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Registration for 2018 fall classes is ongoing!Registration is a-la-carte, and new families are welcome to enroll. See the 2018-2019 Academic Calendar for class dates. Click here for our Registration FAQ.

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Term Start Date Start Time End Time Day Class Title Grade Range Open Spots Price Availability Description
Hugh Gardner

Students will be immersed in detail and fully engaged in this intensive history course led by well- known homeschool instructor and historian Hugh Gardner. This history class is unlike other high school American history courses. Instead of learning a sequential set of names, dates, and battles, students will learn how to analyze and interpret history. Much like a college seminar, this approach to American History incorporates historiography (the history of the history.) Mr. Gardner does not teach a narrow view from a single textbook or static set of prepared notes. Instead, he presents the back story and multiple interpretations for the "why" questions in American history. Class discussion considers interpretations from a wide array of scholars and is updated as new sources are published. Rather than running through a timeline of outcomes, students will evaluate contributing factors (the "how" questions) and will learn about the personalities, prejudices, and biases of the people involved ("who").

First semester will begin with the War of 1812 and its test of the new republic. The group will examine slavery in America, from Jamestown to the rebellion of Nat Turner. In addition, the class will study how prevailing beliefs and movements such as westward expansion, manifest destiny, and nativism. The saga of Texas and the Mexican-American War will be investigated in-depth, as these not only are essential for study of the Civil War, but are extremely relevant to current political and economic debate. The class will discuss the effects on the political, social, economic, and religious climate as well as influences on the arts, science, literature, and warfare. This is no ordinary history class as Mr. Gardner surrounds the students with vivid posters, maps, charts, primary sources, and artifacts to supplement his story-telling style. Students will be able to examine and handle period pieces such as antique and replica weapons and military accoutrements of the era while learning how these tools helped shape the battlefields and turning points in history. With an emphasis on primary sources, students will scrutinize historical atlases and original writings, all in a fun and interactive setting. Just for fun, students earn historical trading cards for class participation. Registration for the second semester, covering the rise of Lincoln, the complete Civil War, and the aftermath will take place separately in late fall 2018.

This class meets for 2.5 hours, one time per week on Wednesdays. Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours outside of class each week completing assigned reading. Students will be asked to purchase books for class (approximately $30-$40). For those families who want to investigate the course themes at a deeper level, an optional reading list will be furnished. Based on the format and rich content of this class, homeschool families could count two semesters of this series as a full credit in American History for purposes of a high school transcript.

1
Donna Shackelford

How will this year's La Nina weather pattern affect Mexico's Michoacan maize crop or monsoons in Mumbai? What are some strategies for improving water quality, reducing air pollution, and promoting renewal energy sources and sustainability around the world? Environmental Science is a critical, interdisciplinary study that merges the fields of geology, biology, chemistry, meteorology with geography, politics, economics, and sociology with several unifying themes including earth as an interconnected system with both natural and human-made influences.

Key themes in the year-long study of Environmental Science include Earth Systems consisting of geological processes and natural resources and the Living World comprised of ecosystems and cycles. Environmental Science combines the study of population and land and water usage such as agriculture, pest control, forestry, urban development, mining, and fishing. The field also examines energy resources and consumption including a comparison of types of power generation and various fuel sources. Finally, Environmental Science considers the impacts of humans on the planet including air pollution, water contamination, handling of solid waste, and climatological impacts wish as greenhouse gases, global warming, loss of habitats, reduced biodiversity, endangered/threatened species, and efforts in conservation.

This is a year-long, multilevel high school science course with laboratory and field work components. Environmental Science offers a substantive, full-credit experience. Students can pick their desired workload. They can always do more if they would like, but at any level they are expected to keep up with weekly readings and homework which will prepare them for in-class discussions, labs, and projects. All students should expect to spend 4-6 hours outside of class for reading and homework, regardless of level. All levels use materials written at a college level, but the amount and type of homework varies. Brief summer assignments are due in August for those who elect to take the AP level.

All students will register online for the same course. Students must indicate which level they want to study by e-mail by August 15. Once the course has begun, students may move down a level (from AP to honors, or from honors to on-level) at any time. However, once classes have started, students may not "bump up" a level.

Students will be asked to purchase or rent the select class textbook: Environmental Science: Earth as a Living Planet, 9th edition, published by Wiley and Sons (ISBN #978-1-118-42732-3). Students should have a ring binder for notes and handouts and a bound lab book for recording observations and measurements. There is a $160 lab fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. The fee to take the AP exam in May 2019 is not included; each family will be responsible for scheduling and paying for their student's AP exam.

1
Tia Murchie-Beyma

This full-year lab science course introduces classic biology topics updated for the 21st century. Biology, the study of life, looks at living things and their relationships, from microscopic to enormous, ancient to modern, arctic to tropic. Our survey includes: (1) cellular and molecular biology, (2) ecology, (3) genetics, (4) biology of organisms (with selected human health and anatomy topics), and (5) evolution and diversity.

You will observe microscopic organisms; identify pill bug species; and give monarch butterflies a health exam before tagging them for their 2,800 mile migration to Mexico. You will extract real DNA, model its processes, and learn how scientists manipulate this magnificent molecule to make mice glow in the dark. You will trick plants, observe animal behavior, and practice identifying and debunking pseudo-science.

By the end of the course, students will be able to explain the nature of science; cite evidence for foundational theories of modern biology; explain basic biological processes and functions; describe structures and relationships in living systems; outline systems of information, energy, and resources; demonstrate principles of valid experimental design; discern ethical standards of responsibility and respect; relate their values and scientific ideas to decision-making; and apply biological knowledge to their own health.

This course is run as a flipped classroom in which students are responsible for new content by completing readings, videos, animations, and written assignments prior to meetings. In-person classes are used for active discussion, clarification, exploration of content, review, modeling, and hands-on activities.

Labs conducted in class address not only technical skills and sequential operations, but also forming testable predictions, collecting data, applying basic math, drawing conclusions, and presenting findings. While some virtual dissections may be assigned, most are hands-on. These include flowers, crayfish, fetal pigs, a sheep heart, and a cow eyeball.

Regarding a few key issues in biology: Human reproduction is not taught as a separate, stand-alone topics, however, in the course/context of other topics, students will learn about chromosomes, sperm, eggs, stem cells, hormones, fetal development, adolescent growth, HIV, practices that harm fetuses (like drugs, tobacco, and alcohol), and benefits of breast-feeding. However, all those items appear in the context of other topics, not human reproduction specifically. The class will include some debate-type discussions on biological topics such as GMO. Abortion will not be debated. Birth control and sexuality education are not covered in this class. However, gender versus biological sex is a concept discussed in detail in the genetics unit. Dissections will be performed in this class, however, they will be optional for any student. Evolution is embedded in every topic, from molecular to ecological, and it not optional. It is addressed in a scientific context, not from a faith standpoint.

All instructor communications and assignments will take place over the password-protected platform, Canvas. On Canvas, students will find weekly homework, reading assignments, and videos; complete automated quizzes and tests; track their grades; and message the instructor and classmates. This class has a weekly, online meeting in addition to in-person sessions at Compass. Online meetings take place live through Canvas, but can be viewed asynchronously if a student has a conflict.

Introduction to Biology is a year-long, multi-level, high school laboratory science course. It offers a substantive, full-credit experience on either an Honors or On-Level track. The Honors level prepares a student to take the SAT Subject Test in Biology E/M. The amount and type of homework varies by track. All class members share core material and participate in the same labs. Honors goes deeper with longer or additional readings, more analytical work, and more thorough and difficult assessments. Brief, required summer assignments are due in August for those who elect to take Honors. All students, regardless of level, are expected to keep up with weekly readings and homework to prepare for in-class discussions, labs, and projects.

Students will register online for the same course, but must indicate which level they wish to study via e-mail by August 15. Once the course has begun, students may move down a level (from Honors to On-Level) at any time. However, once classes have started, students may not "bump up" a level.

Students at all levels should expect to spend 4-6 hours outside of class reading and preparing homework. They should be strong, independent readers and able to understand graphs, tables, percentages, decimals, ratios, and averages. Homework consists of readings (both in the textbook and additional scholarly and popular sources), videos, animated clips and models, term cards, brief written responses, lab reports, online quizzes, and unit tests. Students will sometimes prepare short, in-class presentations; participate in group projects, run simulations, or conduct simple experiments at home.

Students need to purchase or rent the textbook Biology (2010 edition with baby alligator cover) by Stephen Nowicki, published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt/Holt McDougal (ISBN# 9780547219479) An e-book version is also available (ISBN# 9780547221069). By second semester, those who elect to take the SAT Subject Test will also need the College Board s The Official SAT Subject Test in Biology Study Guide (ISBN# 978-1457309205) and a prep book of their choice, such as Princeton Review's Cracking the SAT Subject Test in Biology E/M, 16th Ed (ISBN# 978-1524710750) or Barron's SAT Subject Test Biology E/M, 6th Edition (ISBN# 978-1438009605).

Students will need the following materials and equipment: access to a computer/internet service, a compound microscope with at least 400X magnification and cool lighting (may be shared by up to two students at family discretion), splash goggles, water-resistant/acid-resistant lab apron, transparent metric ruler, kitchen or postal scale, 3-ring binder, a supply of at least 400 3 X 5 index cards, and plain, lined, and graph paper.

There is a $90 lab fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. The fee to take the SAT Biology E/M Test in June 2019 is not included; each family is responsible for scheduling and paying for their student's exam. The instructor will provide a numerical score in the class which the homeschool parent may consider when assigning a letter grade.

1
Sarah Fraser

Whether college admissions tests (SAT, PSAT, or ACT) are right around the corner or down the road, this class will teach you how to tackle the tests, decode the questions, and boost your scores. While SAT/ACT test scores are not automatic ticket into the college of your choice, higher scores will get your application in the to be considered pile where admissions staff will take a closer look at all the other amazing things you have done.

This class will help you feel prepared to face standardized admissions tests and take away some of the worry and mystery that surround these assessments. Each week, students will spend time on strategies for math and English portions of the tests. Students will learn about test designs and the types and difficulty levels of reading, grammar, and math questions. The class will learn how to approach multiple choice questions, how to read passages for comprehension, and what to do when you don t know an answer. This class is not a crash course that preps you for one test sitting, but rather teaches you lasting techniques to get you ready for whenever you decide to take a standardized test. The instructor will lay out a study plan for test-ready students and be able to offer tips on many aspects of the college admissions process. When the class wraps up, students and parents will understand the process of SAT and ACT testing and feel prepared for the personal challenge of the test experience.

For this class, students should be reading and have comprehension at or above grade level and have completed Algebra I. While geometry is included on the tests, completion of geometry is not assumed. Geometry formulas are provided within the tests, and the instructor will teach how to find and apply those formulas. Students will take a variety of in-class and at-home time, practice test sections. They should expect to spend one hour per week on homework for this class. Students should purchase The Official SAT Study Guide, 2018 Edition , published by the College Board (ISBN # 978-1457309281) for the class. Students should also bring a TI-83 or equivalent calculator (no phone calculators) to class to practice math questions that permit the use of a calculator. This is a 13-week class that does not meet on 9/21/18.

1
Peter Snow

This is the first class in a 4-quarter series on beginning chess. Students will learn skills that build upon each other, including: how all pieces move and capture; castling, pawn promotion, en pass ant; checks and how to get out of them; checkmate and stalemate; notation lesson and chess etiquette behavior; scholars mate & fools mate. Each class will be spent half on technique and half in practice matches with classmates while instructor coaches. Homework and handouts may be given. Experts suggest that the game of chess teaches analytical and disciplined thinking skills, while raising self esteem, teaching motivation and determination, and sportsmanship (Kasparov Foundation)

1
Kouthar Muttardy

Civics Critics will explore specific queries related to the US constitution through guided inquiry and evidence-based analysis. These topics are posed as a series of thought-provoking questions that students will research, debate, discuss, and form opinions about. First semester will examine three big questions: The Ideals of the Declaration: Which is the Most Important? How Did the Constitution Guard Against Tyranny? Should Schools Be Allowed to Limit Students Online Speech?

Civics Critic is an interactive, multi-disciplinary examination of some of the key issues in American Government using sources from The DBQ Project. DBQs, or document based questions, are derived from AP History exams and help develop high school level critical thinking skills. Students will review an array of primary sources such as letters, journal entries, inventories, ship's manifestos, newspaper articles, period maps, and court documents along with selected secondary sources like excerpts, charts, and graphs. Students will be guided through analyzing the documents, interpreting the data, drawing inferences, and forming conclusions. In some historical scenarios, the class will consider conflicting perspectives and be able to defend and debate multiple sides of a key issue. To demonstrate comprehension and a deeper understanding of the class themes, students will use factual findings to develop structured, evidence-based essays. Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week on homework, investigation, or reading for this class. Topics in this year s class series include: Constitutional Queries (first semester) and Current Controversies (second semester). Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component, or partial, credit in civics, government, or history for purposes of a high school transcript.

1
Mylene Nyman

Students will enjoy making savory fall recipes and cool weather comfort foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Fall Favorites are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

Cranberry Pumpkin Brie Bites (appetizer), Chipotle Corn Soup
Autumn Apple-Pea Salad, Stuffed Acorn Squash (side dish),
Butternut Squash Alfredo (entree), Turkey Pumpkin Casserole (entree),
Caramel Apple Cake and Sweet Potato Bars (desserts).

Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.

Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day.

1
Mylene Nyman

Students will enjoy making savory fall recipes and cool weather comfort foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Fall Favorites are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

Cranberry Pumpkin Brie Bites (appetizer), Chipotle Corn Soup
Autumn Apple-Pea Salad, Stuffed Acorn Squash (side dish),
Butternut Squash Alfredo (entree), Turkey Pumpkin Casserole (entree),
Caramel Apple Cake and Sweet Potato Bars (desserts).

Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.

Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day.

1
Jamie Gallagher

CrossFit Kids is a dynamic kids' fitness program that incorporates well-rounded exercises to get kids up and moving mid-day! No two workouts are the same, but each day's activities incorporate exercises that target 10 areas: cardio-vascular endurance, stamina, strength, flexibility, power, speed, coordination, agility, balance, and accuracy. CrossFit Kids focuses on functional movements that are fundamental to all aspects of play and exercise- pulling, pushing, running, throwing, climbing, lifting, and jumping. Work-outs are scalable and adaptable to different individual's own level, and the emphasis in on fun, safety, and personal accomplishment rather than competition among classmates. Kids will use a variety of small equipment and gear in their workouts such as mat, dumbbells, kettlebells, jump ropes, medicine balls, slam balls, rope ladders, and more. When the weather permits, some exercises may be taken outdoors. The physical challenges of CrossFit Kids will foster self-confidence, focus, and help instill a foundation for a lifetime of fitness. All equipment is furnished. Students are asked to wear loose, comfortable clothing, such as running pants or sweatpants, and comfortable, supportive athletic shoes.

1
Bette Cassatt

“All for one, one for all!” The Musketeers had their own motto for teamwork. Have you ever wondered about the team behind the scenes that brings a production to stage? Have you seen a play and been dazzled by the set, amazed by the costumes, and thrilled by the fight scenes? It takes a team of people to put on a show: stage managers, costume designers, set designers, props designers, lighting designers, sound designers, choreographers, actors, and a director to guide them all. This class will explore the different elements of production team, designers, and crew responsibilities as students analyze a script and make decisions as if they were the director and design team.

Students will learn how a production and design team bring a show to life while working with a professional director/ fight choreographer/ actor/ costumer/ playwright/ dramaturg. Students will begin with script analysis and developing the director’s vision. The group will consider stage management, casting, set design, costume design, and dramaturgy (cultural, artistic, and historical insight into a play). As their vision takes shape, the class will continue to explore the jobs of director and stage manager. They will consider the roles of working with actors, planning fight/dance choreography, selecting props, and designing technical elements such as lighting, sound, and music. Example activities for our student design team include creating an aesthetic concept, establishing a production calendar, setting casting requirements, and writing an audition notice. The team may sketch set concepts, design character costumes, and identify and research historical elements of the show. The group will learn to block scenes, plan action sequences, and identify sound effects and music for underscoring.

This class is good for beginners as well as continuing theatre and production students. Every play is different and offers new sets of challenges. The emphasis in this course is on the vision, design decisions, and the teamwork required to bring a performance to stage, but the class will not be putting on an actual performance.

Second semester will analyze a humorous adaptation of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's classic “The Hound of Baskervilles” called “Baskervilles: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery.” Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component, or partial, credit in fine arts (drama) for purposes of a high school transcript.

1
Jen DesRoches

Middle school students are going to learn that "money matters!" The critical life skills of personal finance through budgeting and money management will be introduced through real-world, hands-on activities. Students will begin with the discussion about different careers and the range of expected starting salaries for different fields. They will learn about cost of living indices and that not all salaries are created equal when locale is considered. Students will be given a simple career interest inventory and will examine jobs that are projected to be in high demand in the future. Students will then embark on a guided, quarter-long project where they will learn about developing a personal budget that works with the salary for their dream job. Each week students will tackle a new piece of the budget pie. They will see the effects of tax withholdings from an imaginary paycheck and that take-home pay may not be what they thought. Students will research and make selections on housing and perform cost comparisons among apartments, condos, or buying or renting a house. They will uncover what the real cost of utilities and insurance could be. Kids will select a dream car and see what the cost of owning (and insuring, maintaining, and fueling it) would be. As the students make personal choices in their budget, they will learn about opportunity costs. If they chose to have a dog, will they have enough money left for a vacation? Kids will develop a one-week meal plan and calculate the cost of the associated groceries. They will develop a budget for clothing, personal items, and entertainment. When the project is complete, how have the middle schoolers fared in the game of "Life"? Students should expect to spend 1 to 1.5 hours each week investigating costs on the internet, newspapers, or in stores. Future themes in this series will explore How Money Works (2nd quarter), Entrepreneurship & Innovation (3rd quarter) and Business Start-Up (4th quarter).

1
Luc Atangana

Students will be introduced to painting with acrylics in a relaxed, informal studio setting under the guidance of a professional paint instructor. Students will work on framed canvas and easels and will learn elements of art and principles of design in addition to methods in painting.
First quarter, students will begin painting botanicals such as flowers, plants, or leaves. Through the botanical study, painters will learn techniques with acrylic paints such as blending, stippling, and broad stroke to help them replicate the different effects in natural subjects. Elements of art introduced in the first quarter projects include line, shape, form, space, color, value, and texture. Students will complete two 16 X 20 canvases this quarter.
This class is suitable for beginners who have never painted before, or returning art students who have worked in any medium and are interested in expanding their knowledge and abilities with acrylic paint. Compass parents are welcome to register for this class to work alongside their teens, or to work on their own, while their teen is in another Compass class. Painting can provide a relaxing, needed mid-day break between rigorous academic classes and over-scheduled lives in a fun, supportive environment with an instructor who will meet students where they are with art skills.
There is a $16.00 per student material and supply fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for two canvases, acrylic paint, a sketch book, a 5x7 pad of acrylic paint paper, and use of shared class supplies (desktop easels, brushes, paper products, etc.). Topics in this year s class (or studio) series include: Botanicals Line, Color, Shape, and Texture (first quarter); Still Life- Values, Form, and Space (second quarter); Landscape Composition, Unity, and Repetition (third quarter) and Create Your Own- Balance, Emphasis, and Proportion (fourth quarter). Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component, or partial, credit in fine arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

1
Christine Keen

Philosophy is not about finding life's answers. It's about considering life's questions. This discussion-based class, for high school students, will introduce the vocabulary of philosophy and explore some of philosophy's greatest hits, weaving together the work of specific philosophers (classic and modern) with thought experiments and real-life examples. From Plato's cave and Pascal's wager to John Rawls's veil of ignorance and John Searle's Chinese room, this practical philosophy class will provide a context for students to think more deeply about the choices and experiences of their everyday lives. Because of the nature of the assignments, excellent reading skills (high school+ level) and the maturity to participate in thoughtful discussion are a must. Homeschool families may elect to count this course as a component, or partial, credit in elective humanities for purposes of a high school transcript.

1
Andrew Cummins

Young sculptors will enjoy working hands-on with clay and experiencing the many forms this medium can take. Working with clay is multi-sensory, and young sculptors enjoy the tactile experience of pounding, pinching, rolling, flattening, squeezing, coiling, stretching, squashing, and bending clay into many forms. Working with clay engages a different artistic skillset than coloring, drawing, and writing and encourages creativity to sculpt and represent objects in three dimensions. In this workshop, students will create original hand-made pieces inspired by different themes and clay construction techniques. During first quarter, students will sculpt vessels and vases: a Greek amphora vase using the coil pot technique; a square or triangular vase using the joined slab technique; and a textured cup using a single slab with an added handle. During week seven, students will paint a modern, abstract bowl that the instructor pre-formed on the pottery wheel and bisque fired in his studio. Students will sculpt projects in weeks one, three, and five and paint/glaze projects in weeks two, four, and six each quarter. Students will use natural, low fire white clay and non-toxic glazes on their pieces. They will experiment with different textures and patterns formed in clay with tools, found objects, and with a variety of glaze colors. Clay projects will be taken to back to a studio to dry and be fired. All pieces are considered food safe once they are glaze fired and returned to students. Each quarter, students will further develop hand building techniques and painting skills with each new lesson and project. Topics in this class series include: Ancient Vessels and Modern Vases (first quarter); Hanging Creations (second quarter); Funny Faces (third quarter), and Springtime Sculptures (fourth quarter.) There is a $35.00 per student material fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

1
Natalie Di Vietri

This is a full year course in Pre-Algebra with an emphasis on problem solving skills and computations of math facts. The major topics covered in this course are variables, expressions, integers, order of operations, solving equations, and multi-step equations. The course will also cover inequalities, factors, fractions, exponents, and rational numbers. Additional Pre-Algebra concepts that will be taught include ratios, proportion, probability, percentages, linear functions, real numbers, right triangles, measurement, area, volume, and data analysis. Students will learn to use formulas to solve a variety of math problems encompassing geometry, probability, and statistics. Students will also be applying their learning to real life scenarios to solve problems.

For this course, students should be capable of basic computation, math facts, and an ability to work with fractions and decimals at the 6th/7th grade level. For anyone who is unsure if their child is ready for pre-algebra, the instructor can recommend one or more assessments or pretests to confirm placement. Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class to complete practice problems, homework, and assessments. Please note, all assessments will be taken outside of class with the parental oversight to maximize in-class instructional time.

For this class, students will need a regular notebook and paper and graph paper or graphing notebook. Students will be required to rent or purchase the class textbook, McDougall Littell s Pre-Algebra (ISBM #978-0618250035), purchase the practice workbook (ISBN # 978-0618257522), and subscribe to the online math platform, IXL (https://www.ixl.com/). As an alternate, parents can purchase the textbook on audio-CD for any students who struggle with reading (ISBN #978-0618478828). Finally, although Pre-Algebra is often taught without the use of calculators, if a student is slow with some math facts or computation by hand, a TI-34 calculator is recommended so the student can keep up with the problems.

1
Coder Kids

Tweens and teens love their phones and tablets and have fun writing custom apps (applications) for them. Students start with the Swift programming language which is used for iOS devices like the iPhone and iPad. Later students move into programming responsive web design to create hybrid apps for both desktop and mobile devices using Web App Maker. In all app programming languages, students practice the iterative design process to define a problem, generate ideas, build, test, and improve their app.

Programming Lab is a computer lab environment in which students work through the Coder Kids curriculum under the direction of computer science coaches. Work in the Programming Lab is self-paced which allows students to progress through skill-building activities and instructional coding modules at their own rate of learning. The Lab environment allows students to enroll at any quarter, fosters brand new coders, and encourages those with prior coding experience. Coder Kids coaches work with small pull-out groups, pairs, or individuals to provide additional instruction and support on the skillset each needs each week.

Coder Kids proprietary curriculum is designed to meet and exceed the standards of the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA). Students work on modern MacBook Air laptops. Students may enroll in a Programming Lab course at any quarter, as they can start with initial lessons at any time. Coaches send prompts for parents in the weekly e-mail updates to encourage discussion and reflection about what the student learned in class each week. The class tuition includes a $35.00 per student, per quarter technology fee that covers repair/maintenance of hardware, software, and licenses.

1
Ed Max

Students in this class will get to see and do a variety of fun experiments that illustrate the science of sound. What is sound, and what is the physical difference between musical notes like a B flat or F sharp? What properties of a note played on a clarinet allow you to tell that the sound is coming from a clarinet and not the same note played on a trumpet or violin? We will discuss these questions and other properties of sound, including its speed, which we will measure. You will learn how to electronically analyze vibrations caused by musical instruments or your own voice using a free computer program that produces pictures of different sounds. We will explore what physical properties of an object determine how fast it will tend to vibrate; then we ll use this knowledge to understand how musical instruments can play different notes. String players will learn about how their instruments work; and we will also examine some scientific principles of wind instruments. Is it possible for a soprano to break a glass by singing, or is that idea a myth? From this question we will move to a deep mystery: how can your ear and brain recognize different notes? We will learn how an understanding of the beautiful and complex structures of the inner ear can explain how we hear, what problems lead to deafness in some people, and how engineering can bypass these problems to provide hearing to some patients who were born deaf. You will be able to repeat almost all the fun demonstrations and experiments we do in this class at home. There is a $20.00 per student lab fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year s class series include: Science of the Senses: Sound and Hearing from Ear to Brain (1st quarter); Science of the Senses: Light and Vision from Eye to Brain (2nd quarter); Science of the Human Body Systems: Circulatory, Respiratory, Digestive (3rd quarter), and Science of the Human Body Systems: Kidney, Brain/Nervous and Immune (4th quarter).

1
Lisa Alonso

Get ready for a full year of beginner level high school Spanish! This is a conversation-focused program in which students will build their vocabulary quickly and learn essential grammar skills in Spanish. Vocabulary will include the alphabet, numbers, time, dates, seasons, school, free time activities/hobbies, likes/dislikes, personal descriptions, family relationships, emotions, food/restaurants, places/locations in town, and shopping/clothing. There will be a strong emphasis on competency using regular and irregular present tense verbs and common grammar concepts such as articles, pronouns, adjectives, and comparative phrases.

Class will be conducted primarily in Spanish and will focus on listening and speaking skills, asking and answering questions, and correct use of grammar. At home, students will be responsible for memorizing vocabulary and grammar, completing worksheets and written assignments, and watching both grammar instruction and language immersion videos.

Spanish I offers a substantive, full-credit experience taught at either an honors or on-level track. All students will register online for the same course. Students must indicate which level they want to study via e-mail by August 15. Once the course has begun, students may move down a level (from honors to on-level) at any time. However, once classes have started, students may not "bump up" a level. While all students will cover the same material at the same pace, honors students will be given homework that requires higher level reasoning and advanced application of various grammar skills.

Students should expect to spend at least 30-45 minutes per day, four times per week outside of class time to ensure success with this course.

Students must have access to a computer and internet service as computer-based videos and practice tools are essential to success with this program. In lieu of a purchased textbook, the instructor will provide all materials. A materials fee of $30.00 per student will be due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

Quizzes, tests, and formative assessments will be given to all students at regular intervals to provide parents with sufficient feedback to assign a grade. Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in high school Spanish for purposes of a high school transcript.

1
Jeanniffer Denmark

Hola! Spanish Amigos is a fun, play-based, Spanish immersion class for young children. Much like learning their native language, children will be exposed to the sounds, vocabulary, and phrases in Spanish through songs, games, stories, interactive and hands-on activities. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students in the first few weeks. Spanish language instruction will be presented in a natural learning sequence beginning with themes about colors, numbers, clothing, foods, animals, family members, days/dates, parts of the house, common objects, body parts, etc. Greetings and simple phrases will be woven into the day's activities, as well as cultural traditions when applicable. Writing, spelling, and grammar will not be emphasized in this class. Each quarter introduces new themes and new vocabulary in Spanish, so continuing students can continue to build their language basics. However, themes and units are non-sequential, so students may enroll in this level in any quarter. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, and simple phrases while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Fluency should not be expected at this level. Students may join Spanish Amigos during any quarter.

1
Monika Dorosheff

Learn to play the violin! Students will learn the fundamentals of playing the violin: how to hold the instrument, how to correctly hold the bow, parts of the instrument, and the names of the open strings. Technique progresses by adding one finger at a time to each string until the student can play a complete scale. The students will be taught to play in unison from a songbook of arranged works. Music education enhances teamwork skills and provides children with a path for self-expression. Scientific research has shown that music lessons not only improve organizational skills and executive functioning but that they also develop self-confidence. At the end of the semester, the class will be able to play several simple tunes and will perform for the parents.
Class Expectations: Students will be asked to bring their instrument, bow, and case to every class. In order to fully benefit from each lesson, daily practice is required. The instrument should be set up professionally by a local music store or a string luthier. An instrument can be purchased or rented from most music stores. Parents may contact Compass for a list of recommendations from the instructor. No sheet music purchase is required for this class. This is a 13-week semester class, and the week off will be announced by the instructor.

1
Megan Reynolds

Word Masters is a language challenge for students who enjoy word games, spelling, building their vocabulary, and verbal adventures. Why study lists of words if you can make a game of it? The best way to learn new words is to use them! This class is inspired by the annual Word Masters Challenge (www.wordmasterschallenge.com). Each week students will tackle new vocabulary words and practice them through analogies and critical thinking challenges. Students will examine word meanings, relationships, synonyms and antonyms with in-class activities and games such as Pictionary, Scategories, Charades, and Apples-to-Apples. Word Masters will improve a student's reading comprehension, verbal reasoning, logic skills, and the ability to think analytically and metaphorically. Word Masters will continue each quarter with all new word lists, analogies, and activities.

1
Peter Snow

This is the first of a 4-quarter series of classes on advanced, beginning chess. Students will learn skills that build upon each other, including a review of: castling, pawn promotion, and en pass ant rules; a notation lesson; a review of basic mates; strategies for using the draw rules for drawing a game when too far behind to win, using batteries to cause checkmates, back-rank checkmates; proper development of bishops; proper development of rooks (in the middlegame); advanced beginning overextended pieces, and other teaching topics that may be added based on observed need. Each class will be spent half on technique and half in practice matches with classmates while the instructor coaches. Some homework and handouts may be given. Experts suggest that the game of chess teaches analytical and disciplined thinking skills, while raising self esteem, teaching motivation and determination, and sportsmanship (Kasparov Foundation)

1
Mylene Nyman

Students will enjoy making savory fall recipes and cool weather comfort foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Fall Favorites are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

Cranberry Pumpkin Brie Bites (appetizer), Chipotle Corn Soup
Autumn Apple-Pea Salad, Stuffed Acorn Squash (side dish),
Butternut Squash Alfredo (entree), Turkey Pumpkin Casserole (entree),
Caramel Apple Cake and Sweet Potato Bars (desserts).

Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.

Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day.

1
Mylene Nyman

Students will enjoy making savory fall recipes and cool weather comfort foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Fall Favorites are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

Cranberry Pumpkin Brie Bites (appetizer), Chipotle Corn Soup
Autumn Apple-Pea Salad, Stuffed Acorn Squash (side dish),
Butternut Squash Alfredo (entree), Turkey Pumpkin Casserole (entree),
Caramel Apple Cake and Sweet Potato Bars (desserts).

Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.

Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day.

1
Natalie Di Vietri

Students will learn the language of spies and secret agents in this children s cryptology class. Cryptology is the science of secret writing which uses math and logical reasoning to decode and create mystery alphabets. Each week, students will learn one or more ciphers and will practice using them to decode messages and write secret messages to each other! We will also share the stories of famous writers and code-crackers. Student operatives will expand their stealth options by making their own cipher wheels, learning about algorithms and keys, writing messages in invisible ink, sending messages using flags and more! Second quarter will continue with more cryptology and all new codes. Third and fourth quarter offerings for this grade level will include Math Games, Puzzles and Brain Teasers.

1
Anne Sharp

Over the course of the quarter, middle school writers will create an original fantasy-themed short story. Each week the class will read excerpts from well-known fiction as inspiration for identifying key elements of fantasy writing. The class will explore the evolution of the fantasy genre and read short passages or chapters from literature such as Grimm's Fairy Tales, The Hobbit, Through the Looking Glass, Harry Potter, and more, along with film clips, art, or photographs for inspiration in their fantasy writings. The class will examine the key elements of a short story including plot, characters, setting, and tone. A portion of each class will be dedicated to sharing students' working drafts and refining their stories with collaboration and in-class feedback. Students will be expected to complete some writing and short reading at home each week. Literature selections will not be assigned in their entirety, but students may want to continue reading the complete story. The culmination of the students' work will be a bound class literary magazine. Topics in this year s class series include: Fantasy Writing (1st quarter), Gothic Tales (2nd quarter), Sci-Fi Short Stories (3rd quarter) and Writing Journeys and Creating Character (4th quarter)

1
Jen DesRoches

Does the President have the power to declare war? Can the Supreme Court make laws? What if we want to change a part of the Constitution? Students will use their best detective skills to examine the US Constitution. Using an inquiry-based approach, middle school students will be given leading questions to investigate in the Constitution and other founding documents. The class will look at the Articles of Confederation, and discover why that document was not working for the young nation. They will debate the Federalist and Anti-Federalist issues of the day, and will learn how James Madison borrowed part of Virginia s state constitution to help frame the new US Constitution. Students will delve into the US Constitution to understand its Preamble, Articles, and Amendments. Find out what powers and restrictions are actually listed in the Constitution and how many times it has been revised. Students will learn what amendments have been proposed but failed to be adopted, and what others may be on the horizon. Being Constitution detectives will set students up for future topics in this series: You Have the (Bill of) Rights! (second quarter); Three Branches (third quarter); and State/Local (fourth quarter).

1
Velocity Dance

Get moving to high-energy Hip Hop mid-day! Break-up your child's sit-down, quiet, or serious time with this popular urban dance class. Focusing on Hip Hop and Street Jazz styles, while using clean edits of popular music (rated E for everyone), students will learn new choreography each week. We begin with a welcome, stretching and across the floor dancing. A game transitions to center floor work of choreography combinations, techniques, and tricks. Over the session dancers will put together video clips to create a class music video to showcase their new skills to family and friends. The last class of the quarter, students will perform a group routine for parents. Hip Hop is a co-ed dance style that accommodates kids who have not danced before and those who don't want the structure of more traditional dance formats while providing a fun, creative physical and cardio work out.

1
Monika Dorosheff

Students who play violin, viola, cello, or bass are invited to join this homeschool string orchestra! Musicians will have an opportunity to develop ensemble skills and enjoy the experience of practicing, playing, and performing as a group. The class will start each week with tuning and warm-ups such as playing musical scales and simple exercises. Then the class will work on several group songs each semester where they will improve musical literacy, learn to follow the directions from the conductor, and learn to play in different keys- as a group. During the final class of the semester, a concert will be held for friends and family.
This orchestra is intended for advanced beginners and intermediate strings students who are currently (or recently) enrolled in private lessons. As a guideline, a student should be able to play a D major scale in two octaves on his/her instrument. Students are expected to be able to locate notes on the their instruments, read music and be able to identify all rhythmical patterns. Students with less experience will be asked to play for the conductor or to submit a brief video to help establish placement.
The instructor will provide the orchestral repertoires, and these arrangements will be specially composed to accommodate the range of abilities of all stringed players in the orchestra. Students will be asked to pay a fee $5.00 for their individual music which will be provided on the first day of class. Participants are expected to prepare and practice at home for at least 15 - 20 minutes per day. This is a 13-week semester program, and the week off will be announced by the instructor.

Prerequisites: Private instruction on stringed instrument

1
Lee Nathanson

Intermediate Guitar is a continuation of Beginning Guitar. Students will continue to build on the fundamentals of playing the acoustic guitar! In this class, students will continue learn basic melodies to familiar songs and will add new chords and strum patterns each week. Students are encouraged to bring in music they are interested in learning. The class will continue to learn to read music, use tablature notations for guitar, and cover basic music theory. As an intermediate level class, most students will have had 14-30 weeks of instruction through Compass, or equivalent. The pace of the class and material covered will be adapted by the instructor once he has assessed enrolled students. Students should plan to practice at home several times each week. Each student will need a least a beginner level acoustic guitar. There is a materials fee of $5.00 payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a music notebook if the student does not have one. Compass parents are welcome to register for the class to work alongside their teens, or to work on their own, while their teen is in another Compass class. Students should expect to spend 20-30 minutes per day most days practicing chords and melodies from class. Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component, or partial, credit in fine arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

1
Donna Shackelford

Razor Scooters, Post It Notes, and electric tooth brushes are cool inventions that kids use all the time! In this class, students will practice creative thinking and be coached through the steps of the invention process. Students will be encouraged to identify a need by noticing a problem or inconvenience and thinking about ways to solve it. They will engage in hands-on, in-class activities to encourage imagination and effective brainstorming- the spontaneous, creative thinking where all ideas are considered. Recognizing that many great inventions are twists or remakes on existing goods or inspired by others ideas, kids will learn to apply the SCAMPER technique to the problems they identify: Substitute, Combine, Adapt, Minify, Magnify, Put to new use, Eliminate, and Reverse/Rearrange.

Students will practice inventive thinking with a class problem and class invention in order to get them comfortable with working on their own inventions. They will learn to consider alternatives and pros and cons of a new idea and narrow down possible solutions. Students will be asked to keep an Inventor s Log (journal) to track all aspects of their inventing process. They will name their invention, sketch it, and build a prototype (model) of the invention.

This class will use a curriculum based on the Project XL program that was developed by the US Patent and Trademark Office in conjunction with educators, inventors, scientists, and specialists. During their discoveries, students will also learn about some inventors and discover that an inventor can be old or young, male or female, and any color or nationality. They will also learn how patents and trademarks protect their ideas. Students will be encouraged to showcase their Invention Dimension creations at Compass s Show What You Know Expo on November 6. In class, the instructor will provide basic prototyping materials such as cardboard, tape, straws, wooden sticks, scissors, glue, and paper. If a student s model-building needs require other materials, his/her family made need to send supplies from home or purchase prototyping materials from a local craft or home improvement store.

During second quarter, inventors will be challenged with Invention Dimension: Going Green" using found or recycled materials. During winter and spring, themes for this age group will include Flight Academy: Aviation Challenge (third quarter) and Flight Academy: Aerospace Race (fourth quarter.)

1
Kerry Deiderich

This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art or artist, view sample works, and then will create a project in the style of the artist using a wide variety of materials and representative colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors. First quarter, Junior Artists will learn about the unique Craft Art of famous artists! We will work on art projects that have craft themes such as Van Gogh s Sunflowers, torn paper rainbows, Faith Ringold s story quilts, and sand painting, to name a few. Through weekly projects, junior artists will learn about and make their own Craft Art while learning about the artist, the technique, and the subject matter. There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints. Topics in this year s studio series include: Unique Craft Art (first quarter); Seascape Art (second quarter); Famous Abstract-Inspired Projects (third quarter); and Animals in Art (fourth quarter).

1
Tim Rook

Krav Maga is the Israeli martial art which teaches self defense and fitness. Students of Krav Maga are taught a series of strategies to assess and respond to common situations, such as facing a bully. Teens are always taught to first and foremost to get away, to get help, and to try to deescalate the situation. When that fails, students practice a technique that includes a warning strike followed by escape, and finally, they learn how to stand up for themselves and how to counterattack if a situation escalates and becomes threatening. Teens are empowered and gain confidence when they rehearse how to handle real-life situations. Exercises and self defense practice in class incoporporate balance, coordination, energy, and other key elements of fitness alog with life skills such as confidence, teamwork, respect, discipline, and respect. In lieu of a full martial arts uniform, students will be asked to wear a class t-shirt that the instructor will furnish for $10.00 on the first day of class. Students should also wear shorts, leggings, or loose, comfortable athletic pants, and comfortable athletic shoes or sneakers with their class t-shirt. This class repeats each quarter, however the drills and skills taught in class will continue to change and progress. Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component, or partial, credit in physical education for purposes of a high school transcript.

1
Nick Grenier

Look up in that tree! Why is that robin alarming ? is there a hawk passing by? Is that a drey (a squirrel's nest)? What animal rubbed the bark off that sapling? Which plants are useful and which should be avoided? Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has lead for several years. Students will follow the paths and create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing fall season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world! Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Sorry, but the explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

1
Tia Murchie-Beyma

This semester-long, evidence-based science class offers a fascinating look at past and present variation in humans and our close relatives. Physical anthropology links biology, forensics, history, philosophy, and many other fields to examine the distant past and speculate on the future, always with an eye on the scientific method.

Our bodies carry clues about ancient environments and challenges faced by our ancestors, as well as our own personal pasts. To learn about this, physical anthropology (also called biological anthropology) investigates skeletal remains, variations among living people, life histories of non-human primates, genetic patterns, migration, and much more. Given a smooth, bleached skull, forensic anthropologists can reconstruct the face of a Neanderthal who lived thirty thousand years ago or a recent victim of crime. Using archaeology, genealogy, chemical tests, 3D scans, computer modeling, and other sources, anthropologists have identified previously anonymous individuals so their once-lost stories can now be told.

Physical anthropology is truly a bio-social science, considering both our bodies and our behaviors. How can we tell what sorts of labor early farming women did in Central Europe 7,000 years ago? Comparing their arm and leg bones to those of modern athletes has told us much about early agriculture that we could know no other way. Why do some people have thick, spiraled curls or long, loose locks? What advantages have many skin colors and eye colors given us? Now that DNA analysis has joined anthropology's toolkit, anthropologists have unveiled what Britain's famous, 10,000-year-old "Cheddar Man" looked like: a 5'4" tall, black-skinned man with blue eyes. Such variety is fascinating, but where does it come from?

Physical anthropology sheds light on such ancient mysteries, but also answers modern questions. Our health is closely connected to our evolutionary roots. Have you ever wondered why so many people have impacted wisdom teeth or the birth of a human infant is so difficult? Why do our bodies excel at storing fat, even at the risk of heart disease? Why did genes for sickle cell anemia spread throughout sub-Saharan Africa and the Mediterranean? Why can only some adults drink milk with lactose? By the end of this course, you'll know about many of these topics, and perhaps have some informed thoughts about the future of humanity. Are we still evolving? What might our distant descendants look like?

Class time is used for active discussion and weighing evidence, so students should come prepared with the week s investigations. All students should expect to spend 2-3 hours outside of class each week on reading/listening, both in the textbook and additional scientific sources such as podcasts, magazine articles, and videos. Students will also have some creative assignments and experiments over the semester with options based on interests. The class will not include in-depth writing, research papers, or unit tests. All instructor communications and assignments will take place over the password-protected platform, Canvas. On Canvas, students will find weekly assignments, links to videos and readings, brief online reading quizzes, and a message center for instructor and classmates.

Students will be asked to purchase or rent a print or electronic copy of the class textbook, Essentials of Physical Anthropology (3rd edition), by Clark Spencer Larsen (ISBN# 978-0-393-28874-2).

Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component, or partial credit in a non-laboratory science or social science for purposes of a high school transcript. The topic for second semester is Cultural Anthropology.

1
Katherine Hoeck

Newtonian Mechanics is a classical, lab-based physics course which will help students explore everyday phenomena in our physical world. Students will develop an in-depth conceptual and analytical understanding of principals such as vectors and vector analysis, graph matching, linear motion and kinematics, acceleration and free fall, projectile motion, force and Newton s Laws of Motion, centripetal force and circular motion, gravitation, work and energy, conservation of energy and momentum, static equilibrium, and simple machines through the study of error analysis and trigonometry.

This course will use algebra- and trigonometry-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe mechanics. The course is designed to emphasize scientific thinking and reasoning, problem solving, and experimentation. Students can expect to spend most of the time in class performing labs and collecting data relative to the current topic of discussion.

Students will be expected to study independently, read, and take detailed notes on concepts before coming to class, complete various problem-solving activities, analyze data, and write formal lab reports. Students should expect to spend 3 hours of independent study/homework for every 1 hours in class (or about 6 hours per week.)

Students should have completed Algebra I before taking this course and have completed some work in trigonometry. The instructor will recommend some trig resources and videos for any student who needs to review the concepts before the start of the physics class. The instructor will also be providing an assessment over the summer to understand where students are in their math background before starting class.

The second semester of Physics will cover the topics of fluid dynamics, heat and kinetic theory, thermodynamics, harmonic motion, waves and sound, light and optics, electricity and magnetism, and an introduction to relativity and nuclear physics. First semester is not required for second semester, but a basic understanding of mechanics and trigonometry is advised.

Students will be asked to rent or purchase the textbook Physics Fundamentals by Vincent Coletta (2010 ed.) ISBN #978-0971313453. There is a $125.00 lab fee due to the instructor on the first day of class. Students will also need a scientific calculator for this course.

Prerequisites: Algebra 1

1
Andrew Cummins

Young sculptors will enjoy working hands-on with clay and experiencing the many forms this medium can take. Working with clay is multi-sensory, and young sculptors enjoy the tactile experience of pounding, pinching, rolling, flattening, squeezing, coiling, stretching, squashing, and bending clay into many forms. Working with clay engages a different artistic skillset than coloring, drawing, and writing and encourages creativity to sculpt and represent objects in three dimensions. In this workshop, students will create original hand-made pieces inspired by different themes and clay construction techniques. During first quarter, students will sculpt vessels and vases: a Greek amphora vase using the coil pot technique; a square or triangular vase using the joined slab technique; and a textured cup using a single slab with an added handle. During week seven, students will paint a modern, abstract bowl that the instructor pre-formed on the pottery wheel and bisque fired in his studio. Students will sculpt projects in weeks one, three, and five and paint/glaze projects in weeks two, four, and six each quarter. Students will use natural, low fire white clay and non-toxic glazes on their pieces. They will experiment with different textures and patterns formed in clay with tools, found objects, and with a variety of glaze colors. Clay projects will be taken to back to a studio to dry and be fired. All pieces are considered food safe once they are glaze fired and returned to students. Each quarter, students will further develop hand building techniques and painting skills with each new lesson and project. Topics in this class series include: Ancient Vessels and Modern Vases (first quarter); Hanging Creations (second quarter); Funny Faces (third quarter), and Springtime Sculptures (fourth quarter.) There is a $35.00 per student material fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

1
Coder Kids

Students are introduced to coding in the virtual world they already know and love. Students learn to enhance their Minecraft world through mods (modifications) that they program themselves. Young coders begin by creating custom structures, teleporting, and cool new effects through Python. Later they create mods that add custom items, armor, tools, and blocks to the game using Java. Students use their imaginations to make Minecraft do what they want it to do- through the power of coding. The custom features that each coder develops create one-of-a-kind mods for an enhanced gaming experience. When students learn Python to code mods, they add functions, loops, conditionals, predefined constructs, and parameters to their programming. They also gain a basic understanding of Minecraft s client-server architecture and the iterative design process. In learning to program with Java, students learn about hierarchy in coding languages, instruction sets, and logic circuits. They learn to create computational models and to program interactive elements that respond to an event or condition. Programming Lab is a computer lab environment in which students work through the Coder Kids curriculum under the direction of computer science coaches. Work in the Programming Lab is self-paced which allows students to progress through skill-building activities and instructional coding modules at their own rate of learning. The Lab environment allows students to enroll at any quarter, fosters brand new coders, and encourages those with prior coding experience. Coder Kids coaches work with small pull-out groups, pairs, or individuals to provide additional instruction and support on the skillset each needs each week. Coder Kids proprietary curriculum is designed to meet and exceed the standards of the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA). Students work on modern MacBook Air laptops. Students may enroll in a Programming Lab course at any quarter, as they can start with initial lessons at any time. Coaches send prompts for parents in the weekly e-mail updates to encourage discussion and reflection about what the student learned in class each week. The class tuition includes a $35.00 per student, per quarter technology fee that covers repair/maintenance of hardware, software, and licenses.

1
Natalie Di Vietri

Why do we dream? What happens to your brain when you are in love? Why do all babies like peek-a-boo? The course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of behavior and mental processes of human beings. Students are exposed to psychological facts, principles and phenomena associated with each of the sub fields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice. Students will be challenged to think like a psychologist as they analyze research and design future experiments.
This is a year-long, multi-level high school course. It will cover the fourteen major content areas covered on the College Board s AP Psychology Exam including: history and approaches, research methods, biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, learning, cognition, motivation and emotion, developmental psychology, personality, testing and individual differences, abnormal behavior, treatment of abnormal behavior, and social psychology.
The class offers a substantive, full-credit experience and will be a mixture of lecture, discussion, group work, and short videos. There is some mature content discussed in this course, especially as it pertains to abnormal psychology. Also, there is a section on sexual motivation, including homosexuality, that needs to be covered for the AP test. These topics will be discussed in a purely scientific manner, and students need to be prepared to have a respectful discussion about these subjects.

The course is offered at three levels, which meet together: Advanced Placement (AP), Honors, and On-Level. Students can pick their desired workload. Students can always do more if they would like, but at any level they are expected to keep up with weekly readings and homework which will prepare them for in-class discussions, assignments, and projects. All students must be prepared to read about 30 pages of college level text per week and should expect to spend 4-5 hours outside of class for reading and homework, regardless of level. All levels use materials written at a college level, but the amount and type of homework varies. A brief summer assignment will be due in August for those who wish to take the AP level, and successful completion is a prerequisite take the course at the AP level.
All students will register online for the same course. Students must indicate which level they want to study by e-mail by August 15. Once the course has begun, students may move down a level (from AP to honors, or from honors to on-level) at any time. However, once classes have started, students may not "bump up" a level. This is a year-long class that meets on Fridays for two hours and will have an additional online component. All assessments, essays, and projects will be submitted online so that class time can be maximized.
Students will be asked to purchase or rent the select class textbook: Myers Psychology for the AP, 2nd Edition, (ISBN #978-1464113079). The fee to take the AP exam in May 2019 is not included; each family will be responsible for scheduling and paying for their student's AP exam.

1
Monifa Hamilton

Glossophobia is defined as the fear of public speaking", and in a recent survey conducted by Chapman University, public speaking was again defined as the #1 fear! Unfortunately, it is that fear that hinders many teens from becoming expressive, confident, and capable of speaking and being heard. Yet, public speaking is an invaluable skillset that we need throughout our lives!
In this class, students will find their voice! Preparation is the key, so students will learn how to select and formulate a speech topic, get to know their audience, and develop a speech. The class will learn how to control the nerves, incorporate gestures, eye contact, and other nonverbal body language techniques, and how to enhance their presentations with vocal variety, props, and visual aids in addition to learning the Art of Engagement.
Students will practice three speaking styles: Impromptu, Extemporaneous, and Original Oratory. Impromptu Speech is an off-the-cuff oral response to a question, statement, or phrase with minimal preparation. Participants will learn how to quickly think on their feet and deliver a two- minute speech. (Coach Mo won this category at Toastmasters International, District 27). Extemporaneous Speech is prepared on short notice with thirty minutes to outline a position on an issue or theme given three prompts to consider. Original Oratory, a favorite in the National Forensics and Speech competition, can be an informative or persuasive speech that is composed, rehearsed, and delivered by the speaker on any topic they choose. (This is a category that Coach Mo competed in while in high school and placed as a finalist for New York State.) At the end of the quarter, we will crown an Original Oratory Speech Champion...the first for Compass!

1
Heather Sanderson

Read it! Act it! Students will enjoy this two-hour, 10-week workshop with Shakespearian coach Heather Sanderson who hails from England and is known for instilling a love of Shakespeare into the hearts of students throughout the Greater DC area. The class will explore Shakespeare's timeless tragedy, Macbeth, and analyze its characters, plot, themes and motives. Students will take on the personas of King Duncan, General Macbeth, Lady Macbeth, the Three Witches, and a cast of courtesans, soldiers, murders, and apparitions in this tale of corruption, political ambition, and paranoia.

Students will read various roles, study and act out scenes, practice monologues, and work through the literature while having fun with fellow teens. Theatre games will be used to encourage collaboration, and specially designed improv exercises will be used to stretch teens' imaginations and help them get "in character". The class will use read-aloud and in-class dramatization to decipher the original language, word choices, and to identify suspicion, guilt, madness, conflict, and betrayal in this work. The class will work from complete texts (not redacted, abridged, or simplified school versions) to hear and practice Elizabethan lingo. (How did someone of Shakespeare's time hurl insults or woo a woman?) Students will learn how the Bard crafted scenes and conveyed the primary storyline and sub-plots in a dark tale that has endured for over 400 years.

Several scenes will be shared with parents on the last day of class as a way for students to demonstrate their appreciation and understanding of what they have learned about Shakespeare. Instructor Heather Sanderson shares a teaching style based on actions and interactions, developed from years of experience coaching Shakespeare in a way that appeals to students. Her approach brings abstract concepts, complex themes, and difficult language to the students' level, so that they can relate to and appreciate Shakespeare. This is a 10-week workshop that meets for two hours per week from September 14 through November 16. The course fee includes the cost of the selected paperback edition of the play. Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component, or partial, credit in English or Fine Arts (drama) for purposes of a high school transcript.

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Megan Reynolds

Stretch your child's brain with this metacognitive class! In Smart Start, children will sharpen their critical and creative thinking skills to become more independent and effective learners. Using in-class readings of high quality literature, children will be introduced to a broad range of thinking strategies such as de Bono's Thinking Hats, SCAMPER, and FFOE (Fluency, Flexibility, Originality, and Elaboration). Through facilitated discussion and community inquiry, children will learn to ask their own questions and raise issues for discussion, explore and develop their own ideas and theories, and give creative reasons.
Each week, students will complete engaging activities that require them to apply what they have learned. For example, the class might consider, What happens when Max returns to Where the Wild Things Are the next day? Next year? How about 10 years from now? (Green Hat Thinking). They may expand to discuss what would happen if another character from literature, like Curious George or Cinderella, visited Where the Wild Things Are? (SCAMPER approach "C" for combining two things that do not normally go together). Young learners will have fun on this engaging, creative class which will boost their ability to use higher order thinking skills, predict outcomes, and solve problems! New stories and activities are introduced each week and not repeated from previous sessions. Students must be able to think independently, work collaboratively, and enjoy a good challenge. Emerging readers and writers can be accommodated.

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Penny Russell

Preschoolers will have fun with weekly science topics presented through stories, songs, and games with professional puppeteer Miss Penny! Storytime with Penny is extra-special because she brings a different character from her cast of colorful puppets each week. Three and four- year olds will dive into the wonderful world of science through play and the performing arts.
Preschoolers will develop their observational skills at they listen to, act out, and learn from stories. Throughout the quarter, Miss Penny will use drama, puppetry, music, movement and stories to teach science concepts and beginning science vocabulary. Our youngest students will learn to work in a group, exercise their senses, improve their attention spans, and self regulate along with making predictions and thinking creatively when science is introduced in a fun, multi-sensory setting.
Topics in this year s storytime series include: Our Senses (first quarter); Animals (second quarter), Lifecycles(third quarter), and The Great Outdoors (fourth quarter)
Students must be 3 years old by the first class meeting. Preschoolers should be comfortable sitting apart their parents during the story time. This is a 45 minute class.

1
Christine Keen

Geography is our window into understanding the world around us. It helps us make sense of history and economics, peoples and culture, politics and current events. The focus of this class will be on physical geography: the longest rivers, driest deserts, tallest mountains, and other landforms that shape our planet and the way we use it. Where were yesterday's earthquakes? What is the biggest lake in the world, and why is it getting bigger? Where do two rivers of different colors run side by side without mixing for nearly 4 miles? Each week will feature a variety of hands-on activities, games, and at-home assignments designed to enrich students understanding of both U.S. and world geography. Prior geographic knowledge is welcome but not assumed. Students must be able to read at or above grade level and be prepared to complete several brief projects at home to present during class time. This class will help prepare students for the National Geographic Bee and, more importantly, give them the geographic knowledge to be more informed citizens of their world. Topics in this year s class series include: Physical Geography (1st quarter), Destinations (2nd quarter), Human Geography (3rd quarter), and BioGeography (4th quarter). This class was previously taught in September 2017.

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Karen Hickman

What do Star Wars Jakku planet and Alice s Wonderland have in common? What gives fantasy its unique characteristics? What makes a story science fiction, and why do both genres often include time travel? An understanding of fantasy writing includes a look at science fiction. By seeing the similarities and differences in the works of Jules Verne, Kenneth Grahame, Lewis Carroll, E.B. White, and Madeline L Engle, we will create our own time travel stories. Developing a sense of audience and purpose through reading/writing groups provides students with ongoing commentary to help with their stories. An anthology of stories will be published at the close of the class. The Writers Workshop gives students in grades 5-6 the skills they need for writing, reading, listening, and speaking that come from practicing by putting pen to paper. Sharing drafts and in-progess works enhances the understanding of language structure, encourages revision, and improves editing in story writing. Each quarter, students will review samples of literature and write about popular themes using the story elements of that theme. Imagination and creativity come easily to most young writers, but acquiring technical skills is also important. Each quarter, students will focus on specific skills. The skills are a part of their Writer s Tool Kit that includes understanding parts and kinds of sentences, plurals, possessives, and punctuation. Learning how to use a dictionary and a thesaurus, as well as practical, higher, middle school level skills such as summarizing, outlining, note taking, writing a book report, or citing sources are included throughout the four sessions. Topics in this year s Writers' Workshop series include: Time Travel, Fantasy or Science Fiction? (first quarter); Learn to Research, Life in a Castle (second quarter); Journalism (third quarter); and Writing Children s Books (fourth quarter).

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Sudhita Kasturi

Conduct biology, chemistry, and environmental science experiments in a university laboratory setting! Use advanced lab equipment, follow college-level lab protocols, and receive instruction from university lab staff. Lab activities are taken from AP curricula and the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS).

Bio-Chem Learning Labs is a series of 5 sessions, held off-site at Towson University s Center for STEM Excellence in downtown Baltimore (60 miles from Compass.) This lab series is a complement to and offers further hands-on experience for students taking Integrated Science, Environmental Science, Biology, or Micro-Biology at Compass in 2018-19. Homeschool students following another curriculum, doing self-study, or taking an online class may take this series to add a lab component to their work.

Each session, students will complete a series of lab experiments around a central theme. Tentative activities include: collecting and testing for water quality and salinity; identifying organisms living on a biofilm; categorizing soil types, percolation, and absorption; measuring concentrations of carbon dioxide; evaluating the antimicrobial properties of different plants; and extracting DNA samples from plant and animal sources. Each lab will emphasize the importance of control samples, recording and graphing data, and will demonstrate the process of identifying a problem, scientifically testing a hypothesis, interpreting results of an experiment, and supporting a scientific claim. All labs are 2.5 -3.0 hours long.

Lab dates are held on Tuesdays: October 2, December 4, February 12, March 12, and April 9. Labs begin at 11:30 am, and students are asked to arrive by 11:15 am. Compass science instructor Sudhita Kasturi will remain with the students throughout the labs and will send a post-lab summary to parents. A class roster will be distributed before the first session to allow parents to form carpools. Families will be responsible for any parking fees incurred on site.

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Rebecca Wahls

Acting is an adventure! Young actors will embark upon an imaginary Safari journey where they will create an original storyline and unique characters for their very own original play about wacky animals, wily adventurers, and the wild sarengeti.

Students will think about the actions, voices, and personalities of characters as they develop their own through exercises and games. Students will explore skills such as sensory awareness, listening, stage movement, character development, emotional development, and observation/concentration while learning to perform their own unique character. Young actors will learn aspects of acting by script read-through, blocking, costume/prop discussion, and planning the show. Through individual and group activities, young actors build confidence in preparation for a final sharing for parents.

This program has been specially adapted for Compass from Acting for Young People's curriculum, and is ideal for students with any level of experience.The script will be developed and customized uniquely for this class by the instructor with input from the students. All actors must be at least age 6 to sign up for this class. Topics in this year's class series include: Safari Adventure (first quarter), Outer Space Race (second quarter), Magical Monsters (third quarter), and Our Own Fairy Tale (fourth quarter).

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Taliesin Knol

This class will explore the judicial processes of Europe following the collapse of Rome. From witch trials and Viking blood feuds, then back again to the real barbarians, Europe s early lawyers! Real historical cases will be studied and trial parts assigned to students who will be expected to debate from the perspective of Royal Courts, Church Ordeals, or a Viking assembly creatively called a Thing. The class will serve as the jury and, if necessary, select period-appropriate verdicts and explain how they arrived at their decisions, while striving for period accuracy. Second semester will move to codified Renaissance legal systems, leading up to the direct Ancestor to American legal Traditions, Common Law.

1
Lee Nathanson

Learn the fundamentals of playing the guitar! In this class, students will learn basic melodies, such as Ode to Joy, Happy Birthday, etc Teens will learn to play chords and strumming patterns for familiar songs chosen by the instructor and students. Students are encouraged to bring in music they are interested in learning. New chords and new songs will be added each week as students also learn to read music and basic music theory. Students will also learn how to hold, tune, and care for their guitars. Students should plan to practice at home several times each week. Each student will need a least a beginner level acoustic guitar. There is a materials fee of $5.00 payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a music notebook. Compass parents are welcome to register for the class to work alongside their teens, or to work on their own, while their teen is in another Compass class. Students should expect to spend 20-30 minutes per day most days practicing chords and melodies from class. Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component, or partial, credit in fine arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

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Mylene Nyman

Students will enjoy making savory fall recipes and cool weather comfort foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Fall Favorites are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

Cranberry Pumpkin Brie Bites (appetizer), Chipotle Corn Soup
Autumn Apple-Pea Salad, Stuffed Acorn Squash (side dish),
Butternut Squash Alfredo (entree), Turkey Pumpkin Casserole (entree),
Caramel Apple Cake and Sweet Potato Bars (desserts).

Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.

Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Students must be minimum age six (6) by the start of class. Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day.

1
Mylene Nyman

Students will enjoy making savory fall recipes and cool weather comfort foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Fall Favorites are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

Cranberry Pumpkin Brie Bites (appetizer), Chipotle Corn Soup
Autumn Apple-Pea Salad, Stuffed Acorn Squash (side dish),
Butternut Squash Alfredo (entree), Turkey Pumpkin Casserole (entree),
Caramel Apple Cake and Sweet Potato Bars (desserts).

Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.

Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day.

1
Edwige Pinover

Bonjour! French Foundations is an introductory class for middle school-aged students. The class will be taught in a predominantly immersion environment. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students or explain difficult concepts. French language instruction will be presented in a natural learning sequence beginning with nouns (such as colors, numbers, clothing, foods, animals, days/dates, etc), adjectives, greetings, and simple phrases. Students will learn beginning grammatical constructions such as noun-verb agreement, noun-adjective agreement, adjective placement, and the rules of regular verb conjugation. Students will be encouraged to speak aloud and converse with classmates, but also to learn to sound out, spell, and read beginning, written French. Aspects of Francophone culture such as holidays, foods, and traditions will be incorporated in the classes.

Each quarter introduces new themes and new vocabulary in French, so continuing students can continue to build their language basics. However, themes and units are non-sequential, so students may enroll in this level in any quarter. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, grammar, and usage while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Students should be at grade level in their reading. Fluency should not be expected at this level.

1
Natalie Di Vietri

When is a lotus flower not just a bloom? When it means one thousand in the hieroglyphic number system of ancient Egypt! In the exploration of the history of numbers, students will learn to count using hieroglyphics, Greek letters, and cuneiform characters. From primitive number systems to modern number systems, we will trace the development of numbers through the ages. Students will see how easy it was for the ancient Babylonians to multiply by 60, and how hard it was for Romans and Egyptians to do the same! By performing calculations using different forms of numerical representation, students will be able to assess the relative advantages and disadvantages of these number systems. We will consider how the number systems met the needs of the civilizations that used them, and perhaps, where they fell short. Every student will have a strong sense of the importance of place value and be introduced to alternatives to the base ten system by the end of this class. First quarter will explore the number system of the ancients: Egyptian, Babylonian, Greek, and Roman number systems. Second quarter will examine the classics: Hindu-Arabic, Quinary, Binary, and Mayan. Third and fourth quarter offerings for this grade level will include an exploration of Logic and Reasoning.

1
Karleen Boyle Sudol

Geo-Detectives discover the many mysteries of Earth Science. From large scale disasters that come from inside the planet to microscopic contaminants in the water and soil, Geo-Detectives look high and low to understand the forces, systems, and cycles that continue to shape the Earth, its climates and ecosystems. Geo-Detectives will explore concepts as diverse as fossils to fault lines, ozone to ocean trenches, and trade winds to tundra. Hands-on labs and in-class activities will reinforce geological phenomena such as examining fossils, classifying rocks, reading the seismographic charts, or modelling the water cycle. First quarter, students will examine natural disasters that come from activity in the earth s layers such as volcanoes, tsunamis, and earth quakes. Students will study the geological forces that shape our planet by tracing the paths of volcanoes, earthquakes and tsunamis around the world. What do these occurrances tell us about tectonic plate theory? Students will learn about the rock cycle, subduction and spreading zones, and different types of earthquake faults. They will learn about fossils and other lines of evidence that support the theory of plate tectonics, and learn how the sizes, shapes and positions of land masses and oceans have changed through our planet s history. Topics in this year s class series include: What a Disaster! Volcanoes, Tsunamis, and Earthquakes (first quarter); Global Climate (second quarter); Global Ecosystems (third quarter); and Global Cycles (fourth quarter). There is a $10.00 lab fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for consumable materials.

1
Donna Shackelford

Razor Scooters, Post It Notes, and electric tooth brushes are cool inventions that kids use all the time! In this class, students will practice creative thinking and be coached through the steps of the invention process. Students will be encouraged to identify a need by noticing a problem or inconvenience and thinking about ways to solve it. They will engage in hands-on, in-class activities to encourage imagination and effective brainstorming- the spontaneous, creative thinking where all ideas are considered. Recognizing that many great inventions are twists or remakes on existing goods or inspired by others ideas, kids will learn to apply the SCAMPER technique to the problems they identify: Substitute, Combine, Adapt, Minify, Magnify, Put to new use, Eliminate, and Reverse/Rearrange.

Students will practice inventive thinking with a class problem and class invention in order to get them comfortable with working on their own inventions. They will learn to consider alternatives and pros and cons of a new idea and narrow down possible solutions. Students will be asked to keep an Inventor s Log (journal) to track all aspects of their inventing process. They will name their invention, sketch it, and build a prototype (model) of the invention.

This class will use a curriculum based on the Project XL program that was developed by the US Patent and Trademark Office in conjunction with educators, inventors, scientists, and specialists. During their discoveries, students will also learn about some inventors and discover that an inventor can be old or young, male or female, and any color or nationality. They will also learn how patents and trademarks protect their ideas. Students will be encouraged to showcase their Invention Dimension creations at Compass s Show What You Know Expo on November 6. In class, the instructor will provide basic prototyping materials such as cardboard, tape, straws, wooden sticks, scissors, glue, and paper. If a student s model-building needs require other materials, his/her family made need to send supplies from home or purchase prototyping materials from a local craft or home improvement store.

During second quarter, inventors will be challenged with Invention Dimension: Going Green" using found or recycled materials. During winter and spring, themes for this age group will include Flight Academy: Aviation Challenge (third quarter) and Flight Academy: Aerospace Race (fourth quarter.)

1
Premier Martial Arts

Krav Maga is the Israeli martial art which teaches self defense and fitness. Students of Krav Maga are taught a series of strategies to assess and respond to common situations, such as facing a bully. Kids are always taught to first and foremost to get away, to get help, and to try to deescalate the situation. When that fails, students practice a technique that includes a warning strike followed by escape, and finally, they learn how to stand up for themselves and how to counterattack if a sitation escalates and becomes threatening. Kids are empowered and gain confidence when they rehearse how to handle real-life situations. Exercises and self defense practice in class incorporate balance, coordination, energy, and other key elements of fitness along with life skills such as confidence, teamwork, respect, discipline, and respect. In lieu of a full martial arts uniform, students will be asked to wear a class t-shirt that the instructor will furish for $10.00 on the first day of class. Students should also wear shorts, leggings, or loose, comfortable athletic pants, and comfortable athletic shoes or sneakers with their class t-shirt.

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Kathy Preisinger

Little Hands is a family music and movement classes for parents and children, aged infant to 5 years old. Be part of an engaging musical world while building confidence, coordination, and communications skills. Singing, imitating sounds, rhyming, and object identification foster language skills. Creative movement to various musical moods develops a sense of balance, timing and spatial awareness. Listening and taking turns encourage blossoming social skills. Children and parents meet weekly for a 30-minute class and enjoy singing, moving, listening, and playing simple, specially designed instruments. Structured time runs from 1:15-1:45 pm, with time before and after for gathering and transitions.

1
Nick Grenier

Look up in that tree! Why is that robin alarming ? is there a hawk passing by? Is that a drey (a squirrel's nest)? What animal rubbed the bark off that sapling? Which plants are useful and which should be avoided?
Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has lead for several years. Students will follow the paths and create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing fall season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world!
Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Sorry, but the explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

1
Anne Sharp

Figuring out who you are and what you think is the core of growing up. The personal essay provides a process of discovery as well as a finished product a resulting chronicle of both journey and person.
Going beyond the five-paragraph template that encourages cookie cutter essays, this course will focus on developing a unique architecture embedded with personal style, voice, and narrative structure. In short, students will uncover not just who they are as individuals, but who they are as writers and how to fuse these two identities into a creative, organized, clear, and elegant essay.
In the first part of the semester, we will focus on who you are and where you re heading (nonfictional character analysis). Recognizing that some students will have college essays on their minds and calendars, we ll devote lessons to analyzing applications, prompts, and the general process of showcasing self on paper.

As part of an application, an essay fills in the gaps and provides an opportunity to present what s not anywhere else. A well-written essay puts the writer across the table from the reader. - It s a powerful form.

We ll examine how professional writers put their selves in front of us. We will read essays by Henry David Thoreau, George Orwell, Robert Benchley, James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Annie Dillard, and Joyce Carol Oates. Students will strengthen their observation skills, learning to take note of people, places and situations around them and use this data to add richness and detail to writing. Students will strengthen a writing focus by narrowing not just to a topic, but an individual, a moment, a scene, or a conversation that embodies a polished thesis that may or may not be overtly stated.

The student should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week on writing homework, research, or reading for this class. The class will meet twice a week, with Wednesdays introducing writing concepts and literature for the week and Friday serving as a writing lab in which students revise and refine their drafts. Students will keep a journal and a portfolio to organize their writings and class handouts.

1
Kathleen Olsen

Out of breath, sudden fever, rash! What could be wrong with this patient? This class is a case-based approach to the many infectious diseases that humans share and contract from domestic animals. Each week, students will be presented with a sick patient, and will follow that person's case through diagnostics, progression, treatments, and outcome.

The class will integrate principles of microbiology, immunology, physiology, and pharmacology within the framework of each individual case. We will also discuss the historical, economic, and societal impacts that plagues and pestilence resulting from these infectious agents have wrought over the course of recorded history.

The class will include laboratory activities in microbiologic techniques. Students will become familiar with principles of laboratory safety, light microscopy, biologic stains, culture techniques, and common immunologic tests.

First semester lectures and labs will introduce the basic microbiology and diseases caused by bacteria and prions, an introduction to the immune system, and antibiotic therapy/resistance. Cases will include zoonotic diseases such as Bubonic Plague, Lyme Disease, Mad Cow Disease, Anthrax, and many others!

This class will be offered on two levels: Honors and On-Level. All students will be expected to keep a lab manual for notetaking, lab reports, and assigned homework questions. On-level students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week on assigned readings and lab reports. Honors students will be assigned additional readings, homework questions, and lab reports. Honors students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week on work outside of the classroom. At the end of the semester, the instructor will review student notebooks and assign numerical scores to their notebooks, if requested, for the parents use in assigning letter grades.

Although previous classwork in Biology and Chemistry will be helpful, they are not prerequisites. Students should purchase or rent the required class textbook: Microbiology: A Systems Approach, 5th Edition" by Marjorie Kelly Cowan (ISBN # 978-1259706615). A lab fee of $100 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year s class series include: Bacteria and Prions (first semester) and Viruses and Parasites (second semester).

1
Coder Kids

Our youngest coders learn to program simple video games using the block-based and text-based programming languages of Scratch, Roblox, and Lua. Students learn to create their very own game worlds and animate their own characters. They learn to add scripting logic to make their games interactive. Programming skills at this level include conditionals, loops, if-statements, multiple branches, and variables. Other computer science skills at this level include predicting outcomes, sequencing activities, debugging code, and incorporating responsive elements such as game objects that respond to an event or condition or keeping score. Students may program one simple video game each quarter, or may continue to build on and enhance their original game concept over many quarters.

Programming Lab is a computer lab environment in which students work through the Coder Kids curriculum under the direction of computer science coaches. Work in the Programming Lab is self-paced which allows students to progress through skill-building activities and instructional coding modules at their own rate of learning. The Lab environment allows students to enroll at any quarter, fosters brand new coders, and encourages those with prior coding experience. Coder Kids coaches work with small pull-out groups, pairs, or individuals to provide additional instruction and support on the skillset each needs each week.

Coder Kids proprietary curriculum is designed to meet and exceed the standards of the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA). Students work on modern MacBook Air laptops. Students may enroll in a Programming Lab course at any quarter, as they can start with initial lessons at any time. Coaches send prompts for parents in the weekly e-mail updates to encourage discussion and reflection about what the student learned in class each week. The class tuition includes a $35.00 per student, per quarter technology fee that covers repair/maintenance of hardware, software, and licenses.

1
Dan Gallagher

Pretty soon you won t need a driver s license, just a smart car. The future of self-driving cars is almost here. In this project-based class we will learn how smart cars work by building autonomous cars. As a member of a small team, you will design a vehicle that can autonomously operate in a small-scale version of the real world. The vehicles will need to be able to follow basic rules of the road, sense and react to the environment, and recognize elements from a real roadway, including the lanes on the road, road signs, and other obstacles (like vehicles and pedestrians).

The class will focus on construction and programming, with heavy emphasis on sensors. The cars will be programmed to sense and react by taking appropriate actions to avoid collisions while making their way through a pre-defined course. Students will build with VEX metal components, incorporate sensors and motors from Lego Mindstorms, and will program using the Robot C language. Teams will conduct research, apply the engineering design process, follow the general rules and conventions of the engineering profession, including maintaining an engineering notebook.

1
Christine Keen

Stocks? Bonds? Shorts? Margins? Cryptocurrencies? Commodities? This class, built around the Stock Market Game, gives students the information and experience they need to invest for their futures. Student teams will compete to generate the highest returns on their (imaginary) money while learning about the ins and outs (and ups and downs!) of various investment strategies and the global economy. In addition to the tools provided by the Stock Market Game, students will discuss relevant readings ranging from Adam Smith through blockchain technology and be able to participate, if they choose, in the security industry's "InvestWrite" essay contest. To be successful in this class, students should read at or above grade level and be comfortable calculating decimals and percentages. They should also be prepared to do a minimum of 30 minutes of research each week and coordinate and communicate with team members. Teams of 2-3 students each will be registered with the national Stock Market Game program with an estimated registration fee of $5.00-$6.00 per team member. (This fee will be finalized when team registration details are published.) Homeschool families may elect to count this course as a component, or partial, credit in personal finance for purposes of a high school transcript.

1
Megan Reynolds

Follow sixteen-year-old Magnus Chase, the half-mortal son of the Norse God Frey, on his quest to prevent Ragnarok- a cataclysmic battle among Norse gods Odin, Thor, Loki and others. The Magnus Chase series is the most recent, mythology-inspired young adult fantasy by Rick Riordan, author of the Kane Chronicles and Percy Jackson series. Why do myths, legends, and fairy tales inspire countless retellings and reinvention? Traverse the globe while exploring the world of traditional tales in this class. Each quarter, students will read a full-length novel based on myths or fairy tales while simultaneously exploring the source material that inspired the author. In addition, students will analyze the culture and geography that generated the traditional tales and the hero cycle. Students will have the opportunity to synthesize all they have learned through a project shared on the last day of class. This class will be run as a book group with students being asked to read sections each week and return prepared to discuss. Students are welcome to read the works via recorded audio books if preferred. Topics in this year s class series include: Norse Mythology- Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard, Book 1: The Sword of Summer by Rick Riordan (first quarter); Egyptian Mythology- Tut: The Story of my Egyptian Immortal Life by P.J. Hoover (second quarter); Japanese Folklore- Momotaro: Xander and the Island of Lost Monsters by Margaret Dilloway (third quarter); and European Fairy Tales- A Tale Dark and Grimm by Adam Gidwitz (fourth quarter).

1
PlayWell Teknologies

Students will use LEGO to design and build beginning engineering projects such as a pullback stunt car and ramps, house and city, airplanes and airports, simple bridge, merry?go?round, boats and dock, and farm with windmill. In this 90 minute class, students will explore concepts in physics, mechanical engineering, structural engineering, and architecture while playing with their creations. Students will be exposed to concepts and vocabulary of engineering, architecture, and physics. Each class session opens with 10-minutes of free build from tubs of LEGO components followed by a short discussion and demonstration of the day's project and concepts. Students build individually or in groups. Instructors will provide individual assistance, facilitate challenges, performance testing, competitions, and modifications to projects. Some of the projects in this class were covered in the 1st quarter 2014 course. Students are welcome to take the class again as their building skills and understanding will have grown.

1
Taliesin Knol

Why read about key military battles on maps or in books when you can learn about them hands-on, in three dimensions, using historical miniature gaming? In 3D History, pivotal engagements come alive for new and experienced students, as they navigate a table-top terrain, deploy hundreds of miniature soldiers, ships, and tanks... all while playing a military strategy game. Each student will have the opportunity to fight a battle from both sides, allowing them to test various strategies, try multiple scenarios, predict different outcomes, and rewrite history- an effective way to gain a deeper understanding of what actually happened and why!

In the summer of 1941 Nazi Germany seemed unbeatable. The Wehrmacht had made seemingly short work of almost all of mainland Europe and now, with Operation Barbarossa, turned its sights on Soviet Russia. Attempting to do what Napoleon could not, Hitler expected to repeat the successes of the invasion of France, only to find that he had bitten off more than his army could chew. At the gates of Moscow and in the streets of Stalingrad the lighting war would find itself frozen, then ground down into nothingness by the enormity of its failure. What had been the most impressive campaign in modern military history would instead turn into the biggest and bloodiest blunder in history.

This semester will study the early success, and ultimate failure of Germany s invasion, looking at the tactics, technology and economics behind this near total war, where the price of failure was nothing less than threat of extinction. The following semester will complete the study of the Eastern Front, from Kursk to Berlin. Course documents including period maps, photographs and recreations will be made available through a class Google Drive link emailed to parents (and students who provide their email address), as well as a class YouTube playlist for any videos watched in class or assigned as homework.

1
John Waldron

Imagine a scene on a long airplane flight, in a Chinese restaurant, at an awkward class reunion, a doctor s waiting room, a kooky family reunion, an English pub, a football game, or even the mall. Envision those scenarios all in one zany production, as a collection of one-minute plays! The class will race through at least twenty super-short scripts featuring a range of zany mini stories. The class will cast, practice, and perform them in a rapid-fire form called tiny theater and flash fiction. One-minute plays are popular around the country in venues such as college theater, indie stage, and countless festivals such as the annual Gone in 60 Seconds event.

New and returning acting students will have fun and be challenged to think on their feet with the rapid-fire pace of these super-short plays as they connect with the audience, bring their character to life, and tell their story... in just one minute. Students will change characters and plots in quick succession and have to bring the audience along with them. If they forget a line, they ll improvise! From story to story, students will develop clever transitions and sequence the short scenes to a coherent class production.

In this class, actors will learn the art of a cold read in front of a director. If a student would like to write a script for the class, he/she should bring a hard copy to the first day of class to review and edit with the instructor before the script is offered to the class.

The students will perform for family and friends at the end of the quarter. This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, are flexible and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work in a collaborative group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class.

Topics in this year s Teen Stage series include: One Minute Plays (first quarter); Wednesday Afternoon Live (second quarter); Improv Theater Games (third quarter); and Mystery on Demand (fourth quarter). Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component, or partial, credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

1
Dan Gallagher

Interested in rocket design and engines? Join a simulation class focused on missions to build rockets that can deliver satellites to planetary orbit in space. Learn about rocket design and how to create and launch multi-stage rockets to complete orbital missions. Each week students will learn about aerospace history, the physics of space flight, and basic aerospace concepts and technologies. The class will use KerbalEDU simulation software on laptops to immerse themselves in a realistic, simulated environment to complete a series of challenging missions. In the KerbalEDU environment, students can design and build different space vehicles, launch them, and use mission data to improve rocket designs and mission results. Topics in this year s simulation class series include: Space Missions (first quarter), Aircraft Challenge (second quarter), Space Station Design (third quarter); and Marine Engineering Simulation: Ships & Submarines (fourth quarter)

1
Coder Kids

AP Computer Science A is a college-level course that prepares students for twenty-first century computing skills along with solid, higher level logic and reasoning skills that are critical in many academic and professional areas. This computer science class teaches students fundamental and scalable skills that can be applied to small, simple problems or large, complex challenges. This course will examine the six major themes of the AP Computer Science A curriculum: (1) Object-Oriented Program Design, (2) Program Implementation, (3) Program Analysis, (4) Standard Data Structures, (5) Standard Operations and Algorithms, and (6) Computing in Context, while requiring hands-on programming time with application-related labs.

AP Computer Science A used the Java programming language which is known for its precision in expression and applications in problem solving such as object-orientation, abstraction, and encapsulation. Java allows students to easily test potential solutions by running their partial programs. As the Java programming language is extensive with more features that can be covered in a single, albeit college-level course, the AP Computer Science A program is based on using a subset of Java that is defined in the AP curriculum.
Fundamental skills that will be covered in AP Computer Science A include problem solving, design strategies, methodologies, organization of data (i.e. data structures), approaches to processing data (algorithms), and to run-test-debug programs. Students will also learn machine-level representation of data, object-oriented programming, and the ethical and social implications of computer use.

The AP Computer Science A curriculum is compatible with the recommendations of professional and academic organizations: the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), the Computer Society of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE-CS), and the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA).

The College Board recommends that students have completed Algebra I before taking AP Computer Science A because of the use of mathematical functions, notations, and mathematical reasoning. Students should expect to spend 4-5 hours outside of class each week for problem solving and programming homework. A college level textbook will be identified for students to rent or purchase for this class.

MacBook Air laptops will be furnished by the instructor for in-class computing work. Students should have access to a laptop or desktop computer for programming work at home. At a minimum, the student's computer should have 4 MB of RAM, the ability to connect and download from the internet, and the capacity to install programs. Students will be required to download an initial computer science program and some smaller software packages throughout the year. Chromebooks are only terminals and are NOT suitable for programming. Students must bring their laptops or desktops (with monitors and peripherals) on the first day of class. On the first day of class, a team of computer techs will be on hand to get students' own computers set up with the correct access, logins, and software. The class tuition includes a $100.00 per student technology fee that covers repair/maintenance of hardware, software, licenses for in-class computing, and a personal computer set up fee. The fee to take the AP exam in May 2019 is not included; each family will be responsible for scheduling and paying for their student's AP exam.

Prerequisites: Algebra 1

1
Lori Goll

veryone can learn to draw! In this class, students will complete fun exercises which will build confidence and teach basic drawing fundamentals that they can use in the future. This class will combine classical drawing techniques in pencil, charcoal, and pen-and-ink as well as basic color drawing with colored pencils. Students will learn drawing fundamentals such as perspective, composition, shading and blending while they practice the essential elements of art (value, gesture, perspective, proportion, etc). Basic color theory will also be introduced. More importantly, students will learn to "see" as artists, and to draw what they see instead of what they think they know. Lessons will include important art vocabulary and visual references of classical and contemporary art. We will draw from both life and photographic references and our possible subject matter will include still life, figures, portraits, animals, birds, and landscape

1
Natalie Di Vietri

Are you interested in learning a new language that is used right here in America? Are you intrigued by a modern language that has no written form? Do you want to find out why American Sign Language is much more closely linked to French Sign Language than British Sign Language? If so, American Sign Language (ASL) is the perfect language for you! In this class, students will learn the basic skills in production and comprehension of ASL while covering thematic units such as personal and family life, school, social life, and community. Each unit will include presentations and readings on Deaf culture and Deaf history. Students will learn finger spelling and numbers, developing conversational ability, culturally appropriate behaviors, and fundamental ASL grammar.

Class time will be dedicated to interactive ASL conversations, games, poetry, and story-telling. Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours each week outside of class on required vocabulary exercises, readings, and practice. Homework assignments will include an online component where students will be asked to upload videos of themselves signing. Enrolled students will be asked to complete a summer assignment consisting of learning the ASL alphabet and practicing fingerspelling before the start of classes. ASL is an excellent second language choice for teens who have difficultly with writing, spelling, or challenging pronunciation. Penn State University research demonstrated that the visual and kinesthetic elements of ASL helped to enhance the vocabulary, spelling, and reading skills in hearing students.

Students should plan to rent or purchase the "Signing Naturally Units 1-6 workbook" (ISBN# 978-1581212105) which includes a DVD or signing videos. Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in world language for purposes of a high school transcript.

1
Taliesin Knol

This quarter will focus on the first battles of the American War of Independence, Lexington and Concord from the shots heard round the world to the unlikely match-up of an untrained militia of colonial farmers against the professional soldiers and statesmen of the great British Empire s army.
Students will engage in a hands-on 3D battle strategy game using the military dioramas that they make! Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will each form a 12 X 18 shaped, foam diorama with landscape elements (hills, valleys, rivers, ridges, vegetation, fences, etc) to represent a scene of a famous historical engagement. Students will each receive 1:72 scale miniature soldiers to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate the larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices. The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical background and circumstances leading up to the specific battle.
Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year s series include: Revolutionary War, Battles of Lexington and Concord (1st quarter), Revolutionary War, Yorktown (2nd quarter), Civil War, Gettysburg (3rd quarter), and Civil War, The Siege of Petersburg (4th quarter).

1
Anne Sharp

In order to understand American Literature, it s important to know the roots of our literary tree, and we are deeply rooted in British Literature. As a new nation with emerging writers, Americans still consumed the literary works of our former mother country. This course focuses on two genres, the play and the novel, and three British writers, William Shakespeare, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley and Charles Dickens, whose influence continues to resonate in American Literature today.

Beginning with the study of Shakespeare, students will read selected scenes and key acts of some of his well-known comedies and tragedies such as A Midsummer Night's Dream, Hamlet, As You Like It, Macbeth, Twelfth Night, and/or Romeo & Juliet. Students will analyze pivotal scenes and dialogue to identify methods Shakespeare used to present character and narrative conflict. Shakespeare s characters, memorable for their passion and angst, provide the psychological structure and templates for fictional characters for subsequent centuries including the twenty-first one.

The second half of the semester will move from stage to page. Students will examine the emergence of the English novel and its influence on modern literature by focusing on two pivotal writers: Charles Dickens and Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley. Dickens stories, first serialized in magazines then published as books, paved the way for both soap operas of the past and the binge-watching of today. Shelley s novel created and cemented the concept of gothic fiction. It is a literary cornerstone for multiple later genres: romance, detective, sci-fi, mystery, dystopian, and superheroes. Students will identify ways that Dickens and Shelley dealt with narrative conflicts and learn how to analyze character development and pivotal scenes. We remember Dickens s people in the same way that we remember those of Shakespeare.

Emphasis in this class will be on critiquing literature, forming a thesis statement, writing literary commentary, and citing examples to defend opinion. Literary criticism is one of the forms of higher-level writing needed for a student to transition from a casual writer to an academic and ultimately college-level writer. Criticism follows an analytical structure that parallels the way scientists approach problem-solving by selecting an area of study, developing a thesis or theory, and then supporting it with evidence.

The student should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week on writing homework, investigation, or reading for this class. The class will meet twice a week with Wednesdays introducing the concepts and vocabulary of the literature and authors, and Friday serving as a writing lab to explore the mechanics of writing criticism. Topics in this year s class series include: A Trio of British Literature (1st semester) and A Trio of American Genres (2nd semester). Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component, or partial, credit in English or language arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

1
Mylene Nyman

Students will enjoy making savory fall recipes and cool weather comfort foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Fall Favorites are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

Cranberry Pumpkin Brie Bites (appetizer), Chipotle Corn Soup
Autumn Apple-Pea Salad, Stuffed Acorn Squash (side dish),
Butternut Squash Alfredo (entree), Turkey Pumpkin Casserole (entree),
Caramel Apple Cake and Sweet Potato Bars (desserts).

Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.

Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day.

1
Karleen Boyle Sudol

A powerful hurricane season forecasted. Polar ice caps receding. Hydraulic fracking. Solar power. Everywhere we look, Environmental Science is in the news! Environmental science is an exciting interdisciplinary study that merges the fields of geology, biology, chemistry, and meteorology to explain the earth as an interconnected system with both natural and human-made influences. This year middle schoolers will sample Environmental Science topics in a hands-on, lab-based investigation. First quarter, students will begin their study of Geology and Soil Sciences and discover the ways geology, paleontology, soil science and agricultural sciences are used in environmental research. The class will learn about techniques such as carbon dating, and sediment and ice core analysis, that scientists use to investigate current environmental issues such as human impacts to carbon and nitrogen cycling, pesticide use, the use of genetically modified organisms to improve agricultural yields, and the ongoing loss of pollinators. Students will do in-class labs to make predictions, collect and graph data, draw conclusions, and develop models of key Environmental Science processes. Topics in this year s class series include: Geology and Soil Sciences (first quarter); Atmospheric Science (second quarter); Water Science (third quarter); and Current Issues in Environmental Science (fourth quarter). There is a $10.00 lab fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for consumable materials.

1
Edwige Pinover

Salut! French with Friends is an introductory class for elementary aged beginner. The class will be taught in a predominantly immersion environment. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students or explain difficult concepts. French language instruction will be presented in a natural learning sequence beginning with nouns (such as colors, numbers, clothing, foods, animals, family members, days/dates, etc), adjectives, beginning verbs, greetings, and simple phrases. Songs, games, stories, and hands-on activities will be used in class to review vocabulary and phrases. Emphasis will be on conversation, but students will be encouraged to learn to spell and sound out written French. Aspects of Francophone culture such as holidays, foods, and traditions will be incorporated in the classes.

Each quarter introduces new themes and new vocabulary in French, so continuing students can continue to build their language basics. However, themes and units are non-sequential, so students may enroll in this level in any quarter. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, and simple phrases while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Fluency should not be expected at this level.

1
Katherine Hoeck

This is a complete course in high school Geometry which will cover the fundamental concepts of Euclidean geometry and focus on developing critical thinking skills as they relate to logical reasoning and argument. This course is designed to emphasize analytical thinking and will include an in-depth analysis of plane, solid, and coordinate geometry through abstract mathematical ideas as well as real world problem solutions. Students will connect concepts from Algebra I to geometric phenomena with the analysis of parallel lines and polygons, perimeter and area, volume and surface area, similarity and congruence, and introductory trigonometry. Students will develop an understanding of these concepts through the study of geometric definitions, theorems, axioms, and postulates by writing reasoned, logical explanations that arrive at the conclusion about the geometric statement. A key focus will be on the development and history of the concepts being studied. Students can expect to spend time in class learning how to articulate the logical progression of concepts in addition to a thorough analysis of the topics. Independent study will involve reading assignments on concepts *before* they are presented in class as well as various problems to support what is covered in class.

Students should have a solid foundation in Algebra I in order to take this class. Students should expect to spend 3 hours on independent study activities for each hour spent in class, or about 6 hours per week.

The required textbook for this class is The Art of Problem Solving: Introduction to Geometry text (ISBN: 978-1-934124-08-6) and corresponding solutions manual (ISBN #978-1-934124-09-3). These can be purchased from https://artofproblemsolving.com/store/item/intro-algebra. Additional resources for the development of geometric proofs will be pulled from Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geometries: Development and History. Students will be provided with the material used from this book. A calculator is not necessary for this course. Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Geometry for purposes of a high school transcript.

1
Mylene Nyman

Mosaics is run as a studio art class where students create unique compositions and work at their own pace under the guidance of an experienced mosaic artist. Each quarter, students are taught new design, cutting, layout, and finishing techniques and are introduced to new mosaic materials which they can incorporate into inspired, original pieces. Throughout the quarter, the instructor will suggest possible themes for projects based on the featured materials, but students are always welcome to pursue a different direction.
First quarter, students will learn to work with colored water glass, Van Gogh glass, and cathedral glass. Students will learn to use wavy cut techniques to create flowing patterns. Possible projects include a mosaic-framed mirror or a water scene in which wavy water glass gives the impression of a lake, pond, or ocean.

Each project will expand a student s understanding of color, pattern, rhythm, texture, and spacing as they complete rich, dimensioned compositions. Students will be able to incorporate other glass and ceramic tiles into their compositions and may select feature elements such as beautiful glass gems, millifiori, sliced stone, metallic ornaments, mirrored bits, or shells, to serve as focal points in their mosaic piece. For each project, students will be able to choose from a variety of substrates- rectangular, square, shaped, or circular backboards, or special forms such as mirrors, pots, or small boxes.

There is no prerequisite for this class. Students who are new to mosaics will complete a quick checkerboard project (complete with wooden checkers) to teach pattern, layout, and lines before starting their specialized projects. The number of projects completed each quarter depends on the student s work speed and attendance in class. Compass parents are welcome to register for the class to work alongside their teens, or to work on their own, while their teen is in another Compass class.

There is a $40.00 per student material and supply fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year s studio series include: Whimsical Works in Wavy Glass (1st quarter), Creative Compositions with Curvy Class (2nd quarter), Winter Works in Ceramic and Porcelain (3rd quarter), and Spring Sampler with Cut China (4th quarter). Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component, or partial, credit in fine arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

1
Kathy Preisinger

Music Makers explores many facets of the musical experience- singing, moving, dancing, listening, and playing instruments. The class will explore musical stories, famous composers, and different genres of music while playing a variety of percussion instruments (drums, sticks, triangles, woodblocks and more!). Students will learn to play a beginning pitched instrument on glockenspiels (a small barred instrument like the xylophone). Using an Orff-based approach, students will learn to read and write beginning musical notation and learn musical terminology all in the context of fun and play. Music Makers classes provide a fun, pressure-free environment to experience music and movement with the goal of general musicianship and excellent preparation for further, individual instrument lessons if desired. Music Makers helps every child acquire the essential building blocks for a future of musical learning!

1
Nick Grenier

Look up in that tree! Why is that robin alarming ? is there a hawk passing by? Is that a drey (a squirrel's nest)? What animal rubbed the bark off that sapling? Which plants are useful and which should be avoided? Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has lead for several years. Students will follow the paths and create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing fall season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world! Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Sorry, but the explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

1
Natalie Di Vietri

Interested in cooking? Baseball? Carpentry? Business? Shopping? Whatever the pursuit, there is math involved! Do you want to figure out how your high school teachers will calculate your grades? Learn how much you ll save if you get an extra 15% off the already discounted 30% off sale price. This class will use real world scenarios to explore fractions, decimals, and percentages and finally answer the question Why do I have to learn this?

Each skill will be reviewed independently, with tips and tricks given and then applied to the word problems. In addition to improving specific math skills, students will become more comfortable moving between word problems and abstract mathematical representation by working with situations that are meaningful to them. The class serves as a solid complement to Middle School math. Topics in this year s class series include: Ratios and Proportions (2nd quarter), Integers (3rd quarter), and Exponents and Orders of Magnitude (4th quarter).

1
Donna Shackelford

Science Kids is a lab-based science sampler program where our youngest scientists will be exposed to the concepts, acquire scientific vocabulary, and learn hands-on skills to needed to be comfortable with more advanced science classes as they get older. Your first or second grader will come home with an understanding of concepts like phases of matter, melting point, buoyancy, and life cycles. Most importantly, young students will gain confidence discussing science concepts and working with science equipment. Labs will teach students how to use a thermometer, take linear measurements, weigh items on a scale, peer into a microscope, record elapsed time, and make scientific sketches, for example. Each quarter will reinforce principles and lab skills around a central, unifying theme. Living World will introduce biology and life science concepts. Students will complete labs such as observing microscopic organisms in a microscope, examining life cycles and metamorphosis, and learning about biological functions such as respiration and digestion. Topics in this year s class series include: Living World (first quarter), Earth/Space (second quarter), Chemistry (third quarter), and Physics (fourth quarter).

1
Soccer Shots

Soccer Shots is a fun, engaging class for the youngest Compass students or their preschool-aged siblings! Soccer Shots is an outdoor skills class in which children learn basic mechanics of soccer such as passing, dribbling, and shooting through imaginative games in a fun, supportive, small-group experience with a dedicated coach. Equally as important, young athletes get to practice valuable life skills such as working with teammates, good sportsmanship, taking turns, cooperation, and communicating with their coach! Each week, young soccer players will be guided through warm-ups, skill-building games, and a scrimmage.

This program includes 30 minutes of structured coaching from 2:15 pm - 2:45 pm. Time before is for gathering, and the final 15 minutes are for cool-down and free play. This is a 7-week program that will meet weeks 1-7 with the 8th week of the quarter reserved for an inclement weather make-up, if needed.
Students must be age 4 by the start of this program and must be able to separate from his/her parent and follow directions. There is an optional fee of $8.50 payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a high quality Adidas team jersey.

1
Bette Cassatt

Let s fight! In the movies, it doesn t take much for everyone to start throwing punches. A fight between two people could quickly turn into a brawl. This exciting class will explore unarmed stage combat techniques, grappling (close fighting), and brawling with multiple fighters. Stage combat is the art of creating the illusion of violence for storytelling on stage and screen. This class is best suited for students who are focused and have self-discipline, can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. This class is for beginning and experienced students. Topics in this year's class series include: Brawls, Grappling, and Fisticuffs- Unarmed Combat (first quarter); Weapons of Long Ago and Far Away- broadsword, lightsaber, and rapier (second quarter); and Found Weapons- fights with everyday objects (third quarter ); and Swashbuckling (fourth quarter).

1
Lee Nathanson

Teens will have fun playing their instruments and performing- and jamming- with other musicians under the guidance of a professional musician/guitarist. Songs can range from simple melodies to full, popular songs. Students can bring music to class from any genre that they are working on or would like to learn, and the instructor can provide some selections for the group to work on together. This class will be creative and fluid with the direction driven by the teen musicians.

All instruments are welcome. Students must have a basic level of proficiency on their respective instrument: Guitar players should know most of their open chords. Piano players should be able to read simple melodies and play chords. Bass players should know how to play simple bass lines. Other instruments should be able to play notes and some scales. Guitarists with electric guitars should have a small amplifier so they can be heard. This session will repeat each session, but music will change each week. Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component, or partial, credit in fine arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

1
John Waldron

Students will not want to miss the chance to play a part in this delightful musical classic which generations of children have enjoyed since it hit the big screen in 1939. This story begins when Dorothy and her little dog Toto are swept away in a cyclone and land in the mixed-up, magical world of Oz. The Good Witch of the North sends Dorothy on a magical journey homeward where she meets the Scarecrow, the Tin Man, the Cowardly Lion, and the Wicked Witch of the West. Together, the new friends sing, We re off to see the Wizard, the wonderful Wizard of Oz. Act One (and quarter one) ends in a cliffhanger when the witch reveals that she will stop at nothing to stop Dorothy and her friends.

Students will want to continue in this class for second quarter where they will play all new roles and continue the adventure. The group will learn Act 2 of the story which takes the gang from the perilous journey to the Emerald City through Dorothy s and Toto s safe return home. This is a story of friendship, courage, and the realization that, there s no place like home.

Young actors will further their theatrical skills and stretch their imaginations by working on characters, envisioning settings, and exploring the plot as they develop scenes in which everyone has a role. Students will benefit from experimenting with public speaking through acting in a safe, supportive environment and enjoy the satisfaction of working as a team. Students will be coached on acting basics such as facing the audience, projecting their voices, and dramatizing their character through body language and movements. The final class will be a class performance which showcases what they have learned. This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, can follow directions, can collaborate with others, do their best to memorize lines, and enjoy working in a group. Students should be able to read on grade level in order to follow the script. The cost of the class script is included in the class fee. Topics in this year s class series include: Wizard of Oz, Act 1 of 2 (first quarter); Wizard of Oz, Act 2 of 2 (second quarter); The Jungle Book (third quarter), and Treasure Island (fourth quarter).

1
Katherine Hoeck

This is a complete course in Algebra I which will cover fundamental concepts in algebra and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. This course is designed to emphasize the study of algebraic problem-solving with the incorporation of mathematical reasoning, analysis, communication skills, and real world applications. Students will build on prior knowledge by exploring and understanding our number system, linear systems, rational numbers and proportional relationships, complex numbers, exponents, quadratics, polynomials, factoring, data analysis and probability, and solving, graphing, and writing linear equations and inequalities. Students will discover these topics through hands-on activities, class discussions, and open-ended problem solving. Each assignment will be categorized as either cooperative group investigations, partner collaboration, or individual work. Individual work will consist of periodic checks for understanding and independent-study activities that students are expected to complete outside of class.

Students should have a solid foundation in pre-algebra topics in order to take this class. Students should expect to spend 3 hours on independent study activities for each hour spent in class, or about 6 hours per week.

The required textbook for this class is The Art of Problem Solving: Introduction to Algebra (ISBN# 978-1-934124-14-7) and the corresponding and solutions manual (ISBN# 978-1-934124-15-4). These can be purchased from https://artofproblemsolving.com/store/item/intro-algebra. A calculator is not necessary for this course. Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Algebra for purposes of a high school transcript.

1
Natalie Di Vietre

Are you interested in learning a new language that is used right here in America? Are you intrigued by a modern language that has no written form? Do you want to find out why American Sign Language is much more closely linked to French Sign Language than British Sign Language? If so, American Sign Language (ASL) is the perfect language for you! In this middle school version of the class, students will learn the basic skills in production and comprehension of ASL while covering thematic units on personal and family life. Each unit will include presentations and readings on Deaf culture and Deaf history. Students will learn finger spelling and numbers, developing conversational ability, culturally appropriate behaviors, and fundamental ASL grammar.
Class time will be dedicated to interactive ASL conversations, games, poetry, and story-telling. Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours each week outside of class on required vocabulary exercises, readings, and practice. ASL is an excellent second language choice for tweens who have difficultly with writing, spelling, or challenging pronunciation. Penn State University research demonstrated that the visual and kinesthetic elements of ASL helped to enhance the vocabulary, spelling, and reading skills in hearing students.

Students should plan to rent or purchase the "Signing Naturally Units 1-6 workbook" (ISBN# 978-1581212105) which includes a DVD or signing videos. This is a semseter-long, 14-week course. The goal is for 4 semesters of middle school ASL (two years) to equal one year of high school ASL.

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Karleen Boyle Sudol

More than 70% of the Earth s surface is water! Understanding the earth s oceans and freshwater systems is critical to understanding life on our planet- from beginnings in the seas to the water cycle that supports ongoing life. The study of aquatic and marine biology provides a basis for understanding much of the chemistry, physics, biology, and meteorology on our planet. Budding marine biologists will travel inland to learn about freshwater systems like lakes and ponds, rivers and streams before returning to the coast to study marshes and estuaries followed by extreme marine environments- all under the guidance of an experienced marine biologist. The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in several demonstrations and experiments in each class.

During first quarter, the class will focus on freshwater lakes and the variety of unique biomes that exist in them. Students will compare major lake systems around the world and learn about general limnological processes such as seasonal turnover and phytoplankton blooms. They will also explore the incredible range of lake biomes, from acidic, volcanic lakes and hot springs, to ancient temperate lakes like Lake Baikal. Students will learn about the extreme chemistry that occurs in some systems, like stratified lakes with toxic gas layers at the bottom, and will study the many unique, endemic species of plants and animals that have evolved in lake systems. Topics in this year s class series include: Lakes and Ponds (first quarter); Roparian Biomes- Rivers and Streams (second quarter); Marshes and Estuaries, Where the River Meets the Sea (third quarter); and Extreme Marine (fourth quarter). There is a $10.00 lab fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for consumable materials.

1
Lori Goll

veryone can learn to draw! In this class, students will complete fun exercises which will build confidence and teach basic drawing fundamentals that they can use in the future. This class will combine classical drawing techniques in pencil, charcoal, and pen-and-ink as well as basic color drawing with colored pencils. Students will learn drawing fundamentals such as perspective, composition, shading and blending while they practice the essential elements of art (value, gesture, perspective, proportion, etc). Basic color theory will also be introduced. More importantly, students will learn to "see" as artists, and to draw what they see instead of what they think they know. Lessons will include important art vocabulary and visual references of classical and contemporary art. We will draw from both life and photographic references and our possible subject matter will include still life, figures, portraits, animals, birds, and landscape

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Natalie Di Vietri

ASL for Little Fingers is a fun, play-based sign language class for younger children. Students will begin to learn the language of the Deaf community by developing a vocabulary for greetings, everyday objects and common phrases. We will watch short videos of a Deaf family demonstrating the signs, learn about Deaf culture, play games, and work with partners. Each quarter will include a biography of a famous deaf American, an introduction to poetry, fun phrases, a signed story, and more!

During first quarter, children will learn the ASL alphabet, how to introduce themselves, numbers, basic greetings, colors, calendar vocabulary, and question words in a fun setting. They will learn ask and answer simple questions like, What s your favorite color? or When is your birthday? They will hear a story about Alice Cogswell, the little girl who inspired Thomas Gallaudet travel to Europe to learn the best ways to teach deaf students.

ASL is an excellent second language choice for young children who are not ready for a foreign language with difficult writing, spelling, or challenging pronunciation. Penn State University research demonstrated that adding the visual and kinesthetic elements of ASL to verbal communication helped to enhance the vocabulary, spelling, and reading skills in hearing students. Students may join ASL for Little Fingers during any quarter. At the end of the year, students will perform for parents to showcase their learning. Topics in this year s class series include: About Me (1st quarter), My Family (2nd quarter), My Town (3rd quarter) and My Big Adventures (4th quarter)! There a $9.00 materials fee for an age-appropriate class book. Compass will have the book on the first day, and families should bring cash or check payable to Compass for the book.

1
Lee Nathanson

Learn the fundamentals of playing the guitar! In this class, students will learn basic melodies, such as Ode to Joy, Happy Birthday, Jingle Bells, etc Kids will learn to play chords and strumming patterns for familiar songs chosen by the instructor and students. Students are encouraged to bring in music they are interested in learning. New chords and new songs will be added each week as students also learn to read music and basic music theory. Students will also learn how to hold, tune, and care for their guitars. Students should be able to read at grade level for this class, and should plan to practice at home several times each week. Each student will need a least a beginner level acoustic guitar. There is a materials fee of $5.00 payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a music notebook. Students should expect to spend 20-30 minutes per day most days practicing chords and melodies from class.

1
Anne Sharp

This semester-long course is a home for students who love to write, who love to read writing, and who love to share writing with others. Writing is often a solitary act, but writers also need a community in which to grow. Mirroring the design of famous writing salons/groups like The Bloomsbury Group, The Algonquin Round Table, and The Inklings, this course fosters a Compass community that will encourage individual writers, promote literary collaboration and provide challenging feedback to boost creativity and artistic development.

Our first semester will focus on building a personal writing portfolio strengthening students passions for genres and forms they re comfortable with as well as trying writing that is new to them. Using writing workshops to capitalize on what they already know and to encourage experimentation in unfamiliar areas, students can expect to grow as writers, editors and leaders in our Compass community.

Students will use their own work and the works of professional authors to understand what makes good writing, to improve technique, to experiment with new forms/genre and to understand the drafting, editing and publishing process.

Using the InkBlot Writers website that we built last year, students will have an internal and ongoing method for publishing. This portal will serve as both a place for students to explore their own fiction and nonfiction writing and to begin the process of creating online writing materials (columns, blogs, tutorials, videos, TED-type talks) for others.

Our second semester will focus on editing and publishing. Students in this course will select writings from their portfolios and prepare them to submit to contests, anthologies and publications beyond our Compass campus. While continuing to draft and explore their own personal writing, InkBlot students will assume editorial roles in the production of InkBlot, a beyond-our-classroom anthology. As editors, students will design and build an anthology, advertise the publication, solicit manuscripts and artwork, develop selection criteria, review/select/edit material, and learn the principles of layout and design. Embedded in this process are real-world experiences, and students will improve their communication and organization skills through goal-setting, time management, meeting deadlines, emailing, confirmations, proofreading, etc.

Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week out side of class on investigation, writing, or editing for this class. Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component, or partial, credit in English or language arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

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Mylene Nyman

Students will enjoy making savory fall recipes and cool weather comfort foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Fall Favorites are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

Cranberry Pumpkin Brie Bites (appetizer), Chipotle Corn Soup
Autumn Apple-Pea Salad, Stuffed Acorn Squash (side dish),
Butternut Squash Alfredo (entree), Turkey Pumpkin Casserole (entree),
Caramel Apple Cake and Sweet Potato Bars (desserts).

Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.

Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day.

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Taliesin Knol

Travel back to the ancient Middle East and learn about the very first civilizations ever to exist! Discover the first major cities of Ur and Uruk, the first written language in Cuneiform, and the first story every written, The Epic of Gilgamesh.
Each student will create an individual diorama of an ancient Sumerian Settlement city. Students will craft and hand-shape their scene on a 10" x 12" foam board using artistic, model-making techniques. They will customize their dioramas with landscape elements, waterways, structures of the time, and paint. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 miniature figures and combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to create a larger terrain. Students will then compete in a history-based survival strategy game. This will reinforce lessons about the culture, agriculture, warfare, and politics of the time.
Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them. Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $15.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Future topics in this series include Ancient Greece, The Iliad & Odyssey (2nd quarter), Roman Republic, Hannibal & The Punic Wars (3rd quarter), and Ancient China and The Three Kingdoms (4th quarter).

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Kouthar Muttardy

History Investigators will examine formative events in Western Civilization through guided inquiry and evidence-based analysis. These topics are posed as a series of thought-provoking questions that students will research, debate, discuss, and form opinions about. First semester will examine three big questions: Citizenship in Athens vs. Rome: Which Was the Better System? How Great Was Alexander the Great? And, Why Did Christianity Take Hold in the Ancient World?

History Investigators is an interactive, multi-disciplinary examination of some of most significant events in ancient history using sources from The DBQ Project. DBQs, or document based questions, are derived from AP History exams and help develop high school level critical thinking skills. Students will review an array of primary sources such as letters, journal entries, inventories, ship's manifestos, newspaper articles, period maps, and court documents along with selected secondary sources like excerpts, charts, and graphs. Students will be guided through analyzing the documents, interpreting the data, drawing inferences, and forming conclusions. In some historical scenarios, the class will consider conflicting perspectives and be able to defend and debate multiple sides of a key issue. To demonstrate comprehension and a deeper understanding of the class themes, students will use factual findings to develop structured, evidence-based essays. Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week on homework, investigation, or reading for this class. Topics in this year s class series include: Ancient Western Civilizations (first semester) and Ancient Eastern Civilizations (second quarter). Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component, or partial, credit in history for purposes of a high school transcript.

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Sudhita Kasturi

Biotechnology. Geophysics. Astrochemistry. These specialties evolved because scientific fields are interrelated, interdependent, and inseparable. Today's research and innovation take place across many disciplines demonstrating the chemistry, biology, physics, and geosystems work together and are not stand-alone subjects. This view, called Integrated Science, is how Princeton now teaches science as do Harvard, Northwestern, and locally, Virginia Tech.

Many of today's most pressing scientific problems and tomorrow's technological challenges will require an interdisciplinary understanding of science. The modern world s greatest scientific dilemmas, such as the global supply of clean water, alternative fuels, and prolonged space travel will require Integrated Science solutions.

In this course, students will learn how to think, discover logical connections, and come to scientifically sound conclusions based on multidisciplinary scientific facts. This approach will build knowledge and understanding in a systematic and interconnected manner. Integrated Science is intended to be a two-year course, that will prepare a student to pursue AP- level, higher-level, or dual enrollment biology, chemistry, or physics in high school. For students who will not be pursuing the sciences further, this course will give them a solid foundation in the basics for everyday application and will cover a general-education level high school biology, chemistry, and physics. However, because of the compact, accelerated approach to the material, this course is considered an honors level course. This course is year one of a two-year long course. Students should plan to take Year 2 in 2018-19. Students may not enroll in Year 2 if they have not taken Year 1.

This class will have both lecture and laboratory components. Students will be expected to maintain a science notebook and write laboratory reports. Weekly homework will be assigned, along with occasional independent or collaborative projects or presentations. There will be a 10-minute break in the middle of each 2-hour class. Students should expect to spend 6-8 hours per week on work outside of class for the first quarter (as he/she learns the class expectations and how to prepare lab reports and homework.) Thereafter, the student should expect to spend 5-7 hours per week. Students should be able to read and perform math at grade level for this class. There is a $100 supply and lab fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. The instructor may recommend that the students purchase the Building Foundations of Scientific Understanding text (ISBN # 978-1432770334) as a reference book. This is a year-long, 30-week course. Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in laboratory science for purposes of a high school transcript.

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Nick Grenier

Look up in that tree! Why is that robin alarming ? is there a hawk passing by? Is that a drey (a squirrel's nest)? What animal rubbed the bark off that sapling? Which plants are useful and which should be avoided? Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has lead for several years. Students will follow the paths and create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing fall season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world! Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Sorry, but the explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

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Arthuretta Martin

Students develop their public speaking skills and their own "voice" through the Art of Storytelling in a fun, supportive environment taught by a seasoned speaker, coach, and storyteller! Students will build on the theme of interpretive reading, voice, and inflection by adding memorization and use of their bodies to communicate the stories. Storytelling is not acting but it is a creative, performing art and a great tool in successful public speaking. Students will have the option of writing and telling their own stories or re-telling a known tale. Students will have the opportunity to view videos of professional storytellers from different genres and countries and choose the genre they would like to demonstrate. Students will practice posture, eye contact, enunciation, pauses, and timing while receiving tips and techniques from the instructor and peer feedback. The class will culminate in an end of the quarter presentation for parents. This workshop is open to students new to public speaking or those with experience, and students may repeat the program to continue to refine their public speaking skills.

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Dan Gallagher

Student engineers will be challenged to design, build, and program a robot to complete several unique mazes in the fastest possible time. Students will learn to program their robots to make "decisions" when exploring an unfamiliar maze such as "go straight until you encounter a wall" and "turn to the right if you run into an obstacle." Students will have to install touch, gyro, and ultrasonic sensors and multiple motors on their robots from the range of modular Lego Mindstorms components. Using the drag-and-drop EV3 programming menu, students will learn to program their robots while experimenting with key concepts such as constants, variables, loops, and logic constructs. Don't worry, this is a beginning robotics class! Prior experience is not expected, but returning students are welcome. Each student will build his/her own robot project, so students can
progress and customize at their own pace. In general, in this class, students will spend three weeks designing building, three weeks programming, and two weeks testing and making modifications as necessary.

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Bette Cassatt

This is the sword fighting class you ve been dying for! You ve learned the basics (the cuts, the parries, the footwork), now it s time to step it up a notch. Master students will learn a piece of choreography and spend the quarter perfecting the distance, placement, timing, rhythm, tempo, footwork, intention, and acting of the fight. Actors will begin to transition from working solely with practice weapons to working with professional stage combat swords. The goal is to get very comfortable with a piece of choreography and all of its details and bring it up to performance quality. This class demands a high level of personal discipline and focus from the student. Stage Combat Masters is 'by invitation only" for students who have been recommended by the instructor. Former students who wish to be considered for this advanced class should contact Compass to inquire. Topics in this year's class series include: From Sticks to Steel, Practice Precision, and Perfection (first quarter); Advanced Choreography (second quarter); Dual Wielding (third quarter); and Multiple Opponent Battles (fourth quarter). Prerequisites: Evaluation from the instructor. The student needs a thorough command of stage combat basics (ex. Cuts, parries, footwork, vocabulary, etc.) as well as demonstrate consistency in targeting, weapon handling, and self-discipline. Parents of students who are not currently enrolled, may inquire by emailing admin@compassclasses.com. Please put Stage Combat Masters: AUDITION INQUIRY in the subject line.

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Kathleen Olsen

Discover the science (and art) of small animal medicine! Find out how vets- and even human physicians and other medical professionals- use clues to form a diagnosis. Analyze actual cases and make predictions based on health history, exam findings, and diagnostics. See how anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, and biochemistry come together!

Each week students become "veterinarians for an hour." Using real veterinary cases from Emergency Medicine, the group will work together to evaluate a patient's history, consider various diagnostic tests, interpret results, and form a treatment plan. Students will work with a practicing veterinarian and use deductive reasoning and logic to piece together the clues of the medical mystery. Will they be successful clinicians?

This class is geared towards students interested in pursuing any career in the biological sciences, but will be interesting for anyone curious to learn more about the health of their furry friends. A basic understanding of biology and anatomy is recommended for this class. Students will receive a printed notebook with essential information to be reviewed before the first class. They will also be responsible for some research at home each week as they analyze their findings and formulate a diagnosis. There is a $20.00 material fee for the class notebook and in-class supplies for new students and a $5.00 fee for returning students. The topics in this class series include Emergency Medicine (first semester) and General Practice (second semester), the latter of which will include topics on canine and feline behavior. Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week on investigation and reading for this class. Homeschool families could count this course as a component, or partial credit, in science.

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Donna Shackelford

Maneuver the Curiosity Mars Rover over rugged terrain. Climb through the structures of a human cell. Hold a beating human heart in your hand. Yes, these scientific explorations and others will be possible in the comfort of a Compass classroom through cutting edge AR/VR (augmented reality/virtual reality) technology! Tweens will engage in a variety of discoveries using the Merge Cube and virtual reality goggles. The Merge Cube and its miniverse of apps project holographic images in the palm of the user s hand. When viewed through a smart phone or VR goggles, students can rotate the Cube in their hands to actually see what is on the underside of the human brain or hurling through the Kuiper Belt beyond Neptune. Other apps allow the user to experience 360 degree environments such as NASA s Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) for space walk training. Not just for gaming, these AR/VR devices have dozens of educational apps that reveal the scientific possibilities of modern imaging.
Each week students will view different AR/VR apps and will engage in a lesson about the concepts they are seeing in three dimensions. Mini lessons will encompass a sampling of earth and biological sciences and engineering. The class will engage in thoughtful discussion about the possibilities and future applications of AR/VR and holographic imaging for education and science. Because of the instructor s relationship with the Merge company software development, the class s explorations will also serve as Beta testing of not-yet-commercially-released applications. Students should bring an iOS or Android smart phone to class. Students may want to purchase their own Merge cube (approx. $7.00) and/or VR googles (approx. $25.00). Otherwise, the instructor will provide one Merge cube per every two students and cardboard viewers. This class topic will continue in the third quarter. Second and fourth quarters will introduce middle schoolers to Citizen Science applications.

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Taliesin Knol

Why read about key military battles on maps or in books when you can learn about them hands-on, in three dimensions, using historical miniature gaming? In 3D History, pivotal engagements come alive for new and experienced students, as they navigate a table-top terrain, deploy hundreds of miniature soldiers, ships, and tanks... all while playing a military strategy game. Each student will have the opportunity to fight a battle from both sides, allowing them to test various strategies, try multiple scenarios, predict different outcomes, and rewrite history- an effective way to gain a deeper understanding of what actually happened and why!

In the summer of 1941 Nazi Germany seemed unbeatable. The Wehrmacht had made seemingly short work of almost all of mainland Europe and now, with Operation Barbarossa, turned its sights on Soviet Russia. Attempting to do what Napoleon could not, Hitler expected to repeat the successes of the invasion of France, only to find that he had bitten off more than his army could chew. At the gates of Moscow and in the streets of Stalingrad the lighting war would find itself frozen, then ground down into nothingness by the enormity of its failure. What had been the most impressive campaign in modern military history would instead turn into the biggest and bloodiest blunder in history.

This semester will study the early success, and ultimate failure of Germany s invasion, looking at the tactics, technology and economics behind this near total war, where the price of failure was nothing less than threat of extinction. The following semester will complete the study of the Eastern Front, from Kursk to Berlin. Course documents including period maps, photographs and recreations will be made available through a class Google Drive link emailed to parents (and students who provide their email address), as well as a class YouTube playlist for any videos watched in class or assigned as homework.

1
Lori Goll

veryone can learn to draw! In this class, students will complete fun exercises which will build confidence and teach basic drawing fundamentals that they can use in the future. This class will combine classical drawing techniques in pencil, charcoal, and pen-and-ink as well as basic color drawing with colored pencils. Students will learn drawing fundamentals such as perspective, composition, shading and blending while they practice the essential elements of art (value, gesture, perspective, proportion, etc). Basic color theory will also be introduced. More importantly, students will learn to "see" as artists, and to draw what they see instead of what they think they know. Lessons will include important art vocabulary and visual references of classical and contemporary art. We will draw from both life and photographic references and our possible subject matter will include still life, figures, portraits, animals, birds, and landscape

1
Mylene Nyman

Students will enjoy making savory fall recipes and cool weather comfort foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Fall Favorites are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

Cranberry Pumpkin Brie Bites (appetizer), Chipotle Corn Soup
Autumn Apple-Pea Salad, Stuffed Acorn Squash (side dish),
Butternut Squash Alfredo (entree), Turkey Pumpkin Casserole (entree),
Caramel Apple Cake and Sweet Potato Bars (desserts).

Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.

Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Students must be minimum age six (6) by the start of class. Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day.

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Karleen Boyle Sudol

Become a world-travelling eco adventurer and earth scientist without leaving Compass! Study the world's most exciting and diverse ecosystems and learn about the incredible biologic and geologic phenomena that shape them. Venture into caves and coasts, tundra and taiga, and forests and fjords. Each week student scientists will begin by locating the fascinating features on a map before learning about these incredible habitats from the ground-up, starting with the geology of a place, then working their way through the climate, biome, flora, and fauna. Hands-on labs and in-class activities will reinforce regional and ecological diversity by examining rock types, classifying plants, observing insects, or modelling weather phenomena. Throughout their journey to fascinating ecosystems, explorers will keep a science log to document their discoveries. Finally, students will link their studies to current events in these regions.

First quarter, students will journey through the tundra, prairies, temperate rain forests, deciduous forests, and deserts of North and South America. We ll learn how global climate patterns form these different ecosystems, and learn about the amazing diversity of plants and animals that inhabit them. We ll investigate the rainshadow effect, and see why it forms deserts on the leeward side of coastal mountain ranges around the world. Then we ll jump from the tip of Chile across the roaring 40 s to explore one of our planet s most extreme ecosystems Antarctica! Topics in this year s class series include: The Americas & Antarctica (first quarter), The Arctic, Greenland, Russia, Europe and the Middle East (second quarter); Africa and Asia (third quarter); and Islands (fourth quarter). There is a $10.00 lab fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for consumable materials.

1
Dan Gallagher

Learn all about electricity and electronics in this practical, hands-on workshop! Electronics are fundamental to lots of things that kids want to build such as automated toys, robots, and computers. Student engineers will learn about the properties of electricity through experimentation and circuit building. They will learn the basics of electronic circuits symbolically and in working with actual components. The class will start by assembling simple circuits on breadboards using real components such as resistors, transistors, relays, and LEDs before moving into soldering real circuit boards. Students will learn to work with Arduino microcontrollers where they will experiment with different inputs and outputs. Each student will assemble, wire, test, and take home numerous electronic circuits, including a simple Arduino door alarm, an electronic piano, and their soldering project. There is a $65.00 lab supply fee for electronics and soldering kits which are all take-home materials.

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Fencing Sports Academy

Fencing is the clashing of steel and competitive spirit combined with the battle of the wits. Apply the rules of Olympic fencing, and you have a physically and mentally challenging game of strategy, often called, "physical chess." In Beginning Fencing, students will learn the rules of the sport as well as footwork, attacks, parries, responses, and how to judge matches. Beginning students will use the epee, a thin, lightweight sword with broad hand guard and will wear a wireless electronic scoring sensor over layers of protective gear. Returning students will work with both the epee and foil. The physical benefits of fencing are an increase in agility, balance and coordination. Fencing also provides mental benefits such as improved focus, strategy and confidence. Fencing is safety-oriented with blunt tip weapons, chest protectors, chest/sleeve pads, fencing jacket, gloves, and face mask. All equipment is provided by the instructor. Students are asked to wear comfortable athletic pants such as running pants or sweatpants (no jeans, no dresses), and low-heeled athletic shoes.

1
Kouthar Muttardy

Discover the island culture of ancient Japan, and its contributions to the modern world in this vibrant hands-on history class! Learn about the cultural development and traditions of Japan (such as homes, architecture, clothing, food, transportation, and beliefs) through weekly projects. Students will make Japanese paper fans, samurai swords, carp streamers, noh masks, origami, painted rice paper scrolls, and sushi as they learn about life in ancient Japan! Students will learn about the lasting influence of Japanese culture and inventions on the world. The class will also sample the oral traditions and literature of the period through read-alouds of fables and folklore. Students will be excited by history when approached through this engaging, multi-disciplinary exploration of historical connections and integrated concepts rather than memorizing dates and disconnected facts! There is a $15.00 per student material and supply fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year s class series include: Japan (first quarter), Polynesia (second quarter), Indonesia (third quarter), and Australia (fourth quarter).

1
Lisa Li

Mandarin Chinese is the most commonly spoken language in the world! From the beginning, students will be taught Chinese characters and correct pronunciation of sounds, tones, and inflection. Language instruction will be presented in a natural learning sequence beginning with nouns (such as colors, numbers, clothing, foods, animals, days/dates, etc), and simple greetings. The class will incorporate projects, games, and songs to reinforce learning. Aspects of Chinese culture such as holidays, foods, and traditions will be incorporated in the classes. This is taught as a small group class of 4-6 students. Students will be asked to purchase a student workbook, but specific edition will be recommended based on the age range and experience of the enrolled students.

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Taliesin Knol

The Mongol hordes spread out like a plague across Asia, killing an estimated 25-50% of the populations that dared stand in their way. This quarter will examine the Great Khan himself, and the Mongol empire he left behind that stretched from the Pacific Coast all the way to Europe s borders.
Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will create a 12 X 18 diorama board, and populate it with 1:72 scale invading armies and their adversaries for historical re-enactments. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate a larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the conquest while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and siege equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how battles progressed and test different scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices.
Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year s series include: Genghis Khan (1st quarter), Alexander Nevsky, Russia's Hero (2nd quarter), Edward the Black Prince & Henry V, The 100 Years War (3rd quarter), and French King Charles VIII, The Italian Wars (4th quarter).

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Donna Shackelford

Compass is forming two Odyssey of the Mind (OotM) teams for 2018-19! OotM teams will participate in creative, problem-solving challenges and work on year-long group projects. Odyssey of the Mind is an international program which has encouraged children to tackle problems in unconventional ways through innovation since 1978. OotM merges STEM and the arts into a collaborative effort that brings kids with a variety of interests and talents together. OotM participants build self-confidence, develop life skills, such as speaking and presenting in front of others, and make friends while having fun while they learn and create.

Students will learn to apply creativity to real-world problems in an approach the OotM organization boasts as NOT teaching students how to solve a problem, [but instead] teaching them how to be Problem Solvers! Each year, OotM publishes five, original, competitive long-term problems. Students work with their teams to think outside the box for one-of-a-kind solutions to the challenges. Students will brainstorm, create artwork, make technical drawings, create a set, design costumes, construct prototypes, write scripts, and more, all to package and present their unique solutions in a live performance at local and regional OftM competitions. Long term problems fall into the categories of: vehicle, technical, classics, structure, and performance, and each is designed with limits and constraints on size, cost, resources, or function.

OotM team members will also learn to tackle spontaneous challenge programs. These problems are solved in a brief time using on-the-spot creativity, quick thinking, and teamwork. Teams practice Verbal spontaneous challenges (name things that use water), Hands-On spontaneous challenges (move or build task with random objects), or combination Verbal/Hands-On challenges.

The Compass OotM teams will be facilitated by STEM instructor Donna Shackelford who has worked as a coach, mentor, coordinator and judge with over 20 OotM teams from public, private, and after school programs for 12 years. Registration is for three quarters, and Ms Shakelford will work with teams for 18 of the 22 weeks in the term. (Some weeks she will leave the teams to meet, research, or rehearse on their own.) The two Compass teams will be comprised of at least five (5), but no more than seven (7) team members, and two levels are planned: a Division 1 team for grades 3-5 and a Division 2 team for grades 6-8. In order to follow organization rules, the two Compass teams will have to select different long term problems (cannot have two teams doing structure, for example.) Compass will also need two parent assistants, one for each team, to help during class meetings and activities. There will be requirements for materials and supplies. Student contributions via purchased or donated materials or a class fee will be determined when the long term problem is selected. In addition, there will be team registration fees for the local and/or regional competitions that will be shared among team members. 2018-19 fees are not yet published as of spring registration. Registration for this program is a committment to participate in the regional OotM tournament at an area high school on a Saturday in February/March.

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Donna Shackelford

Compass is forming two Odyssey of the Mind (OotM) teams for 2018-19! OotM teams will participate in creative, problem-solving challenges and work on year-long group projects. Odyssey of the Mind is an international program which has encouraged children to tackle problems in unconventional ways through innovation since 1978. OotM merges STEM and the arts into a collaborative effort that brings kids with a variety of interests and talents together. OotM participants build self-confidence, develop life skills, such as speaking and presenting in front of others, and make friends while having fun while they learn and create.

Students will learn to apply creativity to real-world problems in an approach the OotM organization boasts as NOT teaching students how to solve a problem, [but instead] teaching them how to be Problem Solvers! Each year, OotM publishes five, original, competitive long-term problems. Students work with their teams to think outside the box for one-of-a-kind solutions to the challenges. Students will brainstorm, create artwork, make technical drawings, create a set, design costumes, construct prototypes, write scripts, and more, all to package and present their unique solutions in a live performance at local and regional OftM competitions. Long term problems fall into the categories of: vehicle, technical, classics, structure, and performance, and each is designed with limits and constraints on size, cost, resources, or function.

OotM team members will also learn to tackle spontaneous challenge programs. These problems are solved in a brief time using on-the-spot creativity, quick thinking, and teamwork. Teams practice Verbal spontaneous challenges (name things that use water), Hands-On spontaneous challenges (move or build task with random objects), or combination Verbal/Hands-On challenges.

The Compass OotM teams will be facilitated by STEM instructor Donna Shackelford who has worked as a coach, mentor, coordinator and judge with over 20 OotM teams from public, private, and after school programs for 12 years. Registration is for three quarters, and Ms Shakelford will work with teams for 18 of the 22 weeks in the term. (Some weeks she will leave the teams to meet, research, or rehearse on their own.) The two Compass teams will be comprised of at least five (5), but no more than seven (7) team members, and two levels are planned: a Division 1 team for grades 3-5 and a Division 2 team for grades 6-8. In order to follow organization rules, the two Compass teams will have to select different long term problems (cannot have two teams doing structure, for example.) Compass will also need two parent assistants, one for each team, to help during class meetings and activities. There will be requirements for materials and supplies. Student contributions via purchased or donated materials or a class fee will be determined when the long term problem is selected. In addition, there will be team registration fees for the local and/or regional competitions that will be shared among team members. 2018-19 fees are not yet published as of spring registration. Registration for this program is a committment to participate in the regional OotM tournament at an area high school on a Saturday in February/March.

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Joe Romano

Curious coins, baffling balls, confounding cards, and puzzling papers! Students will learn tricks of the trade from a professional magician using the Discover Magic curriculum! This class will present all new tricks from the new Orange Wand curriculum. Each week, kids will learn how to perform a unique magic trick, and students will practice and perfect the illusion in class so they can come home and mystify their friends and family. Students will unlock the secrets to eight special magic tricks: Legendary Loops, Forgotten Fairy Tales, Lightning Ball, Hocus Pocus Handkerchief, Magic Map, Special Delivery, and others. For each trick, students will receive a custom magic prop and full color instructions, and at the end of each class, every magician will take home a Top Secret file folder with additional tricks they can practice. Student magicians will be given a secret password each week to gain access to an additional magic trick on the Discover Magic website (parents will need to work the magic to set up the child's online account.) Along with the actual magic, students will discuss a life skill each week that is essential to a good magician (and student) such as public speaking, presentation skills, practicing, being prepared, and reading your audience. Magicians who complete the class will receive a certificate and magic wand. There is a $45.00 supply fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year s class series include: Orange Wand Wonders (first quarter), Perplexing Purple Wand (second quarter), Groovy Green Wand (third quarter), and Baffling Black Wand (fourth quarter).

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Bette Cassatt

Can't afford a wizard s hat from Madame Malkin s? Can't find the right wand at Ollivanders? Wish you could shop at Scrivenshaft's? No worry- you can still be a properly outfitted Witch or Wizard. In this charming class, you will learn how to create many magical items inspired by the world of Harry Potter. What witch or wizard is complete without a magic wand to wave (or swish and flick)? Or a fashionably pointy hat? This class will unlock the chamber of secret magical crafts including flying keys, bowtruckles, a potion bottle, and other fun and enchanted items. A supply fee of $22.50 is payable to instructor on the first day of class. Students should also bring good scissors for cutting fabric and paper and a low temp mini hot glue gun. Items from home should be labeled with the student's name. These items will be kept in the class supply box for the duration of the quarter so they are not forgotten when needed and will be returned at the end of the quarter.

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Lisa Li

Mandarin Chinese is the most commonly spoken language in the world! The emphasis in Intermediate Speakers is for students to continue to add and learn Chinese characters. Students will work on reading, writing, and speaking at the same time. The group will work on reading comprehension and will be encouraged to develop their own, creative tricks for memorizing and recalling a growing list of Chinese characters. Since this is offered as small class of 4-6 students, the curriculum will be adjusted and customized to the pace of the enrolled students. Students may be asked to purchase a student workbook, but specific edition will be recommended based on the age range and experience of the enrolled students. Students taking this class should have had a minimum of 30 hours of instruction (once per week for a year).

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Melanie Kosar

Masterworks is a collegiate-level literature analysis and discussion class for advanced high school English students. Written works will be selected for their contribution to world literature or their influence on society. In the first half of the course, students will read and discuss literature focusing on tales of voyage, revenge, comedy and tragedy from the ancients through 1800, such as Homer s The Odyssey , Swift s Gulliver s Travels , and selections from Shakespeare. Students should expect to see a number of writers of the Western canon before transitioning to Medieval and Renaissance authors, and continuing with the Age of Enlightenment.

During the second half of the course, the class will explore modern works, beginning with the 1800s Romantic Period, and progress to the present. Readings will include pieces from a diverse group of writers, from Faulkner to Hurston, T.S. Eliot to Coelho, Morrison and Orwell, to non-Western writers. Along the way the class will discuss the rise of journalism, popular media, music, and the role of both technology and globalism in the study of literature. Works from other eras and authors will be added as time and interest permit.

For this course, students should be active, engaged, advanced readers who come to class prepared to participate in intellectual discussion. Students should expect to read up to 100 pages per week. Students are also expected to take the lead in weekly class discussions by sharing their reflections/ reactions to the readings, drawing conclusions/ comparisons with other works, and investigating scholarly articles or other writings on the theme, genre, or by the assigned author. The course instructor will serve as a facilitator-moderator and will use Socratic discussion to further the class s analysis of the literature. A goal in the class is to encourage students to think critically about what they are reading and to help them identify patterns and divergences in material that will give them a framework for anything they read in the future. Students will be expected to write one paper per semester and give one oral presentation to demonstrate understanding and interpretation of materials.

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