudiantes aplicaran distintas técnicas y procedimientos en la pintura. Como también despertaran, impulsaran y dinamizaran la imaginación y la creatividad.

    Hay una tarifa de $15.00 por cada estudiante. Páguele esto al maestro por los materiales de arte.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    David Cubias

    Krav Maga is the Israeli martial art which teaches self defense and fitness. Students of Krav Maga are taught a series of strategies to assess and respond to common situations, such as facing a bully. Kids are always taught first and foremost to get away, to get help, and to try to deescalate the situation. When that fails, students practice a technique that includes a warning strike followed by escape, and finally, they learn how to stand up for themselves and how to counterattack if a situation escalates and becomes threatening. Kids are empowered and gain confidence when they rehearse how to handle real-life situations. Exercises and in-class practice incorporate balance, coordination, energy, and other key elements of fitness along with life skills such as confidence, teamwork, respect, discipline, and respect. Students may enroll in Krav Maga at any time, and everyone will begin as a white belt. Each quarter, students will practice the full range of skills, but there will be two "featured" moves that a student can earn a belt stripe for being able to demonstrate. Featured moves will include a combative strike and a defensive escape technique. No one stripe is a prerequisite for any other color, and color stripes can be earned in any order. First quarter, students will have the chance to earn a Blue Stripe. Featured moves include: cover defense and wrist locks (red stripe); straight punch defense and bear hugs (orange stripe); head movement defense and front 2-handed choke (yellow stripe); round kick defense and back 2-handed choke (green stripe); front kick defense and guillotine choke (blue stripe); clinch defense and rear choke (purple stripe); ground striking defense and head lock defense (brown stripe); and 360 defense and full Nelson (black stripe). Students will be able to test for belt promotions to move through the ranks of white belt, yellow belt, orange belt, etc. On average, it is estimated that a student will be ready for a belt test after four quarters/four color stripes. Belt testing will be by coach approval. Topics in this Series: Blue Stripe (1st Quarter), Purple Stripe (2nd Quarter), Brown Stripe (3rd Quarter) and Black Stripe (4th Quarter). Assessments: Belt testing for promotion will be by coach recommendation, but on average will take 4 quarters. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $6.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class- for new students only- for a white belt to collect the colored stripes! A belt test fee of $25.00 is due payable to the instructor when a student is ready to test for promotion. What to Bring: Refillable water bottle. What to Wear: Participants should wear their belt along with shorts, leggings, or loose, comfortable athletic pants, and comfortable athletic shoes or sneakers.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Judith Harmon
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    Young readers and writers will explore classic tales in a variety of creative, multi-media interpretations. Pulling from classic children's literature including fairy tales, fables, and favorites, such as Newberry Award medalists, the group will explore 3-4 well-known stories each quarter (generally spending 2 weeks per tale).

    First quarter will feature Amazing Adventures with the stories of Jack and the Beanstalk, The Three Billy Goats Gruff, and The Gingerbread Man.

    For each story, the instructor will share a lively read-aloud of the featured story. Next, the class will watch a short clip of an animated, televised, or stage version of the same story. Finally, the group will hear a re-telling of the same story from a different angle, such as one adapted to a theme, a different era, or a different culture. Students will discuss what was the same and what was different among the different adaptations. Was a character added or omitted? Was the performed version true to the original? Finally, students will write and illustrate their own, original re-telling of the story by changing characters, setting, or even crafting a surprise, new ending. New Twists on Old Tales introduces some basic literary elements and rudimentary literary analysis skills to encourage children to think more deeply about what they read.

    Topics in this Series: Amazing Adventures (Quarter 1), Favorite Fairy Tales (Quarter 2), Friend Stories (Quarter 3), and Morals from Fables (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Becca Sticha
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    Does your child learn best by hands-on activities, crafts, games, and stories? Number Ninjas is based on the belief that children need to work with mathematics in a concrete, physical, and tangible way in order to learn fundamental concepts. Young students will love learning numerical concepts in this interactive, exploration-based class where work with numbers feels like a game.

    First quarter, students will explore the concepts of even and odd numbers, comparing and ordering, place value, rounding, and counting by 2, 5, 10, 25.. Example activites include building an abacus, solving skip counting puzzles, and more!

    This class covers many of the 1st and 2nd grade Standards of Learning for math. Weekly update e-mails to parents will include suggestions for practice at home and extension activities.

    Topics in the Series: Play with Place Value (Quarter 1), Measurement Madness (Quarter 2), Super Shapes (Quarter 3), and Fun with Fractions (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Jen Hallworth

    This is a complete course in Pre-Algebra that will provide an introduction to basic algebra concepts and a review of arithmetic algorithms with an emphasis on problem solving. The major topics covered in this course are Numbers and Operations, Expressions and Properties, Equations and Inequalities, Functional Relationships and Ratios, Percent and Proportions. Students will learn to use formulas to solve a variety of math problems encompassing geometry, measurement probability, and statistics. Students will also be applying their learning to real life scenarios to solve problems. Prerequisites: Students must be fluent in the four basic operations- addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. They will need to show proficiency and have a thorough command of basic computation. In addition, a basic, introductory understanding and ability to work with fractions and decimals is required to solve equations and simplify expressions. If you are unsure about your child's readiness for this class, the instructor will recommend one or more practice platforms and/or assessments to confirm placement. Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class to complete practice problems, homework, and assessments. Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, link to quizzes and tests, track grades, and message the instructor and classmates. Assessments: All chapter tests will be taken outside of class with parental oversight to maximize in-class instructional time. Points will be assigned for completed homework, quizzes, and tests. A letter grade will not be assigned, but parents can use total points earned versus total points offered to assign a grade for purposes of a homeschool transcript. Parents can view total points earned at any time through the Canvas site. See the instructor's webpage for detailed homework and test policy, including late work and re-work. Textbook: The selected textbook is available free online, and a link will be posted on Canvas. Students who prefer a hard copy textbook may purchase or rent McDougall Littell's Pre-Algebra (ISBN #978-0618250035). As an alternative, for any student who struggles with reading, the textbook can be purchased as an audio CD (ISBN #978-0618478828). What to Bring: TI-34 calculator Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Mathematics for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Jessica Eastridge
    Add

    7 weeks X 25-minute Private Music Lesson weeks with Jessica Eastridge in:

  • Any beginner-level woodwind, brass, or percussion instrument;
  • Advanced beginner and above-level in clarinet, saxaphone, trombone, euphonium;

  • ukulele

  • Song/Theory Books/Sheet Music: Instructor will make recommendations to purchase or reimburse her, depending on instrument and level.

    Cancellation/Rescheduling: In the event of a change in your schedule, Compass requires 24 hours notice to reschedule the private lessons. Every effort will be made to reschedule the session at a time that is mutually agreeable to the teacher, the student/client, and Compass. In the event of a no-show or change/cancellation occurring less than 24 hours before the scheduled instruction session, pre-paid fees will be forfeited and no refund will be offered.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Jessica Eastridge
    Add

    7 weeks X 25-minute Private Music Lesson weeks with Jessica Eastridge in:

    • Any beginner-level woodwind, brass, or percussion instrument;
    • Advanced beginner and above-level in clarinet, saxaphone, trombone, euphonium;
    • ukulele
    Song/Theory Books/Sheet Music: Instructor will make recommendations to purchase or reimburse her, depending on instrument and level. Cancellation/Rescheduling: In the event of a change in your schedule, Compass requires 24 hours notice to reschedule the private lessons. Every effort will be made to reschedule the session at a time that is mutually agreeable to the teacher, the student/client, and Compass. In the event of a no-show or change/cancellation occurring less than 24 hours before the scheduled instruction session, pre-paid fees will be forfeited and no refund will be offered.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Jessica Hall
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    6 weeks X 25-minute Private Music Lesson weeks for new or returning, beginner or advanced students with Jessica Hall in:


  • Piano;
  • Voice;
  • Ukuele
  • Song/Theory Books/Sheet Music: Instructor will provide an Amazon link for parent to order the recommended music book(s).


    Cancellation/Rescheduling: In the event of a change in your schedule, Compass requires 24 hours notice to reschedule the private lessons. Every effort will be made to reschedule the session at a time that is mutually agreeable to the teacher, the student/client, and Compass. In the event of a no-show or change/cancellation occurring less than 24 hours before the scheduled instruction session, pre-paid fees will be forfeited and no refund will be offered.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Jessica Hall
    Add

    7 weeks X 25-minute Private Music Lesson weeks for new or returning, beginner or advanced students with Jessica Hall in:


  • Piano;
  • Voice;
  • Ukuele
  • Song/Theory Books/Sheet Music: Instructor will provide an Amazon link for parent to order the recommended music book(s).


    Cancellation/Rescheduling: In the event of a change in your schedule, Compass requires 24 hours notice to reschedule the private lessons. Every effort will be made to reschedule the session at a time that is mutually agreeable to the teacher, the student/client, and Compass. In the event of a no-show or change/cancellation occurring less than 24 hours before the scheduled instruction session, pre-paid fees will be forfeited and no refund will be offered.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    David Chelf
    Add

    The odds of winning the Powerball jackpot are 1 in 292 million. 77% of teens ages 12-17 have cell phones. One out of every two youth voters cast a ballot in 2020. From election polls to stock market data and weather reports to medical test results, statistics and probability are all around us. They are quoted in the podcasts we listen to, the news we watch, and the textbooks and articles we read. Statistics and probability are used in almost every field of study and career for forecasting, decision making, and tracking progress. In 2021-22, the government will release a tsunami of 2020 census statistics about our country's population. (Coincidentally, the odds of a tsunami hitting the east coast- less than the Powerball win.) But statistics and probability are also often misused, misquoted or incorrectly applied, so having a solid understanding of what these numbers represent will help make teens informed consumers and decision-makers.

    This course will explore the collection and analysis of data, inferences and conclusions, and the use of this information. Themes include relationships between variables, gathering data, interpreting categorical versus quantitative data. The class will also cover sample surveys, experiments, and observational studies and evaluate randomness and probability. Finally, students will learn about making inferences, justifying conclusions, and using probability to make decisions.

    Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation in Algebra I and Geometry in order to take this class. It is an ideal class for a student who needs an additional credit in high school math, but who may not wish to pursue more advanced mathematics courses such as Algebra II and Pre-Calculus.

    Levels: The course provides a substantive, full-credit experience on either an Honors or On-Level track. All class members share core material and participate in the same class lectures. Honors students will receive additional, more challenging problems. Students register online for the same course but must indicate which level they wish to follow by the first day of class. Students may move down a level (from Honors to On-Level) at any time.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-1.5 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 7-day cycle, with assignments posted on Thursdays and due the following Thursday. Students are advised to start homework once it is assigned (i.e., not wait until the night before it is due). Weekly homework assignments will be of a length that a student should be able to complete them in two or three at-home work sessions. Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of their work.

    Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.

    Assessments: Student progress will be assessed by: (1) The instructor checking that weekly homework sets are attempted and complete and (2) detailed grading of periodic take-home tests. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. See the instructor's webpage for detailed homework and test policy, including late work and re-work.

    Textbook: The required textbook for this class is "Stats In Your World" 1st edition by David E. Bock (ISBN-13: 978-0131384897).

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Probability & Statistics for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Catherine Vanlandingham
    Add

    Reading and writing affect a student's achievement in all aspects of schoolwork, so strong language arts skills are fundamental to success in homeschooling. This weekly class is a small group of 3-6 students who read and write at a similar level. Students follow a comprehensive language arts curriculum under the guidance of an experienced reading specialist. Each Monday class meeting will include a short story with select vocabulary words, a graphic organizer, main themes, and embedded learning objectives. Students will continue to practice language arts skills at home with easy-to-implement "page a day" workbook activities assigned by the instructor and implemented by the parents. For most early elementary learners, enrollment in Reading Rally can serve as a complete, self-contained language arts curriculum where families will not need additional resources in reading, comprehension, composition, spelling, and grammar. Weekly readings are organized around thematic units. The instructor will teach students how to approach a new story as a fun reading puzzle. For example, before reading aloud in class, students will conduct a "picture walk" to overview and predict elements of the story from the illustrations, review a graphic organizer to assist in writing sentences, define vocabulary words, and preview summary questions. Then, the instructor will read the story aloud, model good reading practices, and encourage students to read. Students will only be asked to read aloud when they feel comfortable and have built trust in their group. All follow-up activities are designed around learning objectives such as decoding, comprehension, prediction, visualization, and verbalization. READINESS: As a comprehensive language arts curriculum, a student must be at a similar grade level ability in reading, comprehension, and writing. Early readers who have not learned to write, for example, or emerging readers who struggle with comprehenion, may not be a good fit for this class. In addition, students must have the hand-eye coordination and basic handwriting skills to be able to copy the instructor's many notes, examples, and definitions from the classroom white board into their own notebook. Grade level references in Reading Rally are based on scope, sequence and pacing that correlate to the Grade Level Equivalent (GLE) standards of learning. Students who are more than one year behind in GLE in language arts or who have a difference in skill level between their reading and writing may be recommended for a second, weekly class meeting on Fridays or 1-on-1 private instruction to make up ground in reading or writing skills. Additional class meetings or private instruction will be an additional cost. ATTENTION! Parents should not register for a Reading Rally class until they have had a Language Arts Skills Inventory (i.e. brief assessment) and placement determination by the reading specialist. This must be scheduled separately through Compass at a cost of $125.00. The fee is due prior to the assessment and is not refundable in the event the child is not recommended for a reading group. The instructor has experience working with reluctant and fearful readers, those who are late bloomers, neurodivergent, dyslexic, and ESOL students. However, she might recommend a more complete evaluation by another professional if she suspects other learning differences are impacting the student's langauge arts learning. Students will work from a spiral bound copy of reading textbook and workbook by Pearson. A class fee of $98.00 is due payable to Compass for the required books. Students continuing from one semester to the next will receive priority registration to remain with their reading group.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Catherine Vanlandingham
    Add

    Reading and writing affect a student's achievement in all aspects of schoolwork, so strong language arts skills are fundamental to success in homeschooling. This weekly class is a small group of 3-6 students who read and write at a similar level. Students follow a comprehensive language arts curriculum under the guidance of an experienced reading specialist. Each Monday class meeting will include a short story with select vocabulary words, a graphic organizer, main themes, and embedded learning objectives. Students will continue to practice language arts skills at home with easy-to-implement "page a day" workbook activities assigned by the instructor and implemented by the parents. For most early elementary learners, enrollment in Reading Rally can serve as a complete, self-contained language arts curriculum where families will not need additional resources in reading, comprehension, composition, spelling, and grammar. Weekly readings are organized around thematic units. The instructor will teach students how to approach a new story as a fun reading puzzle. For example, before reading aloud in class, students will conduct a "picture walk" to overview and predict elements of the story from the illustrations, review a graphic organizer to assist in writing sentences, define vocabulary words, and preview summary questions. Then, the instructor will read the story aloud, model good reading practices, and encourage students to read. Students will only be asked to read aloud when they feel comfortable and have built trust in their group. All follow-up activities are designed around learning objectives such as decoding, comprehension, prediction, visualization, and verbalization. READINESS: As a comprehensive language arts curriculum, a student must be at a similar grade level ability in reading, comprehension, and writing. Early readers who have not learned to write, for example, or emerging readers who struggle with comprehenion, may not be a good fit for this class. In addition, students must have the hand-eye coordination and basic handwriting skills to be able to copy the instructor's many notes, examples, and definitions from the classroom white board into their own notebook. Grade level references in Reading Rally are based on scope, sequence and pacing that correlate to the Grade Level Equivalent (GLE) standards of learning. Students who are more than one year behind in GLE in language arts or who have a difference in skill level between their reading and writing may be recommended for a second, weekly class meeting on Fridays or 1-on-1 private instruction to make up ground in reading or writing skills. Additional class meetings or private instruction will be an additional cost. ATTENTION! Parents should not register for a Reading Rally class until they have had a Language Arts Skills Inventory (i.e. brief assessment) and placement determination by the reading specialist. This must be scheduled separately through Compass at a cost of $125.00. The fee is due prior to the assessment and is not refundable in the event the child is not recommended for a reading group. The instructor has experience working with reluctant and fearful readers, those who are late bloomers, neurodivergent, dyslexic, and ESOL students. However, she might recommend a more complete evaluation by another professional if she suspects other learning differences are impacting the student's langauge arts learning. Students will work from a spiral bound copy of reading textbook and workbook by Pearson. A class fee of $XX.00 is due payable to Compass for the required books. Students continuing from one semester to the next will receive priority registration to remain with their reading group.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Catherine Vanlandingham
    Closed

    Reading and writing affect a student's achievement in all aspects of schoolwork, so strong language arts skills are fundamental to success in homeschooling. This weekly class is a small group of 3-6 students who read and write at a similar level. Students follow a comprehensive language arts curriculum under the guidance of an experienced reading specialist. Each Monday class meeting will include a short story with select vocabulary words, a graphic organizer, main themes, and embedded learning objectives. Students will continue to practice language arts skills at home with easy-to-implement "page a day" workbook activities assigned by the instructor and implemented by the parents. For most early elementary learners, enrollment in Reading Rally can serve as a complete, self-contained language arts curriculum where families will not need additional resources in reading, comprehension, composition, spelling, and grammar.

    Weekly readings are organized around thematic units. The instructor will teach students how to approach a new story as a fun reading puzzle. For example, before reading aloud in class, students will conduct a "picture walk" to overview and predict elements of the story from the illustrations, review a graphic organizer to assist in writing sentences, define vocabulary words, and preview summary questions. Then, the instructor will read the story aloud, model good reading practices, and encourage students to read. Students will only be asked to read aloud when they feel comfortable and have built trust in their group. All follow-up activities are designed around learning objectives such as decoding, comprehension, prediction, visualization, and verbalization.

    READINESS: As a comprehensive language arts curriculum, a student must be at a similar grade level ability in reading, comprehension, and writing. Early readers who have not learned to write, for example, or emerging readers who struggle with comprehension, may not be a good fit for this class. In addition, students must have the hand-eye coordination and basic handwriting skills to be able to copy the instructor's many notes, examples, and definitions from the classroom white board into their own notebook.

    Grade level references in Reading Rally are based on scope, sequence and pacing that correlate to the Grade Level Equivalent (GLE) standards of learning. Students who are more than one year behind in GLE in language arts or who have a difference in skill level between their reading and writing may be recommended for a second, weekly class meeting on Fridays or 1-on-1 private instruction to make up ground in reading or writing skills. Additional class meetings or private instruction will be an additional cost.

    ATTENTION! Parents should not register for a Reading Rally class until they have had a Language Arts Skills Inventory (i.e. brief assessment) and placement determination by the reading specialist. This must be scheduled separately through Compass at a cost of $125.00. The fee is due prior to the assessment and is not refundable in the event the child is not recommended for a reading group. The instructor has experience working with reluctant and fearful readers, those who are late bloomers, neurodivergent, dyslexic, and ESOL students. However, she might recommend a more complete evaluation by another professional if she suspects other learning differences are impacting the student's language arts learning.

    Students will work from a spiral bound copy of reading textbook and workbook by Pearson. A class fee of $72.00 is due payable to Compass for the required books.

    Students continuing from one semester to the next will receive priority registration to remain with their reading group.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Becca Sticha

    Student engineers will be challenged to design, build, and program a robot to complete several unique mazes in the fastest possible time. Students will learn to program their robots to make "decisions" when exploring an unfamiliar maze such as "go straight until you encounter a wall" and "turn to the right if you run into an obstacle."


    Students will use the LEGO MINDSTORMS Education EV3 robotics sets. They will build with motors, wheels/axles, gears, levers, and special components. Students will have to install touch, sound, color, gyro, ultrasonic, and/or infrared sensors while also learning to program sequences and commands that use input/output devices for controlled movements and precise turns. Using the drag-and-drop EV3 programming menu, students will learn to program their robots while experimenting with key concepts such as fixed values, variables, loops, and logic constructs.


    This course integrates science, engineering and computational thinking while introducing physical constraints, units of measurement, and coordinate systems. But, don't worry, this is a beginning robotics class. Prior experience is not expected, but returning students are welcome. Each student will build his/her own robotic project, so students can progress and customize at their own pace. In general, in this class, students will spend two weeks assembling, three weeks programming, and two weeks testing and re-designing. Topics in this Series: Maze Runner (Quarter 1), Sumo Bots (Quarter 2), Mars Rover (Quarter 3), and Explore Atlantis (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Sirdley Taborga
    Add

    Hola! Get ready for a full year of beginner level high school Spanish! This is a conversation-focused program in which students will build their vocabulary quickly beginning with the alphabet, numbers, time, dates, seasons, school, free time activities/hobbies, likes/dislikes, personal descriptions, family relationships, emotions, food/restaurants, places/locations in town, and shopping/clothing. There will be a strong emphasis on conversation with common grammar concepts such as articles, pronouns, adjectives, comparative phrases, and present tense and regular past tense verbs learned and practiced in the context of conversation (rather than stand-along grammar exercises). Class will be conducted primarily in Spanish and will focus on listening and speaking skills, asking and answering questions. At home, students will be responsible for practicing vocabulary and grammar and completing written assignments, and watching language immersion video clips. Workload: Students should expect to spend 30-45 minutes per day approximately 4 days per week on homework outside of class. Assignments: Are sent by e-mail to parents and students. Students must have access to a computer for videos that are assigned. Assessments: Quizzes and tests will be scored with a points system that parents can use in calculating a grade. Textbook: Students should purchase or rent Avancemos!: Student Edition Level 1, 2018 edition (ISBN # 978-0544861213) Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Foreign Language for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Kathryn Beirne
    Add

    Successful social skills can help kids navigate almost every aspect of their lives. Building confidence in social settings can help improve self esteem and comfort in group settings, sports, new endeavors, with family, in public, or just hanging out with friends. Every child can benefit from improved social skills, but some need a little more practice. In this class, kids will work with a certified, licensed therapist to develop strategies for navigating different social challenges- from conversation skills and identifying feelings and emotions, to seeing perspective, handling stress, talking to parents, making friends, tolerating siblings, and more. The small group class will be highly interactive with games, role playing, videos, modelling behavior, and projects using a evidence-based, social-emotional curriculum

    Kids will benefit most from taking Social Skills for several quarters. Some activities will be new each quarter, and some will be repeated for reinforcement. As new students join the group, the dynamic will shift, better imitating real life scenarios. Kids' confidence and comfort level will grow when they have multiple quarters to practice their social skills.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Michele Forsythe
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    "S" is for science, and "A" is for art in the study of STEAM, but have you thought about the science in art? Artists must understand the science of the materials that they use: how they tint and texturize, mix and melt, dye and dry, blend or bend. There is a complex community of scientists and engineers with specialties in polymers, glass, chemicals, paper, and textiles who design the materials that artists use to create their art. This class will learn about the science and properties of some unique artistic processes and materials and how and why they work.

    First quarter, the class will work with resins and polymers. Students will learn what are polymers and resins and about the chemical and physical properties of special plastics. They will look at real-life applications of resins and polymers such as sealants, countertop construction, molds, and sculptures. Students will work with resin to encase small specimens, such as tiny flowers, small drawings, or objects to make a decorative, durable piece of art. The class will spend 7 weeks examining natural and synthetic resins as well as learning what polymers are and making things with products that have different catalysts for polymerization. Students will make items using epoxy resin, clay, Sculpey or Fimo, Shrinky Dinks, and Perler beads.

    Topics in this series: Resins & Polymers (Quarter 1), Paints & Dyes (Quarter 2), Optical Illusions & Color (Quarter 3), and Paper Engineers (Quarter 4). There is a supply fee of $20.00 due payable to the instructor on the first day.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon

    Tweens take over as they collectively brainstorm and collaboratively write their own play. Find out what happens when tweens "act out" the unique characters and an original storyline they created. Just in time for Halloween! What horrors haunt the house on the hill? Will our tweens uncover the undead or greet ghosts and ghouls galore?



    Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other and to begin to brainstorm about their original play. Through group activities and guided discussion, the actors will decide on characters, conflict, and conclusion, and the story they want to tell. The script will be developed and customized for this class with the students' input.



    The class will learn the practical aspects of acting, as they work on script read-through, blocking, costume/prop design, and planning the show. Students will develop their own "actor's toolkit" of voice, body, and imagination in this creative process! Actors will grow in confidence and communication skills in preparation for a final sharing with parents on the final day of the quarter.



    Once the script is fully developed, it will be emailed to parents. Parents will be expected make sure their tweens memorize their script/lines/cues and assemble a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories they already own and a little creativity.



    Topics in this Series: Haunted House of Horrors (Quarter 1), Chaos in the Courtroom (Quarter 2), No Exit Escape Room (Quarter 3) and Rock Start Rivalry (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Karen Shumway
    Add

    A chihuahua needs a check-up. A beagle with a bellyache. Vaccinations for Vizsla pups. Sometimes even our canine friends need medical care! Lots of kids love animals, and some even think about becoming veterinarians and animal specialists. There is a lot of science in the care and keeping of animals.



    In this class, future dog veterinarians will learn all about dog care (nutrition, exercise, grooming), dog anatomy, and dog behavior. Kids will learn to recognize signs that a dog is unfriendly, afraid, aggressive or unwell. They will learn to perform steps of a well-pet check-up and identify some common medical care and preventatives recommended for dogs. The class will also learn about dog behavior and training. Kids will discover some of fun and fascinating facts, similarities, and differences in dog groups and specific breeds. Students will learn about dog's relationship with humans and the many jobs and duties that dogs perform for humans. Finally, students will take one class session to journey to other corners of the continents to meet some wild members of the dog (Canidae) family such as the dingo, jackal, wild dog, fox, and wolf species (and, hey, why aren't hyenas on the list?)



    Each class meeting will include hands-on and interactive demonstrations, simulations, role-playing, activities, games, stories, or short video clips to convey the information. During the first week, students will receive a lab coat and clinic name tag, a plush dog for demonstrations, and a class workbook. They will "adopt" and name their dog, and during the final week, they will receive a diploma. (Pets, lab coats, name tags, and workbooks will remain at Compass between classes so they are not forgotten at home). There is a $31.00 supply fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.



    Topics in this series include: Discover Dogs (Quarter 1), Pocket Pets (Quarter 2), Reptile Roundup (Quarter 3) and Wildlife Rescue (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Danielle Mercadal
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    Wannabe Writers is a beginning writing class for first graders. Students will use creative journaling and illustrations to respond to simple writing prompts. The class will explore the use of various punctuation for simple sentences and will use new vocabulary words to express an idea. Each week, students will share their completed writing and drawings with their classmates. For this level, students must be able to read a Level 1 reader independently and possess the readiness skills outlined below. Children may repeat this class each quarter as new prompts and writing techniques will be introduced each session, and assignments will not be repeated.

    Note:: This class is designed for students to enjoy a fun, new dimension of writing with peers and a teacher, but this will not take the place of a comprehensive language arts curriculum and regular writing practice.

    Writing Readiness: Enrolling students must be able to (1) recognize, spell and write his/her first and last name; (2) recognize and write all upper case and lower case letters and know the corresponding sounds; (3) spell and pronounce simple blends, (4) recognize the following sight words: all, am, are, at, ate, be, black, brown, but, came, day, did, do, eat, four, get, go, good, have, he, in, into, is, like, must, new, no, now, on, our, out, please, pretty, ran, ride, saw, say, she, so, soon, that, the, there, they, this, to, too, under, want, was, well, went, what, white, who, will, with, yes; (5) spell and write all 2-letter sight words unaided; (6) be familiar with simple sentence structure; and (7) hold and use a pencil correctly.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Danielle Mercadal
    Add

    Wee Writers is a simple journaling class for emergent kindergarten writers ages 5 and 6. Beginning writers will use basic sight words and phonetics while writing about feelings and experiences. Students will learn basic sentence structure with noun-verb construction, initial capital letter, and ending punctuation. Beginning sentences such as, "I lik cak." or "I drnk wtr." would be typical of emergent writers. Students will illustrate their journal entries and have opportunities to share and discuss their writing with peers. Children may repeat this class each quarter as new writing activities will be introduced each session.


    Note:: This class is designed for students to enjoy a fun, new dimension of writing with peers and a teacher, but this will not take the place of a comprehensive language arts curriculum and regular writing practice.


    Writing Readiness; Enrolling students must be able to (1) recognize and write his/her first name; (2) recognize and write each letter of the alphabet and know the corresponding sounds; and (3) hold and use crayons and scissors correctly.


    Social Readiness; Students must be age five (5) by the start of the class. To be successful in this program, kindergartners must be able to do the following preschool-level skills: (1) be able to separate from parents with little discomfort; (2) be able to sit and stay on a task for 10 minutes; (3) be able to follow simple, age-appropriate directions from the teacher or another adult; (4) be completely self-sufficient in a public restroom (wiping, flushing, washing hands, etc.)

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Shannon McClain
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    Writing is not only a critical skill for school and life, it gives teens a voice! In this class, high school students will gain confidence, increase writing fluency, and learn how to incorporate writing a variety of school subjects, for pleasure, and one day, for a job. The objective of this class is for each student to progress and improve his/her own writing. This class does not have a fixed curriculum trying to achieve the same outcome and same skillset for each teen, because each comes to class with different writing experience and varying needs. Instead, through personalized feedback from the instructor and peer feedback exercises, student writers will improve their writing skills from where they started.

    Students will learn the steps of the writing process: prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing. Key skills practiced at this level include organizing one's thoughts, defining a purpose and audience for the paper, formulating a topic sentence or main idea, developing supporting details, using correct sentence structure. Students will always be encouraged to write about what interests them, or they may work on writing assignments for other classes or projects. They will write in class each week and will be expected to write at home and submit their work to the instructor for feedback. Each week, the instructor will share brief lessons on grammar (such as correct capitalization, agreement, tenses, parts of speech, use of adjectives/adverbs), and/or style (for example, using metaphors, adding details, building tension). Examples and exercises will be presented from a variety of styles and genres with the instructor using models from fiction, poetry, and non-fiction. Students must be near grade level for reading.

    Topics in this Series: Writing Lab (Semester 1 and Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: Reading near grade level.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Will be discussed in class and emailed in a weekly update.

    Assessments: The instructor will provide individualized, qualitative feedback and suggestions on assignments. Formal grades will not be given. The parent should review this work or keep a portfolio in order to assign a comprehensive grade the their student's effort and progression.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript. In order to earn a full credit in English, this course should be paired with a literature course.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    YMCA Swimming Staff
    Add

    Homeschool Swim Lessons are taught at the Reston YMCA located 0.9 miles/ 3 minute drive from Compass's classroom facility. For more information on swimming lessons, see the program webpage.


    During the first lesson, students will be observed and determined to be Beginner or Advanced Beginner level, and the class will be divided accordingly among two instructors. Beginners level is for students with little to no swim experience and will cover YMCA Level 1 skills such as water acclimation, floatation, water movement, putting face in the water, swimming 5 feet without a floatation device, and becoming comfortable on back in water. Advanced Beginners level will review all skills in beginner-level class and add YMCA Level 2 skills such as stamina, swimming one length of the pool (25 yards), performing elementary backstroke, rotary breathing, becoming comfortable in deep water, and stroke introduction to include: front crawl, backstroke, and elementary breaststroke.


    Please note that these skills will be introduced and progress at different rates depending on the comfortable level and experience of enrolled students and may take more than one quarter to complete. At times, students might be moved to a different swimming group (same day, same time, different instructor) to better match the experience level of enrolled children.


    Lessons are 40 minutes long, running from 0:05 until 0:45 after the hour, leaving enough time to towel dry, change clothes, and return to Compass for your next class. Students should bring a swimsuit, towel, and change of clothes. Googles and swim caps are optional.


    A parent (or parent proxy) is required to remain on site. Parents may wait on poolside benches or lobby seating. YMCA waivers must be signed and returned for each swimmer. All registration is completed through Compass. All YMCA swimming classes are taught by certified, experienced, background-checked adult instructors with experience teaching children.


    Consider enrolling your child in both Tuesday and Thursday classes to improve their rate of learning.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    YMCA Swimming Staff
    Add

    Homeschool Swim Lessons are taught at the Reston YMCA located 0.9 miles/ 3 minute drive from Compass's classroom facility. For more information on swimming lessons, see the program webpage.


    During the first lesson, students will be observed and determined to be Beginner or Advanced Beginner level, and the class will be divided accordingly among two instructors. Beginners level is for students with little to no swim experience and will cover YMCA Level 1 skills such as water acclimation, floatation, water movement, putting face in the water, swimming 5 feet without a floatation device, and becoming comfortable on back in water. Advanced Beginners level will review all skills in beginner-level class and add YMCA Level 2 skills such as stamina, swimming one length of the pool (25 yards), performing elementary backstroke, rotary breathing, becoming comfortable in deep water, and stroke introduction to include: front crawl, backstroke, and elementary breaststroke.


    Please note that these skills will be introduced and progress at different rates depending on the comfortable level and experience of enrolled students and may take more than one quarter to complete. At times, students might be moved to a different swimming group (same day, same time, different instructor) to better match the experience level of enrolled children.


    Lessons are 40 minutes long, running from 0:05 until 0:45 after the hour, leaving enough time to towel dry, change clothes, and return to Compass for your next class. Students should bring a swimsuit, towel, and change of clothes. Googles and swim caps are optional.


    A parent (or parent proxy) is required to remain on site. Parents may wait on poolside benches or lobby seating. YMCA waivers must be signed and returned for each swimmer. All registration is completed through Compass. All YMCA swimming classes are taught by certified, experienced, background-checked adult instructors with experience teaching children.


    Consider enrolling your child in both Tuesday and Thursday classes to improve their rate of learning.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sevim Kalyoncu
    Add

    Have fun the final weeks of summer! Look forward to early fall! Animals are active and sunning themselves. Plants are mature, and flowers have gone to seed. The stream may have slowed down from summer drought, but discoveries at the water's edge abound.


    Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!


    A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.


    Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.


    Students must be minimum age 5 by the start of class, be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of class and must be able to stay in a group and follow instructions.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sevim Kalyoncu
    Add

    Have fun the final weeks of summer! Look forward to early fall! Animals are active and sunning themselves. Plants are mature, and flowers have gone to seed. The stream may have slowed down from summer drought, but discoveries at the water's edge abound.


    Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!


    A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.


    Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.


    Students must be minimum age 5 by the start of class, be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of class and must be able to stay in a group and follow instructions.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Various
    Add

    Step back in time each week for a one-of-a-kind rendez vous with key personalities in American history. First quarter appearances will focus on the 1600s and 1700s. Meet great Americans such as Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Patrick Henry. (The full line-up of appearances will be published by June 1.

    Each week a professional, costumed living history interpreter will deliver a compelling first-person performance portraying his or her role in American history. Living history actors are the professionals employed by museums, historical sites, and conferences. They have typically studied their historical character for years and tell their story in first person. Presentations are conversational in style, occasionally involve the audience, and conclude with spontaneous audience Q & A. Watch the historical actors answer 21st century questions in character with period replies!

    Students will receive a packet each quarter with biographies, puzzles, and activities about each famous personality that we will meet. Note: Students younger than age 8 must be accompanied by a paid parent or adult. Parents and siblings interested in the program must register and pay separately.

    Topics in this series include: The 1700s (Quarter 1); The 1800s (Quarter 2); The Civil War (Quarter 3); and the 20th Century (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Jessica Eastridge
    Add

    7 weeks X 25-minute Private Music Lesson weeks with Jessica Eastridge in:

  • Any beginner-level woodwind, brass, or percussion instrument;
  • Advanced beginner and above-level in clarinet, saxaphone, trombone, euphonium;

  • ukulele

  • Song/Theory Books/Sheet Music: Instructor will make recommendations to purchase or reimburse her, depending on instrument and level.

    Cancellation/Rescheduling: In the event of a change in your schedule, Compass requires 24 hours notice to reschedule the private lessons. Every effort will be made to reschedule the session at a time that is mutually agreeable to the teacher, the student/client, and Compass. In the event of a no-show or change/cancellation occurring less than 24 hours before the scheduled instruction session, pre-paid fees will be forfeited and no refund will be offered.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Jessica Eastridge
    Add

    7 weeks X 25-minute Private Music Lesson weeks with Jessica Eastridge in:

    • Any beginner-level woodwind, brass, or percussion instrument;
    • Advanced beginner and above-level in clarinet, saxaphone, trombone, euphonium;
    • ukulele
    Song/Theory Books/Sheet Music: Instructor will make recommendations to purchase or reimburse her, depending on instrument and level. Cancellation/Rescheduling: In the event of a change in your schedule, Compass requires 24 hours notice to reschedule the private lessons. Every effort will be made to reschedule the session at a time that is mutually agreeable to the teacher, the student/client, and Compass. In the event of a no-show or change/cancellation occurring less than 24 hours before the scheduled instruction session, pre-paid fees will be forfeited and no refund will be offered.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Jessica Hall
    Add

    6 weeks X 25-minute Private Music Lesson weeks for new or returning, beginner or advanced students with Jessica Hall in:


  • Piano;
  • Voice;
  • Ukuele
  • Song/Theory Books/Sheet Music: Instructor will provide an Amazon link for parent to order the recommended music book(s).


    Cancellation/Rescheduling: In the event of a change in your schedule, Compass requires 24 hours notice to reschedule the private lessons. Every effort will be made to reschedule the session at a time that is mutually agreeable to the teacher, the student/client, and Compass. In the event of a no-show or change/cancellation occurring less than 24 hours before the scheduled instruction session, pre-paid fees will be forfeited and no refund will be offered.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Jessica Hall
    Add

    7 weeks X 25-minute Private Music Lesson weeks for new or returning, beginner or advanced students with Jessica Hall in:


  • Piano;
  • Voice;
  • Ukuele
  • Song/Theory Books/Sheet Music: Instructor will provide an Amazon link for parent to order the recommended music book(s).


    Cancellation/Rescheduling: In the event of a change in your schedule, Compass requires 24 hours notice to reschedule the private lessons. Every effort will be made to reschedule the session at a time that is mutually agreeable to the teacher, the student/client, and Compass. In the event of a no-show or change/cancellation occurring less than 24 hours before the scheduled instruction session, pre-paid fees will be forfeited and no refund will be offered.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Jessica Eastridge
    Add

    This program has two in-person meetings each Monday: a 45-minute instrument family sectional at 11:40 am and a 55-minute all-instrument group practice session from 1:00 pm- 1:55 pm. Band students must take both sectional and group together. Registration for a sectional will automatically enroll the student in the group session.

    Enjoy the camaraderie and cooperation of making music with others in a school band! Join the first homeschool concert band in the region at Compass. This band is for beginner and advanced beginner musicians of brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments.

    Students in beginner percussion will learn to play the snare drum and mallet instruments (such as glockenspiel and xylophone). They will learn proper stick and mallet grip, posture, and playing position for concert percussion instrumentals. Students will learn the fundamentals of music reading. The group will practice short songs in Concert B-flat and Concert E-flat major (and their relative minors) on mallet instruments and basic rudiments on snare drum. Students will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing percussion instruments and will play both cooperatively in small ensembles and independently.

    Students in beginner woodwinds will learn to play the flute or clarinet (4th-8th grade) or alto saxophone (7th-8th grade only). They will learn how to hold their instruments with proper posture and hand position and correct embouchure (mouth position and blowing technique) for the instrument. Students will receive instruction on the parts of their instruments and how to safely, correctly, and independently assemble and clean them. Students will learn the fundamentals of music reading, and the group will practice short songs in Concert B-flat and Concert E-flat major (and their relative minors). Students will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing woodwind instruments and will play both cooperatively in small ensembles and independently.

    Students in beginner brass will learn to play the trumpet, trombone, or euphonium (4th-8th grade) and French horn or tuba (7th-8th grade students only). They will learn how to hold their instruments with proper posture and hand position and correct embouchure (mouth position and blowing technique) for the instrument. Students will receive instruction on the parts of their instruments and how to safely, correctly, and independently assemble and clean them. Students will learn the fundamentals of music reading, and the group will practice short songs in Concert B-flat and Concert E-flat major (and their relative minors). Students will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing woodwind instruments and will play both cooperatively in small ensembles and independently.

    Students will need to rent or purchase an instrument and accessories for the band. See the linked list by instrument.

    There is a $33.00 supply fee due payable to Compass on/before the start of class for the "Do It! Play (a Band Instrument)" book and workbook t and the sheet music songs used for the group band performance.>

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Ashley Ramsey
    Add

    5th grade math is a full-year, complete math curriculum for students who have covered the 4th grade equivalent math skills (see prerequisites). This course uses the Grade 5 Math Mammoth curriculum which homeschool guru Cathy Duffy (cathyduffyreviews.com) calls "an amazingly well-developed program." She praises the program saying, "Math Mammoth has created a very high-quality product... the content is also top-notch. Some people have compared Math Mammoth with Singapore Math since both programs teach for mastery and understanding." Read more about Math Mammoth here: https://www.mathmammoth.com/complete-curriculum

    This class meets twice a week and is designed to be a complete program in which students receive instruction in person at Compass and complete homework on off-days at home. Parents do not have to select a curriculum or deliver the instruction, but rather are expected to ensure that assignments are being completed on time and assisting the student in checking attempted homework.

    Topics covered in Grade 5 Math Mammoth include:

    • Chapter 1: The Four Operations
    • Chapter 2: Large Numbers and the Calculator
    • Chapter 3: Problem Solving
    • Chapter 4: Decimals, Part 1
    • Chapter 5: Graphing
    • Chapter 6: Decimals, Part 2
    • Chapter 7: Fractions: Add and Subtract
    • Chapter 8: Fractions: Multiply and Divide
    • Chapter 9: Geometry

    4th Grade Math is being offered at Compass as a full year class with 59 in-person class meetings. Attendance is very important. In the event of a missed class due to illness or travel, students may cover the missed lesson through online recorded lectures by the author available on YouTube.

    Prerequisites: Grade 4 Math or equivalent, with experience/familiarity in following:

    • Addition and subtraction
    • Early algebraic thinking
    • The order of operations
    • Graphs
    • Large numbers and place value
    • Rounding and estimating
    • Multi-digit multiplication
    • Word problems
    • Some basic conversions between measuring units
    • Measuring length
    • Time calculations
    • Long division
    • The concept of remainder
    • Factors
    • Area and perimeter
    • Measuring and drawing angles
    • Classifying triangles according to their angles
    • Adding and subtracting fractions and mixed numbers (like fractional parts)
    • Equivalent fractions
    • Comparing fractions
    • Multiplying fractions by whole numbers
    • The concept of a decimal (tenths/hundredths)
    • Comparing decimals

    For guidance if a child is ready for Grade 5 math, parents can administer the Math Mammoth end-of-4th-grade placement test. A score of 80% is recommended to place into Grade 5.

    Assignments: Assignments will be made in class as a range of pages to complete on the topics that were taught in class. The instructor will follow up with an email repeating the assigned pages.

    Assessments: Each class, the instructor will check that students have completed the assigned homework. Homework will be recorded as attempted or not attempted. Parents will be provided with an answer key for homework. Students will have take-home unit tests that will be graded by the instructor. Parents may track unit test scores in order to assign their own grades and complete homeschool record-keeping.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $52.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for Grade 5, color edition worktext books. Students will be issued the 5A book first semester, and the 5B book second semester.

    What to Bring: Students should bring a spiral notebook, pencil, and their worktext to class each week.

    Prerequisites: 4th Grade Math, See Description

    2
    Judith Harmon
    Add

    Kids take to the stage as they collaboratively write and perform their very own play with unique characters and an original storyline. What happens when campers have to deal with tent troubles, campfire calamities, a bothersome bear and other camping catastrophes?


    Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other and start to brainstorm about their original play. Through group activities and guided discussion, the student actors will decide on characters, conflict, and conclusion, and the story they want to tell. The script will be developed and customized for this class with input from the students.


    The class will learn the practical aspects of acting, as they work on script read-through, blocking, costume/prop design, and planning the show. Student actors will explore skills such as stage movement, character development, emotional expression, and observation/concentration while learning to portray their original character. Students will develop their own "actor's toolkit" of voice, body, and imagination in this creative process! Actors will grow in confidence and communication skills in preparation for a final sharing with parents on the last day of the


    Once the script is fully developed with everyone's parts, it will be emailed to parents. Parents will be expected to help their children memorize their script/lines/cues and assemble a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity. Note: Students who are emerging readers (not able to read at a 3rd/4th grade level) would be better suited to the Young Actor's Playhouse class, rather than this level.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Jen Hallworth
    Add

    This is a complete course in high school Algebra I which will cover fundamental concepts in algebra and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. This course is designed to emphasize the study of algebraic problem-solving with the incorporation of real-world applications. Topics in Algebra I include number systems, linear systems, rational numbers, complex numbers, exponents, roots, radicals, quadratic equations, polynomials, factoring, absolute values, ratios, and proportions. In addition, the course will cover solving and graphing systems of functions, linear equations, and inequalities. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem-solving. Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation in pre-algebra topics in order to take this class. In addition, students should be capable of copying the sample problems and solutions worked in class on the white board to his/her own notes as examples for completing homework. Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class to complete practice problems, homework, and assessments. Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload. Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by: checking that weekly homework sets are complete; spot-checking the full solution 1-2 select problems in class each week, and giving quarterly take-home tests. Points will also be awarded for class participation. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. See the instructor's webpage for detailed homework and test policy, including late work and re-work. Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Algebra I: Expressions, Equations, and Applications by Paul A. Foerster. It is available in a few different editions, each of which is virtually identical: 2nd edition (ISBN-10 020125073X, ISBN-13 978-0201250732), 3rd edition (ISBN-10 0201860945, ISBN-13 978-0201860948), and Classic edition (ISBN-10 020132458X, ISBN-13 978-0201324587). It is also available under the title Foerster Algebra I, Classics edition (ISBN-10 0131657089, ISBN-13 978-0131657083). A calculator is not needed for this course. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Algebra I for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Albert Thompson
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    In this class, students will engage with American History from a unique, thoughtful perspective, facilitated by college professor Dr. Albert Thompson who is a "researcher, problem solver, and educator." Dr. Thompson is considered a historian of the state, culture, and conflict. He was homeschooled through high school and will guide high school students to use "historical data to advance solutions to contemporary problems."

    First semester will cover American History I from 1607 through the start of the War of 1812. The class will uncover history that is often overlooked or downplayed, such as the Inter-Colonial Wars as a precursor to the American Revolution. Professor Thompson encourages students to think deeply about history by introducing individuals and groups in a way that lets students put themselves in others' places. He covers the worldviews that were dominant at the time as a way to explain what motivated historical figures and decisions of the day. Conflicts will be closely examined since throughout history, war is always a catalyst that causes economic and social conditions to change dramatically in the shortest period of time. Major themes that will be covered this semester include Indigenous America, Colliding Cultures, British North America, Colonial Society, the American Revolution, a New Nation, and the Early Republic.

    Topics in this Series: First Settlement to First Crisis, 1607-1812 (Semester 1), Civil War to Reconstruction, 1812-1890 (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: None

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week on readings. Readings should be treated as pre-readings which students complete before class in order to engage in in-class discussion.

    Assignments: Reading assignments will be communicated weekly to students. This class will not have written assignments or projects.

    Assessments: The instructor will not give quizzes or provide assessments. Parents may elect to administer online quizzes that are available through the e-textbook website for purposes of assessment their own student's understanding of major themes.

    Textbook/Materials: The class will use The American Yawp, and open-source online textbook from Stanford University Press (www.americanyawp.com). Students may read chapters online or download a pdf.

    What to Bring: Paper or notebook; pen or pencil; assigned chapter.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in American history for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Fatimah Aziz
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    Students of ASL will continue to improve their fluency in this 2nd year course. As students become more advanced signers, emphasis will be on focusing on the meaning of a conversation (whole) rather than individual signs (parts). In conversation, students will learn to confirm information by asking questions in context. Second year students will continue to build their vocabulary, apply ASL grammar, and will learn to make requests, ask for advice, give opinions, make comparisons and use superlatives, and narrate stories. Other skills covered in ASL II include expressing year, phone numbers, time, and currency in numbers, appearance, clothing, giving directions, locations, etc. Each unit will include presentations and readings on Deaf culture and Deaf history. Class time will be dedicated to interactive ASL activities and signing practice.

    ASL students will have a Deaf instructor. She regularly teaches all-hearing classes and is an excellent role model for students to meet and interact with a native speaker of ASL and to lean natural facial expressions, gestures, and body language used in Deaf communications. ASL students will have more confidence when they encounter Deaf instructors in college or greet speakers of ASL in social settings. Because the instructor is Deaf, students are not permitted to speak aloud in class. This approach improves visual attention and encourages immersion in the language. Students will be able to ask questions of the instructor by writing on individual white boards, but they will be encouraged to sign in order to communicate with the instructor. Lessons are facilitated with Power Point presentations, and a professional ASL interpreter will assist the class on the first day of class.

    Hundreds of colleges and universities, including all public institutions of higher learning in Virginia, accept ASL as a distinct foreign language. This allows hearing and Deaf students to fulfill foreign language requirements for admission to college. Teens who have difficulty writing, spelling, or have challenging pronunciation in English, can be successful with ASL as a second or foreign language choice. Penn State University research demonstrated that the visual and kinesthetic elements of ASL helped to enhance the vocabulary, spelling, and reading skills in hearing students.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours each week outside of class on required vocabulary exercises, readings, and signing practice.

    Assignments: Homework assignments will be posted online in the Canvas digital classroom platform. Through Canvas, students will be asked to post short videos of themselves signing as homework. Enrolled students will be asked to review ASL 1 vocabulary, grammar, and facial expressions.

    Assessments: The instructor will assign points using a class rubric for the parent's use in assigning a course grade. Course rubrics will evaluate students on their sign production, fingerspelling, ASL grammar, facial expressions including "above the nose" grammar (brows and body movement), and "below the nose" modifiers (lip expressions).

    Textbook/Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $50.00 payable to Compass for the digital access code for the interactive e-textbook, TRUE+WAY ASL. With their subscription, students may also accces a free searchable, bilingual ASL & English dictionary, called What's the Sign?

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in World Languages for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Tia Murchie-Beyma
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    AP students are required to enroll in this additional lecture section. The lecture is recorded and open to all Modern World History Students. It is tentatively scheduled for 12:00 pm- 12:55 pm online (subject to an alternate time by consensus of AP-enrolled students). A physical meeting room will be designated for on-campus students who have classes immediately before or after this virtual session.

    Prerequisites: Completion of Algebra I

    2
    Scott Sarich
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    Around the World is a creative, interactive examination of world geography! Against the backdrop of a giant, classroom-sized map, students will engage in an interactive investigation of aspects of physical and human geography, region-by-region. The class will cooperatively create the mega map adding features and details week by week as their understanding of the region expands. All students will contribute to coloring countries, depicting demarcations, rendering rivers, sketching seas, mapping mountains, delineating deserts, situating cities, crafting clay contours, and fashioning famous landmarks. The custom mega map will serve as a giant game board for in-class simulations, scavenger hunts, strategy games, and more.

    Geography is much more than just maps and mountain ranges! First quarter will explore the geography of Europe from Madrid to Minsk, Naples to Norway, and Baltic to Black Seas. For example, the class will learn about the lands, features, inhabitants, and phenomena and five themes of geography (location, place, human and environment interaction, movements, and regions) for each area that they study. For each major region, the class may look at aspects of human geography: political boundaries, prominent cities, cultural, social, and economic themes (dominant languages, religions, ethnic groups, agriculture, and trade), along with aspects of physical geography such as landforms, waterways, climate zones, biomes, etc.

    There is a $25.00 supply fee due payable to the instructor on/before the start of class. Topics in this Series: Europe (Quarter 1); Russia & East Asia (Quarter 2); Middle East & North Africa (Quarter 3); Sub-Saharan Africa (Quarter 4); Second Year 2025-26- South & Southeast Asia (Quarter 5); Central and South America (Quarter 6); North America (Quarter 7); and Australia, Oceania, Earth's Poles & Oceans (Quarter 8)

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Kerry Diederich
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    Elementary artists can get in on the action as they learn about a different artist or artistic style and create representative pieces using a wide range of artistic supplies such as tempura and water color paints, pastels, pencils, cray pas, oil pastel crayons, specialty papers, sculpting media, and embellishments.


    In this workshop, the class will voyage to Paris and The Louvre museum. Students will create art inspired by Paris and its artists, mimic masterpieces in the Louvre and create special projects featuring the Eiffel Tower. There is a $15.00 supply fee due payable to the instructor on or before the start of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Taliesin Knol
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    Students will engage in a hands-on 3D battle strategy game using the military dioramas that they make! In the lead up to the First World War, the new German Empire needed a powerful fleet of modern warships to establish itself as a world power. This could only mean the Dreadnought Battleship, the strongest, fastest, and best-protected ship of their era. Reluctant to use their obscenely expensive Dreadnoughts, the two largest fleets in Europe- the British Home Fleet and the German High Seas Fleet- eyed each other across the English Channel in the early years of WWI. The smaller German force hoped they could break Britain's stranglehold blockade. Nearly 100 German and 150 British ships would clash off the coast of Jutland in a battle that would determine the fate of the whole war.

    Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will each form a 10" X 14" shaped, foam diorama with landscape elements (Islands, reefs, harbors, minefields, etc) to represent the only large clash of dreadnought battleships! Students will each receive scale miniature naval ships to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate the larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Axis and Allies War at Sea gaming rule system for moving ships and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices.

    The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical background and circumstances leading up to the specific battle. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents.

    There is a $25.00 materials fee due payable to the instructor on/before the first day of class. Topics in this series include: Naval Conflict-Jutland (Quarter 1), Germany's Last Offensive (Quarter 2), America's Arrival (Quarter 3), and the 100 Days Offensive/Fall of Germany (Quarter 4)

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Peter Snow

    Students will enjoy the logic and challenge of the timeless strategy board game as they learn and play chess with classmates. In Intermediate Chess 1, students will learn skills that build upon each other such as: 8 questions to ask before you move, mating nets, piece defenses against common tactics, forcing combinations, king and pawn endings, offensive opening tactics, and review of two-move checkmates tactics.


    Learning and playing chess supports problem solving, decision making, critical and creative thinking, general cognitive ability, scholastic skills, and mathematical achievement (Univ. of Minnesota). Experts suggest that the game of chess teaches analytical and disciplined thinking skills, while raising self esteem, teaching motivation and determination, and sportsmanship (Kasparov Foundation). Each class will be spent half on technique and half in practice matches with classmates while the instructor coaches. Students should have 30+ hours of chess instruction prior to enrolling in Intermediate Chess, a working knowledge of most skills taught in the Compass Beginner and Advanced Beginner Chess levels, or instructor permission.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Jessica Eastridge
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    Children will enjoy the camaraderie and cooperation of making music together with others in a beginning school band! They will be introduced to brass and woodwind instruments using child-sized plastic instruments from Nuvo. These instruments offer the same fingering, hand positions, embouchure (mouth position and blowing technique) and reeds as their full-sized metal and wood counterparts in a range of fun, lively colors. Parents should purchase the Nuvo Toot for a child wanting to learn flute or the Nuvo Dood for a child wanting to learn a single reed instrument like the clarinet or saxophone. The Nuvo instruments cost approximately $30.00 and are considered a "step up" from a traditional plastic recorder with silicone keys, accurate mouthpieces, and a 1.5 octave range in the 'C' key. Students will learn to read music and play as a group. The Children's Beginner Band will get students ready to join the Compass Homeschool Concert Band as 4th graders. Student may join the Children's Band at any quarter and may continue from one quarter to the next as the instructor continues to introduce new songs and skills.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Diane Wright Cobb
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    Little kids will be introduced to watercolor painting in a small group class under the guidance of a professional painter and art teacher. The class will learn the theory of color mixing and the techniques of blending, building up color, creating gradients, and applying light washes. The class will learn how to select the right brush and how to use water to create different effects. Our new painters will practice using paint and brush strokes to create effects like light and shadow, dimension, and texture, and how to develop backgrounds, foregrounds, and detail work. Students will try techniques such as applying and removing paint, layering, stippling, and dabbing, along with wet and dry brush techniques. Students will complete several paintings on canvas boards. A variety of subjects, such as still life, animals, florals, landscapes, seascapes, fantasy, abstracts, or "mimic the masters" will be introduced to illustrate different painting techniques through in-class projects. There is an $15.00 supply fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this series include: Watercolor Painting (Quarter 1), Tempera Painting (Quarter 2), Acrylic Painting (Quarter 3), and MultiMedia Painting (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Karen Shumway
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    Dissection! The critical lab skill that schools skip and parents hate hosting at home. This lab can be paired with any independent study or online course in high school biology or anatomy in order to gain significant hands-on experience or to complete a lab science credit.

    Students will investigate the comparative anatomy of a variety of organisms and organs through a year-long dissection study. Class time will be primarily devoted to hands-on exploration with important background information posted in Canvas as slide presentations. Students will begin with an exploration of organisms from a range of phyla, in order of increasing complexity: prokarya, simple eukarya, nematode, sponge, mussel or clam, jellyfish, starfish, earthworm, squid or octopus, crayfish, grasshopper, perch, dogfish shark, frog, owl pellets (for small mammal remains), and fetal pig. The complex organ systems of vertebrates will then be systematically explored, dissecting a critical organ for each system. Where appropriate, organs of multiple species will be used to allow comparison between vertebrates: the circulatory system (pig heart), nervous system (sheep brain), excretory system (pig kidney), sensory system (cow/sheep/pig eyeballs), and musculoskeletal system (chicken wings and cow femur). Students will also use microscopes to look at wet (i.e. fresh or live) and dry mount (i.e. prepared) organism and tissue samples throughout the year.

    The class will cover lab safety, practice proper dissection techniques, and how to set up and maintain a lab journal with notes and drawings of organs and organisms. Students will have a pre-lab activity (lecture slides, video, and/or packet) to complete each week as "admission" to the following session's dissection.

    Prerequisites: Students must have age/grade-level dexterity and fine motor skills for the detailed instrument work in this class.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1 hour per week outside of class.

    Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, and track grades.

    Assessments: Will not be given

    Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase The Anatomy Coloring Book (ISBN-13 : 978-0321832016)

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $140.00 is due payable to the instructor on or before the first day of class.

    What to Bring: Students should bring a paper or a notebook, pen or pencil, and a set of colored pencils to class each week.

    What to Wear: Students should not wear any loose, drapey clothing to lab. They should also come to class with long hair tied back and should wear closed toe shoes.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in a laboratory science for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mylene Nyman
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    Students will enjoy making delicious recipes and family favorites that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

    • Asparagus Gruyere Puff Pastry Bundles
    • Dumpling Soup
    • Green Bean Salad
    • Sicilian Brussels Sprouts
    • Italian Sheet Pan Chicken
    • Beef-Cheddar Mac & Cheese
    • Apple Pecan Tarts (contains nuts)
    Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week. Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on or before the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). Cooking Class Requirements:For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mylene Nyman
    Add

    Students will enjoy making delicious recipes and family favorites that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

    • Asparagus Gruyere Puff Pastry Bundles
    • Dumpling Soup
    • Green Bean Salad
    • Sicilian Brussels Sprouts
    • Italian Sheet Pan Chicken
    • Beef-Cheddar Mac & Cheese
    • Apple Pecan Tarts (contains nuts)

    Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.

    Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics.

    Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4).

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on or before the first day of class.

    What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided.

    What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).

    Cooking Class Requirements:For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mylene Nyman
    Add

    Students will enjoy making delicious recipes and family favorites that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

    • Asparagus Gruyere Puff Pastry Bundles
    • Dumpling Soup
    • Green Bean Salad
    • Sicilian Brussels Sprouts
    • Italian Sheet Pan Chicken
    • Beef-Cheddar Mac & Cheese
    • Apple Pecan Tarts (contains nuts)
    Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week. Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on or before the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). Cooking Class Requirements:For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Pete Van Riper
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    Anyone can learn to draw! A professional artist will teach kids how to draw a variety of projects by breaking down complex forms and figures into simple shapes and giving them dimensions through shading, shadow, and textures. Projects will focus on fantasy and fictional subjects which are a great choice to keep beginning artists from becoming frustrated when their work does not look "the real thing."


    Bam! Pow! First quarter, students will be introduced to the fundamentals of drawing comics, with an emphasis on drawing fantasy characters and developing a storyline. They will be taught the basics of illustrating an animal or an imaginary creature by combining and replicating simple shapes to create the character's form. The class will learn to draw simple costumes and props around their character to convey setting without drawing elaborate landscapes, and they will learn how to express thoughts and conversation through dialogue bubbles.


    This is not a “follow-the-leader” or copy/mimic art class, but rather a supportive environment where students are encouraged to create their own fantasy characters and scenarios. They will receive individual coaching and feedback to develop the characters that they dream up rather than trying to replicate well-known existing characters like DC, Marvel, Disney, or Looney Tunes. Young artists having fun playing off each other’s ideas to draw outrageous imaginary characters and worlds. The instructor will often use prompts to get the ideas flowing and to encourage collaboration. The instructor has a class rule that illustrations must be rated “G” with no violence (guns, knives, blood/gore) and will often suggest alternatives such as battle with unexpected objects like baguettes or bananas!


    Students' practice illustrations and draft renderings will be drawn with regular #2 pencil in sketchbooks, but they are welcome to add color to their work with colored pencils or markers, if desired. There is a $15.00 material fee payable to the instructor on the first day for a sketchbook and shared classroom art supplies. Topics in this Series include: Comic Art and Characters (Quarter 1); Comics with a Cast of Characters (Quarter 2), Fantastical Figures (Quarter 3), and Playful Portraits (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Pete Van Riper
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    Students will draw in a relaxed, informal studio setting, where they will learn the fundamentals of drawing along with the elements of art and principles of design. Most drawing projects are "student's own" where each artist selects their own subject to incorporate demonstrated techniques such as representing light and dark, creating texture and patterns, and shading to show dimension.

    First quarter, students will learn to translate what they observe in real life to 2D on paper. Example beginning projects include a pumpkin, a cow skull, and class favorite, "Walter" the teddy bear. Throughout the course, students will progress to draw more carefully and more accurately and to represent more refined details in their drawings.

    The instructor will demonstrate various techniques by developing a sample drawing. Students may elect to follow the class sample or may apply the drawing skills to an entirely unique drawing. This class is suitable for beginners who have never drawn before and for intermediate art students who have worked with other media and are interested in exploring drawing. Drawing can provide a relaxing, needed break from rigorous academic classes and over-scheduled lives in a fun, supportive environment.

    Topics in this Series: Everyday Objects (Quarter 1), Portraits and Creative Caricatures (Quarter 2), Creating Narrative (Quarter 3), and Imitating Illustration Styles (Quarter 4).

    Workload: Work outside of class is optional for those who wish to practice their drawing techniques.

    Assessments: Individual feedback is given in class. Formal assessments will not be given.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $18.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a sketchbook, a pencil box with pencils of varying hardness, and an eraser. Returning drawing students do not need to pay a supply fee and are expected to replace their drawing supplies as needed, with similar or better quality.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Taliesin Knol
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    After the Fall of Rome, people kept stories alive of the heroes who defended civilization in the face of barbarian invasions. In Britain, and perhaps all of Europe, there is none more famous than the legend of King Arthur. The Myth of Arthur begins with Saxon invasions and "the last Roman," Artorius Rex, in the 5th century CE, but the tale wasn't written down until the 9th century and not popularized until the 12th century! Cleric Geoffrey of Monmouth adapted earlier legends in his work, "The History of the Kings of Britain" where he introduced characters like Merlin the wizard, Arthur's family, and his sword Excalibur. These would be further "medievalized" by other authors to give us the Knights of the Round Table at Camelot, the Quest for the Holy Grail, and other medieval romances and tales of Chivalry.

    Each student will create an individual diorama recreating or interpreting a scene from Arthurian Myth: castles on hills, European battlefields, or dragon's lairs! Students will craft and hand-shape their scene on a 10" x 14" foam board using artistic, model-making techniques. They will customize their dioramas with landscape elements, waterways, structures of the time, and paint. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature warriors, then combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to create larger terrain. Students will then compete in history-based survival strategy games. This will reinforce lessons about the culture, economy, warfare, and mythology of the time. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them.

    Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. Topics in this series include: King Arthur (Quarter 1), 1001 Arabian Nights (Quarter 2), Joan of Arc (Quarter 3), William Wallace and the Scottish Uprising (Quarter 4). There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Taliesin Knol
    Add

    This class begins with the transition from farm to factory. Students will begin the semester as "independently wealthy" barons and tycoons of various mid-century industries. The class will use a custom Role-Playing Game to simulate a fully industrialized economy. From day one, students will be assigned to key roles in industry, from railroads and shipping, to a variety of factories or resource extraction. They must manage their initial investments wisely or risk being overrun by their classmates. They will endeavor to dominate their market and rule the supply and demand, or risk ending up penniless. In true role-playing fashion, they will create characters and build their "backstories" to fit into this economy. Will they be Carnegies and Rockefellers, or will they run out of steam?

    Using the lessons taught in class, students will navigate their interconnected business world, learning to either cooperate with or destroy their rivals. Using their carefully documented ledgers, the class will learn to manage key business elements, from keeping their labor force happy enough not to strike, forging deals and making partnerships, and of course, influencing government policy to their benefit.

    The end of the semester should make clear how each business is interdependent on another, the benefits of cooperation or forceful acquisition. What role does a good (or bad) government play in encouraging and safeguarding investment and for whose benefit? Above all, it should stress the importance of keeping orderly records, making safe vs highly rewarding investments, and how to successfully manage working relationships. By recreating the circumstances of the industrial revolution, and navigating them in the role playing game, students should understand the why and how, to the history they've played through.

    Topics in this Series: Tycoons, Titans & Tyrants- Late 19th century (Semester 1), Corporations, Capitalists & Consumers- Early 20th century (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: None

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Course documents including period plans, photographs and recreations will be made available through a class Google Drive link emailed to parents (and students who provide their email address), as well as a class reading list of articles/excerpts and YouTube playlist for any videos watched in class or assigned as homework.

    Assessments: Informal assessments will be given at the instructor's discretion, but assignments will not be scored or graded. Each student's financial success in the game will be an indicator of their learning and participation for purposes of assigning a grade. Parents will also be given shared access to their student's business plan with instructor and ledger, with instructor comments at the conclusion of class.

    Textbook/Materials: None

    What to Bring: Paper or notebook, pen or pencil

    Credit: Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History, Economics, or Business for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Becca Sticha

    Focus on the "E" in STEM- Engineering! Discover the everyday challenges we can solve through engineering in this hands-on, project-focused class! Students will tackle simulated challenges that span a variety of engineering disciplines and practice the three main steps of the engineering design process by asking, "What is the problem?", "What are possible solutions?" and, "How can I improve on the design?"


    First quarter, the class will learn about the careers of Civil Engineers and their responsibility for designing, constructing, and maintaining public infrastructure such as dams, bridges, tunnels, roads, airports, subway systems, and water supply systems. Students will model civil engineering challenges with projects such as the newspaper bridge challenge, spaghetti skyscraper, a geodesic dome, and earthquake-proof structures.


    Students will work together to solve problems and brainstorm options given a variety of project materials. For each project, students will be challenged to adjust their designs, make modifications, re-design to optimize their creations, and retest performance. Basic building, measuring, data collection, and equations will be used to challenge all minds in engineering!


    There is a $25.00 supply fee due payable to the instructor on/before the start of class. Topics in this Series include: Civil Lab (Quarter 1); Electrical Lab (Quarter 2); Mechanical Lab (Quarter 3); and Green (Sustainable) Lab (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Osk Huneycutt
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    A powerful hurricane season forecasted. Polar ice caps receding. Hydraulic fracking. Solar power. Everywhere we look, Environmental Science is in the news! Environmental science is an exciting interdisciplinary study that merges the fields of geology, biology, chemistry, and meteorology to explain the earth as an interconnected system with both natural and human-made influences. This year middle schoolers will sample Environmental Science topics in a hands-on, lab-based investigation. First quarter, students will begin their study of Geology and Soil Sciences and discover the ways geology, paleontology, soil science and agricultural sciences are used in environmental research. The class will learn about techniques such as carbon dating, and sediment and ice core analysis, that scientists use to investigate current environmental issues such as human impacts to carbon and nitrogen cycling, pesticide use, the use of genetically modified organisms to improve agricultural yields, and the ongoing loss of pollinators. Students will do in-class labs to make predictions, collect and graph data, draw conclusions, and develop models of key Environmental Science processes. Topics in this series include: Geology and Soil Sciences (first quarter); Atmospheric Science (second quarter); Water Science (third quarter); and Current Issues in Environmental Science (fourth quarter). There is a $20.00 lab fee due payable to the instructor on/before the first day of class for consumable materials.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Iman Castaneda

    FUNctional Fitness is a dynamic PE program for that incorporates well-rounded exercises to get tweens up and moving mid-day! No two workouts are the same, but each day's activities incorporate exercises that target 10 areas: cardio-vascular endurance, stamina, strength, flexibility, power, speed, coordination, agility, balance, and accuracy. FUNctional Fitness focuses on functional movements that are fundamental to all aspects of play and exercise- pulling, pushing, running, throwing, climbing, lifting, and jumping. Work-outs are scalable and adaptable to different individual's own level, and the emphasis is on fun, safety, and personal accomplishment rather than competition among classmates. When the weather permits, some exercises may be taken outdoors. The physical challenges of FUNctional Fitness will foster self-confidence, focus, and help instill a foundation for a lifetime of fitness.


    The color name in the class title refers to the collectable token students will earn each quarter they take the class. Collect all 8! Students may enroll in FUNctional Fitness at any time, regardless of the color name No one color is a prerequisite for any other color, and tokens can be earned in any order.


    All equipment is furnished. Students are asked to wear loose, comfortable clothing, such as running pants or sweatpants, and comfortable, supportive athletic shoes. FUNctional Fitness continues each quarter, and students may repeat the class to continue to improve fitness. No two workouts are the same!

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Mylene Nyman
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    Compass cooks will enjoy a culinary tour of the world with Global Gourmet classes! Menus feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients seasoned and prepared to represent regional flavors and traditional dishes from the featured country. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. The Compass chefs' gastronomy adventures will include:

  • Maple Sriracha 'Devils on Horseback' (Dates with Blue Cheese and Bacon appetizer)
  • Irish Stew
  • Pea and Bean Salad
  • Irish Pan Haggerty
  • Welsh Anglesey Eggs
  • Bangers and Mash (tweens/teens levels)
  • Beans on Toast (kids/little kids levels)
  • Scottish Dundee Cake
  • Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.

    Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics.

    Topics in this Series: Best of the British Isles (Quarter 1), Savory Scandinavian (Quarter 2), Tasty Thai (Quarter 3), Great Greek (Quarter 4).

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on or before the first day of class.

    What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided.

    What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).

    Cooking Class Requirements: For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Tayler Shreve
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    Information Masters transforms students into savvy consumers and producers of information capable of navigating today's intimidating infosphere. This class introduces high school students to the latest in academic and electronic resources and methodologies for conducting meaningful inquiry and research. Each week, students will develop new media literacy skills necessary for high school and college research writing.

    First semester, students will learn strategies to navigate the traditional and digital resources of a library, tips on working with a librarian, and techniques to access library resources. Each student will be asked to obtain a library card during a field trip to the local library. They will learn how to conduct a search of the library, Google Scholar, and academic search engines and practice ways to locate and skim primary sources, secondary sources, and scholarly publications.

    Students will become educated consumers of information and learn how to select the best resources for their informational needs and not merely the first ones that "pop up" in a browser search. They will practice fact-checking a source and distinguishing a verified and credible source (such as a .gov or .edu website) versus less reliable sources like Wikipedia, blogs, and tabloid articles.

    The class will learn to review reliable sources as the inspiration for a narrower, more focused research topic. They will create mini-maps, circle or identify key words, and draw Venn diagrams comparing similarities and differences on a topic in order to formulate a specific research question. Students will apply ChatGPT to their research topic to gain experience with AI tools and evaluate the accuracy and credibility of the results.

    Once students have used research to identify an area of interest, they will be guided through identifying and refining a research question. Topics can come from scientific or social science research, quantitative and/or qualitative research, or any favorite topic from favorite books and authors, video games, or music artists. Students will learn to skim read and scan sources and extract information from article abstracts. Students taking this course on-level will be expected to locate published literature on their topic, while those taking the course at the honors level will be expected to locate, interpret, and evaluate published literature. All students will be asked to write a brief summary explaining their research question, and honors students will be asked to write a one-paragraph critique of at least five resources.

    Topics in this Series: Inquiry & Investigation (Semester 1) and Research & Reflection (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: Reading and writing at grade-level.

    Workload: On-level students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class. Honors students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes, track grades, and message instructor and classmates.

    Assessments: The instructor will assign points for the completion of various assignments, and parents can use the total point earned versus possible for determining a grade in the class.

    Textbook/Materials: All articles and reference materials will be available online or posted as pdfs on the class Canvas site.

    What to Bring: Students should bring a laptop or tablet to class, paper or notebook, and pen or pencil.

    Non-Meeting Days: In addition to the scheduled days-off on the published Compass schedule, this class does not meet on Monday, September 23.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English or Language Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Manal Hussein

    This year-long, hands-on science course is a survey of key concepts in the fields of Life Science, Physical Science, and Earth Science which will give 7th and 8th grade students the fundamentals they need to tackle high school-level Biology, Chemistry, Physics, or Environmental Science. Topics covered in this course will not only provide a foundation for higher level science, but will also boost the student's confidence and fluency in discussing scientific issues, applying scientific terminology, and using scientific equipment. Content covered in this course will also enable a teen to become a more educated reader and consumer of scientific news and information. General life science themes include life cycles, food webs, scientific classification, cell structure, and human body systems. Topics in chemistry include states of matter, atomic structure, elements and the Periodic Table, and chemical reactions and solutions. Themes in physics include motion, position, speed and acceleration, weight (mass), gravity, friction, buoyancy and density, and electricity and magnetism. The earth science unit will cover the rock cycle, minerals, rocks, fossils, weathering and erosion. In this class, students will learn about the principles of scientific investigations and engineering practices, the Scientific Method, and preparation of formal lab reports. They will practice taking measurements, recording data, converting units of measure, and related mathematical concepts such as significant figures, International System of Units, scientific notation, graphs, and data analysis. Students will learn how to provide evidence to support explanations and solutions for their investigations. This class is appropriate for a tween or teen who has had limited middle school level science and who wants to prepare for high school science. In general, a topic will be discussed one week and then the corresponding lab or activity will be performed in class the following week. Microscope work will be used in some life science labs. For a more robust introduction to life and lab sciences, students may want to concurrently register for the Dissection Lab class and/or the Bio Chem Learning Labs program. Meeting Dates: This is a 29-week course that will not meet during the week of May 23-16, 2025. Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class on reading and homework assignments. Assignments: All class announcements and assignments will be communicated via a Google Classroom. Assessments: Informal, qualitative and constructive feedback will be given on submitted assignments. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided. Textbook: Students should purchase Everything You Need to Ace Science in One Big Fat Notebook: The Complete Middle School Study Guide by Workman Publishing (ISBN # 978-0761160953) Materials: Students should bring the following supplies to each class: colored pencils, glue stick, pens or pencils to write with, and a ruler. Lab/Supply Fee: A lab fee of $100.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Credit: This course is not recommended as a high school credit.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Manal Hussein
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    This year-long, hands-on science course is a survey of key concepts in the fields of Life Science, Physical Science, and Earth Science which will give 7th and 8th grade students the fundamentals they need to tackle high school-level Biology, Chemistry, Physics, or Environmental Science. Topics covered in this course will not only provide a foundation for higher level science, but will also boost the student's confidence and fluency in discussing scientific issues, applying scientific terminology, and using scientific equipment. Content covered in this course will also enable a teen to become a more educated reader and consumer of scientific news and information.

    General life science themes include life cycles, food webs, scientific classification, cell structure, and human body systems. Topics in chemistry include states of matter, atomic structure, elements and the Periodic Table, and chemical reactions and solutions. Themes in physics include motion, position, speed and acceleration, weight (mass), gravity, friction, buoyancy and density, and electricity and magnetism. The earth science unit will cover the rock cycle, minerals, rocks, fossils, weathering and erosion.

    In this class, students will learn about the principles of scientific investigations and engineering practices, the Scientific Method, and preparation of formal lab reports. They will practice taking measurements, recording data, converting units of measure, and related mathematical concepts such as significant figures, International System of Units, scientific notation, graphs, and data analysis. Students will learn how to provide evidence to support explanations and solutions for their investigations.

    This class is appropriate for a tween or teen who has had limited middle school level science and who wants to prepare for high school science.

    In general, a topic will be discussed one week and then the corresponding lab or activity will be performed in class the following week. Microscope work will be used in some life science labs. For a more robust introduction to life and lab sciences, students may want to concurrently register for the Dissection Lab class and/or the Bio Chem Learning Labs program.

    Meeting Dates: This is a 29-week course that will not meet during the week of May 23-16, 2025.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class on reading and homework assignments.

    Assignments: All class announcements and assignments will be communicated via a Google Classroom.

    Assessments: Informal, qualitative and constructive feedback will be given on submitted assignments. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided.

    Textbook: Students should purchase Everything You Need to Ace Science in One Big Fat Notebook: The Complete Middle School Study Guide by Workman Publishing (ISBN # 978-0761160953)

    Materials: Students should bring the following supplies to each class: colored pencils, glue stick, pens or pencils to write with, and a ruler.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A lab fee of $100.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Credit: This course is not recommended as a high school credit.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Kerry Diederich

    This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week, students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art, artist, or culture and view sample works. Then, they will create a project in the style of the featured artist or culture using a wide variety of materials, colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.


    First quarter, Junior Artists will learn about French Artists from the genres of Impressionism and Post Impressionism to include Rodin, Cezanne, Seurat, Degas, Renior, Monet, Matisse and Gauguin. These artists were sculptors, painters, draftsmen, and print makers. Each artist influenced the art world with style, color study and interpretation in their own personal way. Students will discuss which artist featured dancers in his subjects, who experimented in color, and which was multi talented artist using many mediums. Junior artists' projects will vary, from painting, to doing drawings, print-making, sculpting, and color studies.


    Topics in this Series: Imitate the Impressionists (Quarter 1); Destination Art (Quarter 2); Multi-Media Masters (Quarter 3); Native American Art (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $25.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Kerry Diederich
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    This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week, students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art, artist, or culture and view sample works. Then, they will create a project in the style of the featured artist or culture using a wide variety of materials, colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.


    First quarter, Junior Artists will learn about French Artists from the genres of Impressionism and Post Impressionism to include Rodin, Cezanne, Seurat, Degas, Renior, Monet, Matisse and Gauguin. These artists were sculptors, painters, draftsmen, and print makers. Each artist influenced the art world with style, color study and interpretation in their own personal way. Students will discuss which artist featured dancers in his subjects, who experimented in color, and which was multi talented artist using many mediums. Junior artists' projects will vary, from painting, to doing drawings, print-making, sculpting, and color studies.


    Topics in this Series: Imitate the Impressionists (Quarter 1); Destination Art (Quarter 2); Multi-Media Masters (Quarter 3); Native American Art (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $25.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Kerry Diederich
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    This workshop is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art or artist, view sample works, and then will create a projects in the style of the artist using a wide variety of materials and representative colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, chalk, fabric, and watercolor paints.


    In this session, Junior Artists will celebrate the wacky, wonderful world of Dr. Seuss. Students will use a variety of materials to create the colorful, imaginative art from some of Dr. Seuss favorites. There is a $10.00 supply fee payable to the instructor on or before the start of the program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Lina Rodriguez
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    Ciencia para niños es un programa de ciencia basado en teoría y técnicas de laboratorio donde nuestros científicos más jóvenes estarán expuestos a conceptos y vocabulario de ciencia, mientras aprenden las habilidades prácticas necesarias para sentirse cómodos con clases de ciencias más avanzadas a medida que crecen. Los estudiantes obtendrán distintos conocimientos acerca de las fases de la materia, moléculas, la vida microscópica, gravedad, los tipos de energía, catapultas, geología, los patrones climáticos y la vida como astronauta. Lo más importante es que ganarán confianza al discutir conceptos científicos y trabajar con equipos y material de laboratorio. Los laboratorios enseñarán a los estudiantes cómo tomar medidas, usar un microscopio, hacer bocetos científicos y pensar críticamente.

    Cada quater reforzará los principios y las habilidades de laboratorio en torno a un tema central. En ciencia para ninos: Quimica, los estudiantes aprenderán sobre ácidos y bases, fases de la materia, densidad, flotabilidad, ósmosis y reacciones químicas simples que desprenden gas o calor. Esta clase tiene una tarifa de laboratorio de $20.00 que se debe pagar al instructor el primer día. Temas: Química (quater 1), Diversión física (quarter 2), Un Mundo vivo (quarter 3) y Tierra y espacio (quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sirdley Taborga
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    Escribir es una habilidad fundamental para la escuela y para la vida en general. Escribir les da voz a los niños!. En esta clase los estudiantes explorarán la escritura de diferentes maneras. Aprenderán los conceptos básicos de una buena redacción y el arte de la revisión. Las clases consistirán en lecciones sencillas sobre escritura y lectura, así como también la práctica de las mismas en clase. Siempre se alentará a los estudiantes a escribir sobre lo que mas les interesa. También se les darán pautas de escritura creativas y divertidas. Trabajaremos de manera que nadie sienta el pánico o la presión de "qué escribir".

    En la primera sesión, los estudiantes escribirán sobre experiencias y recuerdos personales. Este es uno de los temas más fáciles para que los niños empiecen a escribir, ya que normalmente tienen muchas historias que contar. Aprenderán a organizar sus recuerdos de una manera lógica de lo que pasó primero, segundo, último, etc.

    El objetivo de este curso es ayudar a los jóvenes estudiantes a tener mas confianza en la escritura del idioma, aumentar la fluidez de la escritura e incorporar la misma en el trabajo y los juegos cotidianos. Cada semana, el instructor enseñara lecciones breves sobre gramática, ejemplos: tiempos verbales, partes de la oración, uso de adjetivos/ y adverbios, etc. Los estudiantes también aprenderán el proceso de escribir, como ser: preescritura, redacción y revisión.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Becca Sticha
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    LEGO Mindstorms components and motors are not just for building robots! These interconnecting pieces can be constructed into an infinite number of unique, mechanized machines- much like an erector set!

    Each quarter, students will build three unique inventions like a tank, a 4-legged walker, and an inchworm car. Students will incorporate simple machines, complex machines, and small motors into their projects. They will work with wheels, axles, beams, pulleys, tracks, gears, and specialty components used only in these classes.

    Topics in this Series: Inventions (Quarter 1); Creations (Quarter 2): Innovations (Quarter 3); and Apparatus (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Christina Somerville
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    Explore the world of gargantuan gods, humble heroes, and malevolent monsters! Mythology is the birthplace of some of the most entertaining and incredible cultural stories ever written. Some ancient myths even have plots that rival today's comics and blockbuster movies. Many myths still have millennia-old appeal because of their timeless tales of good versus evil, life and death, creation and the afterlife. This class explores the origins of early mythology, from the Egyptians to the Greeks, Romans, Celts, Aztecs, and more through epics, plays and poetry. Readers will explore the realm of mythology through short stories, class discussion, analyses, extension activities and projects that will boost comprehension and the understanding of myths as the basis for many other forms of modern media. Students will enjoy reading and discussing battles, romance, treachery, larger than life heroes and characters, intricate gods and goddesses, and all sorts of fantastical creatures! First quarter, the class will explore Hero Myths, the exciting classic tales of trial and triumph that inspired many modern adventure stories. As examples, students will read about the journeys of Theseus, who defeated the Minotaur in the Labyrinth and navigated various challenges to become king and Hercules, who accomplished heroic feats, battled mythical creatures, and struggled against curses to eventually ascend Olympus as a god. They will also consider the tale of King Arthur, the legendary British king aided by his Knights of the Round Table and their quests for the Holy Grail. For this class, students need to be on-grade-level for reading. Topics in this series include: Heroes (Quarter 1); Origins (Quarter 2); Monsters (Quarter 3); Transformations (Quarter 4)

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Tia Murchie-Beyma
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    This year-long course dives into change and continuity from 1200 CE-present in Africa, Asia, the Americas, Europe, and Oceania. If you want to better understand Russia's interest in Ukraine or China's motives in Africa, how the world came to drive Japanese cars, Zimbabwe's 2020 land offer to white farmers abroad, or more about the roots of your own family's story and its ties to other places and times, this is the course for you. Global connections were not born with jet travel nor Columbus. By the early 1200s, Persian historian Juvayni, reported that one might walk safely from Southeast Asia to Eastern Europe- thanks to Mongol army units stationed along the way. Silk Roads linked Moscow to Tibet. Vibrant Indian Ocean trade circulated goods, people, and animals from China to Indonesia to India, with links to East African coastal cities and the wider Muslim world, including Arab and Turkic peoples. In 200 more years, Muslim Admiral Zheng He would command China's legendary treasure fleet. What of the Americas? Despite sporadic contacts, like Leif Ericson's disastrous family trip to Canada around 1000 CE, the Old World remained ignorant of lands from the Arctic Circle to Tierra del Fuego. Yet precursors to Incan and Aztec empires built impressive urban city-states, while farther north, Cahokia's pyramids and Mesa Verde's cliffside apartments boomed, the Iroquois League united five great nations, and countless other groups thrived as hunter-gatherers, horticulturists, whalers, fishers, and farmers. At 1200 CE, when this course begins, two halves of the world had not yet collided. Students will use tools and perspectives of historians to see this collision in wider context and learn what else built today's world. The class will analyze primary sources created at the time studied and secondary sources such as historian accounts. Students will learn to spot symbols, think critically about claims, and develop arguments based fairly on evidence. The group will interpret maps, letters, paintings, ceramics, propaganda posters, murals, sculptures, photographs, and speeches to understand context, causation, continuity, and change. Students will learn how to run, ruin, revolt from, and reform empires and nations. By the end of the course, students may not have memorized dozens of dates (unless they want to), but they will have a much clearer idea of who was where, when, and why- and how- that has affected us. Note: This is a reading-heavy course suited for students who can commit to completing homework BEFORE each meeting. That prepares you for active discussion, role play, and activities in class. The course is not lecture-based, but instead is taught as a participatory seminar. Simply cannot learn the rich course material by simply attending. However, if you come with your readings completed, ready to ask questions and apply what you've learned, the world (history) is yours! Levels This course is offered at three levels: On-Level, Honors, and Advanced Placement (AP). Each has a different workload, but all meet together. On-Level students use the same college-level textbook, but have fewer readings, less homework, and less rigorous assessments. Honors students have assignm2ents that engage higher-level analysis and historical thinking skills. AP students work at a university freshman level and have the potential to earn college credit or placement through the spring 2025 AP exam. Once the course begins, students may move down a level anytime, but the instructor will consider "bumping up" on a case-by-case basis only. Before August 1, students must email Compass to (1) choose On-Level, Honors, or Advanced Placement (AP); and (2) provide separate email addresses for student plus adult observer. This allows the instructor to send level-specific Canvas invitations in time for book purchases and completing homework due before your first meeting. Schedule: There are two weekly meetings: (1) Friday 12:00 pm -12:55 pm in-person for all students and (2) Monday tentatively scheduled for 12:00 pm- 12:55 pm online (subject to an alternate time by consensus of AP-enrolled students). The latter is required for AP students, but recorded and open to all. For Honors and On-Level, this is a 28-week course that ends two weeks early due to AP exam timing. AP students have 31 weeks, as they begin two weeks before the regular Compass start date and have an additional session for a mock exam. Workload: Honors and On-Level students should plan 4-5 hours per week outside meetings for reading and homework. AP students typically need 6 hours or more, depending on reading speed and experience. All levels use materials written at a freshman college level. Students must be highly skilled readers or have robust reading support at home. Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments; upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests; track grades; message instructor and classmates; and attend virtual conferences. AP students start asynchronously two weeks early with homework due August 22 and 29. All sections will have brief assignments due September 5, the day before the first class meeting on September 6. Assessments: Completed homework, projects, quizzes, and tests receive points and narrative feedback. Parents can calculate a letter grade using the student's points earned divided by points available, in weighted categories that include assignments, reading quizzes, tests, and participation and presentations. Parents may view all scoring and comments at any time through the Canvas site. Textbooks: Students and observers will receive Canvas invitations by August 5 to access to syllabus and initial assignments once they have provided a student and observer email address. All students should purchase or rent: Ways of the World: A Global History with Sources, 3rd ed. 2016, by Strayer, Robert W. (ISBN 9781319022723). Look for an olive green cover with woodcut print of the first Japanese commercial railway in 1872. AP students will need two additional books: (1) A History of the World in 6 Glasses by Tom Standage, 2005 (any ISBN); and (2) Advanced Placement World History: Modern by Logan/Perfection Learning Logan, 2019 (ISBN 1531129161). About AP: "AP" is a trademark of the College Board, which owns and designs the course outline and "audits" (i.e. approves) high school instructors who employ their expertise and creativity to deliver the college freshman-level content. The College Board's summary of the AP World History program can be read HERE, and the instructor AP Course Audit Approval form can be viewed HERE. https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/media/pdf/ap-world-history-modern-course-overview.pdf) AP Fees: Due to the instructional time, an additional tuition fee of $200 is assessed for the Monday AP lecture session for students approved to take AP level. AP Students must register separately for the Monday lecture session. The fee is not refundable if the student decides midyear to switch to Honors or On-Level. The fee for the College Board's AP World History: Modern exam in May 2025 is not included. Each family is responsible for scheduling and paying for their student's AP exam. AP Enrollment: Students who have taken a prior course with this instructor may discuss AP enrollment through conversation or e-mail with her. If new to this instructor, please email Compass to request a short questionnaire and written assignment prior to selecting AP level. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in World History for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: Completion of Algebra I

    2
    Kathy Preisinger
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    Music Makers explores many facets of the musical experience- singing, moving, dancing, listening, and playing instruments. The class will explore musical stories, famous composers, and different genres of music while playing a variety of percussion instruments (drums, sticks, triangles, woodblocks and more!). Students will learn to play a beginning pitched instrument on glockenspiels (a small barred instrument like the xylophone). Using an Orff-based approach, students will learn to read and write beginning musical notation and learn musical terminology all in the context of fun and play. Music Makers classes provide a fun, pressure-free environment to experience music and movement with the goal of general musicianship and excellent preparation for further, individual instrument lessons if desired. Music Makers helps every child acquire the essential building blocks for a future of musical learning! Students may join Music Makers at any quarter, and they may return again and again since new music, themes, and skills are constantly introduced.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
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    Who doesn't love a good "Whodunnit" mystery? In this workshop, teens actors will work together to bring a cast of characters to life through creative adaptations and interpretive improvisation. Using materials from a commercial murder mystery role playing game (RPG), students will assume the personas of outrageous and offbeat characters. As the drama unfolds in rounds guided by clue cards, eclectic evidence, and fictitious forensics, a victim, a motive, and eventually the murderer will be revealed.

    Student actors will be guided through the development of a strong, compelling character, complete with unique ways of speaking, gesturing, and moving, an original costume, a backstory, and of course, an alibi.

    Tragedy has struck again! Ever since the Crane family moved into Hilltop Manor
    misfortune has followed them. Many of the townspeople tried to warn the family
    that the land the house was built on is cursed. During the funeral of Henrietta Crane, her
    brother Hugh is also found dead under suspicious circumstances. Now it's up to
    Detective Justin Case to dispel the rumors of ghosts and find the real perpetrator of the
    Crane family murders. Who could have done it?

    In this workshop, students benefit from experimenting with acting and improvisation and working as a team. This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, are flexible and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and enjoy working in a collaborative group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class.

    Topics in this Series: Murder at the Haunted House (Quarter 1), Who Wacked a Mole? A 1920's Gangster Mystery (Quarter 2), Murder at the Theater (Quarter 3), Murder at the Buffalo Express (Quarter 4). Students continuing from the prior quarter will receive priority pre-registration for next quarter.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-1.5 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Will be posted in a Google classroom.

    Assessments: Informal qualitative feedback will be given in class throughout the semester. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $25.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a script and costs related to props and performance license fee.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in fine arts or performing arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sevim Kalyoncu
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    Venture outdoors each day to explore the woods with a senior naturalist and mentor while learning valuable survival skills. Students will learn how to construct a temporary debris shelter, make cordage, identify edibles, track animals, purify water, perform basic first aid, and use maps and compass (orienteering). Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things you encounter outdoors, safe exploration of the woods, how to be a good steward of nature, and what to do if you ever became lost or injured in the woods. The group will also take daily hikes and play games in the woods. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong connection to nature and to the real world! Explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. For information on where the class meets, what to wear, and inclement weather, see the webpage for Compass's Nature Quest program. This is a 4-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sevim Kalyoncu
    Add

    Venture outdoors each day to explore the woods with a senior naturalist and mentor while learning valuable survival skills. Students will learn how to construct a temporary debris shelter, make cordage, identify edibles, track animals, purify water, perform basic first aid, and use maps and compass (orienteering). Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things you encounter outdoors, safe exploration of the woods, how to be a good steward of nature, and what to do if you ever became lost or injured in the woods. The group will also take daily hikes and play games in the woods. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong connection to nature and to the real world! Explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. For information on where the class meets, what to wear, and inclement weather, see the webpage for Compass's Nature Quest program. This is a 4-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Taliesin Knol
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    Learn history and geography through hands-on, interactive play rather than by studying flat, dull maps! Many great games feature play on map-based boards that can be used as teaching tools. Visual and kinesthetic learners will remember where Mongolia and Madagascar are when they have amassed miniature armies there! The instructor will use board games from his personal collection as teaching tools. In addition, he creates custom boards to use with modified game rules and playing pieces.

    First quarter, students will learn about the 18th century world map from the Seven Years' War to the Napoleonic Empire using a custom table-top world map and the rules and playing pieces from the game Risk. Students typically play in 2-person teams where one takes the role of admiral, making decisions about naval forces and the other takes the role of general, making decisions about ground forces. The game continues week-to-week with students reviewing the geography as they set the game back up. For each era and conflict, students learn which countries were engaged and where they were located, capitals and key cities, shared borders and boundaries, and prominent geographic features and waterways. They gain an understanding of why countries were at war and how those events influenced history and the modern map.

    There is a $15.00 supply fee due to the instructor on the first day of class for custom-printed maps and shared class materials. Topics in this series include: The 18th Century World (Quarter 1); The American Civil War (Quarter 2), Imperial Asia (Quarter 3), and The World at War- WWI (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Jessica Hall
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    6 weeks X 25-minute Private Music Lesson weeks for new or returning, beginner or advanced students with Jessica Hall in:


  • Piano;
  • Voice;
  • Ukuele
  • Song/Theory Books/Sheet Music: Instructor will provide an Amazon link for parent to order the recommended music book(s).


    Cancellation/Rescheduling: In the event of a change in your schedule, Compass requires 24 hours notice to reschedule the private lessons. Every effort will be made to reschedule the session at a time that is mutually agreeable to the teacher, the student/client, and Compass. In the event of a no-show or change/cancellation occurring less than 24 hours before the scheduled instruction session, pre-paid fees will be forfeited and no refund will be offered.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Jessica Hall
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    7 weeks X 25-minute Private Music Lesson weeks for new or returning, beginner or advanced students with Jessica Hall in:


  • Piano;
  • Voice;
  • Ukuele
  • Song/Theory Books/Sheet Music: Instructor will provide an Amazon link for parent to order the recommended music book(s).


    Cancellation/Rescheduling: In the event of a change in your schedule, Compass requires 24 hours notice to reschedule the private lessons. Every effort will be made to reschedule the session at a time that is mutually agreeable to the teacher, the student/client, and Compass. In the event of a no-show or change/cancellation occurring less than 24 hours before the scheduled instruction session, pre-paid fees will be forfeited and no refund will be offered.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Jeff Levin
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    7 weeks X 25-minute Private Music Lesson weeks for new or returning, beginner or advanced students with Jeff Levin in:


  • Piano;
  • Voice;
  • Song/Theory Books/Sheet Music: Instructor will provide an Amazon link for parent to order the recommended music book(s).


    Cancellation/Rescheduling: In the event of a change in your schedule, Compass requires 24 hours notice to reschedule the private lessons. Every effort will be made to reschedule the session at a time that is mutually agreeable to the teacher, the student/client, and Compass. In the event of a no-show or change/cancellation occurring less than 24 hours before the scheduled instruction session, pre-paid fees will be forfeited and no refund will be offered.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Monika Dorosheff
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    7 weeks X 25-minute Private Music Lesson weeks with Monika Dorosheff in Violin or Viola. Song/Theory Books/Sheet Music: Instructor will make recommendations to purchase or reimburse her, depending on instrument and level. Cancellation/Rescheduling: In the event of a change in your schedule, Compass requires 24 hours notice to reschedule the private lessons. Every effort will be made to reschedule the session at a time that is mutually agreeable to the teacher, the student/client, and Compass. In the event of a no-show or change/cancellation occurring less than 24 hours before the scheduled instruction session, pre-paid fees will be forfeited and no refund will be offered.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Wyndy Fredrick

    5 weeks X 25-minute Private Music Lesson weeks for EXISTING STUDENTS only with Wyndy Fredrick in:


  • Piano;
  • Voice;
  • Ukuele
  • Song/Theory Books/Sheet Music: Instructor will make recommendations to purchase or reimburse her, depending on instrument and level.


    Cancellation/Rescheduling: In the event of a change in your schedule, Compass requires 24 hours notice to reschedule the private lessons. Every effort will be made to reschedule the session at a time that is mutually agreeable to the teacher, the student/client, and Compass. In the event of a no-show or change/cancellation occurring less than 24 hours before the scheduled instruction session, pre-paid fees will be forfeited and no refund will be offered.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Michele Forsythe
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    Every parent knows that kids are curious, captivated, and quick to learn technology-based products. Programming Projects builds on that curiosity to introduce computer science basics, problem-solving, and computational thinking through play-based learning.

    First quarter, students will work with the Sphero indi car. The indi car is a color-sensing learning robot that encourages open-ended, imaginative solutions, and programming fundamentals for early learners. Indi learning robots have an on-board color sensor that detects the color it travels over. Each color gives a specific instruction to the indi robot (such as red = turn 90 degrees left). Students begin with screenless programming using colored block tiles to direct the travel of the indi car. Once students have mastered the screenless programming, they learn to decode the default responses and recode the indi car to react to new color-activated commands. Using the Sphero Edu Jr app on a phone or tablet, students will learn how to re-program the car by changing its response to each color and adding new features such as lights, sounds, or music. Students will enjoy building custom mazes and solving puzzles with the indi robotic car. All equipment and devices will be provided by the instructor. See the indi car here.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wWo3QBNPRRE

    There is a $20.00 technology use fee due payable to the instructor on/before the first day. Topics in this series include: Sphero indi Robotic Cars (Quarter 1), Scratch Coding (Quarter 2), Sphero Robotic Ball Quarter 3) and Tinkercad Design (Quarter 4)

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Ney Mello
    Add

    Students will learn a fun, simplified way to write songs from a professional, award-winning, soundtrack composer. Each week, students will tackle a different phase of songwriting. This class is open to students who play instruments, sing, write lyrics, or a combination of all three talents! The group will learn about the song structure that is popular today with verse, chorus, pre-chorus, pre-verse, intros, and outros. They will listen to some examples of songs to convey what a verse, chorus, and bridge are, and will cover an overview of the basics of functional and classical harmony. Each week, the group will approach a different stage of the songwriting process, working through ideas on their instruments, writing lyrics, or both. Student artists will be guided through making their own background tracks to encourage self- expression and to allow individual voices to emerge. They can use songs they know as inspiration, but they will be encouraged to create everything like a real songwriter. Musicians will be given ready-made chord options so their focus can remain on the creative aspects of songwriting. If the student is only writing lyrics, he/she will be assigned a songwriting partner student who will write the melody and chords. In this case, the lyricist student will be provided with that song's work in progress tracks to write to at home. Students who wish to record their songs should download the free Abbey Road 'Topline' app for Android or Apple smartphones. (The instructor uses this app professionally to share songs and concepts via e-mail, text message, or over social media with colleagues.) The app allows the artist to record songs in sections and play back all together. Microphones will not be needed. The workshop is open to all instrument and voice students, not just guitar. Any style of music is acceptable (pop, folk, country, etc), but all lyrics must be rated "E" for everyone.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon

    Kids will learn the basics of hand sewing and discover it is "sew fun" to create items that can play with and use every day. First quarter, kids will sew two cute cube critters, two spherical pillow pets, and a basket.


    Kids will learn practical sewing skills such as pinning and placement, a running stitch, attaching a button, scissor skills, stuffing, and working with simple patterns. The group will be working with pre-cut felt components from kits that will be enhanced with buttons and embellishments. Since students may work at different rates, some projects may not be completed in class and will be sent home to finish sewing with the newly learned skills. Students should be at age/grade level for fine motor skills for this class. A material fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this series include: Dazzling DIY Decor (Quarter 1), Crafted Keepsakes (Quarter 2), Adorable Accessories (Quarter 3), and Cool Characters (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Ney Mello
    Add

    Students will learn a fun, simplified way to write songs from a professional, award-winning, soundtrack composer. Each week, students will tackle a different phase of songwriting. This class is open to students who play instruments, sing, write lyrics, or a combination of all three talents!


    The group will learn about the song structure that is popular today with verse, chorus, pre-chorus, pre-verse, intros, and outros. They will listen to some examples of songs to convey what a verse, chorus, and bridge are, and will cover an overview of the basics of functional and classical harmony.


    Each week, the group will approach a different stage of the songwriting process, working through ideas on their instruments, writing lyrics, or both. Student artists will be guided through making their own background tracks to encourage self- expression and to allow individual voices to emerge. They can use songs they know as inspiration, but they will be encouraged to create everything like a real songwriter. Musicians will be given ready-made chord options so their focus can remain on the creative aspects of songwriting.


    If the student is only writing lyrics, he/she will be assigned a songwriting partner student who will write the melody and chords. In this case, the lyricist student will be provided with that song's work in progress tracks to write to at home.


    Students who wish to record their songs should download the free Abbey Road 'Topline' app for Android or Apple smartphones. (The instructor uses this app professionally to share songs and concepts via e-mail, text message, or over social media with colleagues.) The app allows the artist to record songs in sections and play back all together. Microphones will not be needed.


    The workshop is open to all instrument and voice students, not just guitar. Any style of music is acceptable (pop, folk, country, etc), but all lyrics must be rated "E" for everyone.


    Topics in this Series: Songwriting Studio for Teens (Semester 1), Songwriting Studio for Teens (Semester 2), etc. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class .


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in fine arts or electives for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sirdley Taborga
    Add

    Buenas tardes! Spanish Exploradores (Explorers) is a fun, immersive introductory Spanish class for older elementary students. Much like learning their native language, students will be exposed to the sounds, vocabulary, and phrases in Spanish through songs, games, stories, and hands-on activities. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students in the first few weeks. The teacher will bring objects each week to give students tangible, hands-on examples of the vocabulary being introduced. In this level, students will be encouraged to begin to combine adjectives with nouns and nouns with verbs.

    Each quarter introduces new themes and new vocabulary in Spanish, so children can continue to build their language basics. However, themes and units are non-sequential, so students may enroll in this level in any quarter. While the theme might be the same as that of a younger level of instruction, more vocabulary will be introduced at the older level. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, and simple phrases while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Instruction will be predominantly verbal, but key vocabulary words may be written down for students to begin a sense of spelling. Students will be encouraged to write down new words each week, but reading, writing, and spelling will not be expected. Fluency should not be expected at this level.

    Material/Supply Fee: The instructor will order a South-American written/published Spanish activity book for students in-class use after assessing their ages/skill levels. Parents will be asked to reimburse the instructor for the expense, typically $10-$15.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sirdley Taborga
    Add

    Que pasa? Get ready for a full year of intermediate level high school Spanish! This is a conversation-focused program in which students will build their vocabulary describing homes and chores; planning a party; health, body parts and sports; vacations, leisure time activities, fun events and places of interest; communicating via phone and computer; and daily routines. There will be a strong emphasis on conversation with common grammar concepts such as regular and irregular past tense verbs and common grammar concepts such as commands, direct and indirect object pronouns, reflexive verbs, learned and practiced in the context of conversation (rather than stand-along grammar exercises).

    Class will be conducted primarily in Spanish and will focus on listening and speaking skills, asking and answering questions. At home, students will be responsible for practicing vocabulary and grammar and completing written assignments, and watching language immersion video clips.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 30-45 minutes per day approximately 4 days per week on homework outside of class.

    Assignments: Are sent by e-mail to parents and students. Students must have access to a computer for videos that are assigned.

    Assessments: Quizzes and tests will be scored with a points system that parents can use in calculating a grade.

    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent Avancemos!: Student Edition Level 2, 2018 edition (ISBN # 978-0544841956)

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Foreign Language for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Ruth Jeantet

    Hola! Spanish Para Pequeños (Spanish for Little Ones) is a fun, play-based, Spanish immersion class for young children. Following the native language-learning process, children will be exposed to the sounds, letters, and high-frequency words in Spanish through songs, games, stories, puppets, and other interactive activities. The teacher will provide all necessary toys and objects to give young children tangible, and hands-on ways to apply new concepts in practical real-life situations. The instructor uses some Montessori-style activities that create a high-energy, playful environment, engaging tactile and kinesthetic learners alike while appealing to children's natural curiosities. The vocabulary and language structures presented in each session follow a new letter of the alphabet each week that will include greetings, simple phrases, foods, colors, numbers, animals, common action verbs, calendar phrases, articles of clothing and seasonal topics. Vocabulary will be repeated and reviewed often to aid in the retention of the language, and will primarily develop listening and speaking skills. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in phonics and essential vocabulary words while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Who knows, your child might just come home singing their new favorite Spanish nursery rhyme!

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Austin Martin

    How do you explore the 139 million square miles of the earth's surface that is ocean when only 25% of the seafloor has been fully mapped? From finding shipwrecks to observing marine life, exploring hydrothermal vents to performing underwater inspections, and carrying out critical search, rescue, and recovery missions, submersible robots known as ROVs, or remotely operated vehicles, are up to the task.



    In this class, students will work in pairs to build, test, redesign, and deploy a small ROV called a SeaPerch. SeaPerch is an "innovative underwater robotics" program sponsored by the Office of Naval Research, NOAA Ocean Education Cooperative Institute, and RoboNation. Working from a kit of stock components, students will first build and test-drive the base model SeaPerch while learning about topics like buoyancy, hydrodynamics, propulsion, and displacement. Teams will learn basic circuitry and how to solder electronic components, first with a light-up practice circuit board, then by assembling, soldering, and wiring the control board for their ROV.



    Once teams have assembled their SeaPerches, the class will meet at a nearby community pool for their first in-water trial. Students will test their assemblies and practice their skills of driving and maneuvering their ROV underwater. Next, it will be back to the classroom workshop to make modifications to their designs, and back to the pool for the iterative design-build-test-modify engineering process. Once teams have fully functional "stock" SeaPerches and understand how decisions such as the placement of propellers and floats affect performance, they will modify and customize their designs while adding features such as hooks or arms to perform underwater tasks. Ultimately, the SeaPerch ROVs will go through an underwater hoop obstacle course and complete challenges like gathering rings from the pool floor.



    Students will gain an understanding of challenges faced by scientists and engineers in underwater applications and will be exposed to careers in mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, marine/nautical engineering, marine sciences, oceanography, and more. In class, they will learn to use hand tools such as a ratcheting PVC cutter, wire cutter, wire stripper, soldering iron/solder, solder removal tool, clamps, screwdrivers, and more. They will also work with waterproofing, adhesives, and fasteners. Teams will be encouraged to keep an engineering design notebook with sketches, performance data, observations, and modifications. Each team will be required to prepare and submit a Technical Design Report using a template and rubric, and the teams will against other Compass teams.


    Students who wish to add enhancements to their final build such as enamel paint, more powerful motors, lights, sensors, depth gauge, or underwater camera, may purchase their own accessories at a hobby or electronics store to install in class. (Enhancements cannot exceed $25.00 to remain eligible for the SeaPerch regional competition.)



    Schedule: This is a 24-week program that will conclude on March 31, 2025 with a small competition and parent showcase.



    Note: Parents should anticipate 3-4 class sessions to be held at the nearby Reston YMCA pool and plan for transportation there (0.9 miles).



    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.



    Assignments: Assignments, if any, will be communicated in class and limited to individual investigation.



    Assessments: Will not be given



    Textbook/Materials: None



    Lab/Supply Fee:

    There is a $155.00 supply fee due payable to Compass for students who are willing to work with a partner (and flip a coin who keeps the ROV). Alternatively, a student could opt to pay $235.00 for their own SeaPerch which they would build individually and keep at the end of the program.



    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a partial credit in technology or career exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Kathryn Beirne

    Successful social skills can help tweens/teens navigate almost every aspect of their lives. Building confidence in social settings can help improve self esteem and comfort in group settings, sports, new endeavors, with family, in public, or just hanging out with friends. Every tween and teeen can benefit from improved social skills, but some need a little more practice. In this class, students will work with a certified, licensed therapist to develop strategies for navigating different social challenges- from conversation skills and identifying feelings and emotions, to seeing perspective, handling stress, talking to parents, making friends, tolerating siblings, and more. The small group class will be highly interactive with games, role playing, videos, modelling behavior, and projects using a evidence-based, social-emotional curriculum

    Tweens and teens will benefit most from taking Social Skills for several quarters. Some activities will be new each quarter, and some will be repeated for reinforcement. As new students join the group, the dynamic will shift, better imitating real life scenarios. Their confidence and comfort level will grow when they have multiple quarters to practice their social skills.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Mylene Nyman
    Add

    The tantalizing aroma of cookies in the oven. A mouth-watering burst of mint. The silky feel of melted chocolate. The sticky sweet of fresh-made caramel. A subtle hint of lemon. Student bakers will enjoy these delicious sensations- and more- as they explore the world of baking homemade desserts.


    Sweet Shop treats are scrumptious, fun, and simple to make. Each week they will prepare a fresh, handmade dessert or sweet such as: pies, cakes, cookies, tarts, trifles, mousses, puddings, candies, fudge, brittle, or chocolate. The class will include some icing, decorating, and garnishing techniques for completed desserts. This quarter, the Compass bakers' culinary adventures will include:


  • Mini Apple Crumble
  • Apple Pecan Bread (contains nuts)
  • Caramel-Apple Monkey Bread Mini Loaves
  • Blue Pear Puff Tarts
  • Fall Spiced Pear and Date Upside Down Cake
  • Nantucket Cranberry Tart
  • Caramel Pecan Cheesecake Pie (contains nuts)
  • Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. This engaging sweets class will get students excited about helping in the kitchen and entertaining. They will learn important baking skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary is introduced each week.


    Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics.


    Topics in this Series: Decadent Delights (Quarter 1); Gooey Goodies (Quarter 2), Best Bon Bons (Quarter 3), and Tasty Treats (Quarter 4).


    Assessments: Qualitative Feedback will be given in class. Formal grades/assessment will not be given.


    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on or before the first day of class.


    What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided.


    What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).


    Cooking Class Requirements: For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Jessica Hall
    Add

    Did you know that the ukulele is not just a miniature guitar? It is a member of the Portuguese lute family, but its sound was popularized in Hawaiian music. Ukulele's fun,