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    Term Start Date Start Time End Time Day Class Title Grade Range Open Spots Price Availability Description
    Christina Somerville
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Roundtable is a seminar-style literature analysis and discussion class for high school students. Instead of a broad, general survey of literature, Roundtable students will examine a focused, "special topic" in literature through critical evaluation and rich discussion. Written works will be selected for their contribution to a specific genre and their influence on society.

    First semester, the class will examine the genre of dystopian literature with a critical eye on what elements are found in all dystopian fiction works. The class will examine the role of government and society in the imagined, oppressive or apocalyptic realms through a study of works such as: Maze Runner (Book 1, 2010) by James Dashner .; Brave New World (1932) by Aldous Huxley; Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949) by George Orwell; The Lottery (1948), a short story by Shirley Jackson; Farenheit 451 (Ray Bradbury); Genre-aligned short fiction will be incorporated throughout the semester.

    For this course, students should be engaged readers who come to class prepared to participate in intellectual discussion. Students are also expected to take part in weekly class discussions by sharing their reflections and reactions to the readings and drawing conclusions and comparisons with other works. For each novel, the instructor will provide a guide with thoughtful questions and prompts on the reading that students must come to class prepared to discuss with textual evidence. The course instructor will serve as a facilitator-moderator to lead Socratic, "roundtable" discussions in addition to other in-class activities, such as partner and small group work, to further the class's understanding of the literature. This course will focus on comprehension and analysis through discussion rather than composition. Students will be assigned creative, short assignments to enhance and demonstrate their understanding of each novel such as rewriting a scene, imagining a conversation between characters from different books, developing a prequel or sequel scene, writing a review, etc.

    When discussing written works, students will be expected to give textual references such as specific quotes and examples- a higher-order high school and college-level skill that will be needed in later courses which require written analysis of literature. A key skill that will be taught in this class is how to annotate texts. Students will begin by examining samples of the instructor's own annotated novels then move to annotating the first short story in class as a group. For each novel, students will be given specific details to search for and annotate such as major plot points, character traits, interesting word choice, setting details, quotations, or questions. Later, students will be prepared to annotate automatically as they read with their own questions and reactions, a skill that can also be applied to the readings in other courses.

    Topics in this Series: Dystopian Discourse (Semester 1) and the Time Machine Travel (Semester 2). Continuing students from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: Students should be able to read and comprehend at a minimum 9th grade level for this course. Per Compass guidelines, accelerated 8th grade students may register for this course, however, in addition to the 9th+ grade reading level, they must possess the maturity to handle high school level topics and more mature discussion.

    Workload: Students should expect to read approximately 100 pages per week. For students who have challenges with reading, audio books may be used, but students should still be prepared to follow along and annotate in the physical novel.

    Assignments: Weekly assignments will be posted in the Canvas classroom management system. Students will need their own e-mail addresses to access the system, and parents may be set up as additional "observers" to their teen's Canvas account.

    Assessments: Points will be assigned for preparation, participation, and short assignments, and parents may use the total points earned to calculate a grade.

    Textbook/Materials: Because students will need clean, inexpensive copies of each novel to mark in, and because they must be able to refer to the passages on the same page numbers, a "class bundle" of mass market paperbacks will be pre-purchased for students. (See Supply Fee below).

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $54.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for the class book bundle.

    What to Bring: Students should bring the current novel, paper, pen or pencil and highlighter to class each week. Some students may wish to bring paper clips, adhesive flags or post-it notes for marking pages.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript. For a full credit in English, families would need to "bundle" this course with additional coursework in composition.

    Prerequisites: Reading at a high school level

    1
    Karen Shumway
    Add

    This intensive, "boot camp" style workshop includes the "Greatest Hits" of high school biology lab work and introduces students to the range of concepts in high school biology. Students will investigate the activity of enzymes, the cycling of carbon in mini-ecosystems, and the movement of molecules through semi-permeable membranes. Microscopy techniques will be employed to view bacteria, protist, fungi, plant, and animal cells, through both live, wet-mount samples and prepared specimen slides. Students will observe the observation of the movement of chromosomes during mitosis and extract DNA from foods. Participants will also visualize the complex processes of cellular respiration and photosynthesis using yeast and aquatic plants; investigate the genetics of taste; explore bacterial growth and evaluate disinfectant efficacy; and simulate evolution with origami birds before dissecting a frog and a sheep's brain. This lab intensive is for high school students who are pursuing or who have recently completed a virtual or textbook-only high school biology course that did not include hands-on lab work. The course can also serve as a preview for high school students who will be taking a full course in high school biology in the fall of 2024. It is suitable for a student who had an incomplete course in biology and needs "a little extra" work to conclude the course, or any other high school student who enjoys laboratory work. Prior to beginning the workshop, students will receive a list of labs, principle topics, and corresponding videos to serve as a review or a pre-lab overview. For safety reasons, Biology Lab has a dress code more restrictive than the general Compass dress code: (1) Long hair must be tied back (male or female); (2) Shirts must have at least short sleeves (such as a t-shirt). Tank tops and sleeveless shirts are not permitted. (3) Students must wear long pants. Shorts are not permitted. (4) Students must wear closed-toe shoes. Open toe sandals, slides, and flip-flops are not permitted. There is a $75.00 supply fee due payable to the instructor on or before the first day. This is a five-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mylene Nyman
    Add

    Teens will learn to make simple, budget-friendly foods to feed themselves. These recipes are perfect for college students who have only a microwave or for teens preparing quick meals at home. Some even have ingredients that can be taken from campus dining halls and transformed. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

    • Homemade Pizza
    • Elevated Raman Noodles
    • Rice Pilaf
    • Loaded Baked Potato
    • Cinnamon Rolls
    • Baked Banana Blueberry Oatmeal
    This engaging cooking workshop will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be introduced to ingredients and flavors they may not regularly eat. They will discover the joy of cooking while practicing skills that range from math (volume, weight, unit conversion, fractions, decimals), reading (instructions, ingredients), geography (traditions, flavors, food sources), and science (nutrition, food chemistry), and life skills. They will also learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced in class, and recipes are provided online for enrolled students to prepare their new foods at home. Notes: Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, eggs, soy, etc. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Recipes cannot be adapted to students with food allergies or dietary restrictions. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $36.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes, closed-toe shoes, and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage. This is a 2-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mylene Nyman
    Add

    Compass chefs will create the fast-casual fare and hand-held favorites found on food trucks across America. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

    • Fish Tacos and Slaw
    • Parmesan Chicken Tenders with Homemade Marinara Sauce
    • Beef Empanadas (2 recipes: dough and filling)
    • Loaded Cheese Fries
    • Doughnuts: Cinnamon, Strawberry Puff, and Strawberry-Glazed
    This engaging cooking workshop will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be introduced to ingredients and flavors they may not regularly eat. They will discover the joy of cooking while practicing skills that range from math (volume, weight, unit conversion, fractions, decimals), reading (instructions, ingredients), geography (traditions, flavors, food sources), and science (nutrition, food chemistry), and life skills. They will also learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced in class, and recipes are provided online for enrolled students to prepare their new foods at home. Notes: Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, eggs, soy, etc. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Recipes cannot be adapted to students with food allergies or dietary restrictions. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $36.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes, closed-toe shoes, and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage. This is a 2-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mylene Nyman
    Add

    Taste your way across America in this cross-country culinary adventure. From diners to dining rooms, create and enjoy regional favorites on your imaginary drive across the US. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: Northeast

    • New England Clam Chowder
    • Boston Baked Beans
    • Boston Cream Pie
    South
    • Southern Tomato and Cheese Pie (with homemade pie crust)
    • Pimento Cheese Spread
    • Blue Ribbon Deviled Eggs
    • Mississippi Mud Pie
    New Orleans
    • Cajun Orzo with Sausage
    • Shrimp and Grits
    • Bananas Foster Cheesecake
    This engaging cooking workshop will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be introduced to ingredients and flavors they may not regularly eat. They will discover the joy of cooking while practicing skills that range from math (volume, weight, unit conversion, fractions, decimals), reading (instructions, ingredients), geography (traditions, flavors, food sources), and science (nutrition, food chemistry), and life skills. They will also learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced in class, and recipes are provided online for enrolled students to prepare their new foods at home. Notes: Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, eggs, soy, etc. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Recipes cannot be adapted to students with food allergies or dietary restrictions. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $54.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes, closed-toe shoes, and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage. This is a 3-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mylene Nyman
    Add

    Taste your way across America in this cross-country culinary adventure. From diners to dining rooms, create and enjoy regional favorites on your imaginary drive across the US. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: Northwest

    • Baked Salmon with Dill Sauce
    • Cauliflower Gratin with Gruyere and Roasted Hazelnuts
    • Blackberry Cinnamon Cobbler
    Midwest
    • Midwest Meatloaf
    • Mashed Potatoes
    • Roasted Lemon Green Beans with Bacon
    • Wisconsin State Fair Cream Puffs (served since 1924)
    Southwest
    • Homemade Salsa and Guacamole
    • Cheesy Green Chili Cornbread
    • Chicken Enchilada Bake
    This engaging cooking workshop will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be introduced to ingredients and flavors they may not regularly eat. They will discover the joy of cooking while practicing skills that range from math (volume, weight, unit conversion, fractions, decimals), reading (instructions, ingredients), geography (traditions, flavors, food sources), and science (nutrition, food chemistry), and life skills. They will also learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced in class, and recipes are provided online for enrolled students to prepare their new foods at home. Notes: Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, eggs, soy, etc. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Recipes cannot be adapted to students with food allergies or dietary restrictions. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $54.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes, closed-toe shoes, and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage. This is a 3-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mylene Nyman
    Add

    The start of school and homeschooling is around the corner. Kids' calendars will be filling up, and they will want to munch between meals. In this workshop, kids will learn to make 7 delicious, filling snacks for themselves. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

    • Nachos
    • Sticky Sesame Cauliflower Bites
    • Pomegranate Slushy
    • Strawberry Almond Protein Bars
    • Air Fried Ranch Chickpeas
    • Cinnamon Sticky Buns
    • Strawberry Cheesecake Dip
    This engaging cooking workshop will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be introduced to ingredients and flavors they may not regularly eat. They will discover the joy of cooking while practicing skills that range from math (volume, weight, unit conversion, fractions, decimals), reading (instructions, ingredients), geography (traditions, flavors, food sources), and science (nutrition, food chemistry), and life skills. They will also learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced in class, and recipes are provided online for enrolled students to prepare their new foods at home. Notes: Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, eggs, soy, etc. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Recipes cannot be adapted to students with food allergies or dietary restrictions. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $36.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes, closed-toe shoes, and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage. This is a 2-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mylene Nyman
    Add

    Summer luaus transport us to barefoot beach barbecues under picturesque Pacific palms. Celebrate Hawaiian hospitality and tropical tastes when learning to make the favorite foods of our fiftieth state. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

    • Air Fry Hawaiian Chicken
    • Bruddah Potato Mac
    • Tropical Fruit Salad
    • Loco Moco Rice
    • Pineapple Tarts
    • Butter Mochi Cookies
    This engaging cooking workshop will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be introduced to ingredients and flavors they may not regularly eat. They will discover the joy of cooking while practicing skills that range from math (volume, weight, unit conversion, fractions, decimals), reading (instructions, ingredients), geography (traditions, flavors, food sources), and science (nutrition, food chemistry), and life skills. They will also learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced in class, and recipes are provided online for enrolled students to prepare their new foods at home. Notes: Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, eggs, soy, etc. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Recipes cannot be adapted to students with food allergies or dietary restrictions. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $36.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes, closed-toe shoes, and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage. This is a 2-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mylene Nyman
    Add

    Celebrate the long, lazy days of summer with sweet treats featuring fresh fruits, refreshing freezes, and sticky summer splurges. Compass chefs will make sweets reminiscent of playful parties at the pool, breezy afternoons at the beach, or late nights at the lake. Recipes are selected to be fun and simple to make. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

    • Watermelon Sorbet
    • Strawberry Mousse
    • Peach Ice Cream
    • Raspberry Lemonade
    • Banana Split Bites
    • Mini Angel Food Cakes with Summer Berries
    • S'mores Cookies
    • Dole Whips
    This engaging cooking workshop will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be introduced to ingredients and flavors they may not regularly eat. They will discover the joy of cooking while practicing skills that range from math (volume, weight, unit conversion, fractions, decimals), reading (instructions, ingredients), geography (traditions, flavors, food sources), and science (nutrition, food chemistry), and life skills. They will also learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced in class, and recipes are provided online for enrolled students to prepare their new foods at home. Notes: Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, eggs, soy, etc. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Recipes cannot be adapted to students with food allergies or dietary restrictions. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $36.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes, closed-toe shoes, and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage. This is a 2-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mylene Nyman
    Add

    Children are invited to a magical tea party that they prepare themselves! Young chefs will create a delicious menu of finger foods that they will enjoy with tea, hot chocolate, or juice. Recipes created on the first day will be refrigerated and retained for our party on the second day. The Compass Commons area will be transformed with tablecloths, tea lights, and summer centerpieces. Participants will be invited to bring one stuffed friend and one grown-up to join them for the tea party held the last 30 minutes of the second day. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

    • Cucumber Sandwiches
    • Mini Quiches
    • Asparagus Crostini
    • Mini Cream Puffs
    • Lemon Cake
    • Mini Blueberry Scones
    This engaging cooking workshop will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be introduced to ingredients and flavors they may not regularly eat. They will discover the joy of cooking while practicing skills that range from math (volume, weight, unit conversion, fractions, decimals), reading (instructions, ingredients), geography (traditions, flavors, food sources), and science (nutrition, food chemistry), and life skills. They will also learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced in class, and recipes are provided online for enrolled students to prepare their new foods at home. Notes: Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, eggs, soy, etc. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Recipes cannot be adapted to students with food allergies or dietary restrictions. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $36.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes, closed-toe shoes, and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage. This is a 2-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mylene Nyman
    Add

    Compass Chefs will learn to make the comfort foods and family favorites featured at summer cook-outs, picnics, and pot-lucks across America. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

    • Pulled Pork BBQ with Homemade BBQ Sauce
    • Chili Dogs
    • Homemade Mac & Cheese
    • Watergate Salad
    • Corn Cakes
    • Pasta Caprese Salad
    • Red Skinned Potato Salad
    • Peanut butter Brownies
    • Raspberry-Peach Upside Down Cake
    This engaging cooking workshop will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be introduced to ingredients and flavors they may not regularly eat. They will discover the joy of cooking while practicing skills that range from math (volume, weight, unit conversion, fractions, decimals), reading (instructions, ingredients), geography (traditions, flavors, food sources), and science (nutrition, food chemistry), and life skills. They will also learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced in class, and recipes are provided online for enrolled students to prepare their new foods at home. Notes: Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, eggs, soy, etc. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Recipes cannot be adapted to students with food allergies or dietary restrictions. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $54.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes, closed-toe shoes, and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage. This is a 3-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Jessica Eastridge
    Add

    Enjoy the camaraderie and cooperation of making music with others while using the summer to build skills and boost confidence with your band instrument. Dulles Area Summer Band Camp is a half-day program for beginners (6 months or fewer on their instruments). Read complete details of the camp online.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sandy Preaux
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    A tsunami threatens Sumatra. A cyclone strikes the Solomon Islands. High tides hit Hilton Head. Sub-zero temps settle over Sugar Land, Texas. Atmospheric and oceanic phenomena are in the news every single day!

    Are there any forces on earth more powerful or influential than atmospheric and oceanic sciences? These fields affect almost every aspect of human existence, and understanding them can answer questions from, 'Should I bring an umbrella today?' to 'How deadly will this year's drought be in Dakar?' and 'How will changes in the Gulf Stream affect the migration and mating of Minke Whales?' Atmospheric science is an interdisciplinary field that applies geology, astronomy, physics and chemistry to meteorology, climatology and environmental science.

    In this year-long laboratory science course, students will explore the fields of Atmospheric Science first semester and Oceanic Science second semester. Atmospheric Science is the study of the physical and chemical aspects of the atmosphere which can encompass a wide variety of topics such as weather forecasting, climate change, air quality, etc. Key themes in the study of Atmospheric Science include the gas laws (temperature, pressure, volume) and air movement (buoyancy, angular momentum). Students will learn about the spectra of sunlight, reflection and refraction, and evaluate how surfaces respond to sunlight. The class will also learn about the tools of atmospheric science, such as weather instruments, rain gage, anemometer, thermometer, and barometer, and how to read weather maps and forecast hurricane paths.

    Oceanography is the study of the physical, chemical, and biological aspects of the ocean. Key themes in oceanography include ocean-land interaction, atmosphere-ocean interactions (such as El Nino and La Nina cycles), wave motion, tidal cycles, currents, and thermohaline circulation. The class will consider water chemistry and the oceanic carbon cycle. Finally, students will learn how we measure and map the ocean and use earth system computer models.

    Weekly discussions will be paired with labs. Some lab assignments will take multiple weeks, and some will use computers and a spreadsheet to analyze publicly available data.

    Note: This class has a Tuesday, in-person lecture section from 10:00 am - 10:55 am in addition to the Friday lab section from 9:30 am - 10:55 am.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class.

    ,p>Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates.

    Assessments: Completed assignments will be assessed points. Parents can calculate a letter grade using the student's points earned divided by points available, in weighted categories that include assignments, labs, quizzes, tests, projects, and presentations. Parents may view all scoring and comments at any time through the Canvas site.

    Textbook/Materials: Students should download or purchase Practical Meteorology: An Algebra-based Survey of Atmospheric Science (2018) by Roland Stull (ISBN 978-0888652836). The textbook can be downloaded for free online or purchased for $54.00 online. The textbook for oceanic sciences section will be identified before the start of Semester 2.
    https://www.eoas.ubc.ca/books/Practical_Meteorology/
    https://www.eoas.ubc.ca/books/Practical_Meteorology/world/print.html

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $100.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    What to Bring: Students will need to bring laptop computers to some class sessions for modeling and data analysis labs.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in laboratory science for purposes of a high school transcript

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Tia Murchie-Beyma
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    This class will be taught in a Hybrid format with an online lecture on Mondays (10:00 am - 10:55 am) over a live, online platform and in-person lab and activities on Fridays (9:30 am - 10:55 am). Registration for the Lab section will automatically enroll the student in the Lecture section.

    This full-year lab science course introduces classic biology topics updated for the 21st century. Biology studies living things and their relationships from microscopic to massive, ancient to modern, arctic to tropic. Our survey includes: (1) cellular and molecular biology, (2) ecology, (3) genetics, (4) biology of organisms (with selected human health and anatomy topics), and (5) evolution and diversity.

    You will observe microscopic organisms and give monarch butterflies a health exam before tagging them for their 2,800 mile migration to Mexico. You will extract DNA, model its processes, and learn how scientists manipulate this magnificent molecule to make mice glow. You will observe animal behavior, test your heart rate, and practice identifying and debunking pseudo-science.

    By the end of the course, students will be able to explain the nature of science as a system of knowing; cite evidence for foundational theories of modern biology; explain basic biological processes and functions; describe structures and relationships in living systems; outline systems of information, energy, and resources; demonstrate valid experimental design; discern ethical standards; relate their values and scientific ideas to decision-making; and apply biology knowledge to their own health.

    Students are responsible for pre-reading and reviewing new material such as readings from the textbook and additional popular and scholarly sources, videos, and animations PRIOR to class meetings. In-person sessions focus on active discussion, clarification, exploration of content, review, modeling, and hands-on activities.

    Labs address not only technical skills and sequential operations, but also forming testable predictions, collecting data, applying math, drawing conclusions, and presenting findings. Hands-on dissection, always optional, is taught with preserved crayfish and fetal pigs.

    Sensitive issues: human reproduction is not taught separately, but mentioned as students learn about other, related topics such as sperm, eggs, stem cells, genetic disease, hormones, fetal development, breast-feeding, adolescence, and HIV. While there may be some debate-style discussion of topics such as GMO, abortion will not be debated. Birth control and sex education are not covered, but distinctions between gender and biological sex are discussed in detail in the genetics unit. Evolution is embedded in every topic, from molecular to ecological, inseparably from other content. It is addressed in a scientific context, not from a faith standpoint.

    Levels: The course provides a substantive, full-credit experience on either an Honors or On-Level track. All class members share core material and participate in the same labs. Honors has longer or additional readings, more analytical work, and more thorough and difficult assessments. Brief, required summer assignments are due in August for those who elect to take Honors. Students register online for the same course, but must indicate which level they wish to study via e-mail by August 15. Students may move down a level (from Honors to On-Level) at any time.

    Prerequisites: Students should be very strong, independent readers and able to understand graphs, tables, percentages, decimals, ratios, and averages.

    Workload: All students should expect to spend 4-6 hours outside of class reading and preparing homework. Homework includes term cards, brief written responses, weekly online quizzes, unit tests, occasional lab reports, and some creative assignments including sketching. Students will sometimes prepare short, in-class presentations, participate in group projects, run simulations, or conduct simple experiments at home.

    Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments; upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests; track grades; message instructor and classmates; and attend virtual conferences.

    Assessments: Completed homework, projects, quizzes, and tests receive points and narrative feedback. Parents can calculate a letter grade using the student's points earned divided by points available, in weighted categories that include assignments, reading quizzes, tests, and participation and presentations. Parents may view all scoring and comments at any time through the Canvas site.

    Textbook/Materials: Students must purchase or rent the textbook Biology Now: Third High School Edition (2022) published by WW Norton. A 360-day digital license directly from the publisher costs $53.00 HERE (ISBN: 978-0-393-54247-9) or $130 when bundled with a hardcover text (ISBN 978-0-393-54010-9). Used books may be available from 2022-23 students. Core textbook readings are supplemented by the instructor with updated information drawn from sources such as peer-reviewed science journals, popular science publications, and podcasts.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $130 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Supplies/Equipment: Students will need access to a computer/internet, compound microscope with 400X magnification and cool lighting, splash goggles, water-resistant/acid-resistant lab apron, kitchen or postal scale, 3-ring binder, approximately 400- 3"x5" index cards; and plain, lined, and graph paper. Some of these supplies are used at home. Weekly "Read Me First" web pages and class announcements on Canvas tell students what items to bring to class.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Lab Science for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: See class description

    1
    Karen Shumway
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    This class has an in-person lecture on Tuesdays (10:00 am - 10:55 am) and in-person lab and activities on Fridays (9:30 am - 10:55 am). Students must take lecture and lab together. Registration for the Lab section will automatically enroll the student in the Lecture section. Through the study of chemistry, high school students will learn the science behind things they observe every day! Chemistry explains properties of the food we eat, the beverages we drink, the medicines we take, the fibers we wear, and fuels in the cars we drive. Chemistry is a foundation to understanding the world around us and fundamental to other sciences such as biology, physics, geology, and environmental science. This full-year laboratory course makes chemistry come alive through at-home readings, practice problems, supplementary activities, and in-person hands-on labs to demonstrate key concepts. Course themes include matter, changes in state, scientific measurement, atomic structure, electrons in atoms, and characteristics of the periodic table. Students will then study ionic, metallic, and covalent bonding, chemical names and formulas, and chemical reactions. Further chemistry topics include the behavior of gases, water and aqueous solutions, acids, bases, and salts; oxidation-reduction reactions, solutions, and thermochemistry. Students will learn the skills necessary for successful study of chemical reactions and molecular phenomena, using common high school laboratory chemicals, glassware, and techniques. This is not a course done in microscale using pre-mixed solutions: students will learn to calculate molarity and use dimensional analysis to mix solutions, calculate yields, analyze errors, and construct graphs. Example labs include experiments in molar mass, hydrates, precipitates, filtration, density, distillation, reactants, single and double displacement, acid/base titration, polymers, heat of fusion, heat of vaporization, and stoichiometry. Class demonstrations will model other chemical concepts and processes, such as a radioactive cloud chamber. Prerequisites: High school Algebra I Levels: This course provides a substantive, full-credit experience on either an on-level or honors track. All class members complete the same core material and participate in the same labs. Students taking the course at the honors level are generally on a college prep or STEM track and have additional assignments and alternative scoring. Honors students' homework will be graded and recorded as part of the students' total earned points. On-level students' homework will be corrected and graded, but not factored into their total earned points. Students must identify their level prior to the start of class. At any point in the year, a student may transition from honors to on-level if the workload exceeds the students' expectations. In addition, at the parents' discretion, students may take this course as an "audit" in which they still read chapters, attend lectures, participate in labs, but do not do problem sets or laboratory reports. This approach provides an experiential and conceptual overview of chemistry, but should not be counted as a full year credit. Workload: All students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class on pre-reading and lab reports. Honors students can expect an additional 1-2 hours on weekly problem sets. Pre-reading and pre-lab work is required so in-person class time can be spent on highlights, class discussion, homework review, and labs. In addition, most weeks students should plan for additional meeting time and coordination with their lab partners in-person, by phone, shared documents, or via virtual meeting. Students will also be required to read one scientific, non-fiction book or current events article each quarter and prepare a 2-page summary and response book report. Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates. Parents can have an observer account in Canvas to review assignments and graded work. Students will have weekly readings and mandatory pre-lab assignments. The pre-lab assignment must be completed prior to lab and will serve as the student's "ticket" into the lab session each week. Assessments: Students will earn points for completed homework, unit tests, lab reports, book reports, and semester exams. Parents can calculate a letter grade using the student's points earned divided by points available. Parents may view all scoring and comments at any time through the Canvas site. Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase or rent Prentice Hall Chemistry by Wilbraham, Staley, et. al. 2008 edition (ISBN #978-0132512107). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $125 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a composition notebook, graph paper, lab equipment and supplies, and safety supplies. What to Bring: Students should bring a paper or a notebook, pen or pencil, and a scientific calculator each week. What to Wear: Students should not wear any loose, drapey clothing to lab. They should also come to class with long hair tied back and should wear closed toe shoes. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Lab Science for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: Algebra I

    1
    Manal Hussein
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    This class will be taught in a Hybrid format with an online lecture on Mondays (10:00 am - 10:55 am) over a live, online platform and in-person lab and activities on Wednesdays (9:30 am - 10:55 am). Registration for the Lab section will automatically enroll the student in the Lecture section.

    This is a full-year, lab-based course that covers traditional concepts in physics. Physics is a college-preparatory course that encourages students to engage in scientific inquiry, investigations, and experimentation so they develop a conceptual understanding and basic scientific skills. Physics will help students understand phenomena in the physical world such as the forces on a roller coaster, wave action at the beach, speakers for their music, batteries in electric cars, and the electronics that power their favorite devices.

    Students will develop an in-depth conceptual and analytical understanding of principles such as Newton's laws of motion, work and energy, momentum, circular motion, thermodynamics, sound, properties of light, electric fields and energy, and magnetism. This course will use algebra- and trigonometry- based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe mechanics. The course is designed to emphasize scientific thinking and reasoning, problem solving, and experimentation.

    Meeting Dates: This is a 29-week course that will not meet during the week of May 12-16, 2025.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Students should have completed Algebra I, Geometry, and basic, right-angle trigonometry before taking this course. Students should be concurrently enrolled in Algebra II or PreCalculus when taking this course. For those students who have not covered trigonometry or other key Algebra II topics prior to encountering them in this course, the instructor will recommend resources and videos for independent review or instruction. Students are encouraged to buy the textbook over the summer to work through the Math Review section before September. The emphasis in this course is teaching/learning physic concepts, not teaching or re-teaching mathematical concepts.

    Class Expectations: For both in-person and virtual class meetings, students are expected to come prepared, have class materials, and be ready to participate in class discussions and activities. During virtual lectures (Mondays), students are expected to be seated at a desk or table and have their cameras on.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 4 - 6 hours of independent study/homework every week consisting of pre-reading chapters, taking detailed notes on concepts before class, completing problem-solving activities, analyzing data, and writing formal lab reports.

    Assignments: All assignments and announcements will be posted on Google classroom management site. There, students access assignments; upload lab reports, message instructor and classmates; and attend virtual conferences. Parents can view the course instructions and materials via their students' accounts.

    Assessments: The instructor will assign points for correct answers on quizzes and tests, and points/feedback for lab reports. Homework assignments will be marked as complete or incomplete. Parents can calculate a letter grade using the student's points earned divided by points available.

    Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase or rent Physics by James S. Walker (2014 ed.) (ISBN #9780131371156.)

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $100.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Supplies/Equipment: Students will need access to a computer with working camera, internet, a graphing calculator, a ruler, writing supplies, colored pens for graphs, highlighters, plain, lined, and graph paper, a 1-inch three ring binder, and a Five Star, 8.5" X 11" Quadrille-Ruled Notebook.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component full credit in laboratory science for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: Algebra II

    1
    JR Bontrager
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Students will learn to think like inventors and designers when creating 3D! 3D design is used not only for modeling and fabricating objects but is also at the heart of many cutting-edge technologies such as AR and VR, video game design, interactive exhibits, and more. 3D printing is used in nearly all industries and design fields today from art to animation, manufacturing to medicine, and engineering to entertainment.


    In this class, students will first learn to use Tinkercard, a 3D modeling software that works in solid forms (like LEGO bricks). Then, students will transition to MeshMixer, a software that creates smooth, curved, organic shapes (like clay). They will learn to think about their design from all angles and how to subtract forms to create holes, voids, and concave features, and add forms to create projections, contours, appendages, and convex details. They will discover the limitations of 3D printing and how to handle overhanging elements or delicate details.


    Students will practice the artistic design process with simple sketches before diving into the software. They will be encouraged to use reference material, whether photos, a model, or even by modifying existing, public domain 3D files. Students will use an iterative printing process in which they print their project, check it for design intent, functionality, or fit, make modifications, and print again. The class will learn how to save and convert between 3D solid object files (.stl) and object files (.obj) and work with metadata fields to protect the intellectual property of their designs.


    To demonstrate the range and capability of 3D-printed designs, favorite student projects include D & D miniatures, cosplay props, Minecraft-designed creations, and beloved characters such as anime, baby Yoda, and Pokemon creatures.


    Second semester, continuing students will progress to more complex assemblies including multiple parts and parts with hinges. Second semester, some students may wish to work with alternative filaments such as TPU (rubber), metal, or magnetized filament. Because of the studio format, new students can enroll second semester.


    The class instructor is a design engineer with 3D Herndon and expert in 3D technologies and other areas of design and invention. A typical class will be structured with 5-10 minutes of lecture or demonstration of a new design skill, followed by 40 minutes of design "studio" time where students can receive trouble-shooting support and design tips from the instructor and have dedicated work time, and 5-10 minutes of sharing time at the end of class. As a studio class, students will work on individual projects at their own pace.


    Topics in this Series: As an open studio for individual projects, students may continue from one semester to the next or enroll mid-year. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.


    Prerequisites: None


    What to Bring:Students will need to bring a laptop to class for design work.


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1+ hours per week outside of class.


    Assignments: Project criteria will be explained in class to students.


    Assessments: Informal, qualitative feedback will be given in class throughout the semester as the student works.


    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $25.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for 3D printing and filament. This provides the student with 800 g of printed product per semester. Students who are prolific designers and print often will be asked to pay an additional $5.00 per 100 g or fraction thereof.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Visual Arts, Technology, or Career Exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Taliesin Knol
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Why read about key military battles on maps or in books when you can learn about them hands-on, in three dimensions, using historical miniature gaming? In 3D History, pivotal engagements come alive for new and experienced students, as they navigate a table-top terrain, deploy hundreds of miniature soldiers, ships, and tanks... all while playing a military strategy game. Each student will have the opportunity to fight a battle from both sides, allowing them to test various strategies, try multiple scenarios, predict different outcomes, and rewrite history- an effective way to gain a deeper understanding of what actually happened and why!



    In 1916 The Great War had been churning through men and material for two years. Something had to be done- warring countries were driving deep into debt and losing entire generations of young men at the front. The armies had to go "Over the Top." Great Battle Plans were drawn up for massive, simultaneous attacks across the whole of Western Europe. In secret, the British built new technological horrors to drive through the German lines: land battleships bristling with guns, covered in armor and belching smoke and fire. The gears of war reached as far as Gallipoli in Turkey and the deserts of the Middle East. In the West, an untapped American giant slowly stirred to war. Provoked by unrestricted submarine warfare, diplomatic intrigue, and a righteous desire to defend democracy, would America arrive in time to decide the outcome of the Great War?



    This semester will study later years of WWI, the major battles of the Western Front, where tens of thousands of men went "over the top" of their trenches to near certain death, as well as the desperate attempts to break the stalemate in other theaters of war with new technologies.



    Note: This is a 1 hour, 55 minute class with a 10-minute break part way through. This is a 13-week class that will not meet on 10/18/2024.



    Topics in this Series: WWI- No Man's Land 1914-1915 (Semester 1) and WWI- Over the Top 1916-1918 (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.



    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.



    Assignments: Period maps, photographs, and re-creations will be posted on a class Google Drive, and video links from YouTube will be e-mailed to parents and students for homework or supplemental investigation.



    Assessments: Will not be given.



    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Jeff Virchow
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Social dancing does not have to be slow or stuffy! There is energy in the ballroom with Action Dance! Students will learn the dynamic, rhythmic dances of the Caribbean: Salsa (Mexican-Cuban), Merengue (Dominican Republic), Rhumba (Afro-Cuban), and Cha-Cha (triple step Cuban). Emphasis in the class will be on having fun and learning techniques to help dancers be comfortable and relaxed. Social dances encourage confidence, social presence, posture, and poise in teens. Social dancing is partner-based dance; consider signing up with a friend! Please note that in order to demonstrate some steps and forms, students may occasionally be invited to partner with their instructor.

    Topics in this Series: Action Dance: Caribbean & Latin (Semester 1), Action Dance: Swing & Shag (Semester 2), etc. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: None

    Assessments: Informal feedback will be given in class. Formal assessments or grades will not be given.

    What to Wear: Students should wear loose, comfortable clothing.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in fine arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Kerry Diederich
    Add

    Elementary artists can get in on the action as they learn about a different artist or artistic style and create representative pieces using a wide range of artistic supplies such as tempura and water color paints, pastels, pencils, cray pas, oil pastel crayons, specialty papers, sculpting media, and embellishments.


    In this workshop, students will learn about the abstract masters Wassily Kandinsky and Jackson Pollock and create works in their styles using drips and splatters (Pollack) and collage and layered geometric compositions (Kandinsky). There is a $15.00 supply fee due payable to the instructor on or before the start of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sandy Preaux
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    This is a place-holder for the Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences lecture. Students should register for the Atmospheric & Oceanic Science Lab, which will automatically enroll them in both class sections.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Taliesin Knol
    Add

    Vicksburg was the last Confederate stronghold on the Mississippi River. Its capture cut the Confederacy in two and, in combination with the other major Union victory at Gettysburg the day before, destroyed any chance of the Confederacy achieving its war goals. Unlike Gettysburg, which lasted a few days in July, the Siege of Vicksburg lasted more than two months, from May to July. The slow, grinding attritional warfare there foreshadowed the conditions of the First World War more than the US Civil War, featuring trench lines, massive amounts of heavy modern guns, mines, and naval support. The capture of Vicksburg allowed the Union to start its all-out offensives through the Confederate heartland, and ultimately bring the war to a close, as each part of the Confederacy was systematically isolated and destroyed. This was the ultimate end of the Anaconda Plan of 1861 after the disasters at Manassas and Fredericksburg meant no quick end to the fighting. Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will each form a 10" X 14" shaped, foam diorama with landscape elements (hills, valleys, rivers, ridges, vegetation, airfields, etc) to represent a scene of a famous historical engagement. Students will each receive 1:72 scale miniature soldiers to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to create larger scenes. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical background and circumstances leading up to the specific conflict. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. This is a 4-day workshop.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Taliesin Knol
    Add

    The liberation of France from Nazi control began when 156,000 allied American, British and Canadian forces landed on five beaches along the heavily fortified coast of France's Normandy region. Code-named Operation Overlord, the invasion was the largest amphibious military assault in history. Between the American beaches of Omaha and Utah, was Pointe du Hoc. The battery of heavy artillery perched atop a massive cliff and aimed directly at the American beaches had to be neutralized at all costs to ensure the success of the invasion. The attackers would have to scale the 110 foot cliff under fire, fight through heavily fortified Axis defenses, destroy the guns, and then wait for relief from nearby Omaha beach. This mission could only be entrusted to the elite raiders of the US Army Rangers. This special force was trained to operate in small units, strike where the enemy did not think it possible, and operate behind enemy lines when necessary. For the Rangers, it was victory or certain death. Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will each form a 10" X 14" shaped, foam diorama with landscape elements (hills, valleys, rivers, ridges, vegetation, airfields, etc) to represent a scene of a famous historical engagement. Students will each receive 1:72 scale miniature soldiers to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate the larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Axis and Allies gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices. The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical background and circumstances leading up to the specific battle. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. This is a 4-day workshop.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Rebecca Sticha
    Add

    Discover the world of robotics using kids' favorite, interlocking building bricks! Students will build and program whimsical, mechanized projects using the WeDo 2.0 robotics system by LEGO Education. In this workshop, young builders will build two droids: one that can scoop and shove soil, such as on the Martian surface, and one that can "walk" on wheels to explore a pretend planet. Their robots will be built using special-shaped LEGO components from the WeDo Educational set, motors, motion sensors, tilt sensors and a programmable, Bluetooth control unit ("brain"). Students will use classroom tablets to program the control units using intuitive drag-and-drop coding modules. Prior experience with LEGO or coding is not required. All equipment is furnished.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Rebecca Sticha
    Add

    Discover the world of robotics using kids' favorite, interlocking building bricks! Students will build and program whimsical, mechanized projects using the WeDo 2.0 robotics system by LEGO Education. In this workshop, young builders will merge modern technology with medieval times as they build a moving knight and a crushing catapult (if time permits). Their robots will be built using special-shaped LEGO components from the WeDo Educational set, motors, motion sensors, tilt sensors and a programmable, Bluetooth control unit ("brain"). Students will use classroom tablets to program the control units using an intuitive drag-and-drop coding modules. Prior experience with LEGO or coding is not required. All equipment is furnished.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Tia Murchie-Beyma
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    This is a place-holder for the Principles of Biology lecture. Students should register for the Principles of Biology Lab, which will automatically enroll them in both class sections. A physical meeting room will be designated for on-campus students who have classes immediately before or after this virtual session.

    Prerequisites: See class description

    1
    Karen Shumway
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    This is a place-holder for the Chemistry lecture. Students should register for the Chemistry Lab, which will automatically enroll them in both class sections.

    Prerequisites: Algebra I

    1
    Danielle Mercadal
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Can your child sit in a circle for story time? Line up for lunch? Take turns talking? This one-day, 3-hour (half-day) program is a "taste" of kindergarten for 5- year-olds. Start your child's week off right with "Mornings with Miss M" at Compass Kindergarten. Children will work in a small group with an experienced early elementary educator for this dynamic, play-based program that offers regular interaction and socialization. This fun, activity-based program will create rhythm and routine in a homeschooled kindergartner's week and give them a sense of community and a peer group. Children will practice routines and transitions as they move through the morning. Each session will include some simple structure such as a daily arrival song/greeting, circle time, story, snack time, activity, lunch, active game, and closing/goodbyes. Through games and activities, they will also practice key childhood social skills such as sharing, taking turns, and entering play with others. Academic basics such as the ABCs, days of the week, colors, shapes, and number sense will be integrated into activities involving fairy tales, nature and art. The teacher will provide ideas for parents to work on at home with their child during the week. Compass Kindergarten is offered in three weekly sessions: Monday, Wednesday, or Friday. Registration is stand-alone for each day so parents can register for one, two, or all three. While each kindergarten class will give children the opportunities for learning and playing in a social environment along with classroom routines, each of the three days will focus on a particular area of study and discovery of how each is connected. On Mondays, the focus will be on Language Arts where students will be exposed to folktales, seasonal stories, and classic favorites while also practicing basic reading and writing skills such as sound blends, digraphs and long vowel sounds. Readiness Students must be age five (5) by the start of the program or have the teacher's approval for younger. To be successful in this program, entering kindergartners must be able to do the following preschool-level skills: (1) be able to separate from parents with little discomfort; (2) be able to sit and listen to a story or stay on a task for 10 minutes; (3) be able to follow simple, age-appropriate directions from the teacher or another adult; (4) be able to write and recognize his/her first name; (5) be able to hold and use crayons and scissors correctly; (6) be completely self sufficient in a public restroom (wiping, flushing, washing hands, etc.) Other Notes:

    • Children should bring a bagged lunch and water bottle to each session.
    • There is a $50.00 material fee for class consumables due payable to the teacher on the first day of class.
    • Parents can choose to drop children off for this program (different than Compass's school-year policies for 55 minute classes.)
    • Registration for this program is by 13-week semester.
    • Parents who are shopping around or applying to alternate kindergarten programs should review the Compass withdrawal policy.

    Prerequisites: See class decription for skills needed

    1
    Danielle Mercadal
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Can your child sit in a circle for story time? Line up for lunch? Take turns talking? This one-day, 3-hour (half-day) program is a "taste" of kindergarten for 5- year-olds. Start your child's week off right with "Mornings with Miss M" at Compass Kindergarten. Children will work in a small group with an experienced early elementary educator for this dynamic, play-based program that offers regular interaction and socialization. This fun, activity-based program will create rhythm and routine in a homeschooled kindergartner's week and give them a sense of community and a peer group. Children will practice routines and transitions as they move through the morning. Each session will include some simple structure such as a daily arrival song/greeting, circle time, story, snack time, activity, lunch, active game, and closing/goodbyes. Through games and activities, they will also practice key childhood social skills such as sharing, taking turns, and entering play with others. Academic basics such as the ABCs, days of the week, colors, shapes, and number sense will be integrated into activities involving fairy tales, nature and art. The teacher will provide ideas for parents to work on at home with their child during the week. Compass Kindergarten is offered in three weekly sessions: Monday, Wednesday, or Friday. Registration is stand-alone for each day so parents can register for one, two, or all three. While each kindergarten class will give children the opportunities for learning and playing in a social environment along with classroom routines, each of the three days will focus on a particular area of study and discovery of how each is connected. On Wednesdays, the focus will be on Math where students will be exposed to basic mathematical concepts such as adding, subtracting, skip counting, ordinal numbers, and time through stories and play. Readiness Students must be age five (5) by the start of the program or have the teacher's approval for younger. To be successful in this program, entering kindergartners must be able to do the following preschool-level skills: (1) be able to separate from parents with little discomfort; (2) be able to sit and listen to a story or stay on a task for 10 minutes; (3) be able to follow simple, age-appropriate directions from the teacher or another adult; (4) be able to write and recognize his/her first name; (5) be able to hold and use crayons and scissors correctly; (6) be completely self sufficient in a public restroom (wiping, flushing, washing hands, etc.) Other Notes:

    • Children should bring a bagged lunch and water bottle to each session.
    • There is a $50.00 material fee for class consumables due payable to the teacher on the first day of class.
    • Parents can choose to drop children off for this program (different than Compass's school-year policies for 55 minute classes.)
    • Registration for this program is by 14-week semester.
    • Parents who are shopping around or applying to alternate kindergarten programs should review the Compass withdrawal policy.

    Prerequisites: See class decription for skills needed

    1
    Danielle Mercadal
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Can your child sit in a circle for story time? Line up for lunch? Take turns talking? This one-day, 3-hour (half-day) program is a "taste" of kindergarten for 5- year-olds. Start your child's week off right with "Mornings with Miss M" at Compass Kindergarten. Children will work in a small group with an experienced early elementary educator for this dynamic, play-based program that offers regular interaction and socialization. This fun, activity-based program will create rhythm and routine in a homeschooled kindergartner's week and give them a sense of community and a peer group. Children will practice routines and transitions as they move through the morning. Each session will include some simple structure such as a daily arrival song/greeting, circle time, story, snack time, activity, lunch, active game, and closing/goodbyes. Through games and activities, they will also practice key childhood social skills such as sharing, taking turns, and entering play with others. Academic basics such as the ABCs, days of the week, colors, shapes, and number sense will be integrated into activities involving fairy tales, nature and art. The teacher will provide ideas for parents to work on at home with their child during the week. Compass Kindergarten is offered in three weekly sessions: Monday, Wednesday, or Friday. Registration is stand-alone for each day so parents can register for one, two, or all three. While each kindergarten class will give children the opportunities for learning and playing in a social environment along with classroom routines, each of the three days will focus on a particular area of study and discovery of how each is connected. On Fridays, the focus will be on science and exploration of the natural world through stories, crafts, and observations both inside and outside the classroom. Themes include seasons, weather, local animals, and the five senses. Readiness Students must be age five (5) by the start of the program or have the teacher's approval for younger. To be successful in this program, entering kindergartners must be able to do the following preschool-level skills: (1) be able to separate from parents with little discomfort; (2) be able to sit and listen to a story or stay on a task for 10 minutes; (3) be able to follow simple, age-appropriate directions from the teacher or another adult; (4) be able to write and recognize his/her first name; (5) be able to hold and use crayons and scissors correctly; (6) be completely self sufficient in a public restroom (wiping, flushing, washing hands, etc.) Other Notes:

    • Children should bring a bagged lunch and water bottle to each session.
    • There is a $50.00 material fee for class consumables due payable to the teacher on the first day of class.
    • Parents can choose to drop children off for this program (different than Compass's school-year policies for 55 minute classes.)
    • Registration for this program is by 14-week semester.
    • Parents who are shopping around or applying to alternate kindergarten programs should review the Compass withdrawal policy.

    Prerequisites: See class decription for skills needed

    1
    Jessica Eastridge
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    This program has two in-person meetings each Monday: a 45-minute instrument family sectional at 10:00 am and a 55-minute all-instrument group practice session from 1:00 pm- 1:55 pm. Band students must take both sectional and group together. Registration for a sectional will automatically enroll the student in the group session.

    Enjoy the camaraderie and cooperation of making music with others in a school band! Join the first homeschool concert band in the region at Compass. This band is for beginner and advanced beginner musicians of brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments.


    Students in beginner percussion will learn to play the snare drum and mallet instruments (such as glockenspiel and xylophone). They will learn proper stick and mallet grip, posture, and playing position for concert percussion instrumentals. Students will learn the fundamentals of music reading. The group will practice short songs in Concert B-flat and Concert E-flat major (and their relative minors) on mallet instruments and basic rudiments on snare drum. Students will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing percussion instruments and will play both cooperatively in small ensembles and independently.


    Students in beginner woodwinds will learn to play the flute or clarinet (4th-8th grade) or alto saxophone (7th-8th grade only). They will learn how to hold their instruments with proper posture and hand position and correct embouchure (mouth position and blowing technique) for the instrument. Students will receive instruction on the parts of their instruments and how to safely, correctly, and independently assemble and clean them. Students will learn the fundamentals of music reading, and the group will practice short songs in Concert B-flat and Concert E-flat major (and their relative minors). Students will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing woodwind instruments and will play both cooperatively in small ensembles and independently.


    Students in beginner brass will learn to play the trumpet, trombone, or euphonium (4th-8th grade) and French horn or tuba (7th-8th grade students only). They will learn how to hold their instruments with proper posture and hand position and correct embouchure (mouth position and blowing technique) for the instrument. Students will receive instruction on the parts of their instruments and how to safely, correctly, and independently assemble and clean them. Students will learn the fundamentals of music reading, and the group will practice short songs in Concert B-flat and Concert E-flat major (and their relative minors). Students will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing woodwind instruments and will play both cooperatively in small ensembles and independently.



    Students will need to rent or purchase an instrument and accessories for the band. See the linked list by instrument. Mark your calendar for an Instrument Test Drive event on Tuesday, May 7 from 1:00 pm- 3:00 pm at Compass. Representatives from a local store, Music & Arts, will be on hand with instruments for students to try. They will explain rental and purchase options to parents and will sell some of the supplies that students will need. Students who enrolled in one clinic (percussion, woodwinds, or brass) during early registration may switch clinics if they change their minds about their preferred instrument after the test drive event.


    There is a $33.00 supply fee due payable to Compass on/before the start of class for the "Do It! Play (a Band Instrument)" book and workbook and the sheet music songs used for the group band performance.>

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Anne Taranto
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    In Cover-to-Cover, middle school-aged students will read renowned classics and award-winning young adult literature. This book discussion group will examine a different theme each quarter to introduce students to literary analysis. Students will read, examine, and compare two full-length novels that share similar themes through facilitated discussions and extension activities which encourage students to make personal connections to what is read. The group will evaluate themes, characters, setting, and writing style. Second quarter, students will examine the genre of fantasy novel with A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle and When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead. Assigned chapters are expected to be read at home, either as read-aloud, individual silent reading, or listening to the unabridged audiobook. Students should come to class prepared to discuss the reading. Classroom discussions will emphasize the use of textual evidence when explaining thoughts and opinions. Students will be assigned creative, short assignments to enhance and demonstrate their understanding of each novel such as quote explications, thematic questions, or imagining a conversation between characters from different books. Topics in this Series: Fantasy (Quarter 1); Adventure (Quarter 2); Dystopian (Quarter 3); and Mystery & Detective (Quarter 4). Textbook/Materials: Because students will need clean, inexpensive copies of each novel to mark in, and because they must be able to refer to the passages on the same page numbers, copies of mass market paperbacks will be pre-purchased and bundled for students. (See Supply Fee below). Supply Fee: A class fee of $17.50 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class. What to Bring: Students should bring the current novel, paper, pen or pencil and highlighter to class each week. Some students may wish to bring paper clips, adhesive flags or post-it notes for marking pages.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Judith Harmon
    Add

    Celebrate summer through the joy of relaxed crafting which unleashes a child's inner creativity and fosters innovation. Young artists will enjoy working hands-on with a variety of crafting materials and methods to create original projects. Crafting is multi-sensory, and most children enjoy the tactile, no-pressure experience of painting, sculpting, beading, sewing, cutting, assembling, weaving, and embellishing a selection of materials to create unique, personal projects. Crafting engages a different artistic skillset than coloring, drawing, and writing, and encourages imagination and artistry to create objects in three dimensions. In this camp, children will create original hand-made pieces using a range of artistic techniques and a myriad of materials. Kids will enjoy the camaraderie of working alongside a group of friends in Creative Crafters Camp, and parents will appreciate the break! Parent Notes:

    • All the supplies are provided: No need to search high and low for the needed materials.
    • Reduce waste and clutter: No need to buy large quantities of specialty supplies for a one-time project.
    • Reduce clean-up: Leave the glue, paint, and glitter mess at Compass.
    • Kids get to experiment with a variety of materials and techniques, even if you are not crafty.
    • Crafting improves dexterity and fine motor skills, and an afterschool club makes a great social outlet.
    A supply fee of $30.00 is due payable to the instructor on or before the first day of class. This is a 3-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
    Add

    Celebrate summer through the joy of relaxed crafting which unleashes a child's inner creativity and fosters innovation. Young artists will enjoy working hands-on with a variety of crafting materials and methods to create original projects. Crafting is multi-sensory, and most children enjoy the tactile, no-pressure experience of painting, sculpting, beading, sewing, cutting, assembling, weaving, and embellishing a selection of materials to create unique, personal projects. Crafting engages a different artistic skillset than coloring, drawing, and writing, and encourages imagination and artistry to create objects in three dimensions. In this camp, children will create original hand-made pieces using a range of artistic techniques and a myriad of materials. Kids will enjoy the camaraderie of working alongside a group of friends in Creative Crafters Camp, and parents will appreciate the break! Parent Notes:

    • All the supplies are provided: No need to search high and low for the needed materials.
    • Reduce waste and clutter: No need to buy large quantities of specialty supplies for a one-time project.
    • Reduce clean-up: Leave the glue, paint, and glitter mess at Compass.
    • Kids get to experiment with a variety of materials and techniques, even if you are not crafty.
    • Crafting improves dexterity and fine motor skills, and an afterschool club makes a great social outlet.
    A supply fee of $30.00 is due payable to the instructor on or before the first day of class. This is a 3-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Tayler Shreve
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Students will delve into the world of crime scene investigators (CSIs) as seen each week on Law and Order, NCIS, and the CSI television series! Students will be introduced to the field of forensic science which is the application of science, such as biology, chemistry, pharmacology, and physics, to the criminal justice system.


    First semester, students will learn the scientific methodologies used in forensic investigation and how to process a crime scene. They will practice measuring, sketching, photographing, documenting, collecting, preserving, and cataloging crime scene evidence. Students will also apply observation skills, interpret evidence, and use logic and deductive reasoning to the investigative process.


    Each week, students will perform in-class labs and activities to understand common, investigative forensics such as fingerprinting, including identifying fingerprint patterns, and learning how to find and lift latent fingerprints. The class will practice techniques for collecting and analyzing blood and saliva samples, blood typing, and evaluating blood spatter. The class will expand their forensic toolbox with impression evidence, such as footprints and tire tracks, and making molds thereof. They will learn how fibers, fabrics, hair, poison, drugs, pollen, insects, and other trace evidence can be used to unravel a crime. Students will also consider arson evidence, toxicology, and toolmarks in criminal investigative analysis as well as how ballistics, such as firearms evidence and bullet trajectories, are used in investigations.


    The class will use case studies and forensic data from actual crimes- both solved and unsolved- to see how forensic science is used in investigating and prosecuting cases in the criminal justice system. The class will have occasional guest speakers from the criminal justice system and at least one field trip to a police crime lab.


    This course is taught by a PhD candidate and professor of Criminology, Tayler Shreve. It is an introduction to criminology for teens who are interested in becoming practitioners or professionals in the vast criminal justice system or those who enjoy true crime books, blogs, or movies.


    Rating/Advisory: For sensitive students, please note that in the examination of actual crimes, violence such as assault and murder will be discussed. References may be made to illicit substances and weapons used in the commission of crimes. Course content will be filtered to be age-appropriate for high school students in the instructor's judgement. For example, real crime scene photos may be shown with evidentiary details, but not victims or body parts. Students may read autopsy reports, but they will not be shown autopsy photos, and cases of rape will be referred to as sexual assault with no intimate details.


    Topics in this Series: Fundamentals of Forensic Science (Semester 1) and Cold Case Files (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester will receive priority pre-registration for second semester.


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.


    Assignments:

    There are assignments both in and out of the classroom. Students have the ability to submit assignments based on their learning style(s): written assignments, presentations, spoken recordings (podcast, TedTalk, etc.).

    Assessments: Students will receive feedback on all assignments. There are no exams in this course, however points will be assigned for completed assignments, participation, and attendance.


    Textbook/Materials: Articles and case studies will be posted by the instructor as downloadable pdfs.


    Lab/Supply Fee: A lab fee of $100 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.


    Non-Meeting Days: In addition to the scheduled days-off on the published Compass schedule, this class does not meet on 9/23/24.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in humanities or career exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Mylene Nyman
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Students with a curiosity for culinary careers will explore many aspects of cooking for the hospitality industry and for themselves. In this advanced cooking class, students will make delicious, advanced recipes and learn skills that are the foundation for a future career in culinary arts. This class will get students excited about new foods, flavors, and techniques as they gain a working knowledge of food planning and preparation.


    Each quarter, new technical, kitchen skills are introduced, and each week, a new recipe is made in class that demonstrates the featured food group or cooking style.


    First quarter covers chapter Chapter 8 in the Level 1 textbook and features recipes the following recipes:


  • Chicken Pineapple Stir Fry
  • Beef and Broccoli Stir Fry
  • Chicken Roman Casserole
  • Turkey and Cauliflower Tetrazzini
  • Sheet Pan Eggplant Parmesan
  • Sheet Pan Shrimp Biryani
  • Sheet Pan Baked Feta and Vegetables
  • Culinary vocabulary will also be introduced each week. Students will leave this class with an introduction to culinary careers in the hospitality industry and a beginning foundation in culinary arts. Additionally, students will be able to take charge of a home kitchen, prepare advanced dishes, and adhere to safety and hygiene standards. They will have nutrition-planning and cooking skills that will enrich the lives of their friends and families.


    Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics.


    Topics in this Series: Mixed Up! (Stir-Fries & Casseroles)- Quarter 1; Roasted! (Grilled, Baked & Broiled Dishes)- Quarter 2; Stuffed! (Filled Meats & Vegetables)- Quarter 3; Skewered! (Kabobs & Grilled Skewers)- Quarter 4. Students continuing from the prior quarter will receive priority pre-registration for next quarter.


    Prerequisites: Students must be in 9th grade (minimum age 14) to take this class. 7th-8th graders must have Instructor's permission to enroll. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group.


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.


    Assignments: Cooking assignments, practicing skills at home, and related homework will be given in class and e-mailed to students and parents. Brief written assignments may be given, such as recipe modification or development.


    Assessments: Individual feedback will be given in class. Formal assessments will not be given. At the end of the second quarter, enrolled students will be required to complete an online Virginia Food Handler Course for food safety certification through the county health department, which will cost $25.00


    https://courseforfoodsafety.com/states/VA?gclid=CjwKCAjw7LX0BRBiEiwA__gNw4AfZHgp_eOVTeiEXudxZhhF11E2UMggiIeYo6qL33xlUaDXbUeB5RoCG1cQAvD_BwE

    Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase or rent the selected textbooks and workbooks. Used copies are acceptable.


  • Foundations of Restaurant Management & Culinary Arts: Level 1, published by National Restaurant Association (ISBN# 978-0138019389)
  • Foundations of Restaurant Management & Culinary Arts: Level 2, published by National Restaurant Association (ISBN# 978-0131380226)
  • Activity Guide for Foundations of Restaurant Management and Culinary Arts Level 1, published by National Restaurant Association (ISBN# 978-0137070503)
  • Activity Guide for Foundations of Restaurant Management and Culinary Arts Level 2, published by National Restaurant Association (ISBN# 978-0131380714)
  • Required Tools/Materials: Culinary students will be expected to begin to acquire their own tools. Students should purchase and bring with them each week the following basic, minimum tools and supplies:


  • Chef's Knife Set, Professional Quality- (purchased individually or as a starter set) Recommended model (Amazon): J.A Henckels International 31425-000 Classic Starter Knife Set, 3-Piece, Black/Stainless Steel
  • Knife Guards- Recommended model (Amazon): 3- Piece Universal Knife Edge Guards Set
  • Carrying Case- Recommended model (Amazon): Tosnail Chef Knife Case Roll Bag with 15 Slots
  • Chef's Jacket- (long sleeve, white. Brought to class clean each week) Recommended model- women's (Amazon): Chef Works Women's Le Mans Chef Coat Recommended model-men's (Amazon): Chef Works Men's Bordeaux Chef Coat
  • Chef's Cap - (student's choice of color) Recommended model (Amazon): Nanxson 3pcs Chef Hat
  • Office Supplies: Ring binder, pen or pencil, note cards and loose-leaf paper
  • Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $75.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for perishable food items, ingredients, and supplies that are used in this class. For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts or Career Education for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: Prior Tween or Teen Cooking Class or Instructor Permission

    1
    Tom Shumaker
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    From stunning stadiums and ostentatious offices to soaring skyscrapers and massive malls, public projects and humble homes, not a day goes by that you do not interact with the work of architects and builders! You may think of hardhats and shovels when you envision construction, but did you know that behind the scenes, there is a vast team of professionals who design, engineer, finance, manage, staff, schedule, estimate, insure, inspect, furnish, and build these structures in a thriving $1.1 trillion industry? Design and construction of buildings represents a dynamic, fast-paced field to consider a career in.


    First semester, students will learn about the comprehensive process from concept design to completion of construction for buildings. Students will try their hand at basic drafting and will examine simple blueprints to understand the 2D representation of building elements. Teams will build structures out of simple materials to test the strength of different shapes.


    Materials matter. The class will explore and experiment with the literal building blocks that define structures. From concrete and steel to aluminum and glass, each material has its unique properties and potentialities. Students will examine how material choices impact durability, aesthetics, cost, and environmental sustainability. The class will be challenged to think about all the components that go into buildings and will complete in-class labs and activities to test and evaluate construction materials. As examples, they will mix and test a small batch of concrete and consider the effect on strength of embedding reinforcing steel. Students will complete a lumber lab to understand dimensions and strength, and they will experiment with soil types such as stone, sand, and clay to demonstrate how these conditions dictate the design of foundations. The class will look at elements of the building envelope, finishes, and MEP (mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems) to understand these fundamental building systems.


    This course is designed to inspire tomorrow's designers and builders and create an awareness and interest in the design and construction industry. Students will gain insights into the project management, collaboration, and problem-solving critical in these fields. This class will overview trends, innovations, and sustainability practices and will meet the team of stakeholders including owners, municipalities, architects, engineers, construction managers, trade contractors, and many others.


    Topics in this Series: Building Basics (Semester 1) and Foundations to Finish (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.



    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class on assignments.


    Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, download articles, upload homework, track points earned, and message instructor and classmates.


    Assessments: Will not be given.


    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.


    What to Bring: Notebook or paper, pen or pencil.


    Non-Meeting Days: This is a 10-week course that begins on September 30. There is no class meeting on 9/9/24, 9/16/24, or 9/23/24.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Career Exploration or an Elective for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Taliesin Knol
    Add

    Students will learn about the Mesozoic flora and fauna of the prehistoric world and be introduced to the ideas of plate tectonics, species variation, and the evolution of plants. This knowledge will be applied through several games in which the students will learn the characteristics of the various dinosaurs and other creatures that lived with them and how to cooperate in a group. In the role playing game "Saurian Safari", students will simulate a cooperative hunt through a Mesozoic game park using miniature figures, and in "Try-To-Survive-Asaurus," students will try to survive in the harsh and changing environment of the dinosaurs while portraying their very own dinosaur with the options of cooperating with or eating their fellow classmates. Over the course of the class, students should be able to explain the differences in the types of dinosaurs and plants found during the period, be it Cretaceous, Jurassic, or Triassic and how these differences are reflected in their very own swamp, forest, or scrub terrain type boards. Each student will create an individual diorama. Students will craft and hand-shape their scene on a 10 x 14 inch foam board using artistic, model-making techniques. They will customize their dioramas with landforms, waterways, plant life, and paint. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with miniature figures and combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to create a larger terrain. Students will then compete in a zoology-based survival strategy game. Each student will create one board and receive a set of miniatures to take home with them. Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on or before the first day of the workshop. This is a 4-day workshop.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Taliesin Knol
    Add

    At the twilight of the Roman Republic, facing increasing political instability caused by ineffective dictators surrounded by corruption, murder, and intrigue, it seemed only one man could "save" the Republic- by destroying it completely and founding an Empire! That man was Gaius Julius Caesar. Having taken on Rome's broken political system and using it to his own advantage, Caesar and his allies made themselves the most powerful men in Rome. There was no election he could not buy and no campaign he could not win. All that stood between Caesar and ultimate power for life, was the Senate and his former ally, Pompey the Great. Ordered to return from Gaul without his army or the legal immunity, Caesar would make the choice to fight instead. "Alea iacta est!" (The Die is Cast!) This was Caesar's call as he marched his army across the Rubicon River in Italy on his way back to Rome, with the intent to return as a conqueror, thus shattering the Republic and starting yet another Roman Civil War. The war would last years, spanning the entire Mediterranean from Spain to Egypt, and would ensure that Caesar was installed as "Dictator for Life" (however long that might be.) Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will each form a 10" X 14" shaped, foam diorama with landscape elements (hills, valleys, rivers, ridges, vegetation, airfields, etc) to represent a scene of a famous historical engagement. Students will each receive 1:72 scale miniature soldiers to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to create larger scenes. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical background and circumstances leading up to the specific conflict. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. This is a 4-day workshop.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Rebecca Sticha
    Add

    Kids are curious about electricity- the magic that powers the toys, games, and electronics they love. In this workshop, kids will experiment with aspects of electricity- conductors, batteries, and circuits- to take the mystery out of electricity and inspire future engineers. Kids will modify simple circuits to do silly things. They will discover what happens when components such as horns, fans, motors, recording chips, motion and infrared sensors are inserted into simple circuits. They will be delighted when their engineering produces silly circuits that buzz, beep, sing, and fly!

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Rebecca Sticha
    Add

    Kids are curious about electricity- the magic that powers the toys, games, and electronics they love. In this workshop, kids will experiment with aspects of electricity- conductors, batteries, and circuits- to take the mystery out of electricity and inspire future engineers. Kids will discover basic electrical engineering using batteries and circuits with components such as resistors, capacitors, switches, LEDs, and small lamps. Students will learn about parallel and series circuits and experiment with resistance using Snap Circuits kits. Students will learn how to wire and power lights, a fan motor, and a speaker.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Anne Taranto
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    In this introductory high school English workshop, students will be introduced to the concepts of literary genres and analytical writing. Each quarter, the class will examine one select work or genre. Students will learn to recognize figurative language, tone, subtext and diction, identify symbolism and imagery, and develop an awareness of narrative perspective and of the social-historical contexts in which these works were created. First quarter will feature The Novel: Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Sallinger.


    Composition: Students will also learn the fundamental components of academic writing, including how to construct a thesis statement that makes an argument, how to support their ideas effectively with textual evidence, how to organize an argument logically, and how to cite sources in MLA format. Some class periods will be dedicated Writing Lab session in which students write in-class in order to get on-the-spot support and feedback from the teacher. Students should bring laptops to these class sessions.


    Topics in this Series: The Novel (Quarter 1), Poetry (Quarter 2), The Play (Quarter 3), and The Epic (Quarter 4). Students who continue from one quarter to the next will receive priority registration.


    Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at grade level, and it is recommended that students have had a middle school writing class.


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.


    Assignments: All assignments will be posted in a Google Classroom management site. Students will need their own gmail accounts to access Google Classroom.


    Assessments: Students' written assignments will be graded using a rubric and assigned points that the homeschool parent can use when assigning an overall class grade.


    Textbook/Materials: Because students will need clean, inexpensive copies of each novel to mark in, and they must be able to refer to the passages on the same page numbers, copies of mass market paperbacks will be pre-purchased and bundled for students. (See Supply Fee below).


    Supply Fee: A class fee of $15.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for the select novel.


    What to Bring: Students should bring the current novel, paper, pen or pencil and highlighter to class each week. Some students may wish to bring paper clips, adhesive flags or post-it notes for marking passages/pages.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a partial credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Melissa Schaaf
    Add

    Would you know what to do if you cut yourself in the kitchen? What if a friend had an anaphylactic reaction to a food or your grandparent suddenly collapsed? Whether you play outdoors, participate in sports, go to the pool, cook at home, supervise siblings, or just hang out with friends, you should know what to do when an emergency arises! First Aid and CPR are the practical life skills you hope you don't have to use, but are thankful for if you do. Earn four American Heart Association certifications in one course in preparation for working as a camp aide, babysitter, assistant coach, counselor-in-training, or part time employee. <br> This workshop will be taught in two half-day workshops by a certified AHA instructor. Topics include: First Aid and Choking Relief; Adult CPR, AED (automatic external defibrillators), and Child/Infant CPR. The course will use the AHA pediatric first aid curriculum which also emphasizes safety and prevention of accidents and injury, particularly in young children. Key topics include: lacerations/bleeding, broken bones, burns, allergic reactions, breathing problems, heat-related complications, cold-related injuries, bites/stings, fainting/unconsciousness, use of AEDs, chest compressions, rescue breathing, and more. Students will have hands-on practice with many skills and will have to demonstrate competency at certain steps to be "signed off" on learned skills. <br> At the end of the course, students will be certified in First Aid, Adult CPR, Child CPR, and Infant CPR. The certifications will be good for two years, and students will be able to print out their certifications for coaches, employers, scout leaders, or their own records from an online AHA portal. This workshop has two class meetings: Monday, June 10 and Tuesday, June 11 from 10:00 am - 1:00 pm. Students must attend both class meetings in order to earn the certifications. Students registered in the course will receive a 185 page, full color textbook from the AHA, their own face shield for rescue breathing, and have their AHA registration fees covered. <br> This course is recommended for students ages 14+. At a minimum, students must be 5 feet tall and weigh at least 100 pounds to be able to properly perform chest compressions.  

    2
    Edwige Pinover
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Bonjour and get ready for a full year of beginner level high school French! This is a conversation-focused program in which students will build their vocabulary quickly and learn essential grammar skills in French. Vocabulary will include numbers, time, dates, seasons, school, free time activities/hobbies, likes/dislikes, personal descriptions, family relationships, emotions, food/restaurants, and places/locations in town. There will be a strong emphasis on competency using regular and irregular present tense verbs and common grammar concepts such as articles, pronouns, adjectives, and comparative phrases.


    Class will be conducted primarily in French and will focus on listening and speaking skills, asking and answering questions, and correct use of grammar. At home, students will be responsible for memorizing vocabulary and grammar, completing homework assignments, and watching both grammar instruction and language immersion videos.


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 30-45 minutes per day, 4 days per week on homework outside of class.


    Assignments: Are sent by e-mail to parents and students. Students must have access to a computer and internet service for computer-based videos and practice tools that are assigned as homework and are essential to success in the class.


    Assessments: Quizzes, tests, and individual performance reviews will be given to all students at regular intervals to provide parents with sufficient feedback to assign a grade.


    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Bien Dit!: Student Edition Level 1 2013 (French Edition) (ISBN-13 978-0547871790)


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Foreign Language for purposes of a high school transcript.


    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Judith Harmon
    Add

    Learn to use your sewing machine this summer! Discover the wide world of unique creations you can sew with this essential tool: clothing, costumes, alterations, decorative items, accessories, gifts, toys, and more. This workshop is designed to demystify your sewing machine and get you started. Learn to thread your machine, understand the basic functions, adjust tension, and select and practice stitches through guided sewing activities. Each participant must bring a sewing machine with power cord, foot pedal, and at least one bobbin. Participants must provide the model number of their sewing machines prior to the start of the workshop. This enables the instructor to find practice handouts specific to each machine, otherwise they will receive a generic handout.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
    Add

    Learn to use your sewing machine this summer! Discover the wide world of unique creations you can sew with this essential tool: clothing, costumes, alterations, decorative items, accessories, gifts, toys, and more. This workshop is designed to demystify your sewing machine and get you started. Learn to thread your machine, understand the basic functions, adjust tension, and select and practice stitches through guided sewing activities. Each participant must bring a sewing machine with power cord, foot pedal, and at least one bobbin. Participants must provide the model number of their sewing machines prior to the start of the workshop. This enables the instructor to find practice handouts specific to each machine, otherwise they will receive a generic handout.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Ney Mello
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Learn the fundamentals of playing the guitar! In this class, students will learn basic melodies such as Happy Birthday, Jingle Bells, Twinkle Twinkle Little Star, as well as classic rock favorites like Smoke on the Water, etc. Kids will learn to play chords and strumming patterns for familiar songs chosen by the instructor and students. Students are encouraged to bring in music they are interested in learning. New chords and new songs will be added each week as students also learn to read music and basic music theory. Students will also learn how to hold, tune, and care for their guitars. Each student will need a least a beginner level acoustic guitar. Students should be able to read at grade level for this class and should plan to practice at home several times each week. Students should expect to spend 20-30 minutes per day most days practicing chords and melodies from class. There is a materials fee of $8.00 payable to the Compass on the first day of class for a tablature notebook.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Jessica Eastridge
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Teens will enjoy the camaraderie and cooperation of making music with others in an instrument ensemble! This ensemble is for beginner and advanced beginner musicians of brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments.

    Ensemble percussion students will learn to play the snare drum and mallet instruments (such as glockenspiel and xylophone). They will learn proper stick and mallet grip, posture, and playing position for concert percussion instrumentals.

    Ensemble woodwinds students will learn to play the flute, clarinet, or alto saxophone. They will learn how to hold their instruments with proper posture and hand position and correct embouchure (mouth position and blowing technique) for the instrument. Students will receive instruction on the parts of their instruments and how to safely, correctly, and independently assemble and clean them.

    Ensemble brass students will learn to play the trumpet, trombone, euphonium, French horn, or tuba. They will learn how to hold their instruments with proper posture and hand position and correct embouchure (mouth position and blowing technique) for the instrument. Students will receive instruction on the parts of their instruments and how to safely, correctly, and independently assemble and clean them.

    All students will learn the fundamentals of music reading, and the group will practice short songs in Concert B-flat and Concert E-flat major (and their relative minors). They will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing instruments cooperatively and independently.

    Students will need to rent or purchase an instrument and accessories for the band. See the linked list by instrument. Mark your calendar for an Instrument Test Drive event on Tuesday, May 7 from 1:00 pm- 3:00 pm at Compass. Representatives from a local store, Music & Arts, will be on hand with instruments for students to try. They will explain rental and purchase options to parents and will sell some of the supplies that students will need. Students who enrolled in one clinic (percussion, woodwinds, or brass) during early registration may switch clinics if they change their minds about their preferred instrument after the test drive event.

    There is a $33.00 supply fee due payable to Compass on/before the start of class for the "Do It! Play (a Band Instrument)" book and workbook and the sheet music songs used for the ensemble.>

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Angela Goodhart
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Reflections on a rainy day, a sheepish sister smirking, a white-washed winter wonderland- all captured in dynamic digital images. Learn the art, craft, and history of photography for hobby, home, or as a possible profession.


    Students will learn about observation, perspective, and choosing their subjects. They will discuss the exposure triangle and elements of photographic composition, including lighting and exposure. The class will review different genres of photography such as portraiture, nature, sports, black and white, etc., and discuss finding their own "voice" in their photographs.


    Students will expand on photography fundamentals with an exploration of three special topics: nature photography, portraiture, and black and white photography. For each unit, teen photographers will learn techniques and camera settings that highlight the genre. First, students will have fun taking pictures of friends and family. They will learn how to capture natural expressions and record unique personalities when photographing people. They will be introduced to the lighting, posing, and composition for creating studio and lifestyle portraiture. Students will practice as both photographers and the models.


    In the spring, students will take advantage of the buds and blooms to learn to photograph natural subjects. Students will practice seeing the world around them including details, macro-observations, close-range subjects, and elements of composition. They will learn to do isolation studies using natural light to photograph objects and plants in their environment. The class will discuss and practice techniques for landscapes, seasons, weather, water, reflections, and animals in nature and captivity.


    Finally, students will learn how to make beautiful black and white images and what elements to look for to make a stunning monochromatic composition.


    Each week, class time will be split among the review of photographic examples including works by noteworthy photographers, discussion of techniques and camera settings, and hands-on, outdoor photography exercises. The instructor will also teach photo-editing with a free web-based software


    For this class, students will be required to prepare two projects: a presentation on a photographer of their choice and a special photography showcasing their favorite photographs from the semester. On the last day, there will be an art show for the parents.


    Prerequisites: None


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.


    Assignments: In addition to the two projects described, students will have weekly homework taking photographs and occasional quizzes.


    Assessments: Students will receive ongoing, informal assessments and feedback on their photographs.


    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $20.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.


    What to Bring: Students are encouraged to bring digital SLR cameras, but any digital camera that is better than a phone camera will be adequate.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Rebecca Sticha
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    Students will use LEGO to design and build simple engineering projects out of everyone's favorite building toy! Students will explore concepts and vocabulary in physics, mechanical engineering, structural engineering, aerospace engineering, and architecture while playing with their creations. In this workshop, students will explore marine and nautical engineering with projects such as an airboat, a catamaran, a ferry, and a lighthouse. Each session begins with 10-minutes of free build from tubs of LEGO components followed by a short discussion and demonstration of the day's project and concepts. Students build individually or in groups. Instructors will provide individual assistance, facilitate challenges, performance testing, competitions, and modifications to projects. Notes: (1) Students must be minimum age 5, fable to follow directions, and be able to separate from their parents for this workshop. (2) Projects are built from shared, Instructor-owned components, so students will not bring completed projects home. Parents, however, can drop in 15 minutes before the end of each session to photograph their child's construction.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Rebecca Sticha
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    Students will use LEGO to design and build simple engineering projects out of everyone's favorite building toy! Students will explore concepts and vocabulary in physics, mechanical engineering, structural engineering, aerospace engineering, and architecture while playing with their creations. In this workshop, students will look at extraordinary engineering in cities and towns with projects such as a skyscraper, house, suspension bridge, and a rail system. Each session begins with 10-minutes of free build from tubs of LEGO components followed by a short discussion and demonstration of the day's project and concepts. Students build individually or in groups. Instructors will provide individual assistance, facilitate challenges, performance testing, competitions, and modifications to projects. Notes: (1) Students must be minimum age 5, be able to follow directions, and be able to separate from their parents for this workshop. (2) Projects are built from shared, Instructor-owned components, so students will not bring completed projects home. Parents, however, can drop in 15 minutes before the end of each session to photograph their child's construction.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Kerry Diederich
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    This workshop is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art or artist, view sample works, and then will create a projects in the style of the artist using a wide variety of materials and representative colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, chalk, fabric, and watercolor paints.


    In this session, Junior Artists will explore multi-media compositions. They will create abstract alphabet art, create a summer rainstorm with paint, tissue paper, and glue, and they will experiment with painting rocks. There is a $10.00 supply fee payable to the instructor on or before the start of the program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Becca Sticha
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    LEGO Robotics Training Team is a semester-long "boot camp" and training ground for future FIRST LEGO League (FLL) competitors. The Training Team allows Compass students to work through a complete FLL challenge to ensure that they understand the project and enjoy the process before joining a competition team. Training Team students are sub-divided into smaller teams that compete against each other in building and coding challenges at a more relaxed pace than FLL competition teams which may require 6-10+ hours per week.



    Compass Training Team members will complete a full FLL challenge from a previous year. They will learn 21st century skills in robotics and programming while enjoying the camaraderie of working as a team to solve challenges. Kids will gain confidence and build skills in leadership and communication. The Training Team members will compete in-house against each other, but will not participate in a regional competition in 2024-25.



    FIRST LEGO League (FLL) is an accessible, guided, beginners' robotics program that encourages teamwork, discovery, innovation, and problem-solving. The FLL competition is comprised of three components: the Robot Game, an Innovation Project, and Core Values. The Robot Game is an annual theme-based challenge that encourages kids to think of technology solutions to real-world problems. Teams design and program an autonomous robot that scores points on a themed table-top playing field. Past challenges have been inspired by environment, transportation, accessibility, and exploration. FLL team members engage in brainstorming, research, design, and coding while practicing the engineering design process of building, testing, re-building, re-testing, etc. Students will work with LEGO Mindstorms EV3 robotics components and use drag-and-drop coding blocks to program their robots on laptop computers. No robotics or programming experience is necessary to join the Training Team, but it is beneficial if students have experience building with LEGO Technics components (beams, gears, and axel pins rather than bricks with studs).



    FLL members have fun with friends, encourage and support each other, and learn the art of gracious competition. In addition to the robot challenge, FLL team members compete in short, on-the-spot challenge problems in the Innovation Project phase of the competitions. FLL is also known for its philosophies of "professionalism" and "cooperation" which are expressed in the organization's Core Values of discovery, innovation, impact, inclusion, teamwork, and fun. Teams are also judged on how well they promote and exhibit these core values.


    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Taliesin Knol
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    This class will use an interactive role-playing game (RPG) to immerse students in Medieval History. Students will be assigned land and titles to create a mock feudal system in which students collaborate and compete with classmates to better understand medieval society. By chance or choice, will they amass armies, capture castles, take titles, and repel rivals, or fail and fade into the pages of history?


    First semester begins in 1066 with the last successful occupation of Britain, the Norman Conquest by William, Duke of Normandy following the Battle of Hastings. The class will examine the history of Normandy and how the conquest eliminated the existing Saxon nobility. Students will learn how the Normans were able to maintain control of the countryside with a comparatively small occupying force, using control of language, law, and lethal force. In addition, the class will study the resistance, both the real forces and the legends the resistance inspired in the English people. Students will evaluate the history of earlier resistance by the British peoples and compare how previous conquests affected their culture.


    Students will examine case studies taken from primary source documents in art and literature to learn how warfare, architecture, politics, law, and religion interplay to create the history of the world. Students will complete a semester project on the Bayeux Tapestry. They will build on this base of knowledge to continue the study of English history in future semesters.


    In this semester's RPG, all students are Normans and assigned a medieval English county and awarded the title of title of "count" or "countess." Students will develop their own coat of arms in the unit on heraldry. Each begins with similar wealth, populations, knights, and land, and waits to see how their fates unfold each week in a custom game described as a complicated, semester-long game of Risk or Medieval Axis & Allies.


    Topics in this Series: Rise of Norman Power (Semester 1), Crusades and Conquests (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.


    Prerequisites: None


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class on readings.


    Assignments: Reading assignments will be assigned in class and noted in the weekly e-mail.


    Assessments: Short, open note in-class quizzes will be given, and students will have a semester project.


    What to Bring: Paper or notebook; pen or pencil; assigned articles.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in world history for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Rebecca Sticha
    Add

    Student sleuths will tackle a variety of puzzles, games, and riddles while learning about ciphers and code-breaking. Hands-on activities will incorporate cards, dice, coins, cubes, toothpicks, and of course, lots of numbers. Students will discover the intriguing world of cryptology- the science of secret writing which uses math and reasoning to create and decode mystery alphabets.


    For each new puzzle, game, and riddle, students will learn concepts and strategies that they can apply to solving ANY math challenge, such as the phases of solving a problem, what to do when you get stuck, how to make predictions, how to generalize from specific cases, and how to test different outcomes. The workshop will culminate in a collaboration to solve puzzles and crack codes to flee the classroom Escape Room with challenges such as coded letters, picture clues, mirror image writings, invisible ink, puzzling word searches, and cryptograms.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Rebecca Sticha
    Add

    Student sleuths will tackle a variety of puzzles, games, and riddles while learning about ciphers and code-breaking. Hands-on activities will incorporate cards, dice, coins, cubes, toothpicks, and of course, lots of numbers. Students will discover the intriguing world of cryptology- the science of secret writing which uses math and reasoning to create and decode mystery alphabets.


    For each new puzzle, game, and riddle, students will learn concepts and strategies that they can apply to solving ANY math challenge, such as the phases of solving a problem, what to do when you get stuck, how to make predictions, how to generalize from specific cases, and how to test different outcomes. The workshop will culminate in a collaboration to solve puzzles and crack codes to flee the classroom Escape Room with challenges such as coded letters, picture clues, mirror image writings, invisible ink, puzzling word searches, and cryptograms.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mylene Nyman
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Mindful Mosaics is run as a studio art class where students create unique compositions and work at their own pace under the guidance of an experienced mosaic artist. Each quarter, students are taught new design, cutting, layout, and finishing techniques and are introduced to new mosaic materials which they can incorporate into inspired, original pieces. The instructor can suggest possible themes for projects based on the featured materials, but most students work on individual projects that reflect their own interests, hobbies, or decor.


    Students who are new to mosaics will complete a quick checkerboard project (complete with wooden checkers) to teach pattern, layout, and lines before starting an individual projects. For each project, students will choose from a variety of substrates- rectangular, square, shaped, or circular backboards (typically first-year students), or special forms or 3D objects (experienced students). Each project will expand a student's understanding of color, pattern, rhythm, texture, and spacing as they complete rich, dimensioned compositions. Students will be able to incorporate other glass, ceramic, and porcelain tiles into their projects and may select feature elements such as beautiful glass gems, millefiori, sliced stone, metallic ornaments, mirrored bits, or shells, to serve as focal points in their mosaic piece. The mosaic can be monochromatic, complimentary, or contrasting colors. A broad pallet of colors is always available, and new colors are added each quarter to reflect the season.


    Students will develop a skillset for mosaic artistry over multiple quarters or years. As each student demonstrates mastery of basic skills, safety, and artistic expression, that student will be taught advanced techniques, materials, tools, composition, and color theory. A typical progression in mosaics is: (1) Whole tiles in symmetric design on a flat, rectangular substrate with emphasis on proper spacing and adhesion; (2) Tile cut with nippers in themed design and individual color choices on a flat wood substrate; (3) Sheet glass cut with pistol grip, breaking, and/or running pliers with emphasis on composition, color, and design on a flat or curved substrate; (4) Progress to 3D substrate and advanced adhesives; (5) Learn porcelain and ceramic cutting, special adhesives, and advanced design.


    Note:There is no prerequisite for this class. The number of projects completed each quarter depends on the student's work speed and attendance in class. Compass parents are welcome to register for the class to work alongside their teens, or to work on their own, while their teen is in another Compass class.


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.



    Assessments: will not be given.



    Materials Fees: All material fees are due payable to the instructor on or before the first day of class by cash, check or electronic payment. Materials used vary depending on a student's experience with mosaic.


    Beginner Material Fee: $40.00 for a selection of Beginner Materials, including:


  • vitreous glass, ceramic, mini, eco recycled glass, beach glass, glitter glass, glass gems, ceramic pebble, shells, metallic crystal, subway glass
  • Adhesive: weld bond
  • Grout: bone or charcoal color
  • Cutters: wheeled tile nippers
  • Substrate: 2D/Flat 12" x 12",10" x 10", 8" X 8", 4" X 4", framed mirrors, ornament shapes


  • Advanced Material Fee: $50.00 for a selection of Advanced Materials including:


  • All Beginner Materials plus, iridized glass, cathedral sheet glass, opaque sheet glass, color fusion, millefiori, Van Gogh glass, natural stone and minerals, special effects glass, water glass, colored mirror, illumination glass, china plates, rhinestone, ball chain
  • Adhesives: weld bond, thin-set mortar, silicone
  • Grout: Custom colors (purple, rose, green, blue, earth, orange)
  • Cutters: wheeled tile nippers, porcelain hand tool, hand file, pistol grip, beetle bits cutting system
  • Substrates: All flat shapes plus, 3D forms (egg, sphere, cone, pyramid, etc.), cut out sentiments, trays, glass bottle, mini sleds, flower pot, picture frame, sun catcher.
  • Additional Fee: There may be additional fees for premium materials such as tesserae (by request and consultation with instructor), mother of pearl, 24 kt gold tiles (market rate), or specially cut substrates.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Iman Castaneda
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    Mixed martial arts is a fun physical fitness workshop for tweens that blends the Brazilian self-defense martial art of Jiu-Jitsu and Muay Thai, a combat boxing-like sport from Thailand. An experienced coach, black belt, and practitioner of mixed martial arts will lead a well-rounded physical fitness program that incorporates moves and strategies from both sports to increase strength, flexibility, conditioning, endurance, coordination, and balance. Jiu-Jitsu uses grappling and ground work, while Muay Thai introduces standing strikes with fists, elbows, knees, and shins. The latter emphasizes distance and being in or out of an opponent's range with the legs and feet being used to kick and maintain distance. Mixed Martial Arts helps tweens stay active, builds self-esteem, and encourages teamwork. Students will practice techniques for resolving conflicts, dealing with bullies, projecting confidence, and developing stranger awareness in the games and exercises they complete in class. Some partner work may be co-ed. Students must be a minimum of age 10 to enroll. Students will work on mats in socks or bare feet and should come to class wearing loose, comfortable clothing, such as running pants or sweatpants and bring a refillable water bottle.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sevim Kalyoncu
    Add

    Experience the excitement of summer! Watch as the forest matures each week with fulls leaves, flowers, nests, and the stream bursting with life. It is the time for harvesting wild edibles, searching for animal tracks, identifying birds, and relishing the sights and smells of wildflowers and warm summer days. Step outdoors to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Students will take short hikes and play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 6 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class. This is a 4-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sevim Kalyoncu
    Add

    Experience the excitement of summer! Watch as the forest matures each week with fulls leaves, flowers, nests, and the stream bursting with life. It is the time for harvesting wild edibles, searching for animal tracks, identifying birds, and relishing the sights and smells of wildflowers and warm summer days. Step outdoors to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Students will take short hikes and play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 6 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class. This is a 4-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
    Add

    Percy Jackson enthusiasts will embark on a mythical crafting adventure that will transport them to Camp Half-Blood right here in Herndon (no need to travel to Long Island!) Middle school-aged half-bloods and demi-gods will learn a variety of crafting techniques and connect with other fans of Percy Jackon as they create magical projects inspired by their favorite Rick Riordan adventures. Create your own Camp Half-Blood t-shirt, Wings of Hermes for your shoes, lightening in a bottle, and more as you discuss the adventures of the Olympians and explore key themes in mythology while exercising your imagination and unleashing your creativity. A supply fee of $50.00 is due payable to the instructor on or before the first day of class. This is a 3-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Manal Hussein
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    This is a place-holder for the Physics lecture. Students should register for the Physics Lab, which will automatically enroll them in both class sections. A physical meeting room will be designated for on-campus students who have classes immediately before or after this virtual session.

    Prerequisites: Algebra II

    1
    David Chelf
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    This is a complete course in high school PreCalculus which will cover fundamental concepts and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. Topics in Precalculus include functions: polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric (right angle and unit circle). In addition, the course will cover polar coordinates, parametric equations, analytic trigonometry, vectors, systems of equations/inequalities, conic sections, sequences, and series. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem solving.

    Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry in order to take this class.


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-1.5 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 7-day cycle, with assignments posted on Thursdays and due the following Thursday. Students are advised to start homework once it is assigned (i.e., not wait until the night before it is due). Weekly homework assignments will be of a length that a student should be able to complete them in two or three at-home work sessions. Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of their work.


    Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.


    Assessments: Student progress will be assessed by: (1) The instructor checking that weekly homework sets are attempted and complete and (2) detailed grading of periodic take-home tests. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. See the instructor's webpage for detailed homework and test policy, including late work and re-work.


    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Precalculus: Mathematics for Calculus, 6th edition by Stewart, Redlin, and Watson (ISBN-10 0840068077, ISBN-13 978-0840068071). A scientific calculator similar to the Casio fx-115ES PLUS is required for this class.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Precalculus for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Jen Hallworth
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Preparation for Pre-Algebra is a year-long curriculum that will teach the fundamentals a student must master before embarking pre-algebra, algebra, and beyond. The class will review arithmetic skills, operations, and number theory. Key topics include fractions, rates, ratios, decimals, and percentages. Students will learn the computational operations of adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing fractions and decimals. They will learn what decimals stand for, how they relate to fractions, and how to convert between the two. They will discover how rates and ratios are also fractions. Students will learn how to work with negative numbers including strategies for completing all four common operations with negative numbers. The class will also cover exponents and orders of magnitude to make sense of really small and really big numbers and common operations.



    This class will also emphasize real world applications of the mathematical concepts through word problems so students become comfortable switching between prose (written descriptions) and mathematical representation (numbers, symbols) of real world examples such as money, mileage, weights, percentages, and scientific measures.



    Prerequisites: This course can be considered a pre-pre-algebra class that will teach the core concepts typically covered in later elementary school/early middle school after a general arithmetic curriculum and before pre-algebra. While different curriculums and student pacing will vary, this class would be appropriate for a student who has successfully covered long division, multiplication of multiple digit numbers, and an introduction to simple fractions and who has complete mastery of multiplication facts, skills often aligned with 5th grade mathematics.



    Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class to complete practice problems, homework, and assessments.



    Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.



    Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by: checking that weekly homework sets are complete; spot-checking the full solution 1-2 select problems in class each week, and giving quarterly take-home tests. Points will also be awarded for class participation. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade.



    Textbook: Students should purchase the two class texts: "The Complete Book of Math, Grades 5-6" (ISBN# 978-1561896776) and "EP Math 5/6 Workbook" (ISBN# 979-8643323693).

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Catherine Vanlandingham
    Add

    Reading and writing affect a student's achievement in all aspects of schoolwork, so strong language arts skills are fundamental to success in homeschooling. This weekly class is a small group of 3-6 students who read and write at a similar level. Students follow a comprehensive language arts curriculum under the guidance of an experienced reading specialist. Each Monday class meeting will include a short story with select vocabulary words, a graphic organizer, main themes, and embedded learning objectives. Students will continue to practice language arts skills at home with easy-to-implement "page a day" workbook activities assigned by the instructor and implemented by the parents. For most early elementary learners, enrollment in Reading Rally can serve as a complete, self-contained language arts curriculum where families will not need additional resources in reading, comprehension, composition, spelling, and grammar.


    Weekly readings are organized around thematic units. The instructor will teach students how to approach a new story as a fun reading puzzle. For example, before reading aloud in class, students will conduct a "picture walk" to overview and predict elements of the story from the illustrations, review a graphic organizer to assist in writing sentences, define vocabulary words, and preview summary questions. Then, the instructor will read the story aloud, model good reading practices, and encourage students to read. Students will only be asked to read aloud when they feel comfortable and have built trust in their group. All follow-up activities are designed around learning objectives such as decoding, comprehension, prediction, visualization, and verbalization.


    READINESS: As a comprehensive language arts curriculum, a student must be at a similar grade level ability in reading, comprehension, and writing. Early readers who have not learned to write, for example, or emerging readers who struggle with comprehenion, may not be a good fit for this class. In addition, students must have the hand-eye coordination and basic handwriting skills to be able to copy the instructor's many notes, examples, and definitions from the classroom white board into their own notebook.


    Grade level references in Reading Rally are based on scope, sequence and pacing that correlate to the Grade Level Equivalent (GLE) standards of learning. Students who are more than one year behind in GLE in language arts or who have a difference in skill level between their reading and writing may be recommended for a second, weekly class meeting on Fridays or 1-on-1 private instruction to make up ground in reading or writing skills. Additional class meetings or private instruction will be an additional cost.


    ATTENTION! Parents should not register for a Reading Rally class until they have had a Language Arts Skills Inventory (i.e. brief assessment) and placement determination by the reading specialist. This must be scheduled separately through Compass at a cost of $125.00. The fee is due prior to the assessment and is not refundable in the event the child is not recommended for a reading group. The instructor has experience working with reluctant and fearful readers, those who are late bloomers, neurodivergent, dyslexic, and ESOL students. However, she might recommend a more complete evaluation by another professional if she suspects other learning differences are impacting the student's langauge arts learning.


    Students will work from a spiral bound copy of reading textbook and workbook by Pearson. A class fee of $XX.00 is due payable to Compass for the required books.


    Students continuing from one semester to the next will receive priority registration to remain with their reading group.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Catherine Vanlandingham
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Reading and writing affect a student's achievement in all aspects of schoolwork, so strong language arts skills are fundamental to success in homeschooling. This weekly class is a small group of 3-6 students who read and write at a similar level. Students follow a comprehensive language arts curriculum under the guidance of an experienced reading specialist. Each Monday class meeting will include a short story with select vocabulary words, a graphic organizer, main themes, and embedded learning objectives. Students will continue to practice language arts skills at home with easy-to-implement "page a day" workbook activities assigned by the instructor and implemented by the parents. For most early elementary learners, enrollment in Reading Rally can serve as a complete, self-contained language arts curriculum where families will not need additional resources in reading, comprehension, composition, spelling, and grammar.


    Weekly readings are organized around thematic units. The instructor will teach students how to approach a new story as a fun reading puzzle. For example, before reading aloud in class, students will conduct a "picture walk" to overview and predict elements of the story from the illustrations, review a graphic organizer to assist in writing sentences, define vocabulary words, and preview summary questions. Then, the instructor will read the story aloud, model good reading practices, and encourage students to read. Students will only be asked to read aloud when they feel comfortable and have built trust in their group. All follow-up activities are designed around learning objectives such as decoding, comprehension, prediction, visualization, and verbalization.


    READINESS: As a comprehensive language arts curriculum, a student must be at a similar grade level ability in reading, comprehension, and writing. Early readers who have not learned to write, for example, or emerging readers who struggle with comprehenion, may not be a good fit for this class. In addition, students must have the hand-eye coordination and basic handwriting skills to be able to copy the instructor's many notes, examples, and definitions from the classroom white board into their own notebook.


    Grade level references in Reading Rally are based on scope, sequence and pacing that correlate to the Grade Level Equivalent (GLE) standards of learning. Students who are more than one year behind in GLE in language arts or who have a difference in skill level between their reading and writing may be recommended for a second, weekly class meeting on Fridays or 1-on-1 private instruction to make up ground in reading or writing skills. Additional class meetings or private instruction will be an additional cost.


    ATTENTION! Parents should not register for a Reading Rally class until they have had a Language Arts Skills Inventory (i.e. brief assessment) and placement determination by the reading specialist. This must be scheduled separately through Compass at a cost of $125.00. The fee is due prior to the assessment and is not refundable in the event the child is not recommended for a reading group. The instructor has experience working with reluctant and fearful readers, those who are late bloomers, neurodivergent, dyslexic, and ESOL students. However, she might recommend a more complete evaluation by another professional if she suspects other learning differences are impacting the student's langauge arts learning.


    Students will work from a spiral bound copy of reading textbook and workbook by Pearson. A class fee of $72.00 is due payable to Compass for the required books.


    Students continuing from one semester to the next will receive priority registration to remain with their reading group.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Catherine Vanlandingham
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Reading and writing affect a student's achievement in all aspects of schoolwork, so strong language arts skills are fundamental to success in homeschooling. This weekly class is a small group of 3-6 students who read and write at a similar level. Students follow a comprehensive language arts curriculum under the guidance of an experienced reading specialist. Each Monday class meeting will include a short story with select vocabulary words, a graphic organizer, main themes, and embedded learning objectives. Students will continue to practice language arts skills at home with easy-to-implement "page a day" workbook activities assigned by the instructor and implemented by the parents. For most early elementary learners, enrollment in Reading Rally can serve as a complete, self-contained language arts curriculum where families will not need additional resources in reading, comprehension, composition, spelling, and grammar.


    Weekly readings are organized around thematic units. The instructor will teach students how to approach a new story as a fun reading puzzle. For example, before reading aloud in class, students will conduct a "picture walk" to overview and predict elements of the story from the illustrations, review a graphic organizer to assist in writing sentences, define vocabulary words, and preview summary questions. Then, the instructor will read the story aloud, model good reading practices, and encourage students to read. Students will only be asked to read aloud when they feel comfortable and have built trust in their group. All follow-up activities are designed around learning objectives such as decoding, comprehension, prediction, visualization, and verbalization.


    READINESS: As a comprehensive language arts curriculum, a student must be at a similar grade level ability in reading, comprehension, and writing. Early readers who have not learned to write, for example, or emerging readers who struggle with comprehenion, may not be a good fit for this class. In addition, students must have the hand-eye coordination and basic handwriting skills to be able to copy the instructor's many notes, examples, and definitions from the classroom white board into their own notebook.


    Grade level references in Reading Rally are based on scope, sequence and pacing that correlate to the Grade Level Equivalent (GLE) standards of learning. Students who are more than one year behind in GLE in language arts or who have a difference in skill level between their reading and writing may be recommended for a second, weekly class meeting on Fridays or 1-on-1 private instruction to make up ground in reading or writing skills. Additional class meetings or private instruction will be an additional cost.


    ATTENTION! Parents should not register for a Reading Rally class until they have had a Language Arts Skills Inventory (i.e. brief assessment) and placement determination by the reading specialist. This must be scheduled separately through Compass at a cost of $125.00. The fee is due prior to the assessment and is not refundable in the event the child is not recommended for a reading group. The instructor has experience working with reluctant and fearful readers, those who are late bloomers, neurodivergent, dyslexic, and ESOL students. However, she might recommend a more complete evaluation by another professional if she suspects other learning differences are impacting the student's langauge arts learning.


    Students will work from a spiral bound copy of reading textbook and workbook by Pearson. A class fee of $XX.00 is due payable to Compass for the required books.


    Students continuing from one semester to the next will receive priority registration to remain with their reading group.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    David Chelf
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    This is a semi-private section for students with permission of Compass and the Instructor.

    This is continuing course in high school Algebra I and introduction to Geometry covering concepts in mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. This course is designed to continue the study of algebraic problem-solving with the incorporation of real-world applications. Part 1 topics in Algebra I will be reviewed such as number systems, linear systems, rational numbers, complex numbers, exponents, roots, and radicals. Algebra I, Part 2 topics including quadratic equations, polynomials, factoring, absolute values, ratios, and proportions will be covered first semester. The course will review and expand on solving and graphing systems of functions, linear equations, and inequalities.


    Second semester, students will begin an introduction to Geometry covering lines, angles, congruence, concurrence, inequalities, parallel lines, quadrilaterals, transformations, area, similarity, right triangles, circles, regular polygons, and geometric solids. Geometric proofs will not be included. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem-solving.


    Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation in pre-algebra and Algebra I, part 1 in order to take this class.


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-1.5 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 7-day cycle, with assignments posted on Thursdays and due the following Thursday. Students are advised to start homework once it is assigned (i.e., not wait until the night before it is due). Weekly homework assignments will be of a length that a student should be able to complete them in two or three at-home work sessions. Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of their work.


    Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.


    Assessments: Student progress will be assessed by: (1) The instructor checking that weekly homework sets are attempted and complete and (2) detailed grading of periodic take-home tests. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. See the instructor's webpage for detailed homework and test policy, including late work and re-work.


    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Algebra I: Expressions, Equations, and Applications by Paul A. Foerster. It is available in a few different editions, each of which is virtually identical: 2nd edition (ISBN-10 020125073X, ISBN-13 978-0201250732), 3rd edition (ISBN-10 0201860945, ISBN-13 978-0201860948), and Classic edition (ISBN-10 020132458X, ISBN-13 978-0201324587). It is also available under the title Foerster Algebra I, Classics edition (ISBN-10 0131657089, ISBN-13 978-0131657083). A calculator is not needed for this course.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Algebra I for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Taliesin Knol
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Perhaps you have heard that "knowing is half the battle." This class will realize that as we examine the roles of military intelligence and espionage in conflicts. A fundamental goal of military intelligence is to fight smarter, not harder, on the battlefield. For context and inspiration, the class will examine the history of the real spies of WWI, their methods, failures, and successes.



    This semester will start at the outbreak of the First World War and the grueling trench warfare that saw a years-long stalemate in Europe. Both sides sought every advantage they could get to break the stalemate, setting their spies to the task! Espionage was employed to hide one side's battle plans and steal the enemy's. Sabotage was staged to cripple the enemy's ability to fight before a battle had even started. All around the world, agents sought advantages for their country and exploited weaknesses in their opponents.



    The continuing mission, should students choose to accept it, is to use secret codes and a modified tabletop RPG (role playing game) system to simulate missions, discover the enemy's secret plans, and give an edge to the forces on the battlefield.



    While Compass's 3D History classes will simulate the battles in the field, this class will assume the supporting role by attempting to infiltrate enemy lines with field agents. War Room students in the "headquarters" will direct both their field agents and the missions of the frontline troops in 3D History. The decisions of War Room students on Monday will affect the play of 3D History students on Friday, and outcomes of the 3D History role play on Friday will dictate the work of the War Room the following Monday. While co-registration in both classes is not required, some students may want to dual register in order to see both the tactical and strategic aspects of a major engagement and how military intelligence affects the outcomes. This course is recommended for teens who have a passion for military history or an interest in a future career in intelligence.


    Topics in this Series: World at War (Semester 1) and Winning the War (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hour per week outside of class.


    Assignments: Course documents including period maps, photographs and recreations will be made available through a class Google Drive link emailed to parents and students, as well as a class YouTube playlist for any videos watched in class or assigned as homework.


    Assessments: Will not be given.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in World History, US History, Military History, or Career Exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Iman Castaneda
    Add

    This Women's Self Defense Workshop is for older teen girls and young adult women who are heading to college for the first time, returning to campus, working, driving, or traveling alone. First and foremost, this workshop will teach young women about situational awareness and making safe choices: critical life lessons that they would rather hear from a professional than a parent. Students will work in pairs and small groups to act out mock scenarios, rehearse strategies to get away from an attacker, and practice defensive moves and strikes. The National Center for Education Statistics reports a decline in the overall college crime rates from 2009-2019 due to falling burglary rates, but a steady increase in forcible sex offenses during the same time. If you are not sure self defense is needed or pertinent to your daughter, see the following very concerning campus assault statistics: https://students.umw.edu/counseling/sexual-assault-information/statistics/ This workshop is taught by Iman Casteneda, Compass's homeschool PE and Jiu Jitsu Fit instructor. She earned a black belt in Jiu Jitsu under Royce Gracie, a particularly grueling program that took her more than 10 years to prepare for. She is also personal trainer, Cross-Fit instructor, Muy Thai practitioner, former MMA (mixed martial arts) competitor, former EMT, and survivor of assault. Note: Minimum age: 16. This workshop is also appropriate for young women who have had previous instruction in self defense as a refresher for strategies and techniques. This is a 3-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Students will become immersed in the imaginary worlds they construct in this unique course that encompasses elements of fiction writing, sociology, and anthropology. Worldbuilding is the foundation of speculative fiction, such as sci-fi and fantasy, role-playing games, videos, comics, and other visual media. Countless examples of Worldbuilding exist in the movies and books we consume every day such as Tolkien's Middle Earth, the many elaborate settlements of the Star Wars franchise, and the popular RPG, Dungeons and Dragons.



    In this course, students will develop a fictional locale. Will it be a small village in a known place, a new planet, or an original universe? Students will be guided through an interactive, iterative process of "top-down" design of their unique world, determining broad characteristics first then then elaborating with increasing detail. Builders will make coherent and integrated decisions on geography, climate, ecology, flora, fauna, inhabitants, races, history, social customs, language, religion, origin story, powers/magic, legal system, currency, and technology. The class will read excerpts and watch clips of well-known fictional works which will provide strong examples of each of the elements.



    First semester, the class will create fantasy-inspired worlds. Students, along with their instructor, will develop an in-class world as an example. Students will use the lessons and exercises reviewed in class to further develop their individual world project.



    Students will be expected to keep a notebook of decisions and details as they progress through designing the elements of their world. Students will have the option to purchase a discounted student subscription to World Anvil, a web-based subscription service which allows students to create maps, timelines, and other tools to organize their made-up world. Each student will be expected to make a PowerPoint presentation at the end of the semester which addresses each of the built-world elements.



    Topics in this Series: Fantasy (Semester 1), Science Fiction (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.



    Prerequisites: Reading/writing at grade level.



    Workload: Students should expect to spend 2 hours per week outside of class.



    Assignments: Will be posted in a Google Classroom.



    Assessments: The instructor will assign points for a final semester presentation and completed "Creative Sparks" which are written responses to weekly prompts. Parents may use the student's earned points versus total possible points to calculate a grade for the class.



    Textbook/Materials: Students have the option of purchasing a discounted subscription to World Anvil (worldanvil.com) for approximately $35.00.



    Lab/Supply Fee: Included


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in language arts (creative writing) for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Christina Somerville
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Write to the Point is a comprehensive writing class that will prepare 7th, 8th, and 9th grade students for high school level composition. The class will practice the fundamentals of composition through weekly writing assignments that encompass a variety of writing formats.


    First Semester, students will learn to "get to the point." Just as newspaper journalists have limited column spaceand some essayists have word limits, students will learn to make their point and provide supporting details within the criteria of their writing assignment. Students will learn techniques to define their topic, identify their audience, determine their purpose, and back it up with appropriate detail. The class will practice effective paragraph structure with openings statements, main point (or thesis), supporting details, closing sentences, and linking multiple paragraphs. The class will review writing basics such as grammar, agreement, and tense, and will learn tips for effective revision, editing, and feedback. Students will have the flexibility to select prompts and topics relevant to their own interests and will practice a variety of shorter writing styles such as paragraphs and articles.


    Part of each in-class session will be dedicated to sharing and review of writing completed at home. Sometimes, students will be paired with classmates for peer review of grammar; other times, the class will collaborate through shared GoogleDocs for review and feedback of others' writing. Students should bring a laptop and charging cord to class each week for accessing in-progress assignments.


    Topics in this series include: Paragraphs & Articles (Semester 1) and Essays & Short Stories (Semester 2).

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Ryan Hughes
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    What are the effects of strength training versus endurance training on performance? What is the difference between aerobic and anaerobic exercise? How do you prevent- or recover from- sports related injuries?


    Questions like these can be answered by a kinesiologist! Kinesiology is the study of human movement which includes aspects of anatomy, physiology, pathology, psychology, sociology, and biomechanics. Kinesiologists look at the effects of exercise to help prevent injury or speed recovery, improve movement and function throughout life, and enhance the quality of life for their patients, clients, or athletes.


    The study of kinesiology can prepare a student for a career in preventive and rehabilitative exercise and wellness programs, such as physical therapy, occupational therapy, athletic training, or sports medicine. Some use kinesiology as the foundation for careers as physicians, nurses, first responders, nutritionists, chiropractors, osteopaths, orthopedists, personal trainers, coaches, and athletic trainers.


    First semester is an introduction to the field of kinesiology including a survey of human anatomy and overview of careers and credentialing in the field. Students will learn about the metrics used to measure progress for fitness, strength, or the rehabilitation of injury. They will learn how to check vital signs and perform the basics of a physical exam for an athlete. Students will perform in-class activities and labs such as a bone lab, strength tests, muscular endurance tests, rehabilitation lab, and practice the emergency care for injuries. Students will make at least one visit to the nearby YCMA gym to practice common exercises, including how to instruct others to do them.


    Note: This course is not a PE class, a health course, or a lab science, but contains elements of each as a career exploration course taught by an adjunct professor of kinesiology and certified athletic trainer.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Jessica Eastridge
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    This program has two in-person meetings each Monday: a 45-minute instrument family sectional at 10:50 am and a 55-minute all-instrument group practice session from 1:00 pm- 1:55 pm. Band students must take both sectional and group together. Registration for a sectional will automatically enroll the student in the group session.

    Enjoy the camaraderie and cooperation of making music with others in a school band! Join the first homeschool concert band in the region at Compass. This band is for beginner and advanced beginner musicians of brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments.


    Students in beginner percussion will learn to play the snare drum and mallet instruments (such as glockenspiel and xylophone). They will learn proper stick and mallet grip, posture, and playing position for concert percussion instrumentals. Students will learn the fundamentals of music reading. The group will practice short songs in Concert B-flat and Concert E-flat major (and their relative minors) on mallet instruments and basic rudiments on snare drum. Students will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing percussion instruments and will play both cooperatively in small ensembles and independently.


    Students in beginner woodwinds will learn to play the flute or clarinet (4th-8th grade) or alto saxophone (7th-8th grade only). They will learn how to hold their instruments with proper posture and hand position and correct embouchure (mouth position and blowing technique) for the instrument. Students will receive instruction on the parts of their instruments and how to safely, correctly, and independently assemble and clean them. Students will learn the fundamentals of music reading, and the group will practice short songs in Concert B-flat and Concert E-flat major (and their relative minors). Students will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing woodwind instruments and will play both cooperatively in small ensembles and independently.


    Students in beginner brass will learn to play the trumpet, trombone, or euphonium (4th-8th grade) and French horn or tuba (7th-8th grade students only). They will learn how to hold their instruments with proper posture and hand position and correct embouchure (mouth position and blowing technique) for the instrument. Students will receive instruction on the parts of their instruments and how to safely, correctly, and independently assemble and clean them. Students will learn the fundamentals of music reading, and the group will practice short songs in Concert B-flat and Concert E-flat major (and their relative minors). Students will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing woodwind instruments and will play both cooperatively in small ensembles and independently.



    Students will need to rent or purchase an instrument and accessories for the band. See the linked list by instrument. Mark your calendar for an Instrument Test Drive event on Tuesday, May 7 from 1:00 pm- 3:00 pm at Compass. Representatives from a local store, Music & Arts, will be on hand with instruments for students to try. They will explain rental and purchase options to parents and will sell some of the supplies that students will need. Students who enrolled in one clinic (percussion, woodwinds, or brass) during early registration may switch clinics if they change their minds about their preferred instrument after the test drive event.

    There is a $33.00 supply fee due payable to Compass on/before the start of class for the "Do It! Play (a Band Instrument)" book and workbook and the sheet music songs used for the group band performance.>

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    JR Bontrager
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Students will learn to think like inventors and designers when creating 3D! 3D design is used not only for modeling and fabricating objects but is also at the heart of many cutting-edge technologies such as AR and VR, video game design, interactive exhibits, and more. 3D printing is used in nearly all industries and design fields today from art to animation, manufacturing to medicine, and engineering to entertainment.


    In this class, students will first learn to use Tinkercard, a 3D modeling software that works in solid forms (like LEGO bricks). Then, students will transition to MeshMixer, a software that creates smooth, curved, organic shapes (like clay). They will learn to think about their design from all angles and how to subtract forms to create holes, voids, and concave features, and add forms to create projections, contours, appendages, and convex details. They will discover the limitations of 3D printing and how to handle overhanging elements or delicate details.


    Students will practice the artistic design process with simple sketches before diving into the software. They will be encouraged to use reference material, whether photos, a model, or even by modifying existing, public domain 3D files. Students will use an iterative printing process in which they print their project, check it for design intent, functionality, or fit, make modifications, and print again. The class will learn how to save and convert between 3D solid object files (.stl) and object files (.obj) and work with metadata fields to protect the intellectual property of their designs.


    To demonstrate the range and capability of 3D-printed designs, favorite student projects include D & D miniatures, cosplay props, Minecraft-designed creations, and beloved characters such as anime, baby Yoda, and Pokemon creatures.


    Second semester, continuing students will progress to more complex assemblies including multiple parts and parts with hinges. Second semester, some students may wish to work with alternative filaments such as TPU (rubber), metal, or magnetized filament. Because of the studio format, new students can enroll second semester.


    The class instructor is a design engineer with 3D Herndon and expert in 3D technologies and other areas of design and invention. A typical class will be structured with 5-10 minutes of lecture or demonstration of a new design skill, followed by 40 minutes of design "studio" time where students can receive trouble-shooting support and design tips from the instructor and have dedicated work time, and 5-10 minutes of sharing time at the end of class. As a studio class, students will work on individual projects at their own pace.


    Topics in this Series: As an open studio for individual projects, students may continue from one semester to the next or enroll mid-year. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.


    Prerequisites: None


    What to Bring:Students will need to bring a laptop to class for design work.


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1+ hours per week outside of class.


    Assignments: Project criteria will be explained in class to students.


    Assessments: Informal, qualitative feedback will be given in class throughout the semester as the student works.


    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $25.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for 3D printing and filament. This provides the student with 800 g of printed product per semester. Students who are prolific designers and print often will be asked to pay an additional $5.00 per 100 g or fraction thereof.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Visual Arts, Technology, or Career Exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Jeff Virchow
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Snappy comebacks, one-liners, sarcasm, exaggeration, irony...and teenagers. These things just go together! Improv gives kids an outlet for fun, creative stories and spontaneous humor. Teens who find amusement in the unexpected and humor in the unpredictable will enjoy improvisational acting!

    First semester, actors will explore the basics of improvisation, story-telling, and stagecraft through activities and exercises that encourage cooperation, communication, and teamwork. With fun, interactive improv games such as "Yes, and.." and "Improved Stories," students will learn how to use short form improv to play off each other to convey character, emotion, situation, setting, and to highlight their scene partners. The variety of improv activities each week will help develop the "group mind" and class dynamic. Small group and partner work will boost teens' confidence and trust in a supportive environment.

    Improvisation is the art of entertaining with connected, unpredictable twists and turns often seen from the great comedians and best live entertainers. Improv students will improve their ability to think on-their-feet, play off each other, and react with spontaneous wit, sarcasm, and irony. Actors' creative thinking and communication skills will be strengthened as they work "outside-of-the-box" and learn to read their audience.

    Improv can be for everyone! No previous experience is needed. Beginners are welcome, and experienced students will further develop their improv skills. If you have taken this class before, go ahead and take it again because no two classes are ever alike. This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, flexible, and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work collaboratively in a group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class.

    Topics in this Series: Innovative Improv (Semester 1), Immersive Improv (Semester 2. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hour per week outside of class.

    Assignments: If any, will be sent to parents and students by e-mail.

    Assessments: Informal, qualitative feedback will be given in class throughout the semester. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    David Chelf
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    This is a complete course in high school Algebra I which will cover fundamental concepts in algebra and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. This course is designed to emphasize the study of algebraic problem-solving with the incorporation of real-world applications. Topics in Algebra I include number systems, linear systems, rational numbers, complex numbers, exponents, roots, radicals, quadratic equations, polynomials, factoring, absolute values, ratios, and proportions. In addition, the course will cover solving and graphing systems of functions, linear equations, and inequalities. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem-solving.


    Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation in pre-algebra topics in order to take this class. In addition, students should be capable of copying the sample problems and solutions worked in class on the white board to his/her own notes as examples for completing homework.


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-1.5 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 7-day cycle, with assignments posted on Thursdays and due the following Thursday. Students are advised to start homework once it is assigned (i.e., not wait until the night before it is due). Weekly homework assignments will be of a length that a student should be able to complete them in two or three at-home work sessions. Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of their work.


    Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.


    Assessments: Student progress will be assessed by: (1) The instructor checking that weekly homework sets are attempted and complete and (2) detailed grading of periodic take-home tests. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. See the instructor's webpage for detailed homework and test policy, including late work and re-work.


    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Algebra I: Expressions, Equations, and Applications by Paul A. Foerster. It is available in a few different editions, each of which is virtually identical: 2nd edition (ISBN-10 020125073X, ISBN-13 978-0201250732), 3rd edition (ISBN-10 0201860945, ISBN-13 978-0201860948), and Classic edition (ISBN-10 020132458X, ISBN-13 978-0201324587). It is also available under the title Foerster Algebra I, Classics edition (ISBN-10 0131657089, ISBN-13 978-0131657083). A calculator is not needed for this course.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Algebra I for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Fatimah Aziz
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Are you interested in learning a new language that is used right here in America? Are you intrigued by a modern language that has no written form? Do you want to find out why American Sign Language is much more closely linked to French Sign Language than British Sign Language? If so, American Sign Language (ASL) is a great language for you! In this class, students will learn the basic skills in production and comprehension of ASL while covering thematic units such as personal and family life, school, social life, and community. Each unit will include presentations and readings on Deaf culture and Deaf history. Students will learn fingerspelling and numbers, developing conversational ability, culturally appropriate behaviors, and fundamental ASL grammar. Class time will be dedicated to interactive ASL activities and face-to-face signing practice with the instructor and partners.

    ASL students will have a Deaf instructor. She regularly teaches all-hearing classes and is an excellent role model for students to meet and interact with a native speaker of ASL and to lean natural facial expressions, gestures, and body language used in Deaf communications. ASL students will have more confidence when they encounter Deaf instructors in college or greet speakers of ASL in social settings. Because the instructor is Deaf, students are not permitted to speak aloud in class. This approach improves visual attention and encourages immersion in the language. Students will be able to ask questions of the instructor by writing on individual white boards, but they will be encouraged to sign in order to communicate with the instructor. Lessons are facilitated with Power Point presentations, and a professional ASL interpreter will assist the class on the first day of class. Enrolled students are not expected to know any sign language prior to beginning ASL I.

    Hundreds of colleges and universities, including all public institutions of higher learning in Virginia, accept ASL as a distinct foreign language. This allows hearing and Deaf students to fulfill foreign language requirements for admission to college. Teens who have difficulty writing, spelling, or have challenging pronunciation in English, can be successful with ASL as a second or foreign language choice. Penn State University research demonstrated that the visual and kinesthetic elements of ASL helped to enhance the vocabulary, spelling, and reading skills in hearing students.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours each week outside of class on required vocabulary exercises, readings, and signing practice.

    Assignments: Homework assignments will be posted online in the Canvas digital classroom platform. There may be some brief written assignments, but for most homework assignments, students will be asked to post short videos of themselves signing. Students will need either a camera phone or webcam to complete these assignments.

    Assessments: The instructor will assign points using a class rubric for the parent's use in assigning a course grade. Course rubrics will evaluate students on their sign production, fingerspelling, ASL grammar, facial expressions including "above the nose" grammar (brows and body movement), and "below the nose" modifiers (lip expressions).

    Textbook/Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $50.00 payable to Compass for the digital access code for the interactive e-textbook, TRUE+WAY ASL. With their subscription, students may also accces a free searchable, bilingual ASL & English dictionary, called What's the Sign?

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in World Languages for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Taliesin Knol
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    This class will explore the judicial processes of Europe following the collapse of Rome. From witch trials and Viking blood feuds, then back again to the real barbarians- lawyers! Like a traditional mock trial program, the class will hear cases, and students will defend themselves. Real historical cases will be studied, and trial parts assigned to the class, which will be debated from the perspective of Royal Courts, Church Ordeals, or a Viking assembly they creatively called "a Thing." The class will serve as the jury and, if necessary, select period-appropriate verdicts and explain how they arrived at their decisions, while striving for period accuracy. Second semester will move to codified Renaissance legal systems, leading up to the direct Ancestor to American legal traditions, Common Law.



    Topics in this Series: Crime & Punishment in Medieval Times (Semester 1), Crime & Punishment in the Early Modern Era (Semester 2).



    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.



    Assignments: Period maps, photographs, and re-creations will be posted on a class Google Drive, and video links from YouTube will be e-mailed to parents and students for homework or supplemental investigation.



    Assessments: A mid-term and final exam may be given.



    Textbooks: None. Case documents are provided in class.



    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History or Civics for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Pete Van Riper
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Earn college credit and artistic "cred"-ibility in this studio art class! Over the course of the school year, student artists will experiment with artistic techniques, create original works in a variety of mediums and styles, and build a portfolio for submission. Students will be guided by a Compass art instructor, Pete Van Riper, who is also an adjunct art professor at Northern Virginia Community College and a reviewer for AP art portfolios.


    The three goals of AP 2D Art and Design are to (1) investigate a variety of artistic materials, methods, and ideas; (2) produce 2-dimensional art and designs; and (3) be able to describe and present art and design to others. AP Art and Design students "develop and apply skills of inquiry and investigation, practice, experimentation, revision, communication, and reflection."


    Student artists will create a portfolio with works that feature the elements of art and principles of design such as "point, line, shape, plane, layer, form, space, texture, color, value, opacity, transparency, time; unity, variety, rhythm, movement, proportion, scale, balance, emphasis, contrast, repetition, figure/ground relationship, connection, juxtaposition, hierarchy." Students will be asked to document their medium choices and keep a sketch book and art journal describing their inspiration and artistic process.


    In class, works will be done in charcoal, pencil, conte crayon, watercolor crayons, watercolor paints, acrylic paint, and collage. Like other college level classes, outside work will be expected, and art completed outside of the weekly class meetings can include graphic design, digital imaging, photography, collage, fabric design, weaving, fashion design, fashion illustration, painting, and printmaking, and other 2D formats. Students should consider how to express their ideas with selected materials and processes on a flat surface.


    The College Board has no preferred or unacceptable content or style, but all work must be entirely the student's original creation. Submissions may incorporate pre-existing photographs or others' images provided proper attribution and citations are given and the use reflects an extension of the student's vision and not just duplication or copy work. AI generated designs are strictly prohibited from portfolio submissions, but original, digitally created art is welcome.


    Students' portfolio submissions for the AP program must include two sections (1) "Sustained Investigation" which includes 15 images of the purposeful evolution of a work or works through concept sketches, practice, experimentation, and revisions, and (2) "Selected Works" which includes images of 5 completed pieces. All portfolio works will be submitted as digital images (scans or photographs) of the student's original pieces, and all images must be accompanied by a written discussion of the materials and processes used.


    Earn college credit and artistic "cred"-ibility in this studio art class! Over the course of the school year, student artists will experiment with artistic techniques, create original works in a variety of mediums and styles, and build a portfolio for submission. Students will be guided by a Compass art instructor, Pete Van Riper, who is also an adjunct art professor at Northern Virginia Community College and a reviewer for AP art portfolios.


    The three goals of AP 2D Art and Design are to (1) investigate a variety of artistic materials, methods, and ideas; (2) produce 2-dimensional art and designs; and (3) be able to describe and present art and design to others. AP Art and Design students "develop and apply skills of inquiry and investigation, practice, experimentation, revision, communication, and reflection."


    Student artists will create a portfolio with works that feature the elements of art and principles of design such as "point, line, shape, plane, layer, form, space, texture, color, value, opacity, transparency, time; unity, variety, rhythm, movement, proportion, scale, balance, emphasis, contrast, repetition, figure/ground relationship, connection, juxtaposition, hierarchy." Students will be asked to document their medium choices and keep a sketch book and art journal describing their inspiration and artistic process.


    In class, works will be done in charcoal, pencil, conte crayon, watercolor crayons, watercolor paints, acrylic paint, and collage. Like other college level classes, outside work will be expected, and art completed outside of the weekly class meetings can include graphic design, digital imaging, photography, collage, fabric design, weaving, fashion design, fashion illustration, painting, and printmaking, and other 2D formats. Students should consider how to express their ideas with selected materials and processes on a flat surface.


    The College Board has no preferred or unacceptable content or style, but all work must be entirely the student's original creation. Submissions may incorporate pre-existing photographs or others' images provided proper attribution and citations are given and the use reflects an extension of the student's vision and not just duplication or copy work. AI generated designs are strictly prohibited from portfolio submissions, but original, digitally created art is welcome.


    Students' portfolio submissions for the AP program must include two sections (1) "Sustained Investigation" which includes 15 images of the purposeful evolution of a work or works through concept sketches, practice, experimentation, and revisions, and (2) "Selected Works" which includes images of 5 completed pieces. All portfolio works will be submitted as digital images (scans or photographs) of the student's original pieces, and all images must be accompanied by a written discussion of the materials and processes used.


    The class will examine images of others' art, and students will be asked to visit at least two art museums or art exhibits. They will practice giving and receiving construction formal and informal critiques through the observation, analysis, discussion, and evaluation of their own work and that of other artists to hone the AP-required skill of communication about 2D art.


    Levels This course is only offered at the AP level, but enrollment does not obligate a student to submit a portfolio for AP review.


    Workload: Student artists should plan 2-4 hours per week outside of class on their pieces, concept drawings, practice sketches, etc.


    Assignments: All assignments will be communicated to students via email.


    Assessments: Qualitative feedback will be given weekly in class. The principal assessment in this course is the AP score earned.


    Textbooks: The instructor will furnish art and design books for students to browse in class and borrow.


    Supply Fee: A supply fee of $60.00 is due payable to the instructor for shared, in-class basics consisting of: pencils, charcoal, conte a Paris, acrylic paints, brushes, sketch journal, and canvas boards. The instructor will furnish a list of recommended supplies for alternative or premium materials that students may want to incorporate use such as watercolor or colored markers.


    About AP: "AP" is a trademark of the College Board, which owns and designs the course outline and "audits" (i.e. approves) high school instructors who employ their expertise and creativity to deliver the college freshman-level content. The College Board's summary of the AP 2D Art & Design program can be read HERE, and the instructor AP Course Audit Approval form can be viewed HERE.


    AP Fees: The fee for the College Board's AP 2D Art & Design portfolio in May 2025 is not included. Each family is responsible for scheduling and paying for their student's AP registration.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Ney Mello
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    If you like to "Turn Up the Music" (Chris Brown, 2012), "Play That Funky Music" (Wild Cherry, 1976), or "Dance to The Music" (Sly and The Family Stone, 1967), then you know that there is an impressive variety of American music. America is the birthplace of some of the most influential genres of music and musicians in the world. Much of the world's modern music has roots in American blues, jazz, or rock, while American music has elements from West Africa, the West Indies, and diverse communities such as New Orleans, Detroit, Memphis, St. Louis, Nashville, Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and the Bronx. American music has influenced behavior and culture such as dance, entertainment, fashion, technology, popular opinion, lexicon, marketing, and more.


    This is a focused class in music appreciation for students who enjoy listening to or playing music. The class will evaluate a century of American music by listening to and discussing influential performers, writers, and producers. Students will learn to identify music elements unique to each genre- melody, rhythm, harmony- and will develop a musical vocabulary to help them think and talk about musical works. They will also explore innovations in instruments and technologies that evolved with the music, such as drums being placed in a "set" at the advent of jazz music, the rise of electric instruments, and electronic production/mixing.


    First semester will explore music from the 1920s to the 1960s encompassing the genres of blues, ragtime, jazz, boogie-woogie, swing, soul, rhythm and blues, rock-and-roll, Motown, pop, funk, disco. Featured artists will include Louis Armstrong, Miles Davis, Marvin Gaye, Chuck Berry, Elvis, James Brown, Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell, Simon and Garfunkel, Fleetwood Mack, Robert Johnson, Scott Joplin, John McLaughlin, and many others. Find out why the Rolling Stones and the Beatles claim they were influenced by Little Richard, and why the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame described Jimi Hendrix as "arguably the greatest instrumentalist in the history of rock music."


    Like other fine arts classes, music appreciation is a fun break from academics which enriches and engages students in a topic they enjoy. Genres that will not be highlighted in this course include gospel, folk, country, western, tejano, reggae, zydeco, or salsa.


    Topics in this Series: 19202-1960s (Semester 1), 1970s-2020s (Semester 2), etc. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Sheila Anwari
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Don't write poetry? Think you can't draw? Maybe not, but you may still want a creative way to record your thoughts, feelings, dreams, and ideas! Journaling is an ongoing process of discovery and exploration that allows one to be conscious of and connect with his/her own thoughts, emotions and ideas. It is a form of expression that supports both academic and personal growth.


    Creative journaling is not writing daily "Dear Diary" style entries on dated pages. Instead, students will explore various journaling methods, blending self-expression and self-discovery to guide them in learning new ways to problem-solve, achieve goals, and process emotions. Students will work with several writing techniques and a range of art media to develop a personal journal throughout the quarter and will have the opportunity to expand on it in subsequent quarters. Techniques such as freeform writing, black-out poetry, stream-of-consciousness writing, and creative list making will be explored, in addition to experimenting with a wide variety of layered techniques and mixed media with collage, photography, cardstock, book pages, art markers, stencils, tempera sticks, acrylic, paints, washi tape, and stickers. Weekly prompts will cover a range of topics such as gratitude, compassion, ambitions, choices, fear, self-care, and self-esteem as they relate to the students' personal lives and current events. Conversation around the prompts will complement the students' work in their individual journals.


    Topics in this Series: Journal work is done in an open studio environment that allows students to join in any quarter throughout the year.


    Prerequisites: No formal writing or art experience is needed. All teens are welcome.


    Workload: Work outside of class is encouraged but optional.


    Assessments: Not provided.


    Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $35.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Fee covers art journal for student to use in class and shared class supplies (paints, inks, brushes, markers, collage materials, glue, washi tape, etc.)


    What to Wear: Students may wish to have an apron or old shirt to wear when working with paints.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English, Fine Arts, or general Elective for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Judith Harmon
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Imagine an elegant mansion dinner party disrupted by discovery of a dead body and numerous possible weapons: a candlestick, a lead pipe, a rope, and a wrench. Picture a saavy socialite, a courageous colonel, a wealthy widow, a plucky professor, a femme fatale, and others...all who have a motive in the murder. How would you tell this story on stage?



    Have you ever wondered what happens behind the scenes to bring a production to stage? It takes a team of people to put on a show: stage managers, specialized designers for costumes, sets, props, lighting, music, and sound. There are also choreographers, fight directors, a dramaturge, a technical director, casting director, publicist, producer, and stage director to guide them all.



    This class will explore the different roles of the production team, designers, and crew responsibilities as students analyze a script and make decisions as if they were the Director. Under the guidance of a theater professional, students will learn how the pre-production and design teams develop the director's vision to bring a production to life!



    Students will begin by reading and analyzing a script without stage directions or notes. The group will make technical and artistic decisions to formulate a vision for the production. Students will learn to notate stage directions (such as 'stumble in from downstage right') and how to block scenes. They will make aesthetic decisions on set design and props, costuming, and technical effects such as lighting, sound effects, or music. The class will consider casting requirements and discuss the audition process. Example class projects include sketching costume concepts, creating a miniature set, and preparing audition notices.


    This class is recommended for beginners as well as experienced theatre and production students. Every script is different and offers new sets of challenges. The emphasis in this course is on the vision, design decisions, and the teamwork required to bring a performance to stage, but the class will not be putting on an actual production. Students who want to further their study of theatrical production might wish to co-register for Compass courses in sewing, cosplay accessories, or one of several acting/improvisation classes.



    Topics in this Series: Clue! (Semester 1), Harry Potter and the Cursed Child (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.



    Prerequisites: None


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.


    Assignments: Will be reviewed in class and posted in a Google classroom.


    Assessments: Qualitative feedback will be given throughout the semester. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided.


    Textbook/Materials: Furnished by instructor.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $25.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a copy of the licensed script and project materials. What to Bring: Script and notes.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts or Career Exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Anne Taranto
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    This full-credit high school English class will focus on developing critical reading and writing skills through the study of a range of canonical and post-colonial genres and texts written in English. Through exposure to a variety of voices across time periods and geographical regions, students will investigate major themes, such as the importance of language as a locus of power, the continuity of human nature, and the role of the imagination.


    Fall semester will focus on canonical British texts such as the epic poem Beowulf, selections from Canterbury Tales (Chaucer), Shakespeare's Macbeth, and a selection of Romantic poetry.


    Writing Lab: An essential component of this course will be an in-class Writing Lab. Students will write two or three critical response papers and a full-scale literary analysis essay each term. Students will continue to hone the components of academic writing, including how to construct a thesis statement that makes an argument, how to support their ideas effectively with textual evidence, how to organize an argument logically, and how to cite sources in MLA format. Students should bring a laptop to class one day per week for in-class writing.


    Topics in this Series: British Literature, Part I (Semester 1) and British Literature, Part II (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. This is a 13.5 week course that will not meet on 11/7/23.


    Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at grade level and have completed Introduction to Genre or equivalent high school level writing class. Students are expected to take an active role in discussion and complete all writing assignments.


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class.


    Assignments: All assignments will be posted in a Google Classroom management site. Students will need their own gmail accounts to access Google Classroom.


    Assessments: Students' written assignments will be graded using a rubric and assigned points that the homeschool parent can use when assigning an overall class grade.


    Textbook/Materials: Because students will need clean, inexpensive copies of each novel to mark in, and they must be able to refer to the passages on the same page numbers, copies of mass market paperbacks will be pre-purchased and bundled for students. (See Supply Fee below).


    Supply Fee: A class fee of $34.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for the class pack of books and handouts.


    What to Bring: Students should bring the current literature, paper, pen or pencil and highlighter to class each week. Some students may wish to bring paper clips, adhesive flags or post-it notes for marking passages/pages.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a half-credit (one semester) or full credit (both semesters) in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: Introduction to Genres or equivalent

    1
    Edwige Pinover
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Bonjour and welcome to the second year of high school French. This is a conversation-focused program in which students will build their vocabulary quickly and learn essential grammar skills in French. Students will cover the broad themes and vocabular for: my family and my friends, celebrations, shopping, high school, a typical day, and the good old days. The class will begin with a review of adjective-noun agreement, negations, and regular -er, ir-, and -re verbs. They will review and continue to expand their list of irregular verbs such as avoir (to have) and etre (to be). Students will be introduced to the passe compose and Imparfait (imperfect) tenses, and they will learn how to use negations, direct and indirect pronouns, and reflexive verbs with present, past, and imperfect tenses. They will practice comparative and superlative statements, and will continue to have brief cultural lessons integrated in their units.


    Class will be conducted primarily in French and will focus on listening and speaking skills, asking and answering questions, and correct use of grammar. At home, students will be responsible for memorizing vocabulary and grammar, completing homework assignments, and watching both grammar instruction and language immersion videos.


    Prerequisite: French I


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 30-45 minutes per day, 4 days per week on homework outside of class.


    Assignments: Are sent by e-mail to parents and students. Students must have access to a computer and internet service for computer-based videos and practice tools that are assigned as homework and are essential to success in the class.


    Assessments: Quizzes, tests, and individual performance reviews will be given to all students at regular intervals to provide parents with sufficient feedback to assign a grade.


    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Bien Dit! Level II: Student Edition Level 1 2018 edition (ISBN-13 978-0544861343)


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Foreign Language for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: French I or equivalent

    1
    Manal Hussein
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    This class will be taught in a Hybrid format with an online lecture on Mondays (11:00 am - 11:55 am) over a live, online platform and in-person lab and activities on Wednesdays (11:00 am - 11:55 am). Registration for the Lab section will automatically enroll the student in the Lecture section.

    Why do Mentos candies in Coke make a fizzy mess? How do skateboarders survive spins on a half-pipe? What causes some lithium-ion batteries to burst into flames? Answers to these questions can be found in the study of high school science!

    Interdisciplinary Science is a year-long, introductory high school science course which examines the living and non-living worlds. This survey course introduces key concepts from Biology, Chemistry, and Physics, which will lay the foundation for students to pursue more rigorous, year-long high school science courses in each discipline.

    Students will learn about the principles of scientific investigations and engineering practices, the Scientific Method, and the basic format of a lab report. They will practice taking measurements, recording data, converting units of measure, and related mathematical concepts such as International System of Units, scientific notation, graphs, and data analysis. Students will learn how to provide evidence to support explanations and solutions for their investigations.

    Topics in biology will include molecular, cellular, classification, organisms, populations, and ecosystems. Students will explore the relationships between living things and their environments. The chemistry units will cover the composition of matter, atomic structure and periodic table, and chemical bonds and reactions, while the survey of physics will include forces and motions; conservation of energy, thermal energy, electricity and magnetism; and wave phenomena, characteristics, behavior, including electromagnetic and sound waves.

    Meeting Dates: This is a 29-week course that will not meet during the week of May 12-16, 2025.

    Format: This is a hybrid course with the lecture taught synchronously online on Mondays and hands-on experiments done in a lab on Wednesdays.

    Prerequisites: Students should have completed 8th grade math or a course in Pre-Algebra prior to taking Interdisciplinary Science. They should be familiar with ratios, rates, proportions, decimals, percents, exponents, and solving one-variable equations.

    Class Expectations: For both in-person and virtual class meetings, students are expected to come prepared, have class materials, and be ready to participate in class discussions and activities. During virtual lectures (Mondays), students are expected to be seated at a desk or table and have their cameras on.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class on reading and homework assignments.

    Assignments: All class announcements and assignments will be communicated via Google Classroom.

    Assessments: Informal, qualitative and constructive feedback will be given on submitted assignments. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided.

    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent Physical Science - Interactive Science by Pearson / Savvas Publishing (ISBN # 978-0133209266) and Biology Workbook For Dummies (ISBN # 978-1119894810)

    Materials: Students should bring the following supplies to each class: Five Star spiral graph ruled notebook, scientific calculator, colored pencils, glue stick, pens or pencils to write with, and a ruler. Students will be asked to bring a laptop to class on some days.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A lab fee of $100.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Lab Science for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: Pre-Algebra

    1
    Manal Hussein
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    This is a place-holder for the Interdisciplinary Science lecture. Students should register for the Interdisciplinary Lab, which will automatically enroll them in both class sections. A physical meeting room will be designated for on-campus students who have classes immediately before or after this virtual session.

    Prerequisites: Pre-Algebra

    1
    David Cubias
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Krav Maga is the Israeli martial art which teaches self defense and fitness. Students of Krav Maga are taught a series of strategies to assess and respond to common situations, such as facing a bully. Kids are always taught first and foremost to get away, to get help, and to try to deescalate the situation. When that fails, students practice a technique that includes a warning strike followed by escape, and finally, they learn how to stand up for themselves and how to counterattack if a situation escalates and becomes threatening. Kids are empowered and gain confidence when they rehearse how to handle real-life situations. Exercises and in-class practice incorporate balance, coordination, energy, and other key elements of fitness along with life skills such as confidence, teamwork, respect, discipline, and respect. Students may enroll in Krav Maga at any time, and everyone will begin as a white belt. Each quarter, students will practice the full range of skills, but there will be two "featured" moves that a student can earn a belt stripe for being able to demonstrate. Featured moves will include a combative strike and a defensive escape technique. No one stripe is a prerequisite for any other color, and color stripes can be earned in any order. First quarter, students will have the chance to earn a Blue Stripe. Featured moves include: cover defense and wrist locks (red stripe); straight punch defense and bear hugs (orange stripe); head movement defense and front 2-handed choke (yellow stripe); round kick defense and back 2-handed choke (green stripe); front kick defense and guillotine choke (blue stripe); clinch defense and rear choke (purple stripe); ground striking defense and head lock defense (brown stripe); and 360 defense and full Nelson (black stripe). Students will be able to test for belt promotions to move through the ranks of white belt, yellow belt, orange belt, etc. On average, it is estimated that a student will be ready for a belt test after four quarters/four color stripes. Belt testing will be by coach approval. Topics in this Series: Blue Stripe (1st Quarter), Purple Stripe (2nd Quarter), Brown Stripe (3rd Quarter) and Black Stripe (4th Quarter). Assessments: Belt testing for promotion will be by coach recommendation, but on average will take 4 quarters. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $6.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class- for new students only- for a white belt to collect the colored stripes! A belt test fee of $25.00 is due payable to the instructor when a student is ready to test for promotion. What to Bring: Refillable water bottle. What to Wear: Participants should wear their belt along with shorts, leggings, or loose, comfortable athletic pants, and comfortable athletic shoes or sneakers.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Jen Hallworth
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    This is a complete course in Pre-Algebra that will provide an introduction to basic algebra concepts and a review of arithmetic algorithms with an emphasis on problem solving. The major topics covered in this course are Numbers and Operations, Expressions & Properties, Equations & Inequalities, Functional Relationships and Ratios, Percent & Proportions. Students will learn to use formulas to solve a variety of math problems encompassing geometry, measurement probability, and statistics. Students will also be applying their learning to real life scenarios to solve problems.



    Prerequisites: Students must be fluent in the four basic operations- addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. They will need to show proficiency and have a thorough command of basic computation. In addition, a basic, introductory understanding and ability to work with fractions and decimals is required to solve equations and simplify expressions. If you are unsure about your child's readiness for this class, the instructor will recommend one or more practice platforms and/or assessments to confirm placement.



    Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class to complete practice problems, homework, and assessments.



    Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, link to quizzes and tests, track grades, and message the instructor and classmates.



    Assessments: All chapter tests will be taken outside of class with parental oversight to maximize in-class instructional time. Points will be assigned for completed homework, quizzes, and tests. A letter grade will not be assigned, but parents can use total points earned versus total points offered to assign a grade for purposes of a homeschool transcript. Parents can view total points earned at any time through the Canvas site.



    Textbook: The selected textbook is available free online, and a link will be posted on Canvas. Students who prefer a hard copy textbook may purchase or rent McDougall Littell's Pre-Algebra (ISBN #978-0618250035). As an alternative, for any student who struggles with reading, the textbook can be purchased as an audio CD (ISBN #978-0618478828).



    What to Bring: TI-34 calculator



    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Mathematics for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    David Chelf
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    The odds of winning the Powerball jackpot are 1 in 292 million. 77% of teens ages 12-17 have cell phones. One out of every two youth voters cast a ballot in 2020. From election polls to stock market data and weather reports to medical test results, statistics and probability are all around us. They are quoted in the podcasts we listen to, the news we watch, and the textbooks and articles we read. Statistics and probability are used in almost every field of study and career for forecasting, decision making, and tracking progress. In 2021-22, the government will release a tsunami of 2020 census statistics about our country's population. (Coincidentally, the odds of a tsunami hitting the east coast- less than the Powerball win.) But statistics and probability are also often misused, misquoted or incorrectly applied, so having a solid understanding of what these numbers represent will help make teens informed consumers and decision-makers.


    This course will explore the collection and analysis of data, inferences and conclusions, and the use of this information. Themes include relationships between variables, gathering data, interpreting categorical versus quantitative data. The class will also cover sample surveys, experiments, and observational studies and evaluate randomness and probability. Finally, students will learn about making inferences, justifying conclusions, and using probability to make decisions.


    Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation in Algebra I and Geometry in order to take this class. It is an ideal class for a student who needs an additional credit in high school math, but who may not wish to pursue more advanced mathematics courses such as Algebra II and Pre-Calculus.


    Levels: The course provides a substantive, full-credit experience on either an Honors or On-Level track. All class members share core material and participate in the same class lectures. Honors students will receive additional, more challenging problems. Students register online for the same course but must indicate which level they wish to follow by the first day of class. Students may move down a level (from Honors to On-Level) at any time.


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-1.5 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 7-day cycle, with assignments posted on Thursdays and due the following Thursday. Students are advised to start homework once it is assigned (i.e., not wait until the night before it is due). Weekly homework assignments will be of a length that a student should be able to complete them in two or three at-home work sessions. Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of their work.


    Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.


    Assessments: Student progress will be assessed by: (1) The instructor checking that weekly homework sets are attempted and complete and (2) detailed grading of periodic take-home tests. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. See the instructor's webpage for detailed homework and test policy, including late work and re-work.


    Textbook: The required textbook for this class is "Stats In Your World" 1st edition by David E. Bock (ISBN-13: 978-0131384897).


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Probability & Statistics for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Catherine Vanlandingham
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Reading and writing affect a student's achievement in all aspects of schoolwork, so strong language arts skills are fundamental to success in homeschooling. This weekly class is a small group of 3-6 students who read and write at a similar level. Students follow a comprehensive language arts curriculum under the guidance of an experienced reading specialist. Each Monday class meeting will include a short story with select vocabulary words, a graphic organizer, main themes, and embedded learning objectives. Students will continue to practice language arts skills at home with easy-to-implement "page a day" workbook activities assigned by the instructor and implemented by the parents. For most early elementary learners, enrollment in Reading Rally can serve as a complete, self-contained language arts curriculum where families will not need additional resources in reading, comprehension, composition, spelling, and grammar.


    Weekly readings are organized around thematic units. The instructor will teach students how to approach a new story as a fun reading puzzle. For example, before reading aloud in class, students will conduct a "picture walk" to overview and predict elements of the story from the illustrations, review a graphic organizer to assist in writing sentences, define vocabulary words, and preview summary questions. Then, the instructor will read the story aloud, model good reading practices, and encourage students to read. Students will only be asked to read aloud when they feel comfortable and have built trust in their group. All follow-up activities are designed around learning objectives such as decoding, comprehension, prediction, visualization, and verbalization.


    READINESS: As a comprehensive language arts curriculum, a student must be at a similar grade level ability in reading, comprehension, and writing. Early readers who have not learned to write, for example, or emerging readers who struggle with comprehenion, may not be a good fit for this class. In addition, students must have the hand-eye coordination and basic handwriting skills to be able to copy the instructor's many notes, examples, and definitions from the classroom white board into their own notebook.


    Grade level references in Reading Rally are based on scope, sequence and pacing that correlate to the Grade Level Equivalent (GLE) standards of learning. Students who are more than one year behind in GLE in language arts or who have a difference in skill level between their reading and writing may be recommended for a second, weekly class meeting on Fridays or 1-on-1 private instruction to make up ground in reading or writing skills. Additional class meetings or private instruction will be an additional cost.


    ATTENTION! Parents should not register for a Reading Rally class until they have had a Language Arts Skills Inventory (i.e. brief assessment) and placement determination by the reading specialist. This must be scheduled separately through Compass at a cost of $125.00. The fee is due prior to the assessment and is not refundable in the event the child is not recommended for a reading group. The instructor has experience working with reluctant and fearful readers, those who are late bloomers, neurodivergent, dyslexic, and ESOL students. However, she might recommend a more complete evaluation by another professional if she suspects other learning differences are impacting the student's langauge arts learning.


    Students will work from a spiral bound copy of reading textbook and workbook by Pearson. A class fee of $98.00 is due payable to Compass for the required books.


    Students continuing from one semester to the next will receive priority registration to remain with their reading group.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Catherine Vanlandingham
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Reading and writing affect a student's achievement in all aspects of schoolwork, so strong language arts skills are fundamental to success in homeschooling. This weekly class is a small group of 3-6 students who read and write at a similar level. Students follow a comprehensive language arts curriculum under the guidance of an experienced reading specialist. Each Monday class meeting will include a short story with select vocabulary words, a graphic organizer, main themes, and embedded learning objectives. Students will continue to practice language arts skills at home with easy-to-implement "page a day" workbook activities assigned by the instructor and implemented by the parents. For most early elementary learners, enrollment in Reading Rally can serve as a complete, self-contained language arts curriculum where families will not need additional resources in reading, comprehension, composition, spelling, and grammar.


    Weekly readings are organized around thematic units. The instructor will teach students how to approach a new story as a fun reading puzzle. For example, before reading aloud in class, students will conduct a "picture walk" to overview and predict elements of the story from the illustrations, review a graphic organizer to assist in writing sentences, define vocabulary words, and preview summary questions. Then, the instructor will read the story aloud, model good reading practices, and encourage students to read. Students will only be asked to read aloud when they feel comfortable and have built trust in their group. All follow-up activities are designed around learning objectives such as decoding, comprehension, prediction, visualization, and verbalization.


    READINESS: As a comprehensive language arts curriculum, a student must be at a similar grade level ability in reading, comprehension, and writing. Early readers who have not learned to write, for example, or emerging readers who struggle with comprehenion, may not be a good fit for this class. In addition, students must have the hand-eye coordination and basic handwriting skills to be able to copy the instructor's many notes, examples, and definitions from the classroom white board into their own notebook.


    Grade level references in Reading Rally are based on scope, sequence and pacing that correlate to the Grade Level Equivalent (GLE) standards of learning. Students who are more than one year behind in GLE in language arts or who have a difference in skill level between their reading and writing may be recommended for a second, weekly class meeting on Fridays or 1-on-1 private instruction to make up ground in reading or writing skills. Additional class meetings or private instruction will be an additional cost.


    ATTENTION! Parents should not register for a Reading Rally class until they have had a Language Arts Skills Inventory (i.e. brief assessment) and placement determination by the reading specialist. This must be scheduled separately through Compass at a cost of $125.00. The fee is due prior to the assessment and is not refundable in the event the child is not recommended for a reading group. The instructor has experience working with reluctant and fearful readers, those who are late bloomers, neurodivergent, dyslexic, and ESOL students. However, she might recommend a more complete evaluation by another professional if she suspects other learning differences are impacting the student's langauge arts learning.


    Students will work from a spiral bound copy of reading textbook and workbook by Pearson. A class fee of $XX.00 is due payable to Compass for the required books.


    Students continuing from one semester to the next will receive priority registration to remain with their reading group.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Catherine Vanlandingham
    Add

    Reading and writing affect a student's achievement in all aspects of schoolwork, so strong language arts skills are fundamental to success in homeschooling. This weekly class is a small group of 3-6 students who read and write at a similar level. Students follow a comprehensive language arts curriculum under the guidance of an experienced reading specialist. Each Monday class meeting will include a short story with select vocabulary words, a graphic organizer, main themes, and embedded learning objectives. Students will continue to practice language arts skills at home with easy-to-implement "page a day" workbook activities assigned by the instructor and implemented by the parents. For most early elementary learners, enrollment in Reading Rally can serve as a complete, self-contained language arts curriculum where families will not need additional resources in reading, comprehension, composition, spelling, and grammar.


    Weekly readings are organized around thematic units. The instructor will teach students how to approach a new story as a fun reading puzzle. For example, before reading aloud in class, students will conduct a "picture walk" to overview and predict elements of the story from the illustrations, review a graphic organizer to assist in writing sentences, define vocabulary words, and preview summary questions. Then, the instructor will read the story aloud, model good reading practices, and encourage students to read. Students will only be asked to read aloud when they feel comfortable and have built trust in their group. All follow-up activities are designed around learning objectives such as decoding, comprehension, prediction, visualization, and verbalization.


    READINESS: As a comprehensive language arts curriculum, a student must be at a similar grade level ability in reading, comprehension, and writing. Early readers who have not learned to write, for example, or emerging readers who struggle with comprehenion, may not be a good fit for this class. In addition, students must have the hand-eye coordination and basic handwriting skills to be able to copy the instructor's many notes, examples, and definitions from the classroom white board into their own notebook.


    Grade level references in Reading Rally are based on scope, sequence and pacing that correlate to the Grade Level Equivalent (GLE) standards of learning. Students who are more than one year behind in GLE in language arts or who have a difference in skill level between their reading and writing may be recommended for a second, weekly class meeting on Fridays or 1-on-1 private instruction to make up ground in reading or writing skills. Additional class meetings or private instruction will be an additional cost.


    ATTENTION! Parents should not register for a Reading Rally class until they have had a Language Arts Skills Inventory (i.e. brief assessment) and placement determination by the reading specialist. This must be scheduled separately through Compass at a cost of $125.00. The fee is due prior to the assessment and is not refundable in the event the child is not recommended for a reading group. The instructor has experience working with reluctant and fearful readers, those who are late bloomers, neurodivergent, dyslexic, and ESOL students. However, she might recommend a more complete evaluation by another professional if she suspects other learning differences are impacting the student's langauge arts learning.


    Students will work from a spiral bound copy of reading textbook and workbook by Pearson. A class fee of $72.00 is due payable to Compass for the required books.


    Students continuing from one semester to the next will receive priority registration to remain with their reading group.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Ney Mello
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Students will learn a fun, simplified way to write songs from a professional, award-winning, soundtrack composer. Each week, students will tackle a different phase of songwriting. This class is open to students who play instruments, sing, write lyrics, or a combination of all three talents!


    The group will learn about the song structure that is popular today with verse, chorus, pre-chorus, pre-verse, intros, and outros. They will listen to some examples of songs to convey what a verse, chorus, and bridge are, and will cover an overview of the basics of functional and classical harmony.


    Each week, the group will approach a different stage of the songwriting process, working through ideas on their instruments, writing lyrics, or both. Student artists will be guided through making their own background tracks to encourage self- expression and to allow individual voices to emerge. They can use songs they know as inspiration, but they will be encouraged to create everything like a real songwriter. Musicians will be given ready-made chord options so their focus can remain on the creative aspects of songwriting.


    If the student is only writing lyrics, he/she will be assigned a songwriting partner student who will write the melody and chords. In this case, the lyricist student will be provided with that song's work in progress tracks to write to at home.


    Students who wish to record their songs should download the free Abbey Road 'Topline' app for Android or Apple smartphones. (The instructor uses this app professionally to share songs and concepts via e-mail, text message, or over social media with colleagues.) The app allows the artist to record songs in sections and play back all together. Microphones will not be needed.


    The workshop is open to all instrument and voice students, not just guitar. Any style of music is acceptable (pop, folk, country, etc), but all lyrics must be rated "E" for everyone.


    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Sirdley Taborga
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Hola! Get ready for a full year of beginner level high school Spanish! This is a conversation-focused program in which students will build their vocabulary quickly beginning with the alphabet, numbers, time, dates, seasons, school, free time activities/hobbies, likes/dislikes, personal descriptions, family relationships, emotions, food/restaurants, places/locations in town, and shopping/clothing. There will be a strong emphasis on conversation with common grammar concepts such as articles, pronouns, adjectives, comparative phrases, and present tense and regular past tense verbs learned and practiced in the context of conversation (rather than stand-along grammar exercises).



    Class will be conducted primarily in Spanish and will focus on listening and speaking skills, asking and answering questions. At home, students will be responsible for practicing vocabulary and grammar and completing written assignments, and watching language immersion video clips.



    Workload: Students should expect to spend 30-45 minutes per day approximately 4 days per week on homework outside of class.



    Assignments: Are sent by e-mail to parents and students. Students must have access to a computer for videos that are assigned.



    Assessments: Quizzes and tests will be scored with a points system that parents can use in calculating a grade.



    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent Avancemos!: Student Edition Level 1, 2018 edition (ISBN # 978-0544861213)



    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Foreign Language for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Sevim Kalyoncu
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Have fun the final weeks of summer! Look forward to early fall! Animals are active and sunning themselves. Plants are mature, and flowers have gone to seed. The stream may have slowed down from summer drought, but discoveries at the water's edge abound.


    Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!


    A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.


    Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.


    Students must be minimum age 5 by the start of class, be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of class and must be able to stay in a group and follow instructions.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Sevim Kalyoncu
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Have fun the final weeks of summer! Look forward to early fall! Animals are active and sunning themselves. Plants are mature, and flowers have gone to seed. The stream may have slowed down from summer drought, but discoveries at the water's edge abound.


    Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!


    A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.


    Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.


    Students must be minimum age 5 by the start of class, be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of class and must be able to stay in a group and follow instructions.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Jessica Eastridge
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    This program has two in-person meetings each Monday: a 45-minute instrument family sectional at 11:40 am and a 55-minute all-instrument group practice session from 1:00 pm- 1:55 pm. Band students must take both sectional and group together. Registration for a sectional will automatically enroll the student in the group session.

    Enjoy the camaraderie and cooperation of making music with others in a school band! Join the first homeschool concert band in the region at Compass. This band is for beginner and advanced beginner musicians of brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments.


    Students in beginner percussion will learn to play the snare drum and mallet instruments (such as glockenspiel and xylophone). They will learn proper stick and mallet grip, posture, and playing position for concert percussion instrumentals. Students will learn the fundamentals of music reading. The group will practice short songs in Concert B-flat and Concert E-flat major (and their relative minors) on mallet instruments and basic rudiments on snare drum. Students will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing percussion instruments and will play both cooperatively in small ensembles and independently.


    Students in beginner woodwinds will learn to play the flute or clarinet (4th-8th grade) or alto saxophone (7th-8th grade only). They will learn how to hold their instruments with proper posture and hand position and correct embouchure (mouth position and blowing technique) for the instrument. Students will receive instruction on the parts of their instruments and how to safely, correctly, and independently assemble and clean them. Students will learn the fundamentals of music reading, and the group will practice short songs in Concert B-flat and Concert E-flat major (and their relative minors). Students will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing woodwind instruments and will play both cooperatively in small ensembles and independently.


    Students in beginner brass will learn to play the trumpet, trombone, or euphonium (4th-8th grade) and French horn or tuba (7th-8th grade students only). They will learn how to hold their instruments with proper posture and hand position and correct embouchure (mouth position and blowing technique) for the instrument. Students will receive instruction on the parts of their instruments and how to safely, correctly, and independently assemble and clean them. Students will learn the fundamentals of music reading, and the group will practice short songs in Concert B-flat and Concert E-flat major (and their relative minors). Students will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing woodwind instruments and will play both cooperatively in small ensembles and independently.



    Students will need to rent or purchase an instrument and accessories for the band. See the linked list by instrument. Mark your calendar for an Instrument Test Drive event on Tuesday, May 7 from 1:00 pm- 3:00 pm at Compass. Representatives from a local store, Music & Arts, will be on hand with instruments for students to try. They will explain rental and purchase options to parents and will sell some of the supplies that students will need. Students who enrolled in one clinic (percussion, woodwinds, or brass) during early registration may switch clinics if they change their minds about their preferred instrument after the test drive event.

    There is a $33.00 supply fee due payable to Compass on/before the start of class for the "Do It! Play (a Band Instrument)" book and workbook t and the sheet music songs used for the group band performance.>

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Jen Hallworth
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    This is a complete course in high school Algebra I which will cover fundamental concepts in algebra and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. This course is designed to emphasize the study of algebraic problem-solving with the incorporation of real-world applications. Topics in Algebra I include number systems, linear systems, rational numbers, complex numbers, exponents, roots, radicals, quadratic equations, polynomials, factoring, absolute values, ratios, and proportions. In addition, the course will cover solving and graphing systems of functions, linear equations, and inequalities. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem-solving.


    Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation in pre-algebra topics in order to take this class. In addition, students should be capable of copying the sample problems and solutions worked in class on the white board to his/her own notes as examples for completing homework.


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class to complete practice problems, homework, and assessments.



    Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.



    Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by: checking that weekly homework sets are complete; spot-checking the full solution 1-2 select problems in class each week, and giving quarterly take-home tests. Points will also be awarded for class participation. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade.

    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Algebra I: Expressions, Equations, and Applications by Paul A. Foerster. It is available in a few different editions, each of which is virtually identical: 2nd edition (ISBN-10 020125073X, ISBN-13 978-0201250732), 3rd edition (ISBN-10 0201860945, ISBN-13 978-0201860948), and Classic edition (ISBN-10 020132458X, ISBN-13 978-0201324587). It is also available under the title Foerster Algebra I, Classics edition (ISBN-10 0131657089, ISBN-13 978-0131657083). A calculator is not needed for this course.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Algebra I for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Albert Thompson
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    In this class, students will engage with American History from a unique, thoughtful perspective, facilitated by college professor Dr. Albert Thompson who is a "researcher, problem solver, and educator." Dr. Thompson is considered a historian of the state, culture, and conflict. He was homeschooled through high school and will guide high school students to use "historical data to advance solutions to contemporary problems."


    First semester will cover American History I from 1607 through the start of the War of 1812. The class will uncover history that is often overlooked or downplayed, such as the Inter-Colonial Wars as a precursor to the American Revolution. Professor Thompson encourages students to think deeply about history by introducing individuals and groups in a way that lets students put themselves in others' places. He covers the worldviews that were dominant at the time as a way to explain what motivated historical figures and decisions of the day. Conflicts will be closely examined since throughout history, war is always a catalyst that causes economic and social conditions to change dramatically in the shortest period of time. Major themes that will be covered this semester include Indigenous America, Colliding Cultures, British North America, Colonial Society, the American Revolution, a New Nation, and the Early Republic.


    Topics in this Series: First Settlement to First Crisis, 1607-1812 (Semester 1), Civil War to Reconstruction, 1812-1890 (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.


    Prerequisites: None


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week on readings. Readings should be treated as pre-readings which students complete before class in order to engage in in-class discussion.


    Assignments: Reading assignments will be communicated weekly to students. This class will not have written assignments or projects.


    Assessments: The instructor will not give quizzes or provide assessments. Parents may elect to administer online quizzes that are available through the e-textbook website for purposes of assessment their own student's understanding of major themes.


    Textbook/Materials: The class will use The American Yawp, and open-source online textbook from Stanford University Press (www.americanyawp.com). Students may read chapters online or download a pdf.


    What to Bring: Paper or notebook; pen or pencil; assigned chapter.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in American history for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Fatimah Aziz
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Students of ASL will continue to improve their fluency in this 2nd year course. As students become more advanced signers, emphasis will be on focusing on the meaning of a conversation (whole) rather than individual signs (parts). In conversation, students will learn to confirm information by asking questions in context. Second year students will continue to build their vocabulary, apply ASL grammar, and will learn to make requests, ask for advice, give opinions, make comparisons and use superlatives, and narrate stories. Other skills covered in ASL II include expressing year, phone numbers, time, and currency in numbers, appearance, clothing, giving directions, locations, etc. Each unit will include presentations and readings on Deaf culture and Deaf history. Class time will be dedicated to interactive ASL activities and signing practice.

    ASL students will have a Deaf instructor. She regularly teaches all-hearing classes and is an excellent role model for students to meet and interact with a native speaker of ASL and to lean natural facial expressions, gestures, and body language used in Deaf communications. ASL students will have more confidence when they encounter Deaf instructors in college or greet speakers of ASL in social settings. Because the instructor is Deaf, students are not permitted to speak aloud in class. This approach improves visual attention and encourages immersion in the language. Students will be able to ask questions of the instructor by writing on individual white boards, but they will be encouraged to sign in order to communicate with the instructor. Lessons are facilitated with Power Point presentations, and a professional ASL interpreter will assist the class on the first day of class.

    Hundreds of colleges and universities, including all public institutions of higher learning in Virginia, accept ASL as a distinct foreign language. This allows hearing and Deaf students to fulfill foreign language requirements for admission to college. Teens who have difficulty writing, spelling, or have challenging pronunciation in English, can be successful with ASL as a second or foreign language choice. Penn State University research demonstrated that the visual and kinesthetic elements of ASL helped to enhance the vocabulary, spelling, and reading skills in hearing students.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours each week outside of class on required vocabulary exercises, readings, and signing practice.

    Assignments: Homework assignments will be posted online in the Canvas digital classroom platform. Through Canvas, students will be asked to post short videos of themselves signing as homework. Enrolled students will be asked to review ASL 1 vocabulary, grammar, and facial expressions.

    Assessments: The instructor will assign points using a class rubric for the parent's use in assigning a course grade. Course rubrics will evaluate students on their sign production, fingerspelling, ASL grammar, facial expressions including "above the nose" grammar (brows and body movement), and "below the nose" modifiers (lip expressions).

    Textbook/Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $50.00 payable to Compass for the digital access code for the interactive e-textbook, TRUE+WAY ASL. With their subscription, students may also accces a free searchable, bilingual ASL & English dictionary, called What's the Sign?

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in World Languages for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Kerry Diederich
    Add

    Elementary artists can get in on the action as they learn about a different artist or artistic style and create representative pieces using a wide range of artistic supplies such as tempura and water color paints, pastels, pencils, cray pas, oil pastel crayons, specialty papers, sculpting media, and embellishments.


    In this workshop, the class will voyage to Paris and The Louvre museum. Students will create art inspired by Paris and its artists, mimic masterpieces in the Louvre and create special projects featuring the Eiffel Tower. There is a $15.00 supply fee due payable to the instructor on or before the start of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Karen Shumway
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Dissection! The critical lab skill that schools skip and parents hate hosting at home. This lab can be paired with any independent study or online course in high school biology or anatomy in order to gain significant hands-on experience or to complete a lab science credit.



    Students will investigate the comparative anatomy of a variety of organisms and organs through a year-long dissection study. Class time will be primarily devoted to hands-on exploration with important background information posted in Canvas as slide presentations. Students will begin with an exploration of organisms from a range of phyla, in order of increasing complexity: prokarya, simple eukarya, nematode, sponge, mussel or clam, jellyfish, starfish, earthworm, squid or octopus, crayfish, grasshopper, perch, dogfish shark, frog, owl pellets (for small mammal remains), and fetal pig. The complex organ systems of vertebrates will then be systematically explored, dissecting a critical organ for each system. Where appropriate, organs of multiple species will be used to allow comparison between vertebrates: the circulatory system (pig heart), nervous system (sheep brain), excretory system (pig kidney), sensory system (cow/sheep/pig eyeballs), and musculoskeletal system (chicken wings and cow femur). Students will also use microscopes to look at wet (i.e. fresh or live) and dry mount (i.e. prepared) organism and tissue samples throughout the year.



    The class will cover lab safety, practice proper dissection techniques, and how to set up and maintain a lab journal with notes and drawings of organs and organisms. Students will have a pre-lab activity (lecture slides, video, and/or packet) to complete each week as "admission" to the following session's dissection.



    Prerequisites: Students must have age/grade-level dexterity and fine motor skills for the detailed instrument work in this class.



    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1 hour per week outside of class.



    Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, and track grades.



    Assessments: Will not be given



    Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase The Anatomy Coloring Book (ISBN-13 : 978-0321832016)



    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $140.00 is due payable to the instructor on or before the first day of class.



    What to Bring: Students should bring a paper or a notebook, pen or pencil, and a set of colored pencils to class each week.



    What to Wear: Students should not wear any loose, drapey clothing to lab. They should also come to class with long hair tied back and should wear closed toe shoes.



    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in a laboratory science for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Mylene Nyman
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Students will enjoy making delicious recipes and family favorites that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:


  • Asparagus Gruyere Puff Pastry Bundles
  • Dumpling Soup
  • Green Bean Salad
  • Sicilian Brussels Sprouts
  • Italian Sheet Pan Chicken
  • Beef-Chaddar Mac & Cheese
  • Apple Pecan Tarts (contains nuts)
  • Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.


    Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics.


    Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4).


    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on or before the first day of class.


    What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided.


    What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).


    Cooking Class Requirements:For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Pete Van Riper
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Students will draw in a relaxed, informal studio setting, where they will learn the fundamentals of drawing along with the elements of art and principles of design. Most drawing projects are "student's own" where each artist selects their own subject to incorporate demonstrated techniques such as representing light and dark, creating texture and patterns, and shading to show dimension.


    First quarter, students will learn to translate what they observe in real life to 2D on paper. Example beginning projects include a pumpkin, a cow skull, and class favorite, "Walter" the teddy bear. Throughout the course, students will progress to draw more carefully and more accurately and to represent more refined details in their drawings.


    The instructor will demonstrate various techniques by developing a sample drawing. Students may elect to follow the class sample or may apply the drawing skills to an entirely unique drawing. This class is suitable for beginners who have never drawn before and for intermediate art students who have worked with other media and are interested in exploring drawing. Drawing can provide a relaxing, needed break from rigorous academic classes and over-scheduled lives in a fun, supportive environment.


    Topics in this Series: Everyday Objects (Quarter 1), Portraits and Creative Caricatures (Quarter 2), Creating Narrative (Quarter 3), and Imitating Illustration Styles (Quarter 4).


    Workload: Work outside of class is optional for those who wish to practice their drawing techniques.


    Assessments: Individual feedback is given in class. Formal assessments will not be given.


    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $18.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a sketchbook, a pencil box with pencils of varying hardness, and an eraser. Returning drawing students do not need to pay a supply fee and are expected to replace their drawing supplies as needed, with similar or better quality.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Taliesin Knol
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    This class begins with the transition from farm to factory. Students will begin the semester as "independently wealthy" barons and tycoons of various mid-century industries. The class will use a custom Role-Playing Game to simulate a fully industrialized economy. From day one, students will be assigned to key roles in industry, from railroads and shipping, to a variety of factories or resource extraction. They must manage their initial investments wisely or risk being overrun by their classmates. They will endeavor to dominate their market and rule the supply and demand, or risk ending up penniless. In true role-playing fashion, they will create characters and build their "backstories" to fit into this economy. Will they be Carnegies and Rockefellers, or will they run out of steam?


    Using the lessons taught in class, students will navigate their interconnected business world, learning to either cooperate with or destroy their rivals. Using their carefully documented ledgers, the class will learn to manage key business elements, from keeping their labor force happy enough not to strike, forging deals and making partnerships, and of course, influencing government policy to their benefit.


    The end of the semester should make clear how each business is interdependent on another, the benefits of cooperation or forceful acquisition. What role does a good (or bad) government play in encouraging and safeguarding investment and for whose benefit? Above all, it should stress the importance of keeping orderly records, making safe vs highly rewarding investments, and how to successfully manage working relationships. By recreating the circumstances of the industrial revolution, and navigating them in the role playing game, students should understand the why and how, to the history they've played through.


    Topics in this Series: Tycoons, Titans & Tyrants- Late 19th century (Semester 1), Corporations, Capitalists & Consumers- Early 20th century (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.


    Prerequisites: None


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.


    Assignments: Course documents including period plans, photographs and recreations will be made available through a class Google Drive link emailed to parents (and students who provide their email address), as well as a class reading list of articles/excerpts and YouTube playlist for any videos watched in class or assigned as homework.


    Assessments: Informal assessments will be given at the instructor's discretion, but assignments will not be scored or graded. Each student's financial success in the game will be an indicator of their learning and participation for purposes of assigning a grade. Parents will also be given shared access to their student's business plan with instructor and ledger, with instructor comments at the conclusion of class.


    Textbook/Materials: None


    What to Bring: Paper or notebook, pen or pencil


    Credit: Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History, Economics, or Business for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Tayler Shreve
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Information Masters transforms students into savvy consumers and producers of information capable of navigating today's intimidating infosphere. This class introduces high school students to the latest in academic and electronic resources and methodologies for conducting meaningful inquiry and research. Each week, students will develop new media literacy skills necessary for high school and college research writing.



    First semester, students will learn strategies to navigate the traditional and digital resources of a library, tips on working with a librarian, and techniques to access library resources. Each student will be asked to obtain a library card during a field trip to the local library. They will learn how to conduct a search of the library, Google Scholar, and academic search engines and practice ways to locate and skim primary sources, secondary sources, and scholarly publications.



    Students will become educated consumers of information and learn how to select the best resources for their informational needs and not merely the first ones that "pop up" in a browser search. They will practice fact-checking a source and distinguishing a verified and credible source (such as a .gov or .edu website) versus less reliable sources like Wikipedia, blogs, and tabloid articles.



    The class will learn to review reliable sources as the inspiration for a narrower, more focused research topic. They will create mini-maps, circle or identify key words, and draw Venn diagrams comparing similarities and differences on a topic in order to formulate a specific research question. Students will apply ChatGPT to their research topic to gain experience with AI tools and evaluate the accuracy and credibility of the results.



    Once students have used research to identify an area of interest, they will be guided through identifying and refining a research question. Topics can come from scientific or social science research, quantitative and/or qualitative research, or any favorite topic from favorite books and authors, video games, or music artists. Students will learn to skim read and scan sources and extract information from article abstracts. Students taking this course on-level will be expected to locate published literature on their topic, while those taking the course at the honors level will be expected to locate, interpret, and evaluate published literature. All students will be asked to write a brief summary explaining their research question, and honors students will be asked to write a one-paragraph critique of at least five resources.


    Topics in this Series: Inquiry & Investigation (Semester 1) and Research & Reflection (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.


    Prerequisites: Reading and writing at grade-level.


    Workload: On-level students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class. Honors students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class.


    Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes, track grades, and message instructor and classmates.


    Assessments: The instructor will assign points for the completion of various assignments, and parents can use the total point earned versus possible for determining a grade in the class.


    Textbook/Materials: All articles and reference materials will be available online or posted as pdfs on the class Canvas site.


    What to Bring: Students should bring a laptop or tablet to class, paper or notebook, and pen or pencil.


    Non-Meeting Days: In addition to the scheduled days-off on the published Compass schedule, this class does not meet on Monday, September 23.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English or Language Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Manal Hussein
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    This year-long, hands-on science course is a survey of key concepts in the fields of Life Science, Physical Science, and Earth Science which will give 7th and 8th grade students the fundamentals they need to tackle high school-level Biology, Chemistry, Physics, or Environmental Science. Topics covered in this course will not only provide a foundation for higher level science, but will also boost the student's confidence and fluency in discussing scientific issues, applying scientific terminology, and using scientific equipment. Content covered in this course will also enable a teen to become a more educated reader and consumer of scientific news and information.



    General life science themes include life cycles, food webs, scientific classification, cell structure, and human body systems. Topics in chemistry include states of matter, atomic structure, elements and the Periodic Table, and chemical reactions and solutions. Themes in physics include motion, position, speed and acceleration, weight (mass), gravity, friction, buoyancy and density, and electricity and magnetism. The earth science unit will cover the rock cycle, minerals, rocks, fossils, weathering and erosion.



    In this class, students will learn about the principles of scientific investigations and engineering practices, the Scientific Method, and preparation of formal lab reports. They will practice taking measurements, recording data, converting units of measure, and related mathematical concepts such as significant figures, International System of Units, scientific notation, graphs, and data analysis. Students will learn how to provide evidence to support explanations and solutions for their investigations.



    This class is appropriate for a tween or teen who has had limited middle school level science and who wants to prepare for high school science.



    In general, a topic will be discussed one week and then the corresponding lab or activity will be performed in class the following week. Microscope work will be used in some life science labs. For a more robust introduction to life and lab sciences, students may want to concurrently register for the Dissection Lab class and/or the Bio Chem Learning Labs program.



    Meeting Dates: This is a 29-week course that will not meet during the week of May 23-16, 2025.



    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class on reading and homework assignments.



    Assignments: All class announcements and assignments will be communicated via a Google Classroom.



    Assessments: Informal, qualitative and constructive feedback will be given on submitted assignments. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided.



    Textbook: Students should purchase Everything You Need to Ace Science in One Big Fat Notebook: The Complete Middle School Study Guide by Workman Publishing (ISBN # 978-0761160953)



    Materials: Students should bring the following supplies to each class: colored pencils, glue stick, pens or pencils to write with, and a ruler.



    Lab/Supply Fee: A lab fee of $100.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.



    Credit: This course is not recommended as a high school credit.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Kerry Diederich
    Add

    This workshop is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art or artist, view sample works, and then will create a projects in the style of the artist using a wide variety of materials and representative colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, chalk, fabric, and watercolor paints.


    In this session, Junior Artists will celebrate the wacky, wonderful world of Dr. Seuss. Students will use a variety of materials to create the colorful, imaginative art from some of Dr. Seuss favorites. There is a $10.00 supply fee payable to the instructor on or before the start of the program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Tia Murchie-Beyma
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    This year-long course dives into change and continuity from 1200 CE-present in Africa, Asia, the Americas, Europe, and Oceania. If you want to better understand Russia's interest in Ukraine or China's motives in Africa, how the world came to drive Japanese cars, Zimbabwe's 2020 land offer to white farmers abroad, or more about the roots of your own family's story and its ties to other places and times, this is the course for you.


    Global connections were not born with jet travel nor Columbus. By the early 1200s, Persian historian Juvayni, reported that one might walk safely from Southeast Asia to Eastern Europe- thanks to Mongol army units stationed along the way. Silk Roads linked Moscow to Tibet. Vibrant Indian Ocean trade circulated goods, people, and animals from China to Indonesia to India, with links to East African coastal cities and the wider Muslim world, including Arab and Turkic peoples. In 200 more years, Muslim Admiral Zheng He would command China's legendary treasure fleet.


    What of the Americas? Despite sporadic contacts, like Leif Ericson's disastrous family trip to Canada around 1000 CE, the Old World remained ignorant of lands from the Arctic Circle to Tierra del Fuego. Yet precursors to Incan and Aztec empires built impressive urban city-states, while farther north, Cahokia's pyramids and Mesa Verde's cliffside apartments boomed, the Iroquois League united five great nations, and countless other groups thrived as hunter-gatherers, horticulturists, whalers, fishers, and farmers. At 1200 CE, when this course begins, two halves of the world had not yet collided.


    Students will use tools and perspectives of historians to see this collision in wider context and learn what else built today's world. The class will analyze primary sources created at the time studied and secondary sources such as historian accounts. Students will learn to spot symbols, think critically about claims, and develop arguments based fairly on evidence. The group will interpret maps, letters, paintings, ceramics, propaganda posters, murals, sculptures, photographs, and speeches to understand context, causation, continuity, and change. Students will learn how to run, ruin, revolt from, and reform empires and nations. By the end of the course, students may not have memorized dozens of dates (unless they want to), but they will have a much clearer idea of who was where, when, and why- and how- that has affected us.


    Note: This is a reading-heavy course suited for students who can commit to completing homework BEFORE each meeting. That prepares you for active discussion, role play, and activities in class. The course is not lecture-based, but instead is taught as a participatory seminar. Simply cannot learn the rich course material by simply attending. However, if you come with your readings completed, ready to ask questions and apply what you've learned, the world (history) is yours!


    Levels This course is offered at three levels: On-Level, Honors, and Advanced Placement (AP). Each has a different workload, but all meet together. On-Level students use the same college-level textbook, but have fewer readings, less homework, and less rigorous assessments. Honors students have assignm2ents that engage higher-level analysis and historical thinking skills. AP students work at a university freshman level and have the potential to earn college credit or placement through the spring 2025 AP exam. Once the course begins, students may move down a level anytime, but the instructor will consider "bumping up" on a case-by-case basis only. Before August 1, students must email Compass to (1) choose On-Level, Honors, or Advanced Placement (AP); and (2) provide separate email addresses for student plus adult observer. This allows the instructor to send level-specific Canvas invitations in time for book purchases and completing homework due before your first meeting.


    Schedule: There are two weekly meetings: (1) Friday 12:00 pm -12:55 pm in-person for all students and (2) Monday tentatively scheduled for 12:00 pm- 12:55 pm online (subject to an alternate time by consensus of AP-enrolled students). The latter is required for AP students, but recorded and open to all. For Honors and On-Level, this is a 28-week course that ends two weeks early due to AP exam timing. AP students have 31 weeks, as they begin two weeks before the regular Compass start date and have an additional session for a mock exam.


    Workload: Honors and On-Level students should plan 4-5 hours per week outside meetings for reading and homework. AP students typically need 6 hours or more, depending on reading speed and experience. All levels use materials written at a freshman college level. Students must be highly skilled readers or have robust reading support at home.


    Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments; upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests; track grades; message instructor and classmates; and attend virtual conferences. AP students start asynchronously two weeks early with homework due August 22 and 29. All sections will have brief assignments due September 5, the day before the first class meeting on September 6.


    Assessments: Completed homework, projects, quizzes, and tests receive points and narrative feedback. Parents can calculate a letter grade using the student's points earned divided by points available, in weighted categories that include assignments, reading quizzes, tests, and participation and presentations. Parents may view all scoring and comments at any time through the Canvas site.


    Textbooks: Students and observers will receive Canvas invitations by August 5 to access to syllabus and initial assignments once they have provided a student and observer email address. All students should purchase or rent: Ways of the World: A Global History with Sources, 3rd ed. 2016, by Strayer, Robert W. (ISBN 9781319022723). Look for an olive green cover with woodcut print of the first Japanese commercial railway in 1872. AP students will need two additional books: (1) A History of the World in 6 Glasses by Tom Standage, 2005 (any ISBN); and (2) Advanced Placement World History: Modern by Logan/Perfection Learning Logan, 2019 (ISBN 1531129161).


    About AP: "AP" is a trademark of the College Board, which owns and designs the course outline and "audits" (i.e. approves) high school instructors who employ their expertise and creativity to deliver the college freshman-level content. The College Board's summary of the AP World History program can be read HERE, and the instructor AP Course Audit Approval form can be viewed HERE. https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/media/pdf/ap-world-history-modern-course-overview.pdf)



    AP Fees: Due to the instructional time, an additional tuition fee of $200 is assessed for the Monday AP lecture session for students approved to take AP level. AP Students must register separately for the Monday lecture session. The fee is not refundable if the student decides midyear to switch to Honors or On-Level. The fee for the College Board's AP World History: Modern exam in May 2025 is not included. Each family is responsible for scheduling and paying for their student's AP exam.


    AP Enrollment: Students who have taken a prior course with this instructor may discuss AP enrollment through conversation or e-mail with her. If new to this instructor, please email Compass to request a short questionnaire and written assignment prior to selecting AP level.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in World History for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: Completion of Algebra I

    1
    Tia Murchie-Beyma
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    AP students are required to enroll in this additional lecture section. The lecture is recorded and open to all Modern World History Students. It is tentatively scheduled for 12:00 pm- 12:55 pm online (subject to an alternate time by consensus of AP-enrolled students). A physical meeting room will be designated for on-campus students who have classes immediately before or after this virtual session.

    Prerequisites: Completion of Algebra I

    1
    Kathy Preisinger
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Music Makers explores many facets of the musical experience- singing, moving, dancing, listening, and playing instruments. The class will explore musical stories, famous composers, and different genres of music while playing a variety of percussion instruments (drums, sticks, triangles, woodblocks and more!). Students will learn to play a beginning pitched instrument on glockenspiels (a small barred instrument like the xylophone). Using an Orff-based approach, students will learn to read and write beginning musical notation and learn musical terminology all in the context of fun and play. Music Makers classes provide a fun, pressure-free environment to experience music and movement with the goal of general musicianship and excellent preparation for further, individual instrument lessons if desired. Music Makers helps every child acquire the essential building blocks for a future of musical learning! Students may join Music Makers at any quarter, and they may return again and again since new music, themes, and skills are constantly introduced.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Sevim Kalyoncu
    Add

    Venture outdoors each day to explore the woods with a senior naturalist and mentor while learning valuable survival skills. Students will learn how to construct a temporary debris shelter, make cordage, identify edibles, track animals, purify water, perform basic first aid, and use maps and compass (orienteering). Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things you encounter outdoors, safe exploration of the woods, how to be a good steward of nature, and what to do if you ever became lost or injured in the woods. The group will also take daily hikes and play games in the woods. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong connection to nature and to the real world! Explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. For information on where the class meets, what to wear, and inclement weather, see the webpage for Compass's Nature Quest program. This is a 4-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sevim Kalyoncu
    Add

    Venture outdoors each day to explore the woods with a senior naturalist and mentor while learning valuable survival skills. Students will learn how to construct a temporary debris shelter, make cordage, identify edibles, track animals, purify water, perform basic first aid, and use maps and compass (orienteering). Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things you encounter outdoors, safe exploration of the woods, how to be a good steward of nature, and what to do if you ever became lost or injured in the woods. The group will also take daily hikes and play games in the woods. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong connection to nature and to the real world! Explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. For information on where the class meets, what to wear, and inclement weather, see the webpage for Compass's Nature Quest program. This is a 4-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Ney Mello
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Students will learn a fun, simplified way to write songs from a professional, award-winning, soundtrack composer. Each week, students will tackle a different phase of songwriting. This class is open to students who play instruments, sing, write lyrics, or a combination of all three talents!


    The group will learn about the song structure that is popular today with verse, chorus, pre-chorus, pre-verse, intros, and outros. They will listen to some examples of songs to convey what a verse, chorus, and bridge are, and will cover an overview of the basics of functional and classical harmony.


    Each week, the group will approach a different stage of the songwriting process, working through ideas on their instruments, writing lyrics, or both. Student artists will be guided through making their own background tracks to encourage self- expression and to allow individual voices to emerge. They can use songs they know as inspiration, but they will be encouraged to create everything like a real songwriter. Musicians will be given ready-made chord options so their focus can remain on the creative aspects of songwriting.


    If the student is only writing lyrics, he/she will be assigned a songwriting partner student who will write the melody and chords. In this case, the lyricist student will be provided with that song's work in progress tracks to write to at home.


    Students who wish to record their songs should download the free Abbey Road 'Topline' app for Android or Apple smartphones. (The instructor uses this app professionally to share songs and concepts via e-mail, text message, or over social media with colleagues.) The app allows the artist to record songs in sections and play back all together. Microphones will not be needed.


    The workshop is open to all instrument and voice students, not just guitar. Any style of music is acceptable (pop, folk, country, etc), but all lyrics must be rated "E" for everyone.


    Topics in this Series: Songwriting Studio for Teens (Semester 1), Songwriting Studio for Teens (Semester 2), etc. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class .


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in fine arts or electives for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Sirdley Taborga
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Que pasa? Get ready for a full year of intermediate level high school Spanish! This is a conversation-focused program in which students will build their vocabulary describing homes and chores; planning a party; health, body parts and sports; vacations, leisure time activities, fun events and places of interest; communicating via phone and computer; and daily routines. There will be a strong emphasis on conversation with common grammar concepts such as regular and irregular past tense verbs and common grammar concepts such as commands, direct and indirect object pronouns, reflexive verbs, learned and practiced in the context of conversation (rather than stand-along grammar exercises).



    Class will be conducted primarily in Spanish and will focus on listening and speaking skills, asking and answering questions. At home, students will be responsible for practicing vocabulary and grammar and completing written assignments, and watching language immersion video clips.



    Workload: Students should expect to spend 30-45 minutes per day approximately 4 days per week on homework outside of class.



    Assignments: Are sent by e-mail to parents and students. Students must have access to a computer for videos that are assigned.



    Assessments: Quizzes and tests will be scored with a points system that parents can use in calculating a grade.



    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent Avancemos!: Student Edition Level 2, 2018 edition (ISBN # 978-0544841956)



    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Foreign Language for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Austin Martin
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    How do you explore the 139 million square miles of the earth's surface that is ocean when only 25% of the seafloor has been fully mapped? From finding shipwrecks to observing marine life, exploring hydrothermal vents to performing underwater inspections, and carrying out critical search, rescue, and recovery missions, submersible robots known as ROVs, or remotely operated vehicles, are up to the task.



    In this class, students will work in pairs to build, test, redesign, and deploy a small ROV called a SeaPerch. SeaPerch is an "innovative underwater robotics" program sponsored by the Office of Naval Research, NOAA Ocean Education Cooperative Institute, and RoboNation. Working from a kit of stock components, students will first build and test-drive the base model SeaPerch while learning about topics like buoyancy, hydrodynamics, propulsion, and displacement. Teams will learn basic circuitry and how to solder electronic components, first with a light-up practice circuit board, then by assembling, soldering, and wiring the control board for their ROV.



    Once teams have assembled their SeaPerches, the class will meet at a nearby community pool for their first in-water trial. Students will test their assemblies and practice their skills of driving and maneuvering their ROV underwater. Next, it will be back to the classroom workshop to make modifications to their designs, and back to the pool for the iterative design-build-test-modify engineering process. Once teams have fully functional "stock" SeaPerches and understand how decisions such as the placement of propellers and floats affect performance, they will modify and customize their designs while adding features such as hooks or arms to perform underwater tasks. Ultimately, the SeaPerch ROVs will go through an underwater hoop obstacle course and complete challenges like gathering rings from the pool floor.



    Students will gain an understanding of challenges faced by scientists and engineers in underwater applications and will be exposed to careers in mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, marine/nautical engineering, marine sciences, oceanography, and more. In class, they will learn to use hand tools such as a ratcheting PVC cutter, wire cutter, wire stripper, soldering iron/solder, solder removal tool, clamps, screwdrivers, and more. They will also work with waterproofing, adhesives, and fasteners. Teams will be encouraged to keep an engineering design notebook with sketches, performance data, observations, and modifications. Each team will be required to prepare and submit a Technical Design Report using a template and rubric, and the teams will against other Compass teams.


    Students who wish to add enhancements to their final build such as enamel paint, more powerful motors, lights, sensors, depth gauge, or underwater camera, may purchase their own accessories at a hobby or electronics store to install in class. (Enhancements cannot exceed $25.00 to remain eligible for the SeaPerch regional competition.)



    Schedule: This is a 24-week program that will conclude on March 31, 2025 with a small competition and parent showcase.



    Note: Parents should anticipate 3-4 class sessions to be held at the nearby Reston YMCA pool and plan for transportation there (0.9 miles).



    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.



    Assignments: Assignments, if any, will be communicated in class and limited to individual investigation.



    Assessments: Will not be given



    Textbook/Materials: None



    Lab/Supply Fee:

    There is a $155.00 supply fee due payable to Compass for students who are willing to work with a partner (and flip a coin who keeps the ROV). Alternatively, a student could opt to pay $235.00 for their own SeaPerch which they would build individually and keep at the end of the program.



    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a partial credit in technology or career exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Mylene Nyman
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    The tantalizing aroma of cookies in the oven. A mouth-watering burst of mint. The silky feel of melted chocolate. The sticky sweet of fresh-made caramel. A subtle hint of lemon. Student bakers will enjoy these delicious sensations- and more- as they explore the world of baking homemade desserts.


    Sweet Shop treats are scrumptious, fun, and simple to make. Each week they will prepare a fresh, handmade dessert or sweet such as: pies, cakes, cookies, tarts, trifles, mousses, puddings, candies, fudge, brittle, or chocolate. The class will include some icing, decorating, and garnishing techniques for completed desserts. This quarter, the Compass bakers' culinary adventures will include:


  • Mini Apple Crumble
  • Apple Pecan Bread (contains nuts)
  • Caramel-Apple Monkey Bread Mini Loaves
  • Blue Pear Puff Tarts
  • Fall Spiced Pear and Date Upside Down Cake
  • Nantucket Cranberry Tart
  • Caramel Pecan Cheesecake Pie (contains nuts)
  • Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. This engaging sweets class will get students excited about helping in the kitchen and entertaining. They will learn important baking skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary is introduced each week.


    Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics.


    Topics in this Series: Decadent Delights (Quarter 1); Gooey Goodies (Quarter 2), Best Bon Bons (Quarter 3), and Tasty Treats (Quarter 4).


    Assessments: Qualitative Feedback will be given in class. Formal grades/assessment will not be given.


    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on or before the first day of class.


    What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided.


    What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).


    Cooking Class Requirements: For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Sevim Kalyoncu
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Have fun the final weeks of summer! Look forward to early fall! Animals are active and sunning themselves. Plants are mature, and flowers have gone to seed. The stream may have slowed down from summer drought, but discoveries at the water's edge abound.


    Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!


    A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.


    Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Sevim Kalyoncu
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Have fun the final weeks of summer! Look forward to early fall! Animals are active and sunning themselves. Plants are mature, and flowers have gone to seed. The stream may have slowed down from summer drought, but discoveries at the water's edge abound.


    Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!


    A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.


    Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Judith Harmon
    Add

    Steampunk, anime, comic, manga, or fantasy: some teens love cosplay and are drawn to the world of costumed characters and imagined personas. Many cosplayers make their own costumes, and in this workshop, teens will learn basics of machine to create a custom, lined cloak or cape. The workshop instructor is a professional seamstress, costume designer, and cosplayer, and she will help each student customize his/her cloak or cape to portray the genre or character they are interested in. She will assist each student in learning to embellish simple costume pieces for a more elaborate or authentic look. Students must bring working, portable sewing machine* with foot pedal, power cord, and at least one bobbin to class where they will learn about the components, and functions, along with care and use if their machines. They will begin with simple machine-stitching exercises before beginning their project. Students will also learn how to read and use a sewing pattern, and how to take measurements. The group will learn about hems, elastic, and closures and how/where to use them. A list of fabric quantities/types and notions will be provided prior to the start of class. Storage will be provided for machines and supplies to remain overnight during the workshop. A supply fee of $15.00 is due payable to the instructor on or before the first day of class for patterns and supplies that she is providing. *A limited number of sewing machines are available to rent through the instructor for $20.00 per day. This is a 3-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
    Add

    Warrior princess, superhero, villain, pirate, or alien. In the world of cosplay, costumes and personas would not be complete without customized accessories. Many cosplayers make their own costumes, and in this workshop, teens will learn crafting techniques to customize and embellish a sword and a dagger. The workshop instructor is a professional seamstress, costume designer, and cosplayer, and she will help each student customize his/her own sword, dagger, and a scabbard or sheath for one weapon. Students will work from pre-made blanks and will paint, glue, and decorate their creations. Example embellishments include leather wrapping, wire wrapping, and adhered resin jewels. Using materials such as EVA foam, leather, or fabric, students will also design and create a scabbard or sheath for one of their blades. The mock gear will be crafted in accordance with official Cosplay rules governing play weapons in conventions/gatherings. A supply fee of $85.00 is due payable to the instructor on or before the first day of class. This is a 3-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
    Add

    You may have dreamed about heading to Hogwarts, but if you have not yet received your offer of admission, you can continue your preparations for the famous school of wizardry by creating key apparatus from different classes at Hogwarts. In this workshop, future wizards will craft three magical pieces: a Monster Book of Monsters, the textbook used in your Care of Magical Creatures class with Hagrid; a Potted Mandrake, the magical animated plant from Professor Sprout's Herbology class; and a Patronus Shadow Box, the embodiment of a spell from Professor Lupin's Defense Against the Dark Arts class. Muggles will learn a variety of crafting techniques and connect with other fans of Harry Potter as they create magical projects inspired by their favorite childhood books. A supply fee of $60.00 is due payable to the instructor on or before the first day of class. This is a 3-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Catherine Vanlandingham
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Reading and writing affect a student's achievement in all aspects of schoolwork, so strong language arts skills are fundamental to success in homeschooling. This weekly class is a small group of 3-6 students who read and write at a similar level. Students follow a comprehensive language arts curriculum under the guidance of an experienced reading specialist. Each Monday class meeting will include a short story with select vocabulary words, a graphic organizer, main themes, and embedded learning objectives. Students will continue to practice language arts skills at home with easy-to-implement "page a day" workbook activities assigned by the instructor and implemented by the parents. For most early elementary learners, enrollment in Reading Rally can serve as a complete, self-contained language arts curriculum where families will not need additional resources in reading, comprehension, composition, spelling, and grammar.


    Weekly readings are organized around thematic units. The instructor will teach students how to approach a new story as a fun reading puzzle. For example, before reading aloud in class, students will conduct a "picture walk" to overview and predict elements of the story from the illustrations, review a graphic organizer to assist in writing sentences, define vocabulary words, and preview summary questions. Then, the instructor will read the story aloud, model good reading practices, and encourage students to read. Students will only be asked to read aloud when they feel comfortable and have built trust in their group. All follow-up activities are designed around learning objectives such as decoding, comprehension, prediction, visualization, and verbalization.


    READINESS: As a comprehensive language arts curriculum, a student must be at a similar grade level ability in reading, comprehension, and writing. Early readers who have not learned to write, for example, or emerging readers who struggle with comprehenion, may not be a good fit for this class. In addition, students must have the hand-eye coordination and basic handwriting skills to be able to copy the instructor's many notes, examples, and definitions from the classroom white board into their own notebook.


    Grade level references in Reading Rally are based on scope, sequence and pacing that correlate to the Grade Level Equivalent (GLE) standards of learning. Students who are more than one year behind in GLE in language arts or who have a difference in skill level between their reading and writing may be recommended for a second, weekly class meeting on Fridays or 1-on-1 private instruction to make up ground in reading or writing skills. Additional class meetings or private instruction will be an additional cost.


    ATTENTION! Parents should not register for a Reading Rally class until they have had a Language Arts Skills Inventory (i.e. brief assessment) and placement determination by the reading specialist. This must be scheduled separately through Compass at a cost of $125.00. The fee is due prior to the assessment and is not refundable in the event the child is not recommended for a reading group. The instructor has experience working with reluctant and fearful readers, those who are late bloomers, neurodivergent, dyslexic, and ESOL students. However, she might recommend a more complete evaluation by another professional if she suspects other learning differences are impacting the student's langauge arts learning.


    Students will work from a spiral bound copy of reading textbook and workbook by Pearson. A class fee of $101.00 is due payable to Compass for the required books.


    Students continuing from one semester to the next will receive priority registration to remain with their reading group.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Catherine Vanlandingham
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Reading and writing affect a student's achievement in all aspects of schoolwork, so strong language arts skills are fundamental to success in homeschooling. This weekly class is a small group of 3-6 students who read and write at a similar level. Students follow a comprehensive language arts curriculum under the guidance of an experienced reading specialist. Each Monday class meeting will include a short story with select vocabulary words, a graphic organizer, main themes, and embedded learning objectives. Students will continue to practice language arts skills at home with easy-to-implement "page a day" workbook activities assigned by the instructor and implemented by the parents. For most early elementary learners, enrollment in Reading Rally can serve as a complete, self-contained language arts curriculum where families will not need additional resources in reading, comprehension, composition, spelling, and grammar.


    Weekly readings are organized around thematic units. The instructor will teach students how to approach a new story as a fun reading puzzle. For example, before reading aloud in class, students will conduct a "picture walk" to overview and predict elements of the story from the illustrations, review a graphic organizer to assist in writing sentences, define vocabulary words, and preview summary questions. Then, the instructor will read the story aloud, model good reading practices, and encourage students to read. Students will only be asked to read aloud when they feel comfortable and have built trust in their group. All follow-up activities are designed around learning objectives such as decoding, comprehension, prediction, visualization, and verbalization.


    READINESS: As a comprehensive language arts curriculum, a student must be at a similar grade level ability in reading, comprehension, and writing. Early readers who have not learned to write, for example, or emerging readers who struggle with comprehenion, may not be a good fit for this class. In addition, students must have the hand-eye coordination and basic handwriting skills to be able to copy the instructor's many notes, examples, and definitions from the classroom white board into their own notebook.


    Grade level references in Reading Rally are based on scope, sequence and pacing that correlate to the Grade Level Equivalent (GLE) standards of learning. Students who are more than one year behind in GLE in language arts or who have a difference in skill level between their reading and writing may be recommended for a second, weekly class meeting on Fridays or 1-on-1 private instruction to make up ground in reading or writing skills. Additional class meetings or private instruction will be an additional cost.


    ATTENTION! Parents should not register for a Reading Rally class until they have had a Language Arts Skills Inventory (i.e. brief assessment) and placement determination by the reading specialist. This must be scheduled separately through Compass at a cost of $125.00. The fee is due prior to the assessment and is not refundable in the event the child is not recommended for a reading group. The instructor has experience working with reluctant and fearful readers, those who are late bloomers, neurodivergent, dyslexic, and ESOL students. However, she might recommend a more complete evaluation by another professional if she suspects other learning differences are impacting the student's langauge arts learning.


    Students will work from a spiral bound copy of reading textbook and workbook by Pearson. A class fee of $XX.00 is due payable to Compass for the required books.


    Students continuing from one semester to the next will receive priority registration to remain with their reading group.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Catherine Vanlandingham
    Add

    Reading and writing affect a student's achievement in all aspects of schoolwork, so strong language arts skills are fundamental to success in homeschooling. This weekly class is a small group of 3-6 students who read and write at a similar level. Students follow a comprehensive language arts curriculum under the guidance of an experienced reading specialist. Each Monday class meeting will include a short story with select vocabulary words, a graphic organizer, main themes, and embedded learning objectives. Students will continue to practice language arts skills at home with easy-to-implement "page a day" workbook activities assigned by the instructor and implemented by the parents. For most early elementary learners, enrollment in Reading Rally can serve as a complete, self-contained language arts curriculum where families will not need additional resources in reading, comprehension, composition, spelling, and grammar.


    Weekly readings are organized around thematic units. The instructor will teach students how to approach a new story as a fun reading puzzle. For example, before reading aloud in class, students will conduct a "picture walk" to overview and predict elements of the story from the illustrations, review a graphic organizer to assist in writing sentences, define vocabulary words, and preview summary questions. Then, the instructor will read the story aloud, model good reading practices, and encourage students to read. Students will only be asked to read aloud when they feel comfortable and have built trust in their group. All follow-up activities are designed around learning objectives such as decoding, comprehension, prediction, visualization, and verbalization.


    READINESS: As a comprehensive language arts curriculum, a student must be at a similar grade level ability in reading, comprehension, and writing. Early readers who have not learned to write, for example, or emerging readers who struggle with comprehenion, may not be a good fit for this class. In addition, students must have the hand-eye coordination and basic handwriting skills to be able to copy the instructor's many notes, examples, and definitions from the classroom white board into their own notebook.


    Grade level references in Reading Rally are based on scope, sequence and pacing that correlate to the Grade Level Equivalent (GLE) standards of learning. Students who are more than one year behind in GLE in language arts or who have a difference in skill level between their reading and writing may be recommended for a second, weekly class meeting on Fridays or 1-on-1 private instruction to make up ground in reading or writing skills. Additional class meetings or private instruction will be an additional cost.


    ATTENTION! Parents should not register for a Reading Rally class until they have had a Language Arts Skills Inventory (i.e. brief assessment) and placement determination by the reading specialist. This must be scheduled separately through Compass at a cost of $125.00. The fee is due prior to the assessment and is not refundable in the event the child is not recommended for a reading group. The instructor has experience working with reluctant and fearful readers, those who are late bloomers, neurodivergent, dyslexic, and ESOL students. However, she might recommend a more complete evaluation by another professional if she suspects other learning differences are impacting the student's langauge arts learning.


    Students will work from a spiral bound copy of reading textbook and workbook by Pearson. A class fee of $95.00 is due payable to Compass for the required books.


    Students continuing from one semester to the next will receive priority registration to remain with their reading group.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    What happens when you don't have enough time to tell or watch the whole story? Well, you can always try the abridged version! On stage, abridged versions can fast-paced, quirky compilations or hilarious highlights of familiar full-length stories. Teens will enjoy the creativity and camaraderie of selecting, casting, rehearsing, and performing an abridged, one-act play. The class will begin by reading through three* possible scripts to select one that bests suits their group and grabs their interest from among:



  • The Greek Mythology Olympiaganza
  • The Norse Mythology Ragnasplosion
  • The Brothers Grimm Spectaculathon

  • Students, along with their acting coach, will cast, rehearse, and coordinate a class performance. Teens will enjoy taking on unusual personas and bringing their characters to life while interacting with classmates. They will be encouraged to design and assemble simple costumes, props, and backdrops from items at home. They will be expected to learn their lines and fully participate in planning their performance. The group will perform the 45-50 minute piece for family and friends at the end of the semester.



    Classes in acting and theater education build a teen's confidence along with improving their social and communication skills. This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, are flexible and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work collaboratively in a group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class.



    (*An additional script might be introduced based on final cast size.)

    Topics in this Series: Theater Abridged (Semester 1), It's Not What it Seems (Semester 2). Continuing students from the prior quarter will receive priority pre-registration for next semester.



    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.



    Assignments: If any, will be posted in a Google Classroom.



    Assessments: Informal, qualitative feedback will be given in class throughout the semester. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided.



    Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a copy of the licensed script, performance royalty, and project materials.



    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Mylene Nyman
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    The warm, welcoming smell of baking bread, flavorful fondant, carefully crackled creme brulee, mile-high mille-feuille, and proper puffed pastry. These are just some of the specialized baking techniques that Compass bakers will learn in Advanced Baking Academy. From pate a choux to piecrust, students chefs will create more complex baked items in this course. This quarter, the Compass bakers' culinary adventures will include:


  • Apple Meringue Cupcakes
  • Layered Pumpkin Pastry
  • Pumpkin Spice Swiss Roll Cake
  • Iced Raspberry Danish Braid
  • Chocolate Pistachio Tartufo (contains nuts)
  • Chocolate Mint Cream Cookies
  • Gluten-Free Sugar Plums (contains nuts)
  • This engaging advanced baked goods class will get students excited about pastries for a career, side gig, hobby, or special occasions. Some recipes will be completed over two class periods, and several, due to the complexity of the dough or crust, will be sent home with instructions on how to fill or finish baking. Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. They will learn important baking skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, garnishes, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary is introduced each week.


    Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics.


    Topics in this Series: Delightful Desserts (Quarter 1); Seasonal Sweets (Quarter 2); Perfect Pastries (Quarter 3); Creative Confections (Quarter 4).


    Assessments: Qualitative Feedback will be given in class. Formal grades/assessment will not be given.


    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.


    What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided.


    What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).


    Cooking Class Requirements. For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in career exploration, fine arts, or electives for purposes of a high school transcript.


    Prerequisites: Prior Confection or Sweet Shop Class or Instructor Permission

    1
    Taliesin Knol
    Add

    Castles were the ultimate expression of Medieval political power. From there, the noble few could rule the peasant masses, sending out elite knights to exert their will on the countryside, collecting taxes and making war. The designs of castles varied from simple wooden forts and towers to devilishly complicated stone monoliths with layers of defenses, all to allow few to contend with many. It was usually so monumentally dangerous and ineffective to attack these fortresses head on, that the preferred methods of subduing them were either treachery or starvation. But for those opponents who could muster huge armies, amass proper siege equipment, and employ tactics, the successful storming of a castle could be the turning point in an entire war. This class will examine the evolution of castle defenses in the Middle Ages. Students will either work individually to create small towers and wooden motte-and-bailey forts or work cooperatively to recreate massive historical stone castles, like those of the Normans and French in Europe or the Crusaders in the Middle East. But what goes up, must come down, and students will build these dioramas to recreate castles under siege, completed with attacking forces and battle machines. Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will each form a 10" X 14" shaped, foam diorama with landscape and architectural elements (hills, valleys, rivers, ridges, vegetation, stone walls, moats, towers, etc) to represent a medieval castle. Students will each receive 1:72 scale soldiers to populate their construction. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate a larger fortress. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Axis and Allies gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how a battle against a castle might have progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices. The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical background and circumstances leading up to the specific battle. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. This is a 4-day workshop.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Taliesin Knol
    Add

    The Second World War was a titanic struggle across the entire planet, but since our planet is 71% water, that means the battles took place in the oceans too. No empire could dominate the world without also controlling the seas, using massive, floating steel "castles" with the largest guns ever made, in concert with airplanes hunting targets from hundreds of miles away and deadly submarines beneath the waves. This class will use scale warships to re-enact the key naval battles of WWII as they happened, scouting vast trackless oceans to find the enemy fleet being found. In doing so, the class will learn about the technology and economic factors that allowed different nations' navies to operate and how those affected the outcome of the war from the immense shipyards of America to the submarine pens of Nazi occupied Europe. Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will each form a 10" X 14" shaped, foam diorama with landscape to represent a scene of a famous historical engagement. Students will each receive scale miniature naval ships to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate the larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Axis and Allies gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices. The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical background and circumstances leading up to the specific battle. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. This is a 4-day workshop.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    David Chelf
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    This is a complete course in high school Calculus which will cover fundamental concepts and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. Topics in Calculus include limits of functions (one-sided and two-sided limits, limits at infinity and infinite limits, limits of sequences, and continuity of functions), derivatives (various definitions of derivatives, estimating derivatives from tables and graphs, rules of differentiation, properties of derivatives, separable differential equations, and the Mean Value Theorem), applications of derivatives (related rates, optimization, and exponential growth and decay models), integrals (basic techniques of integration including basic antiderivatives and substitution), applications of integrals (in finding areas and volumes, describing motion, and as accumulation functions), and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem-solving.


    Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation in PreCalculus in order to take this class.


    Level: This course is offered at two levels, Honors and Advanced Placement (AP). The scope and sequence are identical, however AP students may have additional practice problems. Students who wish to take the AP exam must register and pay for their own exam through the College Board in fall 2024 for the May 2025 exam.


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-1.5 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 7-day cycle, with assignments posted on Thursdays and due the following Thursday. Students are advised to start homework once it is assigned (i.e., not wait until the night before it is due). Weekly homework assignments will be of a length that a student should be able to complete them in two or three at-home work sessions. Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of their work.


    Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.


    Assessments: Student progress will be assessed by: (1) The instructor checking that weekly homework sets are attempted and complete and (2) detailed grading of periodic take-home tests. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. See the instructor's webpage for detailed homework and test policy, including late work and re-work.


    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Calculus: Single Variable/Early Transcendentals, 8th edition by James Stewart (ISBN-13 9781305270336). A scientific calculator similar to the Casio fx-115ES PLUS is required for this class, and it is highly recommended that students preparing for the AP exam have a graphing calculator similar to the TI-83. Students without a graphing calculator must have access to desmos.com and/or wolframalpha.com for graphing assignments.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Calculus for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Karen Shumway
    Add

    This intensive, "boot camp" style workshop includes the "Greatest Hits" of high school chemistry lab work and introduces students to the range of concepts in high school chemistry. Students will conduct experiments demonstrating the five types of chemical reactions (single-displacement, double-displacement, synthesis, decomposition, and combustion.) They will test the physical and chemical separation of compounds, acid-base chemistry, the gas laws, oxidation-reduction, and colligative properties. Finally, participants will experiment with the properties of solutions with flame tests, electrical conductivity, and the Tyndall Effect. This lab intensive is for high school students who are pursuing or who have recently completed a virtual or textbook-only high school chemistry course that did not include hands-on lab work. The course can also serve as a preview for high school students who will be taking a full course in high school chemistry in the fall of 2024. It is suitable for a student who had an incomplete course in chemistry and needs "a little extra" work to conclude the course, or any other high school student who enjoys laboratory work. Prior to beginning the workshop, students will receive a list of labs, principle topics, and corresponding videos to serve as a review or a pre-lab overview. For safety reasons, Chemistry Lab has a dress code more restrictive than the general Compass dress code: (1) Long hair must be tied back (male or female); (2) Shirts must have at least short sleeves (such as a t-shirt). Tank tops and sleeveless shirts are not permitted. (3) Students must wear long pants. Shorts are not permitted. (4) Students must wear closed-toe shoes. Open toe sandals, slides, and flip-flops are not permitted. There is a $75.00 supply fee due payable to the instructor on or before the first day. This is a five-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Jessica Eastridge
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Children will enjoy the camaraderie and cooperation of making music together with others in a beginning school band! They will be introduced to brass and woodwind instruments using child-sized plastic instruments from Nuvo. These instruments offer the same fingering, hand positions, embouchure (mouth position and blowing technique) and reeds as their full-sized metal and wood counterparts in a range of fun, lively colors. Parents should purchase the Nuvo Toot for a child wanting to learn flute or the Nuvo Dood for a child wanting to learn a single reed instrument like the clarinet or saxophone. The Nuvo instruments cost approximately $30.00 and are considered a "step up" from a traditional plastic recorder with silicone keys, accurate mouthpieces, and a 1.5 octave range in the 'C' key. Students will learn to read music and play as a group. The Children's Beginner Band will get students ready to join the Compass Homeschool Concert Band as 4th graders. Student may join the Children's Band at any quarter and may continue from one quarter to the next as the instructor continues to introduce new songs and skills.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Mercy Wolverton
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Imagine a phone app that could quickly reunite lost pets, connect the poor with resources that they need, or report a problem in the community! Code for a Cause is the Compass-based Technovation hub where middle school and high school girls will participate in the "world's largest technology entrepreneurship program for girls." Each year, Technovation teams solve real world problems through technology that they develop!


    Through Technovation, girls work with women mentors, identify a problem in their community, develop a mobile app, and launch a startup. Since 2010, 140,000 girls around the world have developed mobile apps and small businesses to solve problems ranging from food waste and nutrition to women's safety, education, and much more. In this year-long program, girls will work in teams and learn the skills they need to change the world through technology.


    First semester, the class will participate in team building activities and will be introduced to coding. Students will use Ozaria from Code Combat, a Python-based platform that applies stories and a gamified approach to teach the logic of coding and terminology. Once students understand these fundamentals, they will evaluate (pros and cons) and select their preferred block-based coding tool from either Thunkable or MIT's App Inventor.


    Second semester, students will form teams of 2-3 girls who will brainstorm and identify a community problem. They will propose a mobile app or AI solution to the issue and conduct market research to see if their idea is unique and feasible. Next, the team will begin developing an app following the Technovation curriculum. In class, girls will be coached step-by-step on the process of creating an interactive application. Finally, girls will learn how to brand their app, create a business plan, and look at what it would take to bring the app to market.


    The weekly Technovation work sessions will be facilitated by an experienced Technovation coach and cybersecurity engineering student at GMU. She will be supported by remote advisor, Almira Roldan, Sr. Technical Program Manager, AWS Machine Learning University and CEO, UnDesto AI Agency. Ms Roldan will assist through mentoring and scheduling guest presenters who will speak to the Compass teams about topics relevant to their phase of app development such as user experience and market research.

    Participation in Technovation gives girls the confidence to pursue more computer science courses (70%) and the foundation to eventually major in computer science (26%). Technovation teams are in 100 countries, and the program is sponsored by Oracle, Google, 3M, Adobe Foundation, and others.


    Level:All students will meet together, but student teams will either Junior or Senior division depending the ages of the team members as of August 1, 2025: Junior Division is for girls ages 13-15, and Senior Division is for girls ages 16-18. In addition to the app and competition document, the Junior division has an additional submission of a User Adoption Plan. The Senior division has an additional submission of a Business Plan.


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.


    Assignments: Will be posted on a Google classroom site for students, and key reminders will be emailed to parents.


    Assessments: Students will receive informal feedback throughout the project.


    Lab/Supply Fee: A software fee of $30.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class.


    What to Bring: For this class, students should bring their laptop and charger. Chromebooks cannot be used.


    Non-Meeting Days: In addition to the scheduled days-off on the published Compass schedule, this class ends on 5/2/25 and will have two (2) other dates off to be announced.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Technology or Career Exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Mylene Nyman
    Add

    Teens will learn to make simple, budget-friendly foods to feed themselves. These recipes are perfect for college students who have only dorm room toaster oven or first apartment or for teens preparing quick meals at home. Some even have ingredients that can be taken from campus dining halls and transformed. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

    • Frugal Fried Rice
    • Burrito Bowls (+ 4 component recipes: Corn Salsa, Tomato Salsa, Carnitas, and Cilantro Lime Rice)
    • Pasta Pumpkin Alfredo
    • Cheese Pizza with Homemade Tomato Sauce
    • Chicken Parmesan
    This engaging cooking workshop will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be introduced to ingredients and flavors they may not regularly eat. They will discover the joy of cooking while practicing skills that range from math (volume, weight, unit conversion, fractions, decimals), reading (instructions, ingredients), geography (traditions, flavors, food sources), and science (nutrition, food chemistry), and life skills. They will also learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced in class, and recipes are provided online for enrolled students to prepare their new foods at home. Notes: Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, eggs, soy, etc. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Recipes cannot be adapted to students with food allergies or dietary restrictions. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $36.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes, closed-toe shoes, and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage. This is a 2-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Christina Somerville
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Middle school students will learn how to improve their critical thinking for deeper understanding using strategies in reading comprehension. They will learn how to sort, analyze, describe, and compare information according to the rules of logic.


    Throughout this semester, students will read Alice & Wonderland, which was (surprisingly!) designed to include many hidden gems of logic. Students will learn to ask, "Is this a good argument? What beliefs is it based on? Is it well constructed and convincing? Are there fallacies in it?" They will discover how to define terms and break a whole concept into its component parts in order to formulate and defend their own arguments.


    The semester will build up to an exciting debate in the Lincoln-Douglas format. Students will have to develop a law code for Wonderland, and they will have to put a character on trial according to that code. Prosecution and defense will develop arguments, write speeches, and battle to convict or acquit the accused!


    Middle school students should expect to spend an average of two hours per week on reading and short written responses for this class. Topics in this series include: Critical Thinking Through Short Stories (Semester 1) and Critical Thinking Through Non-Fiction (Semester 2).

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Jessica Eastridge
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    This is a place-holder for the weekly Concert Band All-Instrument group session. Students should register for their selected instrument sectional sessions which will automatically enroll them in the group session.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Mylene Nyman
    Add

    Compass chefs will create the fast-casual fare and hand-held favorites found on food trucks across America. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

    • Fish Tacos and Slaw
    • Parmesan Chicken Tenders with Homemade Marinara Sauce
    • Beef Empanadas (2 recipes: dough and filling)
    • Loaded Cheese Fries
    • Doughnuts: Cinnamon, Strawberry Puff, and Strawberry-Glazed
    This engaging cooking workshop will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be introduced to ingredients and flavors they may not regularly eat. They will discover the joy of cooking while practicing skills that range from math (volume, weight, unit conversion, fractions, decimals), reading (instructions, ingredients), geography (traditions, flavors, food sources), and science (nutrition, food chemistry), and life skills. They will also learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced in class, and recipes are provided online for enrolled students to prepare their new foods at home. Notes: Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, eggs, soy, etc. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Recipes cannot be adapted to students with food allergies or dietary restrictions. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $36.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes, closed-toe shoes, and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage. This is a 2-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mylene Nyman
    Add

    Kids will gain confidence and competency in the kitchen when they learn to correctly cut with knives. No ninja tricks here! Students will learn parts of the knife, knife safety, and proper grips including the "claw." They will practice the basic cuts: baton, julienne, dive, chiffonade, randelles, dice, and brunoise. Students will practice their cuts on potatoes, carrots, cucumbers, bell peppers, celery, radishes, asparagus, and more. They will bring home their beautifully cut work as a tray of crudites (cut veggies) and mashed potatoes. All knives provided. Knife gloves and finger guards will be available. Notes: Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, eggs, soy, etc. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Recipes cannot be adapted to students with food allergies or dietary restrictions. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $18.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes, closed-toe shoes, and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage. This is a 1-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mylene Nyman
    Add

    Taste your way across America in this cross-country culinary adventure. From diners to dining rooms, create and enjoy regional favorites on your imaginary drive across the US. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: Northeast

    • New England Clam Chowder
    • Boston Baked Beans
    • Boston Cream Pie
    South
    • Southern Tomato and Cheese Pie (with homemade pie crust)
    • Pimento Cheese Spread
    • Blue Ribbon Deviled Eggs
    • Mississippi Mud Pie
    New Orleans
    • Cajun Orzo with Sausage
    • Shrimp and Grits
    • Bananas Foster Cheesecake
    This engaging cooking workshop will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be introduced to ingredients and flavors they may not regularly eat. They will discover the joy of cooking while practicing skills that range from math (volume, weight, unit conversion, fractions, decimals), reading (instructions, ingredients), geography (traditions, flavors, food sources), and science (nutrition, food chemistry), and life skills. They will also learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced in class, and recipes are provided online for enrolled students to prepare their new foods at home. Notes: Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, eggs, soy, etc. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Recipes cannot be adapted to students with food allergies or dietary restrictions. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $54.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes, closed-toe shoes, and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage. This is a 3-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mylene Nyman
    Add

    Taste your way across America in this cross-country culinary adventure. From diners to dining rooms, create and enjoy regional favorites on your imaginary drive across the US. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: Northwest

    • Baked Salmon with Dill Sauce
    • Cauliflower Gratin with Gruyere and Roasted Hazelnuts
    • Blackberry Cinnamon Cobbler
    Midwest
    • Midwest Meatloaf
    • Mashed Potatoes
    • Roasted Lemon Green Beans with Bacon
    • Wisconsin State Fair Cream Puffs (served since 1924)
    Southwest
    • Homemade Salsa and Guacamole
    • Cheesy Green Chili Cornbread
    • Chicken Enchilada Bake
    This engaging cooking workshop will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be introduced to ingredients and flavors they may not regularly eat. They will discover the joy of cooking while practicing skills that range from math (volume, weight, unit conversion, fractions, decimals), reading (instructions, ingredients), geography (traditions, flavors, food sources), and science (nutrition, food chemistry), and life skills. They will also learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced in class, and recipes are provided online for enrolled students to prepare their new foods at home. Notes: Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, eggs, soy, etc. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Recipes cannot be adapted to students with food allergies or dietary restrictions. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $54.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes, closed-toe shoes, and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage. This is a 3-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mylene Nyman
    Add

    The start of school and homeschooling is around the corner. Kids' calendars will be filling up, and they will want to munch between meals. In this workshop, kids will learn to make 7 delicious, filling snacks for themselves. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

    • Nachos
    • Sticky Sesame Cauliflower Bites
    • Pomegranate Slushy
    • Strawberry Almond Protein Bars
    • Air Fried Ranch Chickpeas
    • Cinnamon Sticky Buns
    • Strawberry Cheesecake Dip
    This engaging cooking workshop will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be introduced to ingredients and flavors they may not regularly eat. They will discover the joy of cooking while practicing skills that range from math (volume, weight, unit conversion, fractions, decimals), reading (instructions, ingredients), geography (traditions, flavors, food sources), and science (nutrition, food chemistry), and life skills. They will also learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced in class, and recipes are provided online for enrolled students to prepare their new foods at home. Notes: Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, eggs, soy, etc. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Recipes cannot be adapted to students with food allergies or dietary restrictions. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $36.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes, closed-toe shoes, and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage. This is a 2-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mylene Nyman
    Add

    Summer luaus transport us to barefoot beach barbecues under picturesque Pacific palms. Celebrate Hawaiian hospitality and tropical tastes when learning to make the favorite foods of our fiftieth state. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

    • Air Fry Hawaiian Chicken
    • Bruddah Potato Mac
    • Tropical Fruit Salad
    • Loco Moco Rice
    • Pineapple Tarts
    • Butter Mochi Cookies
    This engaging cooking workshop will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be introduced to ingredients and flavors they may not regularly eat. They will discover the joy of cooking while practicing skills that range from math (volume, weight, unit conversion, fractions, decimals), reading (instructions, ingredients), geography (traditions, flavors, food sources), and science (nutrition, food chemistry), and life skills. They will also learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced in class, and recipes are provided online for enrolled students to prepare their new foods at home. Notes: Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, eggs, soy, etc. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Recipes cannot be adapted to students with food allergies or dietary restrictions. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $36.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes, closed-toe shoes, and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage. This is a 2-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mylene Nyman
    Add

    Celebrate the long, lazy days of summer with sweet treats featuring fresh fruits, refreshing freezes, and sticky summer splurges. Compass chefs will make sweets reminiscent of playful parties at the pool, breezy afternoons at the beach, or late nights at the lake. Recipes are selected to be fun and simple to make. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

    • Watermelon Sorbet
    • Strawberry Mousse
    • Peach Ice Cream
    • Raspberry Lemonade
    • Banana Split Bites
    • Mini Angel Food Cakes with Summer Berries
    • S'mores Cookies
    • Dole Whips
    This engaging cooking workshop will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be introduced to ingredients and flavors they may not regularly eat. They will discover the joy of cooking while practicing skills that range from math (volume, weight, unit conversion, fractions, decimals), reading (instructions, ingredients), geography (traditions, flavors, food sources), and science (nutrition, food chemistry), and life skills. They will also learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced in class, and recipes are provided online for enrolled students to prepare their new foods at home. Notes: Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, eggs, soy, etc. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Recipes cannot be adapted to students with food allergies or dietary restrictions. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $36.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes, closed-toe shoes, and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage. This is a 2-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mylene Nyman
    Add

    Compass Chefs will learn to make the comfort foods and family favorites featured at summer cook-outs, picnics, and pot-lucks across America. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

    • Pulled Pork BBQ with Homemade BBQ Sauce
    • Chili Dogs
    • Homemade Mac & Cheese
    • Watergate Salad
    • Corn Cakes
    • Pasta Caprese Salad
    • Red Skinned Potato Salad
    • Peanut butter Brownies
    • Raspberry-Peach Upside Down Cake
    This engaging cooking workshop will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be introduced to ingredients and flavors they may not regularly eat. They will discover the joy of cooking while practicing skills that range from math (volume, weight, unit conversion, fractions, decimals), reading (instructions, ingredients), geography (traditions, flavors, food sources), and science (nutrition, food chemistry), and life skills. They will also learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced in class, and recipes are provided online for enrolled students to prepare their new foods at home. Notes: Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, eggs, soy, etc. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Recipes cannot be adapted to students with food allergies or dietary restrictions. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $54.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes, closed-toe shoes, and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage. This is a 3-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Taliesin Knol
    Add

    The best way to understand a biome is to build (a model) one! A biome is a large zone on Earth characterized by its climate, soil, vegetation, and organisms with special adaptations for the unique environment. In modeling biomes, students will learn how they are different from similar ecological concepts like habitats and ecosystems. Students will discover how human activities, such as deforestation and habitat destruction, are transforming biomes. In this science-themed diorama class, students will be exposed to concepts such as trophic levels, the water cycle, biological competition, geographic isolation, convergent evolution, species diversification, natural vs unnatural climate change, food webs, habitat loss, and ecological niches, while they are working on their models. This Class will focus on wetland biomes, such as the swamps of the American southeast or South America's Pantanal. The defining features of wetland environments are the bodies of water they interact with such as a delta at the mouth of a large river, coastal areas of marshes and lagoons, or bogs. These habitats are essential for a wide variety of life, from birds to fish, and are vital geographic zones that can actually keep human civilization safe from natural disasters and pollution. Each student will create an individual diorama. Students will craft and hand-shape their scene on a 10 x 14 inch foam board using artistic, model-making techniques. They will customize their dioramas with landforms, waterways, plant life, and paint. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with miniature figures and combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to create a larger terrain. Students will then compete in a zoology-based survival strategy game. Each student will create one board and receive a set of miniatures to take home with them. Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on or before the first day of the workshop. This is a 4-day workshop.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Taliesin Knol
    Add

    It began with the forging of great rings... and it will end with the creation of great dioramas. In this class, students will study the connection of Tolkien's Middle Earth to our own history: how history inspired the author and how the series, in turn, influenced the real world. As we study the book and discuss its influences, students will use this knowledge to recreate a scene from the penultimate battle of the War of the 3rd Age at Minas Tirith. Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and descriptions from the source material students in this class will recreate a section of the Gondorian Fortress Capital, Minas Tirith and the battlefield around it. Once everyone finishes their diorama, the class will combine them to simulate the battle from the book and attempt to save mankind from Sauron! (or bring about the age of the Orc.) Each student will receive 1:72 scale figures to populate their scene, from Soldiers of Gondor and Riders of Rhohan, to Orcs, trolls, and evil men of Rhun and Harrad. This is a 4-day workshop.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Anne Taranto
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    This full-credit English course is designed to prepare students for college level academic writing. It will deepen student's critical reading and textual analysis skills by asking students to think critically about the "American Dream" and what it means to be an American by reading texts that engage with these topics from the 18th century to today. In this course, students will read and respond in writing to both fiction and non-fiction texts, and our analytical method will focus on rhetorical context (subject, purpose and audience).


    Fall Semester will feature Daisy Miller (James), Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (Jacobs), The Crucible (Miller), and The Great Gatsby (F. Scott Fitzgerald)


    Writing Lab: An essential component of this course will be an in-class Writing Lab. Students in this class should have mastered the basics of academic writing, such as constructing a thesis statement that makes an argument and organizing their thoughts through effective topic sentences and transition statements. This class will deepen students' textual analysis skills with a focus on developing rhetorical analysis, the study of how a text makes meaning. Over the course of the year, students will develop familiarity with a variety of writing styles and forms including rhetorical analysis, literary analysis, critical response, close reading, opinion essay, and personal essay. Students should bring a laptop to class one day per week for in-class writing.


    Prerequisites: Students taking this class should have mastered the foundations of Introduction to Genre and British Literature (or similar English courses), are expected to take an active role in discussion and complete all writing assignments.


    Topics in this Series: American Literature, Part I (Semester 1) and American Literature, Part II (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. This is a 13.5 week course that will not meet on 11/7/23.


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class.


    Assignments: All assignments will be posted in a Google Classroom management site. Students will need their own gmail accounts to access Google Classroom.


    Assessments: Students' written assignments will be graded using a rubric and assigned points that the homeschool parent can use when assigning an overall class grade.


    Textbook/Materials: Because students will need clean, inexpensive copies of each novel to mark in, and they must be able to refer to the passages on the same page numbers, copies of mass market paperbacks will be pre-purchased and bundled for students. (See Supply Fee below).


    Supply Fee: A class fee of $33.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for the class pack of books and handouts.


    What to Bring: Students should bring the current literature, paper, pen or pencil and highlighter to class each week. Some students may wish to bring paper clips, adhesive flags or post-it notes for marking passages/pages.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a half-credit (one semester) or full credit (both semesters) in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: British Literature or equivalent

    1
    Edwige Pinover
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Bonjour et bienvenue dans notre classe de francais 3 ! Welcome to the third year of high school French. This is a conversation-focused program in which students will build more vocabulary and will be able to communicate using more and more complex sentences. The class will continue using the present tense, the future proche (a future), the passe recent (recent past), the passe-compose and imparfait (two forms of past tense) and will learn the future and the conditional forms of verb. Vocabulary will include school activities, professions, the theme of fairy tales, nature and environment, and the media. At this point in learning French, students should be using all of the vocabulary they know to become better listeners, more fluent speakers, and stronger writers.


    Class will be conducted primarily in French and will focus on listening and speaking skills, asking and answering questions, and correct use of grammar. At home, students will be responsible for memorizing vocabulary and grammar, completing homework assignments, and watching both grammar instruction and language immersion videos.


    Prerequisites: French II


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 30-45 minutes per day, 4 days per week on homework outside of class.


    Assignments: Are sent by e-mail to parents and students. Students must have access to a computer and internet service for computer-based videos and practice tools that are assigned as homework and are essential to success in the class.


    Assessments: Quizzes, tests, and individual performance reviews will be given to all students at regular intervals to provide parents with sufficient feedback to assign a grade.


    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Bien Dit!: Student Edition Level 3, 2013 edition (ISBN-13: 978-0547871691)


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Foreign Language for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: French II or equivalent

    1
    Rebecca Sticha
    Add

    What if schoolwork was fun, and learning happened through games? In Gameschooling, that is exactly what kids will do! The group will play a variety of board games that have underlying educational skills. We are not talking about tedious multiplication facts disguised as a game. Instead, kids will discover and play a wide variety of popular- and lesser-known- board games. The selected games will encourage critical thinking, logic, reasoning, and problem solving. Some involve predictions and probability, while other games encourage cooperation and collaborative solutions. Many games feature a theme from an academic discipline such as history, geography, or science. The game master will curate a portfolio of class games from her private collection such as "Wingspan" (ornithology); "Ticket to Ride" (geography); "Isle of Skye" (spatial relations); "Trekking the National Parks" (geography/natural resources); and "Blokus" (geometry/spatial relations).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Rebecca Sticha
    Add

    What if schoolwork was fun, and learning happened through games? In Gameschooling, that is exactly what kids will do! The group will play a variety of board games that have underlying educational skills. We are not talking about tedious multiplication facts disguised as a game. Instead, kids will discover and play a wide variety of popular- and lesser-known- board games. The selected games will encourage critical thinking, logic, reasoning, and problem solving. Some involve predictions and probability, while other games encourage cooperation and collaborative solutions. Many games emphasize math skills and incorporate math reasoning. The game master will curate a portfolio of class games from her private collection such as "Can't Stop" (probability); "Sleuth" (deductive reasoning); "Set" (pattern recognition); "Dinosaur Tea Party" (deductive reasoning); and "Lucky Numbers" (ordinal numbers/probability).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    David Chelf
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    This is a complete course in high school Geometry which will cover fundamental concepts and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. Students will learn deductive reasoning, and logic by completing geometric proofs. Topics in geometry include: lines, angles, congruence, concurrence, inequalities, parallel lines, quadrilaterals, transformations, area, similarity, right triangles, circles, regular polygons, and geometric solids. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem solving.


    Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation in Algebra I in order to take this class.


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-1.5 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 7-day cycle, with assignments posted on Thursdays and due the following Thursday. Students are advised to start homework once it is assigned (i.e., not wait until the night before it is due). Weekly homework assignments will be of a length that a student should be able to complete them in two or three at-home work sessions. Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of their work.


    Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.


    Assessments: Student progress will be assessed by: (1) The instructor checking that weekly homework sets are attempted and complete and (2) detailed grading of periodic take-home tests. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. See the instructor's webpage for detailed homework and test policy, including late work and re-work.


    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Geometry: Seeing, Doing, Understanding, 3rd edition (ISBN-10 0716743612, ISBN-13 978-0716743613) A calculator is not needed for this course.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Geometry for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Mylene Nyman
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Compass cooks will enjoy a culinary tour of the world with Global Gourmet classes! Menus feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients seasoned and prepared to represent regional flavors and traditional dishes from the featured country. Recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. The Compass chefs' gastronomy adventures will include:


  • Maple Sriracha 'Devils on Horseback' (Dates with Blue Cheese and Bacon appetizer)
  • Irish Stew
  • Pea and Bean Salad
  • Irish Pan Haggerty
  • Welsh Anglesey Eggs
  • Bangers and Mash (tweens/teens levels)
  • Beans on Toast (kids/little kids levels)
  • Scottish Dundee Cake
  • Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.



    Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics.



    Topics in this Series: Best of the British Isles (Quarter 1), Savory Scandinavian (Quarter 2), Tasty Thai (Quarter 3), Great Greek (Quarter 4).


    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on or before the first day of class.



    What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided.



    What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).



    Cooking Class Requirements: For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Ethan Hay
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Do you want to learn the world's fastest growing programming language that is used by Google, NASA, YouTube and the CIA? Python is a versatile, easy-to-learn beginner-level programming language and gateway to foundational concepts in computer science.


    Students will learn how to code apps and games as they practice the computer science design cycle of writing code, executing the code, interpreting the results, revising the code syntax based on the output. The class will cover the fundamental building blocks of programming including: variables, mathematical operators, logical operators, and boolean arithmetic. They will also learn about data types, built-in functions, conditional statements, for- loops, defining functions, function stacks, interpreting error messages, exception handling, and add-on libraries. At each step, the class will create basic programs and fun, interactive content.


    Topics in this Series: Python Programming (Semester 1), JavaScript Programming (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.


    Prerequisites: Algebra I, recommended


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.


    Assignments: Will be given in class.


    Assessments: Will not be given.


    Lab/Supply Fee: The class tuition includes a student technology fee that covers the rental of classroom laptops and all software and licenses installed on the laptops.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Technology or Career Elective for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Karen Shumway
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Discover the exciting world of Latin language and Roman civilization! Learn the foundations of the language of great conquerors, orators, and men and women who shaped the course of history. Studying Latin also opens many doors to learning other Romance languages and deepens students' understanding of English structure and mechanics, including rhetorical and grammatical constructs.



    Latin I is an introductory class focusing on the basics of Latin grammar, vocabulary and syntax. Students will also study Roman history and culture, Roman civilization, Roman numerals, and English derivatives of Latin words. In addition, they will discover the Roman world through geography, mythology, and daily life. While Latin is primarily a written language, the class will cover basic oral Latin for conversation. Students will learn the necessary skills to be prepared for the option of taking the National Latin Exam in the spring.



    Prerequisites: Students must have high school level reading comprehension in English.



    Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class on grammar, vocabulary, translation, and Roman civilization, culture, and geography.



    Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, and track grades. Email is the preferred mode of communication between the instructor, students, and parents.



    Assessments: The instructor will assign points in Canvas using a class rubric, which will include quizzes, tests, projects, and participation. Parents will be given access to their child's work in Canvas as an observer and can use this information to determine the appropriate grade to assign should they be interested in compiling a transcript.



    Textbook: The instructor will order clean, used copies of Cambridge Latin Course, 5th edition, Unit 1 (ISBN-13: 978-1107690639).



    Supply Fee: There is a $60.00 class fee to cover both textbook and printing costs for the year.



    What to Bring: Students will need loose leaf paper, a binder or notebook, index cards in multiple colors for creating vocabulary flashcards, and pencils for daily classes and homework. Projects may require occasional additional materials.



    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Foreign Language for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: Reading/writing at grade level

    1
    Judith Harmon
    Add

    Embark on a magical journey this summer with our enchanting workshop "Magical Creatures' Quest: A Familiar Problem!" This workshop is for middle school students who adore whimsical tales, creative adventures, and the magic of tabletop role-playing games. Each day of the workshop, the group will weave a captivating story where each participant takes on the role of a magical animal on a quest to reunite with its owner. Are you more like a daring dragon, mysterious mermaid, playful Pegasus, or a fearless fairy? Each session presents a new chapter, filled with challenges, mysteries, and opportunities for magical mischief. Tweens will unleash their creativity and collaborate with other participants to shape the adventure, solve puzzles, and make decisions to advance the story. The workshop will be managed by an experienced Game Master who will guide students through the art of role-playing. Tweens will connect and form friendships with other middle schoolers who share a love of magical stories and imaginative play- in person! Previous role-playing experience is not required, but this workshop serves as a great introduction for tweens and teens who might be interested in embarking on Dungeons and Dragons. This is a 3-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Rebecca Sticha
    Add

    Master Engineers will discover what happens when simple machines are combined to work sequentially. They will be challenged to develop a unique, automated maze that moves a ball from start to end with intentionally complex steps! They will use simple machines like ramps, pulleys, and levers and complex machines (compounded simple machines) like tracks and screws to move the ball through a series of lifts, flippers, automated carts, moving gates, escalators, and more! Each successful step will initiate the next step. Can the ball move through the maze without hitting the floor? LEGO Mindstorms components and motors are not just for building robots. These interconnecting pieces can be constructed into an infinite number of unique, mechanized machines. This workshop integrates science, engineering and computational thinking while introducing physical constraints, units of measurement, and coordinate systems.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Marybeth Henry
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Physician. Physical Therapist. Phlebotomist. Paramedic. Did you know that the Healthcare Industry makes up more than 18% of the US economy and employs 20 million workers in the US? Chances are that several Compass teens will work in this field. This course is designed to give students an overview of the healthcare field and a foot in the door to begin work as an Emergency Medical Responder (EMR) or Emergency Medical Technician (EMT).


    First semester will cover the Emergency Essentials that every EMR/EMT must know: stopping bleeding, starting care, and stabilizing a patient. Students will learn what to do in trauma, mass casualty, or hazardous materials incidents where the victims are bleeding or have broken bones, wounds, or head injuries. Every class will include practical, hands-on skills training and labs such as using a tourniquet, applying dressings, and splinting. Throughout the course, the class will learn medical terminology and aspects of human anatomy related to Emergency Essentials. They will use critical thinking skills to reason through problems they might encounter during emergencies. Finally, they will discover how HIPPA, privacy, consent, and legal issues play in the EMR/EMT's role and how these emergency responders interface with law enforcement, hospitals, and other specialties in the community.


    EMRs/EMTs are first-on-the-scene, frontline healthcare workers. In Virginia, individuals age 16 or older who earned their license can volunteer or be hired to work on an ambulance, a private medical transport service, or as an assistant or technician in clinical settings. Work as an EMR/EMT can be a young adult's full time job, side gig through college, or help them earn clinical hours that advanced medical programs want to see.


    Topics in this Series: Emergency Essentials (Semester 1), Crisis Care (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.


    Prerequisite: Students must have completed a workshop in CPR prior to taking this course and will be asked to provide a copy of their certification. An option is the Compass 2-day. 6-hour First Aid/CPR training on June 10 and 11. Alternatively, this Instructor can conduct an outside CPR workshop for $80.00 per student.


    Levels/Certification: Students under age 16 may enroll in this class, but they must be age 16 by October 1 in order to sit for the EMR or EMT exam in the spring of 2025. Students must take both semesters to prepare for an exam. This class will be taught at two levels concurrently: On-Level which prepares students for the EMR exam and Honors which prepares students for the EMT exam. Both levels meet together for all classes and perform the same in-class activities and labs. Those on the Honors track will have additional readings for EMT preparation.


    Students may also enroll in this class for one semester as an elective (i.e. non-exam track). They may also take the class for knowledge and experience with no obligation to take the exam.


    Students who wish to take this at the Honors level and continue the EMT track must have a class average of 80% at the end of the first semester to be approved for Honors level second semester. Students who have less than an 80% average may continue the second semester course at the on-level, or EMR, track. Students on the Honors EMT track may need additional review or test prep sessions with the instructor prior to the exam.


    Workload: On-level (EMR) students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class on reading assignments and chapter questions. Honors (EMT) students should expect to spend 5-6 hours each week outside of class on reading assignments, chapter questions, and review.


    Assignments: Students will be assigned 1-2 chapters each week to read at home each week so class time can be dedicated to the practice of hands-on skills.


    Assessments: The instructor will give short quizzes to ensure that students are keeping up with their reading, which is necessary to prepare for the exam. In addition, students will be "signed off" and approved on hands-on skills throughout the course. The National Registry Exam will be administered in May 2025.


    Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase or rent Emergency Care and Transportation of the Sick and Injured Essentials Package 12th Edition by AAOS (ISBN # 978-1284227222)


    Supplies: Students should purchase the following items and bring to class each week:


  • Lightning X Small First Responder Stocked EMT Trauma Bag (student's choice of 7 colors) on Amazon.
  • https://www.amazon.com/dp/B010G2I3PU/?coliid=I18ZZZ79D6Z0EF&colid=1BQJV62J905ZD&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it&th=1

    Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $30.00 is due payable to the instructor for consumable and in-class supplies and equipment.


    What to Bring: Students should bring their textbook, notebook/paper, pen or pencil, and medical kit to class each week.


    What to Wear: Students should wear comfortable clothing that would allow them to participate in occasional demonstrations on the floor.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Science, Health, Elective, or Career Exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: CPR Course

    1
    Iman Castaneda
    Add

    Mixed martial arts is a fun physical fitness workshop for tweens that blends the Brazilian self-defense martial art of Jiu-Jitsu and Muay Thai, a combat boxing-like sport from Thailand. An experienced coach, black belt, and practitioner of mixed martial arts will lead a well-rounded physical fitness program that incorporates moves and strategies from both sports to increase strength, flexibility, conditioning, endurance, coordination, and balance. Jiu-Jitsu uses grappling and ground work, while Muay Thai introduces standing strikes with fists, elbows, knees, and shins. The latter emphasizes distance and being in or out of an opponent's range with the legs and feet being used to kick and maintain distance. Mixed Martial Arts helps tweens stay active, builds self-esteem, and encourages teamwork. Students will practice techniques for resolving conflicts, dealing with bullies, projecting confidence, and developing stranger awareness in the games and exercises they complete in class. Some partner work may be co-ed. Students must be a minimum of age 10 to enroll. Students will work on mats in socks or bare feet and should come to class wearing loose, comfortable clothing, such as running pants or sweatpants and bring a refillable water bottle.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Rebecca Sticha
    Add

    Build and program a Mario Kart-inspirated robotic racer! Students will enjoy video-game racing in real-life with the projects that they build. Build a coupe or a dragster inspired by Mario, Luigi or the gang. Program your racer to navigate a maze and avoid surprise obstacles while dropping boxes and banana peels to throw off your opponent. Incorporate video-inspired sound effects in your program. Students will use the LEGO MINDSTORMS Education EV3 robotics sets. They will build with motors, wheels/axles, gears, levers, and special components. Students will have to install touch, sound, color, and infrared sensors while also learning to program sequences and commands that use input/output devices for controlled movements and precise turns. Using the drag-and-drop EV3 coding menu, students will learn to program their robots while experimenting with key concepts such as fixed values, variables, loops, and logic constructs. This workshop integrates science, engineering and computational thinking while introducing physical constraints, units of measurement, and coordinate systems. But don't worry, this is a beginning robotics class. Prior experience is not expected, but returning students are welcome. Each student will build his/her own robotic project, so students can progress and customize at their own pace. In general, in this class, students will spend 2-3 hours assembling, 2-3 hours programming, and 2 hours testing and re-designing their projects.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Rebecca Sticha
    Add

    Can you build a robot to move a ball down a field? Can it capture the ball from another robot? Students will design, build, and program robots to compete in two-on-two soccer matches against each other! Students' robots will be put to the test in match-ups with different challenges. Students will use the LEGO MINDSTORMS Education EV3 robotics sets. They will build with motors, wheels/axles, gears, levers, and special components. Students will have to install touch, sound, color, and infrared sensors while also learning to program sequences and commands that use input/output devices for controlled movements and precise turns. Using the drag-and-drop EV3 coding menu, students will learn to program their robots while experimenting with key concepts such as fixed values, variables, loops, and logic constructs. This workshop integrates science, engineering and computational thinking while introducing physical constraints, units of measurement, and coordinate systems. But don't worry, this is a beginning robotics class. Prior experience is not expected, but returning students are welcome. Each student will build his/her own robotic project, so students can progress and customize at their own pace. In general, in this class, students will spend 2-3 hours assembling, 2-3 hours programming, and 2 hours testing and re-designing their projects.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Austin Martin
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Students will explore the science and technology of robotics in an open workshop environment. They will work in pairs by experience level and interests to plan, conceptualize, build, program, and test a robot of their own design. Student partners will set their own design and performance criteria for their robot. Will it be one that plays a game, gathers data, or completes a mission using custom code that the team has written and tested? This laboratory is open to beginners as well as returning students with prior experience.



    The class will focus on construction and programming, with the goal of having functional robots by the end of the semester. There will be an emphasis on the engineering-design process with repeated build-test-redesign iterations until the robot performs as expected. Student pairs will be encouraged to think creatively and apply problem-solving skills to find unique solutions to their scenario. Groups will move at their own pace, and completed robots may have different levels of complexity depending on the experience of the team.



    An experienced electrical engineer who was a robotics competitor and coach will serve as a mentor and facilitator during the lab. He will not teach formal lessons but will instead circulate among the partner teams to trouble-shoot and offer advice on hardware and software issues, spending more time with newer builders and programmers. Students will enjoy the collaboration and camaraderie that comes from watching the successes, missteps, and eventual solutions of other teams. They will build with Tetrix Prime metal robotics components, incorporate sensors [such as, ultrasonic distance, infrared (IR) proximity, mini-LIDAR (laser radar), touch, line-following, color- sensing, or sound sensors], electronics, and motors from Tetrix Prizm, and code using the Arduino IDE. Students do not get to keep finished projects.



    Note: Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.



    Prerequisite:Prior experience with robotics and coding are not required.



    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.



    Assignments: Assignments, if any, will be communicated in class and limited to individual investigation.



    Assessments: Will not be given



    Textbook/Materials: None



    Lab/Supply Fee:

    None.



    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a partial credit in technology or career exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Sirdley Taborga
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Saludos! Get ready for a full year of advanced high school level Spanish! This is a conversation-based program in which students will continue to build their vocabulary quickly and learn essential grammar skills in Spanish. Vocabulary will include shopping for clothing and food; ancient civilizations; modern society; legends and stories; preparing and describing food; ordering meals in a restaurant; watching/making movies and attending movie premiers; reading and writing for newspapers and other publications; family and relationships; the environment and conservation; and careers and professions. There will be a strong emphasis on using regular and irregular preterit tense verbs; imperfect tense verbs; knowing the differences between and when to use preterit vs. imperfect; subjunctive tense verbs; regular and irregular future tense verbs and other common grammar concepts such as commands; direct object pronouns; indirect object pronouns; double object pronouns; when to use por vs. para; comparative phrases; superlative phrases; impersonal expressions and routine application of common spelling changes. Additionally, we will study culture through the lens of contemporary music genres and dances and will gain advanced grammar skills through the translation of popular song lyrics.



    Class will be conducted almost exclusively in Spanish and will focus on listening and speaking skills, asking and answering questions, and correct use of grammar. At home, students will be responsible for memorizing vocabulary and grammar, completing worksheets and written assignments, and watching both grammar instruction and language immersion videos.



    Workload: Students should expect to spend 30-45 per day, 4 days per week on homework outside of class.



    Assignments: Are sent by e-mail to parents and students. Students must have access to a computer and internet service for computer-based videos and practice tools that are assigned as homework and are essential to success in the class.



    Assessments: Quizzes, tests, and individual performance reviews will be given to all students at regular intervals to provide parents with sufficient feedback to assign a grade.



    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $30.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a class packet in lieu of a textbook.



    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Foreign Language for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Cristin Harber
    Add

    What does it take to write a story that jumps off the page and comes alive in a reader's mind? Great authors have mastered the Artistry of Writing. This two-hour workshop will focus on one facet of excellent storytelling:suspenseful and scary scenes.



    Some books make you laugh. Others make you cry. Then there are those special stories that force your heart into your throat. You have to know what will happen next, but you aren't sure you can turn the page. This workshop will focus on writing heart-pounding emotions.



    Suspense and scares go beyond the building blocks of a story (plot, characters, setting) and dive into mood, tone, and theme. This is where less is more. Where sentences can be a single word, and a change in punctuation transforms everything. Students will analyze passages and ask what emotion the author had hoped for. As a class, we will build a scene fraught with tension before turning to independent writing. There will be an opportunity to share and receive feedback.



    This session is part of a series of writers' workshops led by a celebrated author and focused on the Artistry of Writing. Topics in this series include: Compelling Characters (3/5/23); Daring Dialogue (3/19/24); Astounding Action Scenes (4/9/24) and Suspenseful & Scary Scenes (4/23/24).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Iman Castaneda
    Add

    This Women's Self Defense Workshop is for older teen girls and young adult women who are heading to college for the first time, returning to campus, working, driving, or traveling alone. First and foremost, this workshop will teach young women about situational awareness and making safe choices: critical life lessons that they would rather hear from a professional than a parent. Students will work in pairs and small groups to act out mock scenarios, rehearse strategies to get away from an attacker, and practice defensive moves and strikes. The National Center for Education Statistics reports a decline in the overall college crime rates from 2009-2019 due to falling burglary rates, but a steady increase in forcible sex offenses during the same time. If you are not sure self defense is needed or pertinent to your daughter, see the following very concerning campus assault statistics: https://students.umw.edu/counseling/sexual-assault-information/statistics/ This workshop is taught by Iman Casteneda, Compass's homeschool PE and Jiu Jitsu Fit instructor. She earned a black belt in Jiu Jitsu under Royce Gracie, a particularly grueling program that took her more than 10 years to prepare for. She is also personal trainer, Cross-Fit instructor, Muy Thai practitioner, former MMA (mixed martial arts) competitor, former EMT, and survivor of assault. Note: Minimum age: 16. This workshop is also appropriate for young women who have had previous instruction in self defense as a refresher for strategies and techniques. This is a 3-day program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sevim Kalyoncu
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Venture outdoors each week to explore the woods with a senior naturalist and mentor while learning valuable survival skills. Students will learn how to construct a temporary debris shelter, make cordage, identify edibles, track animals, purify water, perform basic first aid, and use maps and compass (orienteering). Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things you encounter outdoors, safe exploration of the woods, how to be a good steward of nature, and what to do if you ever became lost or injured in the woods. Skills will be reintroduced and adapted each each quarter because the available plants, animals, materials, and water sources change with each season. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong connection to nature and to the real world! Explorations in the woodsis for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. For information on where the class meets, what to wear, and inclement weather, see the webpage for Compass's Nature Quest program.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Sevim Kalyoncu
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Venture outdoors each week to explore the woods with a senior naturalist and mentor while learning valuable survival skills. Students will learn how to construct a temporary debris shelter, make cordage, identify edibles, track animals, purify water, perform basic first aid, and use maps and compass (orienteering). Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things you encounter outdoors, safe exploration of the woods, how to be a good steward of nature, and what to do if you ever became lost or injured in the woods. Skills will be reintroduced and adapted each each quarter because the available plants, animals, materials, and water sources change with each season. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong connection to nature and to the real world! Explorations in the woodsis for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. For information on where the class meets, what to wear, and inclement weather, see the webpage for Compass's Nature Quest program.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Catherine Vanlandingham
    Closed

    Reading and writing affect a student's achievement in all aspects of schoolwork, so strong language arts skills are fundamental to success in homeschooling. This weekly class is a small group of 3-6 students who read and write at a similar level. Students follow a comprehensive language arts curriculum under the guidance of an experienced reading specialist. Each Monday class meeting will include a short story with select vocabulary words, a graphic organizer, main themes, and embedded learning objectives. Students will continue to practice language arts skills at home with easy-to-implement "page a day" workbook activities assigned by the instructor and implemented by the parents. For most early elementary learners, enrollment in Reading Rally can serve as a complete, self-contained language arts curriculum where families will not need additional resources in reading, comprehension, composition, spelling, and grammar.


    Weekly readings are organized around thematic units. The instructor will teach students how to approach a new story as a fun reading puzzle. For example, before reading aloud in class, students will conduct a "picture walk" to overview and predict elements of the story from the illustrations, review a graphic organizer to assist in writing sentences, define vocabulary words, and preview summary questions. Then, the instructor will read the story aloud, model good reading practices, and encourage students to read. Students will only be asked to read aloud when they feel comfortable and have built trust in their group. All follow-up activities are designed around learning objectives such as decoding, comprehension, prediction, visualization, and verbalization.


    READINESS: As a comprehensive language arts curriculum, a student must be at a similar grade level ability in reading, comprehension, and writing. Early readers who have not learned to write, for example, or emerging readers who struggle with comprehenion, may not be a good fit for this class. In addition, students must have the hand-eye coordination and basic handwriting skills to be able to copy the instructor's many notes, examples, and definitions from the classroom white board into their own notebook.


    Grade level references in Reading Rally are based on scope, sequence and pacing that correlate to the Grade Level Equivalent (GLE) standards of learning. Students who are more than one year behind in GLE in language arts or who have a difference in skill level between their reading and writing may be recommended for a second, weekly class meeting on Fridays or 1-on-1 private instruction to make up ground in reading or writing skills. Additional class meetings or private instruction will be an additional cost.


    ATTENTION! Parents should not register for a Reading Rally class until they have had a Language Arts Skills Inventory (i.e. brief assessment) and placement determination by the reading specialist. This must be scheduled separately through Compass at a cost of $125.00. The fee is due prior to the assessment and is not refundable in the event the child is not recommended for a reading group. The instructor has experience working with reluctant and fearful readers, those who are late bloomers, neurodivergent, dyslexic, and ESOL students. However, she might recommend a more complete evaluation by another professional if she suspects other learning differences are impacting the student's langauge arts learning.


    Students will work from a spiral bound copy of reading textbook and workbook by Pearson that they already have.


    Students continuing from one semester to the next will receive priority registration to remain with their reading group.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Catherine Vanlandingham
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Reading and writing affect a student's achievement in all aspects of schoolwork, so strong language arts skills are fundamental to success in homeschooling. This weekly class is a small group of 3-6 students who read and write at a similar level. Students follow a comprehensive language arts curriculum under the guidance of an experienced reading specialist. Each Monday class meeting will include a short story with select vocabulary words, a graphic organizer, main themes, and embedded learning objectives. Students will continue to practice language arts skills at home with easy-to-implement "page a day" workbook activities assigned by the instructor and implemented by the parents. For most early elementary learners, enrollment in Reading Rally can serve as a complete, self-contained language arts curriculum where families will not need additional resources in reading, comprehension, composition, spelling, and grammar.


    Weekly readings are organized around thematic units. The instructor will teach students how to approach a new story as a fun reading puzzle. For example, before reading aloud in class, students will conduct a "picture walk" to overview and predict elements of the story from the illustrations, review a graphic organizer to assist in writing sentences, define vocabulary words, and preview summary questions. Then, the instructor will read the story aloud, model good reading practices, and encourage students to read. Students will only be asked to read aloud when they feel comfortable and have built trust in their group. All follow-up activities are designed around learning objectives such as decoding, comprehension, prediction, visualization, and verbalization.


    READINESS: As a comprehensive language arts curriculum, a student must be at a similar grade level ability in reading, comprehension, and writing. Early readers who have not learned to write, for example, or emerging readers who struggle with comprehenion, may not be a good fit for this class. In addition, students must have the hand-eye coordination and basic handwriting skills to be able to copy the instructor's many notes, examples, and definitions from the classroom white board into their own notebook.


    Grade level references in Reading Rally are based on scope, sequence and pacing that correlate to the Grade Level Equivalent (GLE) standards of learning. Students who are more than one year behind in GLE in language arts or who have a difference in skill level between their reading and writing may be recommended for a second, weekly class meeting on Fridays or 1-on-1 private instruction to make up ground in reading or writing skills. Additional class meetings or private instruction will be an additional cost.


    ATTENTION! Parents should not register for a Reading Rally class until they have had a Language Arts Skills Inventory (i.e. brief assessment) and placement determination by the reading specialist. This must be scheduled separately through Compass at a cost of $125.00. The fee is due prior to the assessment and is not refundable in the event the child is not recommended for a reading group. The instructor has experience working with reluctant and fearful readers, those who are late bloomers, neurodivergent, dyslexic, and ESOL students. However, she might recommend a more complete evaluation by another professional if she suspects other learning differences are impacting the student's langauge arts learning.


    Students will work from a spiral bound copy of reading textbook and workbook by Pearson. A class fee of $142.00 is due payable to Compass for the required books.


    Students continuing from one semester to the next will receive priority registration to remain with their reading group.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Catherine Vanlandingham
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Reading and writing affect a student's achievement in all aspects of schoolwork, so strong language arts skills are fundamental to success in homeschooling. This weekly class is a small group of 3-6 students who read and write at a similar level. Students follow a comprehensive language arts curriculum under the guidance of an experienced reading specialist. Each Monday class meeting will include a short story with select vocabulary words, a graphic organizer, main themes, and embedded learning objectives. Students will continue to practice language arts skills at home with easy-to-implement "page a day" workbook activities assigned by the instructor and implemented by the parents. For most early elementary learners, enrollment in Reading Rally can serve as a complete, self-contained language arts curriculum where families will not need additional resources in reading, comprehension, composition, spelling, and grammar.


    Weekly readings are organized around thematic units. The instructor will teach students how to approach a new story as a fun reading puzzle. For example, before reading aloud in class, students will conduct a "picture walk" to overview and predict elements of the story from the illustrations, review a graphic organizer to assist in writing sentences, define vocabulary words, and preview summary questions. Then, the instructor will read the story aloud, model good reading practices, and encourage students to read. Students will only be asked to read aloud when they feel comfortable and have built trust in their group. All follow-up activities are designed around learning objectives such as decoding, comprehension, prediction, visualization, and verbalization.


    READINESS: As a comprehensive language arts curriculum, a student must be at a similar grade level ability in reading, comprehension, and writing. Early readers who have not learned to write, for example, or emerging readers who struggle with comprehenion, may not be a good fit for this class. In addition, students must have the hand-eye coordination and basic handwriting skills to be able to copy the instructor's many notes, examples, and definitions from the classroom white board into their own notebook.


    Grade level references in Reading Rally are based on scope, sequence and pacing that correlate to the Grade Level Equivalent (GLE) standards of learning. Students who are more than one year behind in GLE in language arts or who have a difference in skill level between their reading and writing may be recommended for a second, weekly class meeting on Fridays or 1-on-1 private instruction to make up ground in reading or writing skills. Additional class meetings or private instruction will be an additional cost.


    ATTENTION! Parents should not register for a Reading Rally class until they have had a Language Arts Skills Inventory (i.e. brief assessment) and placement determination by the reading specialist. This must be scheduled separately through Compass at a cost of $125.00. The fee is due prior to the assessment and is not refundable in the event the child is not recommended for a reading group. The instructor has experience working with reluctant and fearful readers, those who are late bloomers, neurodivergent, dyslexic, and ESOL students. However, she might recommend a more complete evaluation by another professional if she suspects other learning differences are impacting the student's langauge arts learning.


    Students will work from a spiral bound copy of reading textbook and workbook by Pearson. A class fee of $XX.00 is due payable to Compass for the required books.


    Students continuing from one semester to the next will receive priority registration to remain with their reading group.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Pete Van Riper
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Students will be introduced to painting with acrylics in a relaxed, informal studio setting under the guidance of a professional art instructor. Students will work on canvas boards and will learn elements of art, principles of design, and color theory in addition to methods in painting. Each week, the instructor will demonstrate a different technique in acrylic painting rather than a different subject. Techniques will include mixing and blending paints, wet and dry brush techniques, sponge techniques, glazing, washing, gradient relief, sgraffito, impasto, smudging, dot techniques, stippling, pouring, splattering, dabbing, underpainting, and detailing. The emphasis will be on methods and effects so that each student has a "toolbox" of techniques for working in acrylics. Students will have the freedom to mix and match the techniques that they have learned to create original pieces. In the open studio concepts, each student will have a different goal and unique project in-progress such as still life, floral, landscape, portrait, fantasy, abstract, or pop art. Student will complete two or three boards each quarter, depending on the level of detailing.


    This class is suitable for beginners who have never painted before, and for experienced art students who have worked in other mediums and are interested in exploring acrylic painting. Compass parents are welcome to register for this class to work alongside their teens, or to work on their own, while their teen is in another Compass class. Painting can provide a relaxing, needed break from rigorous academic classes and over-scheduled lives in a fun, supportive environment.


    Prerequisites: None


    Workload: Work outside of class is optional, however students who want to continue to practice their painting techniques might want to purchase a tabletop easel (approx. $10.00) and set of basic acrylic paints ($30.00+) for home use.


    Assessments: Individual feedback is given in class. Formal assessments will not be given.


    Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $25.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for up to 6 canvas boards and shared class supplies (paints, brushes, paper products, etc.). Students who paint more quickly need more than 6 boards can purchase additional ones from the instructor for $4.00/each.


    What to Wear: Students may wish to wear an apron, smock, or paint shirt when working with acrylic paints.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    David Chelf
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    This is a complete course in high school Algebra II which will cover fundamental concepts and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. Topics in Algebra II include linear functions, systems of equations and inequalities, quadratic functions and complex numbers, exponential and logarithmic functions, rational and irrational algebraic functions, and quadratic relations and systems. In addition, this course will cover higher degree functions with complex numbers, sequences and series, probability, data analysis, and trigonometric and circular functions. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem solving.


    Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation Algebra I in order to take this class.


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-1.5 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 7-day cycle, with assignments posted on Thursdays and due the following Thursday. Students are advised to start homework once it is assigned (i.e., not wait until the night before it is due). Weekly homework assignments will be of a length that a student should be able to complete them in two or three at-home work sessions. Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of their work.


    Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.


    Assessments: Student progress will be assessed by: (1) The instructor checking that weekly homework sets are attempted and complete and (2) detailed grading of periodic take-home tests. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. See the instructor's webpage for detailed homework and test policy, including late work and re-work.


    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Algebra and Trigonometry: Functions and Applications- Prentice Hall Classics (ISBN-10 0131657100, ISBN-13 978-0131657106). A scientific calculator similar to the Casio fx-115ES PLUS is required for this class.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Algebra II for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Albert Thompson
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    From John Locke and Jamestown to conflict, crisis, then Constitution, students will engage with American Government from a unique, thoughtful perspective. This course is facilitated by college professor Dr. Albert Thompson, a historian of the state, culture, and conflict who was homeschooled through high school. He uses an engaging storytelling style to encourage high school students to use "historical data to advance solutions to contemporary problems."


    First semester, the class will examine the founders and the establishment of a constitutional government in America. Students will consider the influence of Medieval English and British Protestant legal history in American thought. They will learn about the legacy of the wars throughout the British Empire, including the War for American Independence, on the development of the state governments and the federal system. This class will cover the Founding Fathers' vision and their framing of the US Constitution, including the economic influences.


    This semester covers the period in American Government from 1607-1804 with a focus on 1764-1804, including an examination of primary sources such as the Articles of Confederation, Declaration of Independence, Federalist Papers, The Constitution of the United States, and the Bill of Rights.


    Topics in this Series: Setting Up the Great Republic (Semester 1) and How the Republic Works Today (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.


    Prerequisites: None


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week on readings. Readings should be treated as pre-readings which students complete before class in order to engage in in-class discussion.


    Assignments: Reading assignments will be communicated weekly to students by email. This class will not have written assignments or projects.


    Assessments: The instructor will not give quizzes or provide assessments. Parents may give the textbook Review Questions and/or Critical Thinking Questions that are available for each unit for purposes of assessing their own student's understanding of major themes. The instructor will provide the answer keys.


    Textbook/Materials: The class will use American Government, , 3rd edition, a free, online open-source textbook from OpenStax. OpenStax is a nonprofit educational initiative based at Rice University. Contributing authors come from a variety of universities. Students may read the book online, download a Kindle version, download a pdf, or order an print copy from Amazon (ISBN-13: 978-1711493954 for $41.00).
    https://openstax.org/details/books/american-government-3e

    What to Bring: Paper or notebook; pen or pencil; assigned chapter.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in American Government or Civics for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Fatimah Aziz
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Students of ASL will continue to improve their fluency in this 3rd year course. As students become more advanced signers, emphasis will be on focusing on the meaning of a conversation (whole) and storytelling rather than individual signs (parts) or phrases. In conversation, students will learn to confirm information by asking questions in context. Third year students will continue to build their vocabulary, apply ASL grammar, and will learn to describe places, giving directions, giving opinions about others, discussing plans and goals, ask for advice, give opinions, make comparisons and use superlatives, and narrate stories. Other skills covered in ASL III include expressing year, phone numbers, time, and currency in numbers, giving directions, locations, etc. Each unit will include presentations and readings on Deaf culture and Deaf history. Class time will be dedicated to interactive ASL activities and signing practice.

    ASL students will have a Deaf instructor. She regularly teaches all-hearing classes and is an excellent role model for students to meet and interact with a native speaker of ASL and to lean natural facial expressions, gestures, and body language used in Deaf communications. ASL students will have more confidence when they encounter Deaf instructors in college or greet speakers of ASL in social settings. Because the instructor is Deaf, students are not permitted to speak aloud in class. This approach improves visual attention and encourages immersion in the language. Students will be able to ask questions of the instructor by writing on individual white boards, but they will be encouraged to sign in order to communicate with the instructor. Lessons are facilitated with Power Point presentations, and a professional ASL interpreter will assist the class on the first day of class.

    Hundreds of colleges and universities, including all public institutions of higher learning in Virginia, accept ASL as a distinct foreign language. This allows hearing and Deaf students to fulfill foreign language requirements for admission to college. Teens who have difficulty writing, spelling, or have challenging pronunciation in English, can be successful with ASL as a second or foreign language choice. Penn State University research demonstrated that the visual and kinesthetic elements of ASL helped to enhance the vocabulary, spelling, and reading skills in hearing students.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours each week outside of class on required vocabulary exercises, readings, and signing practice.

    Assignments: Homework assignments will be posted online in the Canvas digital classroom platform. Through Canvas, students will be asked to post short videos of themselves signing as homework. Enrolled students will be asked to review ASL 1 and 2 vocabulary, grammar, and facial expressions.

    Assessments: The instructor will assign points using a class rubric for the parent's use in assigning a course grade. Course rubrics will evaluate students on their sign production, fingerspelling, ASL grammar, facial expressions including "above the nose" grammar (brows and body movement), and "below the nose" modifiers (lip expressions).

    Textbook/Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $50.00 payable to Compass for the digital access code for the interactive e-textbook, TRUE+WAY ASL. With their subscription, students may also accces a free searchable, bilingual ASL & English dictionary, called What's the Sign?

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in World Languages for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Jessica Eastridge
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    This program has two in-person meetings each Monday: a 55-minute advanced beginner group session at 2:00 pm and a 55-minute all-instrument group practice from 1:00 pm- 1:55 pm. Band students must take both sectional and group together. Registration for the advanced beginner group will automatically enroll the student in the group session.

    Enjoy the camaraderie and cooperation of making music with others in a school band! Join the first homeschool concert band in the region at Compass. This band is for beginner and advanced beginner musicians of brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments.


    Students in Advanced Beginner band will meet together to continue to develop their skills on their selected instruments. To be considered an advanced beginner, students must have the following competencies on their chosen percussion, woodwind, or brass instrument:

  • Minimum of 2 months of playing experience;
  • A firm understanding of how to assemble and disassemble the instrument correctly;
  • Demonstrate proper instrument care;
  • Demonstrate correct posture, hand position, and embouchure (woodwinds);
  • Be able to play Hot Cross Buns in B-flat Major;
  • Be able to play at least one additional song in any key


  • Advanced beginner percussion students will continue their skills on the snare drum and mallet instruments (such as glockenspiel and xylophone). Advanced beginner woodwinds students will continue to play the flute or clarinet (4th-8th grade) or alto saxophone (7th-8th grade only). Advanced beginner brass students will learn to play the trumpet, trombone, or euphonium (4th-8th grade) and French horn or tuba (7th-8th grade students only). All band students will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing percussion instruments and will play both cooperatively in small ensembles and independently.


    Students will need to rent or purchase an instrument and accessories for the band. See the linked list by instrument.

    There is a $33.00 supply fee due payable to Compass on/before the start of class for the "Do It! Play (a Band Instrument)" book and workbook and the sheet music songs used for the group band performance.>

    Prerequisites: See Description

    1
    Judith Harmon
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Kratos wears a leather baldric. Captain America grasps a shield. Harley Quinn sports spiked wrist cuffs, and Lara Croft wouldn't go to war without her weaponry. Great accessories and carefully crafted garments make great cosplay. If you are interested in the world of cosplay and want to bring some of your favorite characters to life, this class will teach you the skills to craft costumes and accessories.



    First quarter, students will learn to work with EVA foam and thermal plastics. They will learn to use patterns, cut, layer, glue, carve, heat-shape, and paint foam and thermal plastic accessories. Projects for the quarter include a dagger and breastplate. Note: These projects are different than those taught in 2023-24, so a student can re-take the class to improve their skill and create new pieces.



    In this class, students will follow templates and patterns provided by and demonstrated by the instructor. Pieces will be individualized through paint and embellishments, but the goal is for cosplayers to learn specialized crafting techniques that they can use at home to make additional, unique pieces. There is a $55.00 supply fee for in-class materials, the shared use of classroom tools/supplies, and some take-home tools to continue crafting at home. First quarter, students will take home 2 types of Exacto knives, a small cutting mat, patterns, and foam remnants. Note: Project themes or materials are subject to change due to availability or sourcing at the time of the class.



    Cosplayers who would like to create original fabric costume elements such as capes, vests, skirts, and more, may want to co-register for this instructor's Learn to Sew classes.



    Topics in this Series: Foam & Plastics (Quarter 1), Resins and Metal Work (Quarter 2), Leather Work (Quarter 3), Mending & Alterations (Quarter 4) etc. Students continuing from one quarter receive priority pre-registration for the next quarter.



    Prerequisites: None



    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.



    Assignments: Will be communicated in weekly e-mails and posted in a Google classroom.



    Assessments: will not be given



    Textbook/Materials: All materials will be furnished.



    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $55.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.



    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in fine arts/theater for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Cristin Harber
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Be part of a team! Join the Compass Collaborative newspaper staff. The staff is a mixed-age team with students from 6th to 12th grade.


    Students will learn about journalism and develop writing skills. They will craft effective articles, conduct interviews, and write reviews. Each quarter, writing assignments and responsibilities will be divided based on individual interests. Students will each contribute at least 2-3 items to the Collaborative edition each quarter.


    While research and data collection will occur outside of class, a portion of staff meetings will be dedicated to writing and editing. The newspaper advisor will use these sessions to demonstrate what constitutes 'good' writing. All staff members will practice editing skills to improve grammar, punctuation, and overall clarity and accuracy in their writing. Students will be informally paired for peer review and feedback on their writing.


    The newspaper staff will also learn about the formatting, layout, and graphic design elements that go into the newspaper. Interested students will serve as layout apprentices and learn to use Microsoft Publisher.


    All students register for the same class, and roles and responsibilities will be reviewed and delegated during the first meetings. Students should expect to work on assignments outside of class and will be expected to bring a laptop, notebook, and pen/pencil to each class meeting.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Edwige Pinover
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Note, this course is being offered as semi-private instruction for select students who had French III with this instructor. Tuition is based on 2 students in the class. If an additional student wishes to enroll, he/she must speak with the instructor to confirm placement. Tuition will be recalculated for all students with the addition one or more students or if only 1 student enrolls.


    Bonjour et bienvenue dans notre classe de Francais 4 ! Welcome to the fourth year of high school French. This is a conversation-focused program in which students will communicate among each other about different topics. The class will naturally continue using the present tenses, the future tenses, the past tenses, and the conditional tense. At this point in learning French, students should be able to communicate fluently about various topics using their knowledge. Students will also develop new vocabulary and new grammar points via the use of different readings.


    Class will be conducted primarily in French and will focus on listening and speaking skills. At home, students will be responsible for memorizing vocabulary and grammar, completing homework assignments, and watching both grammar instruction and language immersion videos.


    Prerequisites: French III


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 30-45 minutes per day, 4 days per week on homework outside of class.


    Assignments: Are sent by e-mail to parents and students. Students must have access to a computer and internet service for computer-based videos and practice tools that are assigned as homework and are essential to success in the class.


    Assessments: Quizzes, tests, and individual performance reviews will be given to all students at regular intervals to provide parents with sufficient feedback to assign a grade.


    Textbook:Each semester, students will read a novel in French that will be selected by the instructor. Students will be asked to reimburse her for the cost of the novel, approximately $10.00-$15.00


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Foreign Language for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: French III or equivalent

    1
    David Cubias
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Krav Maga is the Israeli martial art which teaches self defense and fitness. Students of Krav Maga are taught a series of strategies to assess and respond to common situations, such as facing a bully. Teens are always taught first and foremost to get away, to get help, and to try to deescalate the situation. When that fails, students practice a technique that includes a warning strike followed by escape, and finally, they learn how to stand up for themselves and how to counterattack if a situation escalates and becomes threatening. Teens are empowered and gain confidence when they rehearse how to handle real-life situations. Exercises and in-class practice incorporate balance, coordination, energy, and other key elements of fitness along with life skills such as confidence, teamwork, respect, discipline, and respect. Students may enroll in Krav Maga at any time, and everyone will begin as a white belt. Each quarter, students will practice the full range of skills, but there will be two "featured" moves that a student can earn a belt stripe for being able to demonstrate. Featured moves will include a combative strike and a defensive escape technique. No one stripe is a prerequisite for any other color, and color stripes can be earned in any order. First quarter, students will have the chance to earn a Blue Stripe. Featured moves include: cover defense and wrist locks (red stripe); straight punch defense and bear hugs (orange stripe); head movement defense and front 2-handed choke (yellow stripe); round kick defense and back 2-handed choke (green stripe); front kick defense and guillotine choke (blue stripe); clinch defense and rear choke (purple stripe); ground striking defense and head lock defense (brown stripe); and 360 defense and full Nelson (black stripe). Students will be able to test for belt promotions to move through the ranks of white belt, yellow belt, orange belt, etc. On average, it is estimated that a student will be ready for a belt test after four quarters/four color stripes. Belt testing will be by coach approval. Topics in this Series: Blue Stripe (1st Quarter), Purple Stripe (2nd Quarter), Brown Stripe (3rd Quarter) and Black Stripe (4th Quarter). Assessments: Belt testing for promotion will be by coach recommendation, but on average will take 4 quarters. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $6.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class- for new students only- for a white belt to collect the colored stripes! A belt test fee of $25.00 is due payable to the instructor when a student is ready to test for promotion. What to Bring: Refillable water bottle. What to Wear: Participants should wear their belt along with shorts, leggings, or loose, comfortable athletic pants, and comfortable athletic shoes or sneakers.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Karen Shumway
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Discover the exciting world of Latin language and Roman civilization! Learn the foundations of the language of great conquerors, orators, and men and women who shaped the course of history. Studying Latin also opens many doors to learning other Romance languages and deepens students' understanding of English structure and mechanics, including rhetorical and grammatical constructs.



    Latin II reviews grammar, vocabulary, and syntax from Latin I and continues by extending the use of verbs, pronouns, adjectives, and adverbs. Students will also study Roman history and culture, Roman civilization, Roman numerals, and English derivatives of Latin words. In addition, they will discover the Roman world through geography, mythology, and daily life. While Latin is primarily a written language, the class will cover basic oral Latin for conversation. Students will learn the necessary skills to be prepared for the option of taking the National Latin Exam in the spring.



    Prerequisites: Students must have high school level reading comprehension in English. Latin II students should have completed Latin I through Compass or another program. For a student transferring from a different Latin program, please consult the National Latin exam syllabus for Beginning and Internmediate Latin to determine the appropriate placement.



    Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class on grammar, vocabulary, translation, and Roman civilization, culture, and geography.



    Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, and track grades. Email is the preferred mode of communication between the instructor, students, and parents.



    Assessments: The instructor will assign points in Canvas using a class rubric, which will include quizzes, tests, projects, and participation. Parents will be given access to their child's work in Canvas as an observer and can use this information to determine the appropriate grade to assign should they be interested in compiling a transcript.



    Textbook: The instructor will order clean, used copies of Cambridge Latin Course, 5th edition, Unit 2 (ISBN-13: 978-1107699007).



    Supply Fee: There is a $60.00 class fee to cover both textbook and printing costs for the year.



    What to Bring: Students will need loose leaf paper, a binder or notebook, index cards in multiple colors for creating vocabulary flashcards, and pencils for daily classes and homework. Projects may require occasional additional materials.



    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Foreign Language for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: Latin I

    1
    David Chelf
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Financing a motorcycle, buying your first car, comparing lease options on an apartment, understanding your paycheck, and selecting insurance. These are all real-life scenarios that young adults will face within the first five years of graduating high school, if not sooner. These choices and others are an inevitable part of "adulting" and require a solid understanding of essential math skills.


    This course will work through practical, real-life situations and will review the math skills needed to make informed choices. Often called "Consumer Math," this course will review arithmetic concepts such as decimals, fractions, discounts, rates, ratios, proportions, rounding, simple interest, estimating, and measurements. However, instead of working math problems in abstract exercises, students will revisit these concepts in the context of scenarios they will encounter in everyday life.


    What is a better deal: an extra 15% off the already discounted sales price of 30% off or Buy One, Get One free? Students will be able to use/apply arithmetic concepts to common scenarios to make informed consumer choices. Course themes include:


  • Banking and Checking Accounts including balancing a checkbook (on paper and spreadsheet), understanding fees, and interest.

  • Saving and Investing including how money grows, simple and compounding interest, overview of how stocks, bonds, savings accounts, and CDs work, and discussion on personal emergency fund.
  • Credit Cards including fees, minimum payments, interest, what happens when the balance is not paid off, and a look at consumer credit scores.
  • Measurement/Metric System/Unit Conversion including a review of what units are used for what items in imperial and metric systems, common ballparks and estimates, mathematical methods to convert and compare units, and the use of apps to make conversions.

  • Sales/Discounts by looking at examples to compare various promotions and to calculate which is a better deal.

  • Wages/Income including calculating weekly or bi-weekly or annual pay from a rate, estimate payroll withholdings as percentages, look at hour overtime affects earnings, commissions, and a survey of the salaries and hourly rates for variety of jobs teens and young adults might have.
  • Pricing and Cost including sales taxes and how goods and services are priced and what mark-ups should be considered- useful for those wanting to have their own business.
  • Rent/Mortgages For rentals, understand application fees, security deposits, and pre-paid amounts, monthly rate and what is included, and term of lease and make comparison among options. For purchases: understand how mortgages vary based on down payment, term, and interest rate. Students will look at cost of homes in their area and practice using online calculators to adjust down payment, term, interest rate, and homeowners' insurance affect monthly payment, and they will look briefly at how the amount paid towards principle and interest (P/I) change over time.
  • Types of Insurance including auto, health, and hazard insurance. What is required, what is recommended, and how much do they cost? Understanding option such as employer-paid v. self-pay; private insurance v. ACA marketplace policy; and terminology such as co-pay, co-insurance, deductible, out-of-pocket maximum, etc.
  • Loans- Auto/Student/Personal/Consumer (such as furniture) including understanding how down payment, term, and interest rate affect your monthly payment and what it means to have "no interest for 12 months" or "zero down."
  • Automobiles including the cost of warranties and what they cover, the costs of owning and operating a vehicle, fuel efficiency, and the metrics of EVs.
  • Budgeting including a personal plan given assumed career/average salary, and all anticipated expenses (housing, utilities, transportation, food, insurance, medical, clothing, entertainment).

  • Prerequisites: Pre-Algebra



    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-1.5 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 7-day cycle, with assignments posted on Thursdays and due the following Thursday. Students are advised to start homework once it is assigned (i.e., not wait until the night before it is due). Weekly homework assignments will be of a length that a student should be able to complete them in two or three at-home work sessions. Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of their work.


    Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.


    Assessments: Student progress will be assessed by: (1) The instructor checking that weekly homework sets are attempted and complete and (2) detailed grading of periodic take-home tests. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. See the instructor's webpage for detailed homework and test policy, including late work and re-work.


    Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase or rent Mathematics for Business and Personal Finance,by McGraw Hill Publishers, 1st Edition (ISBN-13: 978-0078805059) [race cars on cover]


    What to Bring: Notebook or paper, pen or pencil, textbook and/or workbook. From time to time the instructor may ask students to bring a smart phone (for apps) or laptop for in-class investigation.



    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as full credit in Mathematics or Personal Finance for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Christina Somerville
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    According to Aristotle, "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." In this year-long course, high school students will practice strategies to improve their reading comprehension for deeper understanding through critical thinking. They will also improve their ability to argue and persuade in writing.


    Using texts on argumentation and rhetoric by Ward Farnsworth, students will learn how to read carefully, define terms, spot logical fallacies, and construct clear, logically compelling, persuasive arguments. The class will be introduced to terminology and techniques in the formal disciplines of logic and rhetoric.


    In the first semester, the class will focus on internal skills: how to understand and evaluate arguments according to logical reasoning and critical thinking. In the second semester, the group will focus on external skills: how to build and communicate arguments that are both compelling and persuasive.


    Class reading selections will include selections from Farnsworth's books Classical English Argument and Classical English Rhetoric, as well as selections from famous speeches. The class may draw from history, literature, law, political theory, religion, contemporary topics, and comparative worldviews.


    Prerequisites: Students must read at grade level for this course.


    Textbooks: Students should purchase or rent Farnsworth's Classical English Rhetoric by Ward Farnsworth (ISBN: 978-1567923858) and Farnsworth's Classical English Argument by Ward Farnsworth (ISBN: 978-1567927986)


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 3 hours per week outside of class. Reading assignments will not be especially long, but students will be expected to read thoroughly and carefully.


    Assignments: Will be posted on a Google Classroom site for students and parents to access.


    Assessments: Papers and assignments will be evaluated and scored which are treated as grade recommendations to parents.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as full credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Judith Harmon
    Add

    Teens will embark on an unforgettable fantasy journey this summer with a virtual role-playing adventure. Aspiring adventurers, creative minds, and strategic thinkers will enjoy these one-shot (i.e. one-day) "shorts." From epic fantasy to futuristic sci-fi escapades, teens will experience a different genre and setting each week. They will unleash their creativity and collaborate with other participants to shape the adventure, solve challenges, and make decisions to advance the story. The weekly online meet-up will be managed by an experienced Game Master who will guide students through the art of role-playing. One-shot RPGs use a simplified rule system of 1-2 pages which make a great introduction for new role-players yet also fun for those with more extensive experience in D&D. The short format works well for summer so a long, involved campaign is not interrupted by other summer plans, and the virtual meeting allows students to connect wherever their summer plans take them. This is a 5-week, 2 hour/week program hosted in a virtual environment.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
    Add

    Teens will embark on an unforgettable fantasy journey this summer with a virtual role-playing adventure. Aspiring adventurers, creative minds, and strategic thinkers will enjoy these one-shot (i.e. one-day) "shorts." From epic fantasy to futuristic sci-fi escapades, teens will experience a different genre and setting each week. They will unleash their creativity and collaborate with other participants to shape the adventure, solve challenges, and make decisions to advance the story. The weekly online meet-up will be managed by an experienced Game Master who will guide students through the art of role-playing. One-shot RPGs use a simplified rule system of 1-2 pages which make a great introduction for new role-players yet also fun for those with more extensive experience in D&D. The short format works well for summer so a long, involved campaign is not interrupted by other summer plans, and the virtual meeting allows students to connect wherever their summer plans take them. This is a 5-week, 2 hour/week program hosted in a virtual environment.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mylene Nyman
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    The tantalizing aroma of cookies in the oven. A mouth-watering burst of mint. The silky feel of melted chocolate. The sticky sweet of fresh-made caramel. A subtle hint of lemon. Student bakers will enjoy these delicious sensations- and more- as they explore the world of baking homemade desserts.


    Sweet Shop treats are scrumptious, fun, and simple to make. Each week they will prepare a fresh, handmade dessert or sweet such as: pies, cakes, cookies, tarts, trifles, mousses, puddings, candies, fudge, brittle, or chocolate. The class will include some icing, decorating, and garnishing techniques for completed desserts. This quarter, the Compass bakers' culinary adventures will include:


  • Mini Apple Crumble
  • Apple Pecan Bread (contains nuts)
  • Caramel-Apple Monkey Bread Mini Loaves
  • Blue Pear Puff Tarts
  • Fall Spiced Pear and Date Upside Down Cake
  • Nantucket Cranberry Tart
  • Caramel Pecan Cheesecake Pie (contains nuts)
  • Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. This engaging sweets class will get students excited about helping in the kitchen and entertaining. They will learn important baking skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary is introduced each week.


    Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics.


    Topics in this Series: Decadent Delights (Quarter 1); Gooey Goodies (Quarter 2), Best Bon Bons (Quarter 3), and Tasty Treats (Quarter 4).


    Assessments: Qualitative Feedback will be given in class. Formal grades/assessment will not be given.


    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on or before the first day of class.


    What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided.


    What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).


    Cooking Class Requirements: For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Anne Taranto
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Teen writers will take inspiration from other writers in this semester-long creative writing workshop:



    • "You can't use up creativity. The more you use, the more you have." - Maya Angelou
    • "Good stories are not written. They are rewritten." - Phyllis Whitney
    • "You may not write well every day, but you can always edit a bad page. You can't edit a blank page." - Jodi Picoult

    This class is designed to inspire teens who are interested in writing short fiction to learn the "tools of the trade", from developing a plot that fits within the scope of a short story arc and developing narrative structure and characterization, to writing convincing dialogue. Each week students will read a short story that demonstrates a particular narrative perspective or technique and then complete a writing exercise designed to emulate that technique. Portions of each class will be dedicated to writing and to peer feedback. The class will culminate in sharing any stories that may develop out of these exercises in a collaborative workshop setting.


    Topics in this Series: Creative Writing (Semester 1) and Creative Non-Fiction (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.


    Prerequisites: Reading/writing at a high school level (9th grade or higher)


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class.


    Assignments: Weekly reading assignments will be posted on Google Classroom. Students will need their own email addresses to access the system, and parents may be set up as additional "observers" to their teen's account.


    Assessments: A point scale of 1-3 will be used to evaluate students based on their level of preparation, their participation in discussion, and their completion of extension activities. Parents may use the total points earned to calculate a grade.


    Textbook/Materials: The instructor will furnish a curated class anthology packet.


    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for the select readings.


    What to Bring: Short story collection, notebook or laptop (depending on student's preferred method of writing), and printed copies of student's writing on days he/she is ready to share writing.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English/Language Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: Reading/writing at grade level

    1
    Catherine Vanlandingham
    Add

    Reading and writing affect a student's achievement in all aspects of schoolwork, so strong language arts skills are fundamental to success in homeschooling. This weekly class is a small group of 3-6 students who read and write at a similar level. Students follow a comprehensive language arts curriculum under the guidance of an experienced reading specialist. Each Monday class meeting will include a short story with select vocabulary words, a graphic organizer, main themes, and embedded learning objectives. Students will continue to practice language arts skills at home with easy-to-implement "page a day" workbook activities assigned by the instructor and implemented by the parents. For most early elementary learners, enrollment in Reading Rally can serve as a complete, self-contained language arts curriculum where families will not need additional resources in reading, comprehension, composition, spelling, and grammar.


    Weekly readings are organized around thematic units. The instructor will teach students how to approach a new story as a fun reading puzzle. For example, before reading aloud in class, students will conduct a "picture walk" to overview and predict elements of the story from the illustrations, review a graphic organizer to assist in writing sentences, define vocabulary words, and preview summary questions. Then, the instructor will read the story aloud, model good reading practices, and encourage students to read. Students will only be asked to read aloud when they feel comfortable and have built trust in their group. All follow-up activities are designed around learning objectives such as decoding, comprehension, prediction, visualization, and verbalization.


    READINESS: As a comprehensive language arts curriculum, a student must be at a similar grade level ability in reading, comprehension, and writing. Early readers who have not learned to write, for example, or emerging readers who struggle with comprehenion, may not be a good fit for this class. In addition, students must have the hand-eye coordination and basic handwriting skills to be able to copy the instructor's many notes, examples, and definitions from the classroom white board into their own notebook.


    Grade level references in Reading Rally are based on scope, sequence and pacing that correlate to the Grade Level Equivalent (GLE) standards of learning. Students who are more than one year behind in GLE in language arts or who have a difference in skill level between their reading and writing may be recommended for a second, weekly class meeting on Fridays or 1-on-1 private instruction to make up ground in reading or writing skills. Additional class meetings or private instruction will be an additional cost.


    ATTENTION! Parents should not register for a Reading Rally class until they have had a Language Arts Skills Inventory (i.e. brief assessment) and placement determination by the reading specialist. This must be scheduled separately through Compass at a cost of $125.00. The fee is due prior to the assessment and is not refundable in the event the child is not recommended for a reading group. The instructor has experience working with reluctant and fearful readers, those who are late bloomers, neurodivergent, dyslexic, and ESOL students. However, she might recommend a more complete evaluation by another professional if she suspects other learning differences are impacting the student's langauge arts learning.


    Students will work from a spiral bound copy of reading textbook and workbook by Pearson. A class fee of $98.00 is due payable to Compass for the required books.


    Students continuing from one semester to the next will receive priority registration to remain with their reading group.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Catherine Vanlandingham
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Reading and writing affect a student's achievement in all aspects of schoolwork, so strong language arts skills are fundamental to success in homeschooling. This weekly class is a small group of 3-6 students who read and write at a similar level. Students follow a comprehensive language arts curriculum under the guidance of an experienced reading specialist. Each Monday class meeting will include a short story with select vocabulary words, a graphic organizer, main themes, and embedded learning objectives. Students will continue to practice language arts skills at home with easy-to-implement "page a day" workbook activities assigned by the instructor and implemented by the parents. For most early elementary learners, enrollment in Reading Rally can serve as a complete, self-contained language arts curriculum where families will not need additional resources in reading, comprehension, composition, spelling, and grammar.


    Weekly readings are organized around thematic units. The instructor will teach students how to approach a new story as a fun reading puzzle. For example, before reading aloud in class, students will conduct a "picture walk" to overview and predict elements of the story from the illustrations, review a graphic organizer to assist in writing sentences, define vocabulary words, and preview summary questions. Then, the instructor will read the story aloud, model good reading practices, and encourage students to read. Students will only be asked to read aloud when they feel comfortable and have built trust in their group. All follow-up activities are designed around learning objectives such as decoding, comprehension, prediction, visualization, and verbalization.


    READINESS: As a comprehensive language arts curriculum, a student must be at a similar grade level ability in reading, comprehension, and writing. Early readers who have not learned to write, for example, or emerging readers who struggle with comprehenion, may not be a good fit for this class. In addition, students must have the hand-eye coordination and basic handwriting skills to be able to copy the instructor's many notes, examples, and definitions from the classroom white board into their own notebook.


    Grade level references in Reading Rally are based on scope, sequence and pacing that correlate to the Grade Level Equivalent (GLE) standards of learning. Students who are more than one year behind in GLE in language arts or who have a difference in skill level between their reading and writing may be recommended for a second, weekly class meeting on Fridays or 1-on-1 private instruction to make up ground in reading or writing skills. Additional class meetings or private instruction will be an additional cost.


    ATTENTION! Parents should not register for a Reading Rally class until they have had a Language Arts Skills Inventory (i.e. brief assessment) and placement determination by the reading specialist. This must be scheduled separately through Compass at a cost of $125.00. The fee is due prior to the assessment and is not refundable in the event the child is not recommended for a reading group. The instructor has experience working with reluctant and fearful readers, those who are late bloomers, neurodivergent, dyslexic, and ESOL students. However, she might recommend a more complete evaluation by another professional if she suspects other learning differences are impacting the student's langauge arts learning.


    Students will work from a spiral bound copy of reading textbook and workbook by Pearson. A class fee of $140.00 is due payable to Compass for the required books.


    Students continuing from one semester to the next will receive priority registration to remain with their reading group.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Catherine Vanlandingham
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Reading and writing affect a student's achievement in all aspects of schoolwork, so strong language arts skills are fundamental to success in homeschooling. This weekly class is a small group of 3-6 students who read and write at a similar level. Students follow a comprehensive language arts curriculum under the guidance of an experienced reading specialist. Each Monday class meeting will include a short story with select vocabulary words, a graphic organizer, main themes, and embedded learning objectives. Students will continue to practice language arts skills at home with easy-to-implement "page a day" workbook activities assigned by the instructor and implemented by the parents. For most early elementary learners, enrollment in Reading Rally can serve as a complete, self-contained language arts curriculum where families will not need additional resources in reading, comprehension, composition, spelling, and grammar.


    Weekly readings are organized around thematic units. The instructor will teach students how to approach a new story as a fun reading puzzle. For example, before reading aloud in class, students will conduct a "picture walk" to overview and predict elements of the story from the illustrations, review a graphic organizer to assist in writing sentences, define vocabulary words, and preview summary questions. Then, the instructor will read the story aloud, model good reading practices, and encourage students to read. Students will only be asked to read aloud when they feel comfortable and have built trust in their group. All follow-up activities are designed around learning objectives such as decoding, comprehension, prediction, visualization, and verbalization.


    READINESS: As a comprehensive language arts curriculum, a student must be at a similar grade level ability in reading, comprehension, and writing. Early readers who have not learned to write, for example, or emerging readers who struggle with comprehenion, may not be a good fit for this class. In addition, students must have the hand-eye coordination and basic handwriting skills to be able to copy the instructor's many notes, examples, and definitions from the classroom white board into their own notebook.


    Grade level references in Reading Rally are based on scope, sequence and pacing that correlate to the Grade Level Equivalent (GLE) standards of learning. Students who are more than one year behind in GLE in language arts or who have a difference in skill level between their reading and writing may be recommended for a second, weekly class meeting on Fridays or 1-on-1 private instruction to make up ground in reading or writing skills. Additional class meetings or private instruction will be an additional cost.


    ATTENTION! Parents should not register for a Reading Rally class until they have had a Language Arts Skills Inventory (i.e. brief assessment) and placement determination by the reading specialist. This must be scheduled separately through Compass at a cost of $125.00. The fee is due prior to the assessment and is not refundable in the event the child is not recommended for a reading group. The instructor has experience working with reluctant and fearful readers, those who are late bloomers, neurodivergent, dyslexic, and ESOL students. However, she might recommend a more complete evaluation by another professional if she suspects other learning differences are impacting the student's langauge arts learning.


    Students will work from a spiral bound copy of reading textbook and workbook by Pearson. A class fee of $XX.00 is due payable to Compass for the required books.


    Students continuing from one semester to the next will receive priority registration to remain with their reading group.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Edwige Pinover
    Opens 05/14 6:00am

    Note, this course is being offered as semi-private instruction for select students who had French IV with this instructor. Tuition is based on 2 students in the class. If an additional student wishes to enroll, he/she must speak with the instructor to confirm placement. Tuition will be recalculated for all students with the addition one or more students or if only 1 student enrolls.


    Bonjour et bienvenue dans notre classe de Francais 5 ! Welcome to the fifth year of high school French. This is a conversation-focused program in which students will communicate among each other about different topics. The class will naturally continue using the present tenses, the future tenses, the past tenses, and the conditional tense. At this point in learning French, students should be able to communicate fluently about various topics using their knowledge. Students will also develop new vocabulary and new grammar points via the use of different readings.


    Class will be conducted exclusively in French and will focus on listening and speaking skills. At home, students will be responsible for memorizing vocabulary and grammar, completing homework assignments, and watching French videos.


    Prerequisites: French IV


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 30-45 minutes per day, 4 days per week on homework outside of class.


    Assignments: Are sent by e-mail to parents and students. Students must have access to a computer and internet service for computer-based videos and practice tools that are assigned as homework and are essential to success in the class.


    Assessments: Quizzes, tests, and individual performance reviews will be given to all students at regular intervals to provide parents with sufficient feedback to assign a grade.


    Textbook:Each semester, students will read a novel in French that will be selected by the instructor. Students will be asked to reimburse her for the cost of the novel, approximately $10.00-$15.00


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Foreign Language for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: French IV or equivalent

    1
    Catherine Vanlandingham
    Add

    Reading and writing affect a student's achievement in all aspects of schoolwork, so strong language arts skills are fundamental to success in homeschooling. This weekly class is a small group of 3-6 students who read and write at a similar level. Students follow a comprehensive language arts curriculum under the guidance of an experienced reading specialist. Each Monday class meeting will include a short story with select vocabulary words, a graphic organizer, main themes, and embedded learning objectives. Students will continue to practice language arts skills at home with easy-to-implement "page a day" workbook activities assigned by the instructor and implemented by the parents. For most early elementary learners, enrollment in Reading Rally can serve as a complete, self-contained language arts curriculum where families will not need additional resources in reading, comprehension, composition, spelling, and grammar.


    Weekly readings are organized around thematic units. The instructor will teach students how to approach a new story as a fun reading puzzle. For example, before reading aloud in class, students will conduct a "picture walk" to overview and predict elements of the story from the illustrations, review a graphic organizer to assist in writing sentences, define vocabulary words, and preview summary questions. Then, the instructor will read the story aloud, model good reading practices, and encourage students to read. Students will only be asked to read aloud when they feel comfortable and have built trust in their group. All follow-up activities are designed around learning objectives such as decoding, comprehension, prediction, visualization, and verbalization.


    READINESS: As a comprehensive language arts curriculum, a student must be at a similar grade level ability in reading, comprehension, and writing. Early readers who have not learned to write, for example, or emerging readers who struggle with comprehenion, may not be a good fit for this class. In addition, students must have the hand-eye coordination and basic handwriting skills to be able to copy the instructor's many notes, examples, and definitions from the classroom white board into their own notebook.


    Grade level references in Reading Rally are based on scope, sequence and pacing that correlate to the Grade Level Equivalent (GLE) standards of learning. Students who are more than one year behind in GLE in language arts or who have a difference in skill level between their reading and writing may be recommended for a second, weekly class meeting on Fridays or 1-on-1 private instruction to make up ground in reading or writing skills. Additional class meetings or private instruction will be an additional cost.


    ATTENTION! Parents should not register for a Reading Rally class until they have had a Language Arts Skills Inventory (i.e. brief assessment) and placement determination by the reading specialist. This must be scheduled separately through Compass at a cost of $125.00. The fee is due prior to the assessment and is not refundable in the event the child is not recommended for a reading group. The instructor has experience working with reluctant and fearful readers, those who are late bloomers, neurodivergent, dyslexic, and ESOL students. However, she might recommend a more complete evaluation by another professional if she suspects other learning differences are impacting the student's langauge arts learning.


    Students will work from a spiral bound copy of reading textbook and workbook by Pearson. A class fee of $101.00 is due payable to Compass for the required books.


    Students continuing from one semester to the next will receive priority registration to remain with their reading group.

    Prerequisites: None

    2