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Registration is OPEN for ONLINE fall classes!

Registration for fall IN-PERSON classes will open the week of August 10 in a new location! Sign up for our subscribers list to receive notices about the re-opening of registration for our new class schedule. An early registration discount of 10% is offered through August 31!

  • See the updated Compass Academic Calendar for 2020-21.
  • Examine our COVID-19 plan before registering for fall classes!
  • Read about the virtual formats some high school classes are being taught in.
  • Review our Registration FAQs.
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    Peter Snow
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    In Intermediate Chess 1, students will learn skills that build upon each other such as, 8 Questions to ask before you move; mating nets; piece defenses against typical tactics; forcing combinations; king and pawn endings; offensive tactics used in the openings; and review of two move checkmates and two move tactics. Experts suggest that the game of chess teaches analytical and disciplined thinking skills, while raising self esteem, teaching motivation and determination, and sportsmanship (Kasparov Foundation). Each class will be spent half on technique and half in practice matches with classmates while the instructor coaches. Students should have 30+ hours of chess instruction prior to enrolling in Intermediate Chess, a working knowledge of most skills taught in the Compass Beginner and Advanced Beginner Chess levels, or instructor permission. Homework may be given.

    Prerequisites: Advanced Beginner Chess series, or equivalent

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    Luc Atangana
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    In Paint Studio II, student artists will further develop their skills in acrylic painting in a relaxed, informal studio setting under the guidance of a professional paint instructor. Paint Studio II is a two-hour session where a focused lesson is demonstrated and practiced in the first hour, and students may continue to paint in open studio (shared with Paint Studio I students) the second hour. The second hour of Paint Studio II is optional in the event that a student must attend a 10:00 am class.

    Students will work on framed canvas and easels and will learn elements of art and principles of design in addition to methods in painting. Advanced painting techniques that will be taught including dry brush work, washing, splattering, dabbing, pallet knife, underpainting, and layering. Each quarter, the instructor will demonstrate techniques by developing a sample painting. Students may elect to follow the class sample, or may apply the painting skills to an entirely unique composition. Students will complete one or two 16" X 20" canvases each quarter, depending on the level of detailing.

    First quarter's lessons will include color studies such as partial mixing of colors and creating a family of colors, to achieve a variety of effects and contrasting textures. Five main color schemes used in art will be introduced including: complimentary, analogous, triadic, split-complimentary, and tetradic. Lessons will explore desaturation of hues to create tints, shades, or tones. Students can apply this understanding to create a color palette for their painting that makes it look more or less natural, depending on their choices.

    This class is suitable for returning teen students who have completed at least two quarters of Paint Studio I or adult students. Prior-year Paint Studio II students are encouraged to continue with this class to develop their skills to the next level. Compass parents are welcome to register for this class to work alongside their teens or to work on their own while their teen is another Compass class. Painting can provide a relaxing, needed break from rigorous academic classes and over-scheduled lives in a fun, supportive environment.

    Prerequisites: A minimum of two quarters of Paint Studio I or prior class(es) in acrylic painting

    Topics in this Series: Abstracts- Advanced Color Work (Quarter 1), Landscapes- Advanced Acrylic Techniques (Quarter 2), Structures & Cities- Advanced Linear Perspective (Quarter 3), and Create Your Own- A Study in Composition (Quarter 4).

    Workload: Work outside of class is optional, however students who want to continue to practice their painting techniques might want to purchase a tabletop easel (approx. $10.00) and set of basic acrylic paints ($30.00+) for home use.

    Assessments: Individual feedback is given in class. Formal assessments will not be given.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A New Student Class Fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for canvases, pallet, pallet knife, 12-piece paint brush set, a sketchbook, and use of shared class supplies (desktop easels, acrylic paint, brushes, paper products, etc.). The Returning Student Class Fee is $20.00 for canvases and shared class supplies.

    What to Wear: Students may wish to wear an apron, smock, or paint shirt when working with acrylic paints.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: Min. 2 Quarters of Paint Studio I or prior class(es) in acrylic painting

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    Lisa Alonso
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Get ready for a full year of advanced high school level Spanish! This is a conversation-based program in which students will continue to build their vocabulary quickly and learn essential grammar skills in Spanish. Vocabulary will include shopping for clothing and food; ancient civilizations; modern society; legends and stories; preparing and describing food; ordering meals in a restaurant; watching/making movies and attending movie premiers; reading and writing for newspapers and other publications; family and relationships; the environment and conservation; and careers and professions. There will be a strong emphasis on using regular and irregular preterit tense verbs; imperfect tense verbs; knowing the differences between and when to use preterit vs. imperfect; subjunctive tense verbs; regular and irregular future tense verbs and other common grammar concepts such as commands; direct object pronouns; indirect object pronouns; double object pronouns; when to use por vs. para; comparative phrases; superlative phrases; impersonal expressions and routine application of common spelling changes. Additionally, we will study culture through the lens of contemporary music genres and dances and will gain advanced grammar skills through the translation of popular song lyrics.

    Class will be conducted almost exclusively in Spanish and will focus on listening and speaking skills, asking and answering questions, and correct use of grammar. At home, students will be responsible for memorizing vocabulary and grammar, completing worksheets and written assignments, and watching both grammar instruction and language immersion videos.

    Level:This class will be offered on two levels: Honors and On-Level. Spanish III offers a substantive, full-credit experience taught at either level. All class members share core material and participate in the same class activities, but honors students will be given homework that requires higher level reasoning and advanced application of various grammar skills. All students will register online for the same course. Students must indicate which level they want to study via e-mail by August 15. Once the course has begun, students may move down a level (from honors to on-level) at any time. However, once classes have started, students may not "bump up" a level.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 30-45 per day, 4 days per week on homework outside of class.

    Assignments: Are sent by e-mail to parents and students. Students must have access to a computer and internet service for computer-based videos and practice tools that are assigned as homework and are essential to success in the class.

    Assessments: Quizzes, tests, and individual performance reviews will be given to all students at regular intervals to provide parents with sufficient feedback to assign a grade.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $30.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for class materials in lieu of a textbook.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Foreign Language for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

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    Sarah Fraser
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    Whether college admissions tests (PSAT, SAT, or ACT) are right around the corner or down the road, this class will teach you how to tackle the tests, decode the questions, and boost your scores. While SAT/ACT test scores are not automatic ticket into the college of your choice, higher scores will get your application in the to-be-considered pile where admissions staff will take a closer look at all the other amazing things you have done. This course will also help prepare students who will be taking the VPT (Virginia Placement Test) or the College Board's ACCUPLACER test for admission to community college.

    This class will help you feel prepared to face standardized admissions tests and take away some of the worry and mystery that surround these assessments. Each week, students will spend time on strategies for math and English portions of the tests. Students will learn about test designs and the types and difficulty levels of reading, grammar, and math questions. The class will learn how to approach multiple choice questions, how to read passages for comprehension, and what to do when you don t know an answer. This class is not a crash course that preps you for one test sitting, but rather teaches you lasting techniques to get you ready for whenever you decide to take a standardized test. The instructor will lay out a study plan for test-ready students and be able to offer tips on many aspects of the college admissions process. When the class wraps up, students and parents will understand the process of admissions testing and feel prepared for the personal challenge of the test experience.

    Note: This section will be held entirely ONLINE in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for the full year. Recordings will be made for students with schedule conflicts.

    Topics in this Series: Ace the ACT & SAT: Strategies for College Entrance Exams (Semester 1), Success Skills for School: High School and Beyond (Semester 2). Continuing students from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: For this class, students should be reading and have comprehension at or above grade level and have completed Algebra I. While geometry is included on the tests, completion of geometry is not assumed. Geometry formulas are provided within the tests, and the instructor will teach how to find and apply those formulas.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend one hour per week on homework for this class.

    Assignments: Prior to the start of class, each student should have taken a scored, practice SAT or ACT exam (found on the College Board or ACT website). All other assignments will be made in class and e-mailed to parents/students.

    Assessments: Students will take a variety of in-class and at-home time, practice test sections. The instructor will not provide additional assessments beyond the practice tests.

    Textbook: Students should purchase either The Official SAT Study Guide, 2020 Edition, from the College Board (ISBN # 978-1457312199) or the 2021 edition, when published, or the The Official ACT Prep Guide, 2020-21 Edition, when published.

    What to Bring: Students should bring their test book, notebook/paper, and a TI-83 or equivalent calculator to class to practice math questions that permit the use of a calculator. Phone calculators cannot be used.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) elective credit purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

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    Donna Shackelford
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    This year-long, lab-based course is a survey of key concepts in the fields of physical science, Earth science, and life science which will give students the foundational knowledge to succeed in high school level Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Environmental Science. Each class period will involve approximately 25 minutes of lecture and 60 minutes of lab time.

    Weekly lab work will allow students to apply the scientific concepts studied, improve laboratory techniques, record observations, take a variety of measurements, use different lab equipment, record and interpret data, convert units of measure, and write lab reports. An effort is made to incorporate recent scientific discoveries and new technologies in class discussions. The background covered in this course will enable a teen to become an educated reader of scientific news and a more knowledgeable consumer.

    The life science topics in this class are designed to give the student general knowledge in biology, zoology, botany, genetics and ecology. General themes in the class include life cycles, food webs, and an understanding that living things depend on each other. Microscope work will be used in life science labs. Students may want to dual register with this course and the fall Dissection Lab classes for a more robust introduction to biology and for further lab experience. The physical science portion of the class will overview fundamentals of chemistry and physics such as the properties and classification of matter, the Periodic Table, basic chemical reactions, energy, forces, work, motion, simple and compound machines, waves, light, sound, and electricity. Earth science concepts include the water cycle, weather patterns, climates, and water/air quality.

    This class is appropriate for a tween or teen who had limited middle school level science and who expects to pursue high school level Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Earth Science, or Environmental Science on a college-preparatory track. This class is also appropriate for a homeschooled teen who will likely pursue an arts- or vocational- focused path and for whom an overview of high school science concepts is sufficient.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: will be given in class and repeated in the weekly e-mail to parents and students. In addition, students will have some take-home labs to complete observations and measurements longer term at home.

    Assessments: The instructor will provide a quarterly student evaluation form which includes metrics on a student's class participation, homework, and general understanding of concepts for the parent's use in assigning a grade.

    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent Miller & Levine Biology, 2010 edition (red macaw cover, ISBN # 978-0133669510). Students should also purchase Everything You Need to Ace Science in One Big Fat Notebook: The Complete Middle School Study Guide by Workman Publishing (ISBN # 978-0761160953)

    Lab/Supply Fee: A lab fee of $125.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in general science for purposes of a homeschool transcript.

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    Tia Murchie-Beyma
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    This full-year lab science course introduces classic biology topics updated for the 21st century. Biology studies living things and their relationships from microscopic to massive, ancient to modern, arctic to tropic. Our survey includes: (1) cellular and molecular biology, (2) ecology, (3) genetics, (4) biology of organisms (with selected human health and anatomy topics), and (5) evolution and diversity.

    You will observe microscopic organisms and give monarch butterflies a health exam before tagging them for their 2,800 mile migration to Mexico. You will extract DNA, model its processes, and learn how scientists manipulate this magnificent molecule to make mice glow. You will observe animal behavior, test your heart rate, and practice identifying and debunking pseudo-science.

    By the end of the course, students will be able to explain the nature of science as a system of knowing; cite evidence for foundational theories of modern biology; explain basic biological processes and functions; describe structures and relationships in living systems; outline systems of information, energy, and resources; demonstrate valid experimental design; discern ethical standards; relate their values and scientific ideas to decision-making; and apply biology knowledge to their own health.

    In this flipped classroom, students are responsible for covering new material such as readings from the textbook and additional popular and scholarly sources, videos, and animations prior to class meetings. In-person sessions focus on active discussion, clarification, exploration of content, review, modeling, and hands-on activities.

    Labs address not only technical skills and sequential operations, but also forming testable predictions, collecting data, applying math, drawing conclusions, and presenting findings. Hands-on dissection, always optional, is taught with preserved crayfish and fetal pigs.

    Sensitive issues: human reproduction is not taught separately, but mentioned as students learn about other, related topics such as sperm, eggs, stem cells, genetic disease, hormones, fetal development, breast-feeding, adolescence, and HIV. While there may be some debate-style discussion of topics such as GMO, abortion will not be debated. Birth control and sexuality education are not covered, but distinctions between gender and biological sex are discussed in detail in the genetics unit. Dissections are optional. Evolution is embedded in every topic, from molecular to ecological, inseparably from other content. It is addressed in a scientific context, not from a faith standpoint.

    The course provides a substantive, full-credit experience on either an Honors or On-Level track. All class members share core material and participate in the same labs. Honors has longer or additional readings, more analytical work, and more thorough and difficult assessments; it is appropriate for students who seek more challenge or plan to take the SAT Subject Test in Biology. Brief, required summer assignments are due in August for those who elect to take Honors. Students register online for the same course, but must indicate which level they wish to study via e-mail by August 15. Students may move down a level (from Honors to On-Level) at any time.

    Schedule: Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous ONLINE instruction via videoconferencing for fall semester. At the instructors' option, the class may transition to HYBRID instruction for second semester as COVID-19 scenarios improve. Hybrid instruction would include online instruction on Mondays (8:00 am - 8:55 am) and in-person instruction on Fridays. Instruction is recommended to be synchronous, but recordings will be made for students with schedule conflicts.

    Prerequisites: Students should be very strong, independent readers and able to understand graphs, tables, percentages, decimals, ratios, and averages.

    Workload: Homework includes term cards, brief written responses, weekly online quizzes, unit tests, occasional lab reports, and some creative assignments including sketching. Students will sometimes prepare short, in-class presentations, participate in group projects, run simulations, or conduct simple experiments at home. All students should expect to spend 4-6 hours outside of class reading and preparing homework.

    Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments; upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests; track grades; message instructor and classmates; and virtual conferences.

    Assessments: Points will be assigned for completed homework, projects, quizzes, and tests. A letter grade will not be assigned, but parents can use total points earned versus total points offered to assign a grade for purposes of a homeschool transcript. Parents can view total points earned at any time through the Canvas site

    Textbook/Materials: Students must purchase or rent the textbook Biology (2010 edition with baby alligator cover) by Stephen Nowicki, published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt/Holt McDougal (ISBN# 9780547219479) An e-book version is also available (ISBN# 9780547221069). By second semester, those who elect to take the SAT Subject Test will also need the College Board's "Official SAT Subject Test in Biology Study Guide" (ISBN# 978-1457309205) and a prep book of their choice, such as the latest Princeton Review's Cracking the SAT Subject Test in Biology E/M or Barron's SAT Subject Test Biology E/M.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $130 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. The cost for the SAT Subject Test in Biology in spring or summer 2021 is not included. Each family is responsible for scheduling and paying for their student's exam through the College Board.

    Supplies/Equipment: Students will need access to a computer/internet, compound microscope with 400X magnification and cool lighting, splash goggles, water-resistant/acid-resistant lab apron, kitchen or postal scale, 3-ring binder, at least 400, 3"x5" index cards, and plain, lined, and graph paper. Some of these supplies are used at home. Students should watch class announcements on Canvas to know when to bring items to class.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Lab Science for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

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    Hugh Gardner

    Students will be immersed in detail and fully engaged in this intensive history course led by well- known homeschool instructor and historian Hugh Gardner. This history class is unlike other high school history course. Instead of learning a sequential set of names, dates, and battles, students will learn how to analyze and interpret history. Much like a college seminar, this approach to American History incorporates historiography (the history of the history.) Mr. Gardner does not teach a narrow view from a single textbook or static set of prepared notes. Instead, he presents the back story and multiple interpretations for the "why" questions in American history. Class discussion considers interpretations from a wide array of scholars and is updated as new sources are published. Rather than running through a timeline of outcomes, students will evaluate contributing factors (the "how" questions) and will learn about the personalities, prejudices, and biases of the people involved ("who").

    First semester will cover the background, events, and inter-war years leading up to the Second World War. The class will examine Hitler's rise to power, election in 1933, and his massive effort to rebuild the German war machine. They will discover Hitler's systematic takeover of eastern European countries before launching a blitzkrieg invasion of France. They will look at Britain acting alone to resist Germany through the deployment of commandos and special forces in targeted raids and the German threat to cross the Channel to invade Britain. The class will learn about military and naval engagements throughout the Mediterranean including north Africa, Sicily, and mainland Italy along with a fight in the Middle East to gain control of the oil supply. Finally, the class will study conflicts along the Eastern Front. The class will discuss the effects on the political, social, and economic climate as well as influences on the arts, science, literature, religion, and warfare. This is no ordinary history class as Mr. Gardner surrounds the students with vivid posters, maps, charts, primary sources, and artifacts to supplement his story-telling style. Students will be able to examine and handle period pieces such as antique and replica weapons and military accoutrements of the era while learning how these tools helped shape the battlefields and turning points in history. With an emphasis on primary sources, students will scrutinize historical atlases and original writings, all in a collaborative and interactive setting. Just for fun, students earn historical trading cards for class participation.

    Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for fall semester. At the instructors' option, the class may transition to in-person instruction for second semester as COVID-19 scenarios improve.

    Topics in this Series: WWII: From Looming War through Stalingrad (Semester 1), WWI: The Defeat of Germany and the Wars Against Japan (Semester 2). Continuing students from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

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    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class on assigned readings.

    Assignments: are given in class and e-mailed to parents and students.

    Assessments: Will not be given

    Textbook: Students should purchase two books: (1) Atlas of World War II by Richard Natkiel, published by The Military Press, 1985. (Note: hardback or paperback editions from the 1980s are preferred over more recent small format editions from 2011 -– on. Used copies available on Amazon.) (2) Collins Atlas of the Second World War, by John Keegan ed., published by HarperCollins, 2003. (Note: This is a very large format atlas in different editions with some titled Times instead of Collins; key is John Keegan as editor. Used copies available on Amazon.) For those families who want to investigate the course themes at a deeper level, an optional reading list will be furnished.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count two semesters of this course as a full credit in American or World History for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

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    David Chelf
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    This is a complete course in high school Algebra I which will cover fundamental concepts in algebra and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. This course is designed to emphasize the study of algebraic problem-solving with the incorporation of real-world applications. Topics in Algebra I include number systems, linear systems, rational numbers, complex numbers, exponents, roots, radicals, quadratic equations, polynomials, factoring, absolute values, ratios, and proportions. In addition, the course will cover solving and graphing systems of functions, linear equations, and inequalities. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem-solving.

    Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation in pre-algebra topics in order to take this class.
    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Friday (day 1), lecture on Wednesday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Friday (day 8), and homework due the next Wednesday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Wednesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work.
    Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.
    Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by checking that weekly homework sets are complete and giving periodic take-home tests; class participation is also strongly encouraged. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade.
    Textbook: Students should purcashe or rent the required textbook for this class: Algebra I: Expressions, Equations, and Applications by Paul A. Foerster. It is available in a few different editions, each of which is virtually identical: 2nd edition (ISBN-10 020125073X, ISBN-13 978-0201250732), 3rd edition (ISBN-10 0201860945, ISBN-13 978-0201860948), and Classic edition (ISBN-10 020132458X, ISBN-13 978-0201324587). It is also available under the title Foerster Algebra I, Classics edition (ISBN-10 0131657089, ISBN-13 978-0131657083). A calculator is not needed for this course.
    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Algebra I for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: PreAlgebra

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    Taliesin Knol
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    This class will explore the judicial processes of Europe following the collapse of Rome. From witch trials and Viking blood feuds, then back again to the real barbarians, lawyers! Like a traditional mock trial program, the class will hear cases, and students will defend themselves. Real historical cases will be studied, and trial parts assigned to the class, which will be debated from the perspective of Royal Courts, Church Ordeals, or a Viking assembly they creatively called "a Thing." The class will serve as the jury and, if necessary, select period-appropriate verdicts and explain how they arrived at their decisions, while striving for period accuracy. Second semester will move to codified Renaissance legal systems, leading up to the direct Ancestor to American legal traditions, Common Law.

    Topics in this Series: Crime & Punishment in Medieval Times (Semester 1), Crime and Punishment in the Early Modern Era (Semester 2).

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Period maps, photographs, and re-creations will be posted on a class Google Drive, and video links from YouTube will be e-mailed to parents and students for homework or supplemental investigation.

    Assessments: A mid-term and final exam may be given.

    Textbooks: None. Case documents are provided in class.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History or Civics for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

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    Peter Snow
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    In Advanced Beginner Chess 1, students will learn skills and strategies that build upon each other, including a review of: castling, pawn promotion, and en pass ant rules; a notation lesson; a review of basic mates; strategies for using the draw rules for drawing a game when too far behind to win; using batteries to cause checkmates; back-rank checkmates; proper development of bishops; proper development of rooks (in the middlegame); advanced beginning overextended pieces; and other topics based on observed need. Experts suggest that the game of chess teaches analytical and disciplined thinking skills, while raising self esteem, teaching motivation and determination, and sportsmanship (Kasparov Foundation). Each class will be spent half on technique and half in practice matches with classmates while the instructor coaches. Students should have 15-20 hours of chess instruction prior to enrolling in Advanced Beginner Chess, or a working knowledge of most skills taught in the Compass Beginner Chess level.

    Prerequisites: Beginning Chess series, or equivalent

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    Peter Snow
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    In Advanced Beginner Chess 1, students will learn skills and strategies that build upon each other, including a review of: castling, pawn promotion, and en pass ant rules; a notation lesson; a review of basic mates; strategies for using the draw rules for drawing a game when too far behind to win; using batteries to cause checkmates; back-rank checkmates; proper development of bishops; proper development of rooks (in the middlegame); advanced beginning overextended pieces; and other topics based on observed need. Experts suggest that the game of chess teaches analytical and disciplined thinking skills, while raising self esteem, teaching motivation and determination, and sportsmanship (Kasparov Foundation). Each class will be spent half on technique and half in practice matches with classmates while the instructor coaches. Students should have 15-20 hours of chess instruction prior to enrolling in Advanced Beginner Chess, or a working knowledge of most skills taught in the Compass Beginner Chess level.

    Prerequisites: Beginning Chess series, or equivalent

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    Judith Harmon
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Children are full of stories and bubbling over with big ideas! In this class, students will learn how to capture their creative vision into a simple story that they will write and illustrate. First quarter, they will spin the tale of their own, unique Awesome Adventure. Will they journey to the wild west, a haunted house, a stormy sea, a creepy cave... or somewhere else?

    Students will learn how to build a Story Arc through guided, weekly activities. They will discover the key elements to composing a story such as crafting characters, posing a problem, advancing the action, constructing the climax, and writing the resolution- through brainstorming questions like, "Who is in your story?", "Where does this take place?", "What does that look like?" and "What happened after ____?"

    Emerging writers or readers are welcome and will receive support, if needed, to get their own words written down. Psst- don't tell your child, but this class helps lay the foundation in language arts for more advanced creative writing and composition. Pair this class with So Cool, No Sew Costume Workshop, Playful Puppet Workshop, Acting: Kids Theater, or Writing Well: Sentences that Speak to further encourage communication and storytelling skills. The supply fee is included in the class tuition. Topics in this Series: Awesome Adventure (Quarter 1), Magic Kingdom (Quarter 2), Medieval Castle (Quarter 3), and Zany Zoo (Quarter 4).

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    Taliesin Knol
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    This class will study and simulate the revolution that built the modern world, from coal to oil!

    For thousands of years, the most advanced feats of human engineering came about through brute labor of men and beasts. Armies, soldiers, and slaves built roads and temples, and cargo was transported on waterways or pulled on animal-drawn carts. Once humanity began the widespread use of mechanical engines, it kick-started a massive leap in technology and progress. The limits were no longer set by biology, but by technology. This took people out of fields and into factories, producing goods at superhuman rates and raising the standard of living for humanity to unimaginable levels. This class will study the early Energy Economy, how modern nations exploited new technology and energy sources in the Industrial Revolution.

    The class will use a custom Role-Playing Game to simulate a transitional industrial economy. Students will role play as either industry or energy tycoons and attempt to dominate the market and rule the supply and demand, while balancing the construction and maintenance of a class energy grid. Economic systems, infrastructure, labor organization, all must be precariously balanced to keep civilization out of literal darkness. Will they be Carnegies and Rockefellers, or will they run out of steam? To accomplish this, students will create a business plan and run balance sheets week-by-week to justify their strategies. These strategies will have to account for decisions like, how much fuel to acquire versus how much energy/goods to produce and sell in the in-class economy. We will track this in a class ledger, updated weekly and posted online. The students' bookkeeping will reveal profit or loss and guide their choices for the next week's game. Players will learn to change their strategies and tactics based on what everyone else is doing so their businesses remain profitable. Will they avoid bankruptcy or achieve a monopoly -– true to history?

    Each student's business plan and bookkeeping ledger will be updated on class Google Drive and will be developed with feedback from the instructor. At the end of the semester, students will add a reflection about what they learned and what they would have done differently in their business plan with their new knowledge and game experience.

    Students are encouraged, but not required, to take both semesters of this class. First semester will use a simple energy and business model, while second semester will be more technical including more energy options and considerations, resulting in more complex business plans and game strategies. During the second semester, students will learn about the different types of jobs found in the energy industry.

    Topics in this Series: The Industrial Revolution (Semester 1), The Oil Economy and Beyond (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: None

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Course documents including period plans, photographs and recreations will be made available through a class Google Drive link emailed to parents (and students who provide their email address), as well as a class reading list of articles/excerpts and YouTube playlist for any videos watched in class or assigned as homework.

    Assessments: Informal assessments will be given at the instructor's discretion, but assignments will not be scored or graded. Each student's financial success in the game will be an indicator of their learning and participation for purposes of assigning a grade. Parents will also be given shared access to their student's business plan with instructor and ledger, with instructor comments at the conclusion of class.

    Textbook/Materials: None

    Lab/Supply Fee: None

    What to Bring: Paper or notebook, pen or pencil

    Credit: Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History, Economics, or Business for purposes of a high school transcript.

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    Kerry Diederich
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art or artist, view sample works, and then will create a project in the style of the artist using a wide variety of materials and representative colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.

    First quarter, students will learn about famous artists and their favorite animals or pets! Featured artists include Hockney, Pollock, Picasso, Kahlo, O'Keefe, Rockwell and Klee. Which artist painted a rooster? Who liked crazy, colored geometric cats, and who else favored standard American hounds? Whose self-portraits included monkeys, black cats, and parrots? Through weekly projects, Junior Artists will learn about and make their animal projects while learning about the artist, the technique, and the subject matter.

    Topics in this Series: Artists and their Animals (Quarter 1); Famous Abstracts (Quarter 2); Cultural Art Creations (Quarter 3), and Scenic Seascapes (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

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    Kerry Diederich
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art or artist, view sample works, and then will create a project in the style of the artist using a wide variety of materials and representative colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.

    First quarter, students will learn about famous artists and their favorite animals or pets! Featured artists include Hockney, Pollock, Picasso, Kahlo, O'Keefe, Rockwell and Klee. Which artist painted a rooster? Who liked crazy, colored geometric cats, and who else favored standard American hounds? Whose self-portraits included monkeys, black cats, and parrots? Through weekly projects, Junior Artists will learn about and make their animal projects while learning about the artist, the technique, and the subject matter.

    Topics in this Series: Artists and their Animals (Quarter 1); Famous Abstracts (Quarter 2); Cultural Art Creations (Quarter 3), and Scenic Seascapes (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

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    Danielle Rhodes
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    Roundtable is a seminar-style literature analysis and discussion class for high school students. Instead of a broad, general survey of literature, Roundtable students will examine a focused, "special topic" in literature through critical evaluation and rich discussion. Written works will be selected for their contribution to a specific genre and their influence on society.

    First semester, the class will examine the Science Fiction genre with a critical eye on what elements are found in all science fiction works. The class will examine the role of identity and the individual in the strange, new worlds through a study of works such as: Blood Child (1995), a short story by Octavia Butler, Frankenstein (1818) by Mary Shelley, Invisible Man (1933) by HG Wells, The Blazing World (1966) by M. Cavendish and Ready Player One (2011) by Ernest Cline. Genre-aligned poetry and excerpts will be incorporated throughout the semester.

    For this course, students should be engaged readers who come to class prepared to participate in intellectual discussion. Students are also expected to take part in in weekly class discussions by sharing their reflections and reactions to the readings and drawing conclusions and comparisons with other works. For each novel, the instructor will provide a guide with thoughtful questions and prompts on the reading that students must come to class prepared to discuss with textual evidence. The course instructor will serve as a facilitator-moderator to lead Socratic, "roundtable" discussions in addition to other in-class activities, such as partner and small group work, to further the class's understanding of the literature. This course will focus on comprehension and analysis through discussion rather than composition. Students will be assigned creative, short assignments to enhance and demonstrate their understanding of each novel such as re-writing a scene, imagining a conversation between characters from different books, developing a prequel or sequel scene, writing a review, etc.

    When discussing written works, students will be expected to give textual references such as specific quotes and examples- a higher-order high school and college-level skill that will be needed in later courses which require written analysis of literature. A key skill that will be taught in this class is how to annotate texts. Students will begin by examining samples of the instructor's own annotated novels then move to annotating the first short story in class as a group. For each novel, students will be given specific details to search for and annotate such as major plot points, character traits, interesting word choice, setting details, quotations, or questions. Later, students will be prepared to annotate automatically as they read with their own questions and reactions, a skill that can also be applied to the readings in other courses.

    Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for fall semester. At the instructors' option, the class may transition to in-person instruction for second semester as COVID-19 scenarios improve.

    Topics in this Series: Science Fiction (Semester 1) and Dystopian Literature (Semester 2). Continuing students from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: Students should be able to read and comprehend at a minimum 9th grade level for this course. Per Compass guidelines, accelerated 8th grade students may register for this course, however, in addition to the 9th+ grade reading level, they must posses the maturity to handle high school level topics and more mature discussion.

    Workload: Students should expect to read approximately 100 pages per week. For students who have challenges with reading, audio books may be used, but students should still be prepared to follow along and annotate in the physical novel.

    Assignments: Weekly assignments will be posted in the Canvas classroom management system. Students will need their own e-mail addresses to access the system, and parents may be set up as additional "observers" to their teen's Canvas account.

    Assessments: Points will be assigned for preparation, participation, and short assignments, and parents may use the total points earned to calculate a grade.

    Textbook/Materials: Because students will need clean, inexpensive copies of each novel to mark in, and because they must be able to refer to the passages on the same page numbers, a "class bundle" of mass market paperbacks will be pre-purchased for students. (See Supply Fee below).

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $34.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class.

    What to Bring: Students should bring the current novel, paper, pen or pencil and highlighter to class each week. Some students may wish to bring paper clips, adhesive flags or post-it notes for marking pages.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript. For a full credit in English, families would need to "bundle" this course with additional coursework in composition.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Nick Grenier
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Look up in that tree! Why is that robin alarming? is there a hawk passing by? Is that a drey (a squirrel's nest)? What animal rubbed the bark off that sapling? Which plants are useful and which should be avoided?
    Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has lead for several years. Students will follow the paths and create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing fall season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world!
    Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 5 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

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    Nick Grenier
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Look up in that tree! Why is that robin alarming? is there a hawk passing by? Is that a drey (a squirrel's nest)? What animal rubbed the bark off that sapling? Which plants are useful and which should be avoided?
    Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has lead for several years. Students will follow the paths and create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing fall season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world!
    Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 5 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

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    Luc Atangana
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Students will be introduced to painting with acrylics in a relaxed, informal studio setting under the guidance of a professional paint instructor.

    Students will work on framed canvas and easels and will learn elements of art and principles of design in addition to methods in painting. Painters will learn basic techniques such as shading, blending, stippling, and broad stroke. Each quarter, the instructor will demonstrate techniques by developing a sample painting. Students may elect to follow the class sample or may apply the painting skills to an entirely unique composition. Students will complete one or two 16" X 20" canvases each quarter, depending on the level of detailing.

    First quarter, students will begin painting botanicals such as flowers, plants, or leaves. Through the botanical study, painters will learn to represent different textures and effects in natural subjects. Elements of art introduced in the first quarter projects include line, color, shape, and texture.

    This class is suitable for beginners who have never painted before, and for experienced art students who have worked in other mediums and are interested in exploring acrylic painting. Compass parents are welcome to register for this class to work alongside their teens, or to work on their own, while their teen is in another Compass class. Painting can provide a relaxing, needed break from rigorous academic classes and over-scheduled lives in a fun, supportive environment.

    Prerequisites: None

    Topics in this Series: Botanicals- Line, Color, Shape, & Texture (Quarter 1); Still Life- Values, Form, & Composition (Quarter 2); 3D Perspective- Space, Depth, & Distance (Quarter 3); and Landscapes- Unity & Harmony (Quarter 4).

    Workload: Work outside of class is optional, however students who want to continue to practice their painting techniques might want to purchase a tabletop easel (approx. $10.00) and set of basic acrylic paints ($30.00+) for home use.

    Assessments: Individual feedback is given in class. Formal assessments will not be given.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A new student class fee of $20.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for two canvases, a sketchbook, and use of shared class supplies (desktop easels, paints, brushes, paper products, etc.). Returning students who are continuing in this class from a prior quarter can continue using their sketchpad, but there is still a $14.00 fee for the other materials.

    What to Wear: Students may wish to wear an apron, smock, or paint shirt when working with acrylic paints.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

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    Dan Gallagher
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Student engineers will be given the challenge of designing, building, and programming a robotic arm and claw to simulate a factory assembly line. Each week, students will improve their assembly though the use of new sensors and additional components and will program their creations to complete specific manufacturing tasks.

    Students will use the LEGO MINDSTORMS Education EV3 robotics sets. They will build with motors, wheels/axles, gears, levers, and special components. Students will have to install touch, sound, color, gyro, ultrasonic, and/or infrared sensors while also learning to program sequences and commands that use input/output devices for controlled movements and precise turns. Using the drag-and-drop EV3 programming menu, students will learn to program their robots while experimenting with key concepts such as fixed values, variables, loops, and logic constructs.

    This course integrates science, engineering and computational thinking while introducing physical constraints, units of measurement, and coordinate systems. But, don't worry, this is a beginning robotics class. Prior experience is not expected, but returning students are welcome. Each student will build his/her own robotic project, so students can progress and customize at their own pace. In general, in this class, students will spend two weeks assembling, three weeks programming, and two weeks testing and re-designing. Topics in this Series: Robotic Arms (Quarter 1), Spider Bots (Quarter 2), Maze Runner (Quarter 3), and Tomb Explorer (Quarter 4).

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    Dan Gallagher
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Working in small teams, students will design, build, and program a medical-assist robot capable of one of the following medical-related tasks: telepresence (to minimize in-person interactions), remote patient processing and vitals inspection, autonomous delivery of critical supplies, shut-in companionship (must be soft, cuddly, and cute), or autonomous sanitization of areas and surfaces.

    The class will focus on construction and programming, with heavy emphasis on design of functional robots. The medical robots will be programmed to sense and react to their environment, users, or patients through sensors. Sensors for medical robots may include: digital infrared (IR) temperature, IR proximity, mini-LIDAR (laser radar), gesture (for patient input/communication with the robot), heart-rate, galvanic skin response, muscle movement, and cameras.

    Teams will conduct research, apply the engineering design process, follow the general rules and conventions of the engineering profession, including maintaining an engineering notebook. Teams will be using the Tetrix Prime robotics system, Grove sensors, and other components to build the robot, and Arduino software to program it. Each robot will be put through a series of tests/challenges related to the specific robot design. Please note that students do not get to keep finished projects.

    Topics in this Series: Medical Robots (Semester 1) and Autonomous Delivery Vehicles (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: None

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class researching robot and automation design

    Assessments: Ongoing feedback is provided in class on construction and programming. Formal assessments are not provided.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Technology or Career Exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

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    Heather Sanderson
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    Read it! Act it! Students will enjoy this two-hour, semester-long workshop with Shakespearian coach Heather Sanderson who hails from England and is known for instilling a love of Shakespeare into the hearts of students throughout the Greater DC area. The class will explore a very popular play from Shakespeare's series of histories- Henry IV, Part 1, and analyze its characters, plot, themes and motives.
    In this thrilling and poignant coming-of-age story, students will be introduced to a jocular knight, a troubled king, a hot-blooded warrior, a prodigal prince, and a whole host of lovable rabble-rousers.

    Students will read various roles, study and act out scenes, practice monologues, and work through the literature while having fun with fellow teens. Theatre games will be used to encourage collaboration, and specially designed improv exercises will be used to stretch teens' imaginations and help them get "in character". The class will use read-aloud and in-class dramatization to decipher the original language, word choices, and to identify humor, mockery, and political intrigue, in this tale of power, honor and rebellion.

    The class will work from complete texts (not redacted, abridged, or simplified school versions) to hear and practice Elizabethan lingo. (How did someone of Shakespeare's time hurl insults or woo a woman?) Students will learn how the Bard crafted scenes and conveyed the primary storyline and sub-plots in a tale that has endured for over 400 years.

    Instructor Heather Sanderson shares a teaching style based on actions and interactions, developed from years of experience coaching Shakespeare in a way that appeals to students. Her approach brings abstract concepts, complex themes, and difficult language to the students' level, so that they can relate to and appreciate Shakespeare.

    Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for fall semester. At the instructors' option, the class may transition to in-person instruction for second semester as COVID-19 scenarios improve.

    Topics in this Series: Henry IV, Part I (Semester 1), Hysterical Scenes and A Midsummer Night's Dream (Semester 2). Continuing students from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hour per week outside of class reading sections.

    Assignments: Sections will be assigned in class and included in the weekly e-mail to parents/students.

    Assessments: Will not be given.

    Textbook: The cost of the class text is included in the course fee.

    Non-Meeting Dates: This is a 13-week class, which follows the Compass first semester schedule with the exception of October 9th, when the class will not meet.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English Literature or Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Lisa Alonso
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Get ready for a full year of intermediate level high school Spanish! This is a conversation-focused program in which students will build their vocabulary quickly and learn essential grammar skills in Spanish. Vocabulary will include describing homes and chores; planning a party; health, body parts and sports; vacations, leisure time activities, fun events and places of interest; communicating via phone and computer; and daily routines. There will be a strong emphasis on competency using regular and irregular past tense verbs and common grammar concepts such as commands, direct and indiect object pronouns, reflexive verbs, and the differences between ser vs. estar and saber vs. conocer.

    Class will be conducted primarily in Spanish and will focus on listening and speaking skills, asking and answering questions, and correct use of grammar. At home, students will be responsible for memorizing vocabulary and grammar, completing worksheets and written assignments, and watching both grammar instruction and language immersion videos.

    Level:This class will be offered on two levels: Honors and On-Level. Spanish II offers a substantive, full-credit experience taught at either level. All class members share core material and participate in the same class activities, but honors students will be given homework that requires higher level reasoning and advanced application of various grammar skills. All students will register online for the same course. Students must indicate which level they want to study via e-mail by August 15. Once the course has begun, students may move down a level (from honors to on-level) at any time. However, once classes have started, students may not "bump up" a level.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 30-45 per day, 4 days per week on homework outside of class.

    Assignments: Are sent by e-mail to parents and students. Students must have access to a computer and internet service for computer-based videos and practice tools that are assigned as homework and are essential to success in the class.

    Assessments: Quizzes, tests, and individual performance reviews will be given to all students at regular intervals to provide parents with sufficient feedback to assign a grade.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $30.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for class materials in lieu of a textbook.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Foreign Language for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

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    Judith Harmon
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    What's on the runways in 2020? Wide disco collars, chic trench coats, and layered skirts in simmering neons, crochet knits, and faux leather. Do you study the pages of Glamour, Vogue, Marie Claire, and wish to be involved in the world of trendy fashion? Perhaps you follow fashion influencers on Instagram. Or, do you enjoy the satisfaction of making things yourself, your way? If so, this class is for you. Each week this course will cover twp parallel tracks: the history of fashion and fashion design.

    Fashion trends are often cyclical, and elements of style are reimagined every few decades. Students will seek inspiration for new designs and style remixes by learning about the history of fashion in eastern and western cultures for the last century. First semester, students will look at fashion trends by decade from 1900 through the 1960s. This semester will cover chapters 1 through 3 in the textbook.

    With inspiration from historical design trends, students will learn how to create fashion renderings, from initial concepts through a chic, coordinated collection. First semester, the class will learn about color theory, color psychology, and composing color palettes. They will learn to draw their designs by sketching a croquis (a quick, rough sketch of a garments on a proportioned figure.) Students will practice vision boarding and developing a story board. This online class will not cover sewing.

    Topics in this Series: Stellar Style: Fashion Design & History I (Semester 1), Stellar Style: Fashion Design & History II (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: None.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class on reading assignments and completing design activities.

    Assignments: Projects and readings will be given out in class and will also be communicated via email.

    Assessments: Individual feedback is given in class. Formal assessments will not be given.

    Textbook: Students should purchase Fundamentals of Fashion Design, 3rd Edition, by Richard Sorger and Jenny Udale (ISBN# 978-1474270007) before the first class. Additional information will be distributed as handouts in class.

    Lab/Supply Fee: None.

    What to Bring: Images/sample photos, swatches, and other assigned materials.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts or Career Education for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Elena Zaklis
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    Social skills do not have to suffer when you are taking virtual school at home! Successful social skills can help tweens navigate almost every aspect of their lives. Building confidence in social interactions can help improve self esteem and comfort in group settings, sports, new endeavors, with family, in public, or just hanging out with friends. Every tween can benefit from improved social skills, but some need a little more practice. This interactive, online Social Skills class will help tweens practice communicating and managing sticky situations.

    In this online class, tweens will work with a certified, licensed therapist (behavior analyst) in a secure, virtual Zoom classroom to develop strategies for navigating different social challenges- from conversation skills and identifying feelings and emotions, to seeing perspective, handling stress, talking to parents, making friends, tolerating siblings, problem solving, perseverance, and more. The small group class will include games, screen-share activities, icebreakers, role-playing, brief videos, modelling behavior, and projects using a evidence-based social-emotional curriculum. Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online coaching via videoconferencing for first quarter. At the instructors' option, the class may transition to in-person instruction for later quarters as COVID-19 scenarios improve.

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    Megan Reynolds
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Word Masters is a language challenge for students who enjoy word games, spelling, building their vocabulary, and verbal adventures. Why study lists of words if you can make a game of it? The best way to learn new words is to use them! This class is inspired by the annual Word Masters Challenge (www.wordmasterschallenge.com). Each week students will tackle new vocabulary words and practice them through analogies and critical thinking challenges. Students will examine word meanings, relationships, synonyms and antonyms with in-class activities and games such as Pictionary, Scategories, Charades, and Apples-to-Apples. Word Masters will improve a student's reading comprehension, verbal reasoning, logic skills, and the ability to think analytically and metaphorically. Word Masters introduce all new word lists, analogies, and activities each quarter.

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    Dr. Danielle Rhodes
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Writing is one of the most essential communication skills, and it gives kids a voice! In this class, upper elementary-aged students will learn the FUN-damentals of Writing Well! Kids will learn the foundations of good writing, step-by-step, in manageable, weekly pieces. Students will start the year with learning to formulate strong sentences and eventually move to organized, cohesive paragraphs in this class series. Classes will consist of lessons on writing basics, reading great examples (and weak ones) from literature and publications, and in-class writing practice. The emphasis will be on varying sentence structures, word choice, and correct structure- all with fun, creative topics that will keep kids interested in writing!

    Quarter one, students will learn all about sentences. The class will learn how to choose descriptive words from word lists and avoid dull, overused words (like good, bad, said) in their writing. They will learn about different sentence structures (simple, complex, and compound) and which one works best for different meanings. Each week, students will practice writing descriptive, informative, argumentative sentences in response to a variety of creative and non-fiction prompts in class. By the end of the quarter, students will feel confident writing three to four sentences cohesively and be prepared for constructing full paragraphs in Quarter two.

    The goal for this course is for students to increase their writing fluency, gain confidence, and strengthen their abilities to write clear, cohesive, and grammatically correct sentences and paragraphs. The group will learn the stages of writing--prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing--and various approaches to each stage. Throughout the quarter, mini-lessons on vocabulary and grammar will be presented on topics such as correct capitalization, agreement, tenses, parts of speech, synonyms, etc. Each week, students will have brief homework assignments based on what was covered in class using creative and non-fiction free response prompts to practice techniques at home. Regular writing practice improves fluency and comfort level. Students should expect 45-60 minutes of writing at home throughout the week (3-4 days at 15 minutes per sitting.)

    Topics in this Series: Sentences that Speak (Quarter 1); Planning Paragraphs (Quarter 2); Fascinating Fiction Paragraphs (Quarter 3); and Fun Factual Paragraphs (Quarter 4)

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    Judith Harmon
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Acting is an adventure! Young actors will find themselves on a Rainforest Rescue where they will create an imaginative storyline and unique characters for their very own original play. Will they encounter a silly sloth, a jolly jaguar, a crazy crocodile, an angry anaconda, or other tropical pals on their equatorial escapades?

    Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other and to begin to brainstorm about their original play. Through group activities and guided discussion, the young actors will decide on characters, conflict, and conclusion, and the story they want to tell. The script will be developed and customized for this class with input from the students.

    Young actors will explore skills such as sensory awareness, listening, stage movement, character development, emotional expression, and observation/concentration while learning to portray their original character. Young actors will learn aspects of acting by script read-through, blocking, costume/prop discussion, and planning the show. Through individual and group activities, young actors build confidence in preparation for a final sharing for parents.

    Students will work from a simple, written script, but emerging readers can be accommodated. Parents will be emailed the script after the 3rd or 4th class and will be expected to help their children memorize their lines and assemble a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity. All actors must be at least age 6 to sign up for this class.

    Topics in this Series: Rainforest Rescue! (Quarter 1), Fractured Fairy Tales (Quarter 2), Our Own Pirate Play (Quarter 3), and Detective Drama (Quarter 4).

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    Taliesin Knol
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    Students will engage in a hands-on 3D battle strategy game using the military dioramas that they make!

    From Stalingrad to Berlin, the downfall of Nazi Germany. This quarter will cover the climactic urban battles of the Eastern Front in Europe, or as the Russians call it, The Great Patriotic War. The Eastern front is often sidelined in Western history, but it was quite possibly the most brutal theater of war in human history. The Germans invaded Eastern Europe to wage a war of extermination, and instead found themselves hunted like rats in the cities they destroyed. This is not the Blitzkrieg, where a modern German army used fancy new tactics to destroy larger armies. This is the rat warfare, brutal attrition more akin to the 1st World War, with the trenches swapped for bitter street fighting, where each side was literally fighting in their own homes, for everything they had.

    Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will each form a 10" X 16" shaped, foam diorama with landscape elements (hills, buildings, rivers, bridges, vegetation, fences, etc) to represent a scene of a famous historical engagement. Students will each receive 1:72 scale miniature soldiers to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate the larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices.

    The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical background and circumstances leading up to the specific battle. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents.

    Note: This section will be held entirely ONLINE in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for the full year. Recordings will be made for students with schedule conflicts.

    There is a $35.00 materials fee that must be paid to the instructor one week before the start of class. The material fee includes a kit of supplies that will be shipped to the student.

    Topics in this year's series include: WWII from the Russian Perspective, Stalingrad/Berlin (1st quarter), WWII The Battle of the Bulge, 1944 (2nd quarter), WWII The USMC at Guadalcanal, 1945 (3rd quarter), and Korean War, 1950-1953 (4th quarter).

    1
    Dr. Danielle Rhodes
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    In Bibliophiles Book Group, middle school-aged students will read renowned classics and award-winning juvenile literature. This book discussion group will examine a different theme each quarter to introduce students to literary analysis. Students will read, examine, and compare two full-length novels that share similar themes through facilitated discussions and extension activities which encourage students to make personal connections to what is read. The group will evaluate themes, characters, setting, and writing style.

    First quarter, students will examine the themes of Deception and Disguise through The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin Prince and The Pauper by Mark Twain.

    Assigned chapters are expected to be read at home, either as read-aloud, individual silent reading, or listening to the unabridged audiobook. Students should come to class prepared to discuss the reading. Classroom discussions will emphasize the use of textual evidence when explaining thoughts and opinions. Students will be assigned creative, short assignments to enhance and demonstrate their understanding of each novel such as quote explications, thematic questions, or imagining a conversation between characters from different books.

    Topics in this Series: Deception and Disguise (Quarter 1); Greed (Quarter 2); Order and Chaos (Quarter 3); Power and Powerlessness (Quarter 4).

    Textbook/Materials: Because students will need clean, inexpensive copies of each novel to mark in, and because they must be able to refer to the passages on the same page numbers, copies of mass market paperbacks will be pre-purchased and bundled for students. (See Supply Fee below).

    Supply Fee: A class fee of $34.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class.

    What to Bring: Students should bring the current novel, paper, pen or pencil and highlighter to class each week. Some students may wish to bring paper clips, adhesive flags or post-it notes for marking pages.

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    Peter Snow
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    In Beginning Chess 1, students will learn beginner basics such as: how all pieces move and capture; castling, pawn promotion, en pass ant; checks and how to get out of them; checkmate and stalemate; notation lesson and chess etiquette behavior; scholars mate & fools mate. Experts suggest that the game of chess teaches analytical and disciplined thinking skills, while raising self esteem, teaching motivation and determination, and sportsmanship (Kasparov Foundation). Each class will be spent half on technique and half in practice matches with classmates while the instructor coaches.

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    Peter Snow
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    In Beginning Chess 1, students will learn beginner basics such as: how all pieces move and capture; castling, pawn promotion, en pass ant; checks and how to get out of them; checkmate and stalemate; notation lesson and chess etiquette behavior; scholars mate & fools mate. Experts suggest that the game of chess teaches analytical and disciplined thinking skills, while raising self esteem, teaching motivation and determination, and sportsmanship (Kasparov Foundation). Each class will be spent half on technique and half in practice matches with classmates while the instructor coaches.

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    Judith Harmon
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Children are full of stories and bubbling over with big ideas! In this class, students will learn how to capture their creative vision into a simple story that they will write and illustrate. First quarter, they will spin the tale of their own, unique Awesome Adventure. Will they journey to the wild west, a haunted house, a stormy sea, a creepy cave... or somewhere else?

    Students will learn how to build a Story Arc through guided, weekly activities. They will discover the key elements to composing a story such as crafting characters, posing a problem, advancing the action, constructing the climax, and writing the resolution- through brainstorming questions like, "Who is in your story?", "Where does this take place?", "What does that look like?" and "What happened after ____?"

    Emerging writers or readers are welcome and will receive support, if needed, to get their own words written down. Psst- don't tell your child, but this class helps lay the foundation in language arts for more advanced creative writing and composition. Pair this class with So Cool, No Sew Costume Workshop, Playful Puppet Workshop, Acting: Kids Theater, or Writing Well: Sentences that Speak to further encourage communication and storytelling skills. The supply fee is included in the class tuition. Topics in this Series: Awesome Adventure (Quarter 1), Magic Kingdom (Quarter 2), Medieval Castle (Quarter 3), and Zany Zoo (Quarter 4).

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    Dan Gallagher
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Learn all about electricity and electronics in this practical, hands-on workshop! Electronics are fundamental to lots of things that kids want to build such as automated toys, robots, and computers. Student engineers will learn about the properties of electricity through experimentation and circuit building. They will learn the basics of electronic circuits symbolically and in working with actual components. The class will begin by assembling simple circuits on breadboards using real components such as resistors, transistors, relays, and LEDs before moving into soldering real circuit boards. Students will learn to work with Arduino microcontrollers where they will experiment with different inputs and outputs. Each student will assemble, wire, solder test, and take home numerous electronic circuit projects.

    Topics in this Series: Circuit Basics (Quarter 1); Circuits + Programming (Quarter 2); Individual Arduino Projects (Quarter 3); and Build a Drone (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $65.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for an electronics kit, soldering iron, and take-home materials.

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    Anne Sharp, Melanie Kosar
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    Overview

    The Introduction to Literary Analysis & Writing is a high school student's first look at the higher-level relationship between literature and personal writing. Literary analysis and critical writing move a teen from being merely a good reader- a middle school skill- to becoming a scholarly reader and diagnostic writer which are the foundations of high school and college level inquiry into all forms of written works.

    In this seminar-style course, literature is not restricted to a particular genre or form, and writing is not limited to a common five-paragraph composition. Instead, literature is presented as a survey, sampling many different types of works, and composition is approached as the development of a student's personal responses to what he reads. During the first semester, students will examine the basic elements of literature, and second semester will evaluate forms and genres to create a "big picture" of the development of literature.

    Literature

    First semester Literary Analysis will focus on the basic elements of literature- character, setting, theme, plot, and conflict- and how they interact to create story. These building blocks exist across all forms of literature, so the class may evaluate the plot in an epic poem, a character in a classic play, or the setting in a short story. Some well-known literature will be used to introduce students to the various literary elements, and new works will be studied to demonstrate the best examples of a vivid fictional universe, a strong narrator, beloved (or feared) characters, and other literary components. Examples of some literature that students may read in this course are The Catcher in the Rye (J.D. Sallinger), Nation (Terry Pratchett), The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (Douglas Adams), A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (Betty Smith), Journey to the Center of Earth (Jules Verne), Fahrenheit 451 (Ray Bradbury), and a selection of short stories. The full reading list will be presented in the course syllabus at the beginning of the term. In addition, students may be asked to read several selections over the summer.

    Composition

    First semester Writing will focus on personal response to literature, with the core being a personal writing journal. The students' journals will be a place to record what they think and feel about what they are reading. Students will learn to annotate, to cite passages from text, and to format. Notes made in the journals will be used to develop short, informal written pieces about the literature read in the course. Observations from the student's journal will also be used to collect supporting, textural evidence to support the reader's opinions which will be formulated into a thesis (personal position). Written assignments will include summaries, compare/contrast analyses, and parallel structure writings that focus on character, setting, plot, conflict, etc., to further underscore and assess student's understanding of the building blocks of literature. First semester will conclude with a culminating project on a sub-genre of the student's own choosing which will analyze works for character, plot, setting, and other literary elements studied.

    Class Structure This course is part of a custom curriculum developed and team-taught by Anne Sharp and Melanie Kosar. The courses are designed in a sequential program that complements the developmental skills of the adolescent learner. It is a seminar-style approach that mirrors university literature and writing classes. Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for fall semester. At the instructors' option, the class may transition to in-person instruction for second semester as COVID-19 scenarios improve.

    Topics in this Series: Elements of Literature (Semester 1) and Forms of Literature (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at grade level, and it is recommended that students have had a middle school writing class.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class. In addition, students should complete the summer assignments consisting of the literature identified above and a hand-out of literary terminology to learn.

    Assignments: will be posted on a Google Classroom.

    Assessments: are portfolio-based. Students will create a digital portfolio that incorporates annotated reading lists, reflects individual interests and accomplishments and showcases a variety of writing. See the Compass memorandum for more information on assessments in Language Arts.

    Textbook: Students should purchase or borrow the assigned literature. In some cases, specific editions will be identified with ISBN numbers so students can be on the "same page" (literally!)

    What to Bring: Students should bring paper or notebook, pen or pencil, current literature selection, and personal writing journal to both class meetings each week.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

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    Luc Atangana
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Students will be introduced to drawing in a relaxed, informal workroom setting, where they will learn the fundamentals of drawing along with the elements of art and principles of design.

    First quarter, teens will begin basic, freehand sketching of marine life such as fish, dolphins, coral, or seaweed to learn to represent the objects that they observe. Teen artists will learn techniques such as drawing a "good line", fading, shading, and blending using crosshatching and smudging. Through the objects study, artists will learn techniques with pencil to help them replicate different effects in light and surfaces. Elements of art that will be emphasized include line, shape, and texture. Over the course, students should progress to draw more carefully and more accurately and to represent more refined details in their drawings. Toward the end of the quarter, students may also choose to add color to their drawings.

    The instructor will demonstrate various techniques by developing a sample drawing. Students may elect to follow the class sample or may apply the drawing skills to an entirely unique drawing. This class is suitable for beginners who have never drawn before and for intermediate art students who have worked in other mediums and are interested in exploring drawing. Students who have two or more quarters of drawing with this instructor, may choose to draw with a digital stylus and iPad/laptop (owned and brought to class by the student), to create digital drawings. Drawing can provide a relaxing, needed break from rigorous academic classes and over-scheduled lives in a fun, supportive environment.

    Topics in this Series: Marine Life- Line, Shape & Texture (Quarter 1), Realistic Renderings- Value, Form & Composition (Quarter 2), The Built Environment- Space, Depth & Dimension (Quarter 3), and Fantasy Landscapes- Unity & Harmony (Quarter 4).

    Workload: Work outside of class is optional for those who wish to practice their drawing techniques.

    Assessments: Individual feedback is given in class. Formal assessments will not be given.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $15.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a sketchbook, a pencil box with pencils of varying hardness, and an eraser. Returning drawing students do not need to pay a supply fee and are expected to replace their drawing supplies as needed, with similar or better quality.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

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    David Chelf
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    This is a complete course in high school Geometry which will cover fundamental concepts and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. Students will learn deductive reasoning, and logic by completing geometric proofs. Topics in geometry include: lines, angles, congruence, concurrence, inequalities, parallel lines, quadrilaterals, transformations, area, similarity, right triangles, circles, regular polygons, and geometric solids. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem- solving.

    Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation Algebra I in order to take this class.
    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Friday (day 1), lecture on Wednesday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Friday (day 8), and homework due the next Wednesday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Wednesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work.
    Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.
    Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by checking that weekly homework sets are complete and giving periodic take-home tests; class participation is also strongly encouraged. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade.
    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Geometry: Seeing, Doing, Understanding, 3rd edition (ISBN-10 0716743612, ISBN-13 978-0716743613) A calculator is not needed for this course.
    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Geometry for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: Algebra

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    Megan Reynolds
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Great Books for Girls offers preteen students the opportunity to read high quality literature and expand their understanding of what they read through book discussion and hands-on extension activities. Through facilitated class discussion, students will analyze plot, theme, characters, genre, and setting by citing specific examples from the story. In addition, students will complete a wide range of extension activities, such as acting out or illustrating favorite scenes, writing alternate endings or prequels, or researching specific aspects of the story. Students will be asked to read assigned chapters from their books at home, either as read-aloud, individual silent reading, or listening to the unabridged audiobook. Readers will be encouraged to take notes on key passages or questions. All books selected for 2020-21 will feature the theme, "XXXX." The first book of Quarter 1 will be Front Desk by Kelly Yang. A second, follw-up book will be voted on by the students each quarter from A Mighty Girl suggested titles, Newbery Medalists and Honor Books, and the Capitol Choices book lists.

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    Kouthar Muttardy
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    History Investigators will examine formative periods in European History through guided inquiry and evidence-based analysis. These topics are posed as a series of thought-provoking questions that students will research, debate, discuss, and form opinions about. First semester will examine several big questions about Medieval Europe:

    -What was the authority of the Catholic Church during the Middle Ages?

    -How did manorialism and feudalism come to dominate Medieval Europe?

    -What factors contributed to the spread of the Black Death in Medieval Europe?

    -What were the varying roles for women in Medieval Europe?

    History Investigators is an interactive, multi-disciplinary examination of some of most significant events and turning points in European history using sources from The DBQ Project. DBQs, or document- based questions, are derived from AP History exams and help develop high school level critical thinking skills. Students will review an array of primary sources such as letters, journal entries, inventories, ship's manifestos, newspaper articles, period maps, and court documents along with selected secondary sources like excerpts, charts, and graphs. Students will be guided through analyzing the documents, interpreting the data, drawing inferences, and forming conclusions. In some historical scenarios, the class will consider conflicting perspectives and be able to defend and debate multiple sides of a key issue. To demonstrate comprehension and a deeper understanding of the class themes, students will use factual findings to develop structured, evidence-based essays.

    Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for fall semester. At the instructors' option, the class may transition to in-person instruction for second semester as COVID-19 scenarios improve.

    Topics in this Series: Medieval Europe (Semester 1) and Renaissance and Reformation (Semester 2). Students may register for either or both semesters independently. Continuing students from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. Students may register for either or both semesters independently. Continuing students from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: All assignments will posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates.

    Assessments: Points will be assigned for completed homework, projects, quizzes, and tests. A letter grade will not be assigned, but parents can use total points earned versus total points offered to assign a grade for purposes of a homeschool transcript. Parents can view total points earned at any time through the Canvas site.

    Textbook: None.

    Lab/Supply Fee: The cost of class copies is included in the course fee.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in American History for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Dr. Erica Hughes
    Add

    What does it mean to be a good person? What does it mean to be happy? Can a machine be moral? Philosophy is the study of life's big questions related to existence, knowledge, value, reason, and the mind. Through pre-readings, short response papers, and class discussions, the class will explore the themes of morals and ethics using approachable, well-known characters from the Simpsons and Isaac Asimov's short stories. These discussions will provide an introduction to some of the ideas from Aristotle's Nichomachean Ethics, Nietzsche's various writings, and Kant's categorical imperative.

    Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for fall semester. At the instructors' option, the class may transition to in-person instruction for second semester as COVID-19 scenarios improve.

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    Topics in this Series: Morals and Ethics (Semester 1), Minds and Knowledge (Semester 2), etc. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at or above grade level and be able to participate in thoughtful class discussion.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-3 hours per week outside of class, depending on speed of reading.

    Assignments: Students will be assigned weekly pre-reading consisting of a chapter or article, which will be discussed in the next class. Students will have two papers or projects during the semester. All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates.

    Assessments: Points will be assigned for class participation (50%), projects/papers (40%), and written journal responses to pre-readings (10%).

    Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase two books: (1) Science Fiction and Philosophy: From Time Travel to Superintelligence, Second Edition by Susan Schneider (Print ISBN# 978-1118922613, Online ISBN:9781118922590) and (2) The Simpsons and Philosophy: The D'oh! of Homer, by William Irwin, Mark T Conard, Aeon J Skoble (ISBN#978-0812694338).

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Humanities for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Donna Shackelford
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Razor Scooters, Post It Notes, and electric tooth brushes are cool inventions that kids use all the time! In this class, students will practice creative thinking and be coached through the steps of the invention process. Students will be encouraged to identify a need by noticing a problem or inconvenience and thinking about ways to solve it. They will engage in hands-on, in-class activities to encourage imagination and effective brainstorming- the spontaneous, creative thinking where all ideas are considered. Recognizing that many great inventions are twists or remakes on existing goods or inspired by others ideas, kids will learn to apply the SCAMPER technique to the problems they identify: Substitute, Combine, Adapt, Minify, Magnify, Put to new use, Eliminate, and Reverse/Rearrange.

    Students will practice inventive thinking with a class problem and class invention in order to get them comfortable with working on their own inventions. They will learn to consider alternatives and pros and cons of a new idea and narrow down possible solutions. Students will be asked to keep an Inventor s Log (journal) to track all aspects of their inventing process. They will name their invention, sketch it, and build a prototype (model) of the invention.

    This class will use a curriculum based on the Project XL program that was developed by the US Patent and Trademark Office in conjunction with educators, inventors, scientists, and specialists. During their discoveries, students will also learn about some inventors and discover that an inventor can be old or young, male or female, and any color or nationality. They will also learn how patents and trademarks protect their ideas. Students will be encouraged to showcase their Invention Dimension creations at Compass s Show What You Know Expo on November 6. In class, the instructor will provide basic prototyping materials such as cardboard, tape, straws, wooden sticks, scissors, glue, and paper. If a student s model-building needs require other materials, his/her family made need to send supplies from home or purchase prototyping materials from a local craft or home improvement store.

    Topics in this Series: Inventors' Lab: Eureka (Quarter 1); Inventors' Lab: Going Green (Quarter 2); Kids' Engineering Lab: Aviation Challenge (Quarter 3); and Kids' Engineering Lab: Rocket Race (Quarter 4)

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    Kerry Diederich
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art or artist, view sample works, and then will create a project in the style of the artist using a wide variety of materials and representative colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.

    First quarter, students will learn about famous artists and their favorite animals or pets! Featured artists include Hockney, Pollock, Picasso, Kahlo, O'Keefe, Rockwell and Klee. Which artist painted a rooster? Who liked crazy, colored geometric cats, and who else favored standard American hounds? Whose self-portraits included monkeys, black cats, and parrots? Through weekly projects, Junior Artists will learn about and make their animal projects while learning about the artist, the technique, and the subject matter.

    Topics in this Series: Artists and their Animals (Quarter 1); Famous Abstracts (Quarter 2); Cultural Art Creations (Quarter 3), and Scenic Seascapes (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

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    Kerry Diederich
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art or artist, view sample works, and then will create a project in the style of the artist using a wide variety of materials and representative colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.

    First quarter, students will learn about famous artists and their favorite animals or pets! Featured artists include Hockney, Pollock, Picasso, Kahlo, O'Keefe, Rockwell and Klee. Which artist painted a rooster? Who liked crazy, colored geometric cats, and who else favored standard American hounds? Whose self-portraits included monkeys, black cats, and parrots? Through weekly projects, Junior Artists will learn about and make their animal projects while learning about the artist, the technique, and the subject matter.

    Topics in this Series: Artists and their Animals (Quarter 1); Famous Abstracts (Quarter 2); Cultural Art Creations (Quarter 3), and Scenic Seascapes (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

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    Nick Grenier
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Look up in that tree! Why is that robin alarming? is there a hawk passing by? Is that a drey (a squirrel's nest)? What animal rubbed the bark off that sapling? Which plants are useful and which should be avoided?
    Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has lead for several years. Students will follow the paths and create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing fall season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world!
    Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

    0
    Nick Grenier
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Look up in that tree! Why is that robin alarming? is there a hawk passing by? Is that a drey (a squirrel's nest)? What animal rubbed the bark off that sapling? Which plants are useful and which should be avoided?
    Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has lead for several years. Students will follow the paths and create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing fall season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world!
    Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

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    Lisa Alonso
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Get ready for a full year of beginner level high school Spanish! This is a conversation-focused program in which students will build their vocabulary quickly and learn essential grammar skills in Spanish. Vocabulary will include the alphabet, numbers, time, dates, seasons, school, free time activities/hobbies, likes/dislikes, personal descriptions, family relationships, emotions, food/restaurants, places/locations in town, and shopping/clothing. There will be a strong emphasis on competency using regular and irregular present tense verbs and common grammar concepts such as articles, pronouns, adjectives, and comparative phrases.

    Class will be conducted primarily in Spanish and will focus on listening and speaking skills, asking and answering questions, and correct use of grammar. At home, students will be responsible for memorizing vocabulary and grammar, completing worksheets and written assignments, and watching both grammar instruction and language immersion videos.

    Level:This class will be offered on two levels: Honors and On-Level. Spanish I offers a substantive, full-credit experience taught at either level. All class members share core material and participate in the same class activities, but honors students will be given homework that requires higher level reasoning and advanced application of various grammar skills. All students will register online for the same course. Students must indicate which level they want to study via e-mail by August 15. Once the course has begun, students may move down a level (from honors to on-level) at any time. However, once classes have started, students may not "bump up" a level.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 30-45 per day, 4 days per week on homework outside of class.

    Assignments: Are sent by e-mail to parents and students. Students must have access to a computer and internet service for computer-based videos and practice tools that are assigned as homework and are essential to success in the class.

    Assessments: Quizzes, tests, and individual performance reviews will be given to all students at regular intervals to provide parents with sufficient feedback to assign a grade.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $30.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for class materials in lieu of a textbook.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Foreign Language for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Taliesin Knol
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    This class will re-enact the great unseen intelligence battles of the Civil War- and learn about far more than spying in the process- using an RPG (role playing game).

    The Civil War was America's deadliest conflict and was fought on all the fronts that existed at the time- on land, at sea, and underground. Knowing your enemy is the surest way to defeat them, and in the Civil War everyone did their part. This class will focus on the clandestine activities of one of America's most successful spies, Elizabeth Van Lew, leader of the Richmond Underground, a Union spy ring which operated under the nose of the highest levels of the Confederate government. The class will role play as Richmond high society, simulating the wartime economy of the Capitol of the South, while working to either support the war effort or undermine it. (Or the third option, war profiteering by playing both sides.)

    The class will use a Role-Playing Game system, designed by the instructor for the Spy Games series of classes, to allow for "Dungeons and Dragons" style game play. Students will attempt to bluff, sneak, and steal their way into positions of power, completing secret objectives while trying to avoid detection and capture. Missions and information will have to be passed via historic methods, such as shift ciphers and code wheels, and as such, part of class will include lessons on basic cryptography. This will of course culminate in the Siege of Richmond, as the Union Army grinds its way into the South, and our student spies will be able to see and affect the scale of the outcomes of this (and other) major Civil War battles.

    Topics in this Series: Early American Spying in The Civil War (Semester 1), Modern American Spying in the Cold War (Semester 2)

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Period maps, photographs, and re-creations will be posted on a class Google Drive, and video links from YouTube will be e-mailed to parents and students for homework or supplemental investigation.

    Assessments: Will not be given.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Taliesin Knol
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    This class will re-enact the great unseen intelligence battles of the Civil War- and learn about far more than spying in the process- using an RPG (role playing game).

    The Civil War was America's deadliest conflict and was fought on all the fronts that existed at the time- on land, at sea, and underground. Knowing your enemy is the surest way to defeat them, and in the Civil War everyone did their part. This class will focus on the clandestine activities of one of America's most successful spies, Elizabeth Van Lew, leader of the Richmond Underground, a Union spy ring which operated under the nose of the highest levels of the Confederate government. The class will role play as Richmond high society, simulating the wartime economy of the Capitol of the South, while working to either support the war effort or undermine it. (Or the third option, war profiteering by playing both sides.)

    The class will use a Role-Playing Game system, designed by the instructor for the Spy Games series of classes, to allow for "Dungeons and Dragons" style game play. Students will attempt to bluff, sneak, and steal their way into positions of power, completing secret objectives while trying to avoid detection and capture. Missions and information will have to be passed via historic methods, such as shift ciphers and code wheels, and as such, part of class will include lessons on basic cryptography. This will of course culminate in the Siege of Richmond, as the Union Army grinds its way into the South, and our student spies will be able to see and affect the scale of the outcomes of this (and other) major Civil War battles.

    Note: This section will be held entirely ONLINE in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for the full year. Recordings will be made for students with schedule conflicts.

    Topics in this Series: Early American Spying in The Civil War (Semester 1), Modern American Spying in the Cold War (Semester 2)

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Period maps, photographs, and re-creations will be posted on a class Google Drive, and video links from YouTube will be e-mailed to parents and students for homework or supplemental investigation.

    Assessments: Will not be given.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Elena Zaklis
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    Social skills do not have to suffer when you are taking virtual school at home! Successful social skills can help kids navigate almost every aspect of their lives. Building confidence in social interactions can help improve self esteem and comfort in group settings, sports, new endeavors, with family, in public, or just hanging out with friends. Every school-aged child can benefit from improved social skills, but some need a little more practice. This interactive, online Social Skills class will help kids practice communicating and managing sticky situations.

    In this online class, kids will work with a certified, licensed therapist (behavior analyst) in a secure, virtual Zoom classroom to develop strategies for navigating different social challenges- from conversation skills and identifying feelings and emotions, to seeing perspective, handling stress, talking to parents, making friends, tolerating siblings, problem solving, perseverance, and more. The small group class will include games, screen-share activities, icebreakers, role-playing, brief videos, modelling behavior, and projects using a evidence-based social-emotional curriculum. Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online coaching via videoconferencing for first quarter. At the instructors' option, the class may transition to in-person instruction for later quarters as COVID-19 scenarios improve.

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    Joe Romano
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Curious coins, baffling balls, confounding cards, and puzzling papers! Students will learn tricks of the trade from a professional magician using the Discover Magic curriculum! This class will present tricks from the Purple Wand curriculum.

    Each week, kids will learn how to perform a unique magic trick, and students will practice and perfect the illusion in class so they can come home and mystify their friends and family. Students will unlock the secrets to eight special magic tricks: Radical Ropes, Total Chaos, Money Maker, Picasso Pouch, Future Card, Trap Door, Gifted, and Luck Winner. For each trick, students will receive a custom magic prop and full color instructions, and at the end of each class, every magician will take home a Top Secret file folder with additional tricks they can practice. Student magicians will be given a secret password each week to gain access to an additional magic trick on the Discover Magic website (parents will need to work the magic to set up the child's online account.) Along with the actual magic, students will discuss a life skill each week that is essential to a good magician (and student) such as public speaking, presentation skills, practicing, being prepared, and reading your audience. Magicians who complete the class will receive a certificate and magic wand.

    Topics in this Series: Groovy Green Wand (Quarter 1); Orange Wand Wonders (Quarter 2); Baffling Blue Wand (Quarter 3); and Perplexing Purple Wand (Quarter 4)Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

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    Tia Murchie-Beyma

    As Thomas Jefferson wrote to Richard Price in 1788, "wherever the people are well informed they can be trusted with their own government." That's what this course aims to do!

    US Government and Politics is a year-long political science and civics course for high school students to build their knowledge of essential political structures and processes. Key themes in the course include Congress, Presidency, Bureaucracy, American Legal System and the Courts (30%); Constitutional Underpinnings of American Democracy (15%); Political Parties and Interest Groups (15%); Political Beliefs and Behavior (20%); and Civil Liberties and Civil Rights (15%).

    Students will learn about the formal and informal machinery that "makes the system go" -– including the so-called "fourth branch of government," the bureaucracy we know so well here in the Washington, DC metropolitan area. By the end of the course, students will also be able to explain the development of civil rights and liberties from their constitutional roots and through several Supreme Court cases; how political parties and interest groups work; the structure of elections; and the means by which citizens learn about politics and form political beliefs. Students will understand enduring issues, including separation of powers, checks and balances, and then tension between majority rule and minority rights.

    LevelsThe course provides a substantive, full-credit experience in either an Honors or On-Level track. Honors and On-Level students meet together and share core preparation each week, but assignments and assessments are differentiated, with longer readings, more practice of synthesis and analysis, and additional writing at the Honors level. Both tiers offer a serious, full-credit experience. A student who wishes to move up or down a level during the year may consult with the instructor. Students register online for the same course, but must indicate which level they wish to study via e-mail by August 15.

    Schedule: Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous ONLINE instruction via videoconferencing for fall semester. At the instructors' option, the class may transition to HYBRID instruction for second semester as COVID-19 scenarios improve. Hybrid instruction would include online instruction on Mondays (9:00 am - 9:55 am) and in-person instruction on Fridays. Instruction is recommended to be synchronous, but recordings will be made for students with schedule conflicts.

    Prerequisites: Students must be highly-skilled readers at the high school level or above; or else have very robust assistance at home with weekly reading assignments.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-5 hours per week outside class meetings for reading and homework, a range which may vary based on reading speed. Note that the core textbook is written at a basic college level, while other materials are targeted at either a high school audience or the news-reading public.

    Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates. These are due by 10 AM on Thursdays before each Friday meeting to promote active, knowledgeable discussion in class. There will be a summer assignment that is due on September 10, before the first class meeting. The class Canvas site will open on August 3 with introductory information, a syllabus, and the initial assignment.

    Assessments: Points will be assigned for completed homework, projects, quizzes, and tests. A letter grade will not be assigned, but parents can use total points earned versus total points offered to assign a grade for purposes of a homeschool transcript. Parents can view total points earned at any time through the Canvas site.

    This course was structured to allow interested students to prepare for the College Boards' CLEP exam in American Government. Time spent on major course themes intentionally mirror the CLEP test's percentages. Students interested in taking the CLEP exam will have to register and pay for those exams individually. This course is not offered at an AP level, but the instructor is willing to advise experienced students who wish to independently prepare for the AP United States Government and Politics exam in May 2021. Additional preparation outside of class, particularly in essay-writing and analysis of Supreme Court cases, would be needed for AP.

    https://clep.collegeboard.org/history-and-social-sciences/american-government
    https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/courses/ap-united-states-government-and-politics/exam

    Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase or rent Keeping the Republic: Power and Citizenship in American Politics, Brief 8th Edition by Christine Barbour and Gerald Wright (ISBN-13: 978-1544316215). Electronic versions are available. Be sure to purchase the EIGHTH (8th) edition that is also labeled "BRIEF." Other readings will be provided by the instructor.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component full year, one-credit course in US Government, Civics, or Humanities for purposes of a high school transcript

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Taliesin Knol
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Why read about key military battles on maps or in books when you can learn about them hands-on, in three dimensions, using historical miniature gaming? In 3D History, pivotal engagements come alive for new and experienced students, as they navigate a table-top terrain, deploy hundreds of miniature soldiers, ships, and tanks... all while playing a military strategy game. Each student will have the opportunity to fight a battle from both sides, allowing them to test various strategies, try multiple scenarios, predict different outcomes, and rewrite history- an effective way to gain a deeper understanding of what actually happened and why!

    In 1914 the world was rocked by the Assassination of the Austro-Hungarian Archduke Franz Ferdinand. His death, and a tangled web of secret and public alliances would be the spark that dragged the whole world into a Great War. The Entente, the triple Alliance of France, Russia, and Great Britain would face off against the Central Powers of Imperial Germany and Austria Hungary, across "No Man's Land" the nightmare zone between the famous trenches of WWI, with all the world's industrialized militaries focused on them.

    This semester, students will study the early years of WWI, and how it settled into the stalemate on the Western Front with its infamous trench warfare, as well as the vast Eastern Front.

    Note: This is a 1 hour, 55 minute class with a 10-minute break part way through.

    Topics in this Series: WWI- No Man's Land 1914-1915 (Semester 1) and WWI- Over the Top 1916-1918 (Semester 2).

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Period maps, photographs, and re-creations will be posted on a class Google Drive, and video links from YouTube will be e-mailed to parents and students for homework or supplemental investigation.

    Assessments: Will not be given.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

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    Judith Harmon
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    When the sun goes down and the Sandman comes, dreams transform our characters and carry them away on an adventure in The Land of Nod! What weird and wacky escapades will take place in the dreamland that our young actors will create and perform?

    Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other and to start to brainstorm about their original play. Through group activities and guided discussion, the actors will decide on characters, conflict, conclusion, and the story they want to tell. Students will pitch ideas to the group, and those concepts will be developed and blended into a script that reflects the contributions of each student. The script will be customized for this class by the instructor with input from the students.

    The class will learn the practical aspects of acting, as they work on script read-through, blocking, costume/prop design, and planning the show. Students will develop their own "actor's toolkit" of voice, body, and imagination in this creative process! Actors will grow in confidence and communication skills in preparation for a final sharing with parents on the final day of the quarter.

    Once the script is fully developed with everyone's parts, about half-way through the quarter, it will be emailed to parents. Parents will be expected to help their children memorize their script/lines/cues and assemble a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity. Note: Students who are emerging readers (not able to read at a 3rd/4th grade level) would be better suited to the Young Actor's Playhouse class, rather than this level.

    Topics in this Series: The Craziest Dream Ever (Quarter 1), Medieval Mayhem (Quarter 2), The Incredible Invention (Quarter 3), and The Emperor's Ensemble (Quarter 4).

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    Keely Kirk
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Snappy comebacks, one-liners, sarcasm, exaggeration, irony...and teenagers. These things just go together! Improv gives kids an outlet for fun, creative stories and spontaneous humor. Teens who find amusement in the unexpected and humor in the unpredictable will enjoy improvisational acting!

    First quarter, actors will explore the basics of improvisation, story-telling, and stagecraft through activities and exercises that encourage cooperation, communication, and team work. With fun, interactive improv games such as "Yes, and.." and "Improved Stories," students will learn how to use short form improv to play off of each other to convey character, emotion, situation, setting, and to highlight their scene partners. The variety of improv activities each week will help develop the "group mind" and class dynamic. Small group and partner work will boost teens' confidence and trust in a supportive environment.

    Improvisation is the art of entertaining with connected, unpredictable twists and turns often seen from the great comedians and best live entertainers. Improv students will improve their ability to think on-their-feet, play off each other, and react with spontaneous wit, sarcasm, and irony. Actors' creative thinking and communication skills will be strengthened as they work "outside-of-the-box" and learn to read their audience.

    Improv can be for everyone! No previous experience is needed. Beginners are welcome, and experienced students will further develop their improv skills. This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, flexible, and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work collaboratively in a group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class.

    Topics in this Series: Irresistible Improv (Quarter 1), Innovative Improv (Quarter 2), Immersive Improv (Quarter 3), Improv in Action (Quarter 4). Continuing students from the prior quarter will receive priority pre-registration for next quarter.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hour per week outside of class.

    Assignments: If any, will be sent to parents and students by e-mail.

    Assessments: will not be given.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

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    Kouthar Muttardy

    Around the World is a creative, interactive examination of world geography! Geography is much more than just maps and mountain ranges! Students will make an in-depth investigation of all aspects of geography region-by-region. First quarter will explore the geography of North America, from Newfoundland, Canada, to Nome, Alaska, and the Neovolcanica region in Mexico.

    Students will engage in hands-on activities, such as games and scavenger hunts, to learn about the lands, features, inhabitants, and phenomena and five themes of geography (location, place, human and environment interaction, movements, and regions) for each area that they study. For each major region, the class will look at aspects of human geography: political boundaries, cities and communities, cultural, social, and economic themes (dominant languages, religions, ethnic groups, agriculture, and trade), along with aspects of physical geography such as landforms, waterways, climate zones, biomes, etc. The class will also touch on the geographic specialties of meteorology and hydrology to understand how these impact physical and human geography.

    Note: Map basics, including reading maps, types of maps, latitude and longitude, and understanding representations on maps, will only be covered during the first quarter of each year. Any student enrolling in the course after the first quarter will be expected to review map basics from a class packet of map information.

    Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for first quarter. At the instructors' option, the class may transition to in-person instruction for later quarters as COVID-19 scenarios improve.

    Topics in this Series: North America (Quarter 1); Central and South America (Quarter 2); Middle East & North Africa (Quarter 3); Sub-Saharan Africa (Quarter 4). Second year (2021-22) Europe (Quarter 5); Russia & East Asia (Quarter 6); South & Southeast Asia (Quarter 7); and Oceania, Antarctica & Earth's Oceans (Quarter 8). Lab/Supply Fee: Included in the course fee.

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    Dr. Erica Hughes
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    Students will travel through time and around the world in this survey of the history of art! The class will look at images of art as religious icons, records of historical events, myths, portraits, propaganda, conveyors of power and authority, and fantasy to answer the big question, "What is the function of art aside from being aesthetically pleasing?" Students will be asked to predict how their definition of art will change throughout the course of the year.

    This unique exploration of art history will be enlivened by rich class discussions, projects, visits to exhibits, and the instructor's own creative style and personal experience at significant historical sites throughout the ancient world. Students will learn about the people and concepts behind each type of art, considering that the conditions of the time influenced the art and architecture: physical location, settlement, innovation, warfare, politics, beliefs, religion, funerary practices, and interconnections to other, contemporary cultures.

    This study of the history of art will begin with the early Renaissance in Northern Europe and the innovation of oil painting. This technique was used to evoke different ideas in Burgundy, Flanders, France and the remains of the Holy roman Empire. Students will discover how etching and engraving are different and explore the illustration of printed books. Next, the investigation turns to Quattrocento Florence and the influence of Humanistic principles and innovations in perspective. Women's participation in Italian art during the High Renaissance will be introduced through the works of several female artists. The allegorical symbols and minute details of the North will be contrasted with the joyful mythologies of Italy. The class will then examine the changes brought about by Mannerism, and how these were expressed in both Italy and the North, as well as the difference in focus of Protestant and Catholic artists. Looking at spectacular Baroque art, the class will discuss the continuation of patronage with an art market and without royalty. The study of the Dutch vanitas paintings will open a discussion of the importance of the household and of personal contribution to society and science. After a century of revolutions, European art has a quick dalliance with the Rococo, then the enlightenment focuses artists on a more austere neoclassicism. Next, the exploration will take students to the effects on art of the Industrial Revolution through materials, technologies and subjects. Students will learn about the political and artistic revolutions that led to the Romantic spirit, the Realist reaction against Romanticism, and how landscape painting was somewhere between the two. The 19th century brings the first public art museum, prefabricated architecture, and the advent of photography. Finally, we will investigate the end of the 19th century and the beginning of Modernism in art: Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, symbolism, and the first skyscrapers.

    Levels:This course is AP Optional for students who took the prior semesters in 2019-20. All four Compass semesters are needed to prepare for the 2020 AP Art History exam.

    Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for fall semester. At the instructors' option, the class may transition to in-person instruction for second semester as COVID-19 scenarios improve.

    Topics in this Series: Renaissance to Recent, Western Art Part 2 (Semester 1), Asia to Africa, Non-Western Art (Semester 2)

    Workload: AP students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class; on-level students should expect to spend 1 hour outside of class.

    Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments, quizzes, and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload. For each chapter, there will be open book quizzes, and students should be able to describe their three favorite works. There will be a semester project based on the creation of one's own myth and culture. Image recognition is key to learning art history. Each semester, students will be assigned approximately 60 images to identify (25% of the AP's 250) on the midterm and final. On-level students should be able to identify the art or object by style. AP students are expected to learn the name, description and compare/contrast the images.

    Assessments: Points will be assigned for projects, quizzes, chapter summaries, and exams, and parents may use the total points earned to assign a class grade. Quizzes will be administered through Canvas.

    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent Gardner's Art through the Ages: A Global History, 15th Edition by Fred Kleiner (ISBN 13- 978-285754994).

    AP Fees: The fee to take the College Board's AP Art History exam in May 2021 is not included; each family will be responsible for scheduling and paying for their student's AP exam

    Credit:Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History or Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Taliesin Knol
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Students will engage in a hands-on 3D battle strategy game using the military dioramas that they make!

    From Stalingrad to Berlin, the downfall of Nazi Germany. This quarter will cover the climactic urban battles of the Eastern Front in Europe, or as the Russians call it, The Great Patriotic War. The Eastern front is often sidelined in Western history, but it was quite possibly the most brutal theater of war in human history. The Germans invaded Eastern Europe to wage a war of extermination, and instead found themselves hunted like rats in the cities they destroyed. This is not the Blitzkrieg, where a modern German army used fancy new tactics to destroy larger armies. This is the rat warfare, brutal attrition more akin to the 1st World War, with the trenches swapped for bitter street fighting, where each side was literally fighting in their own homes, for everything they had.

    Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will each form a 10" X 16" shaped, foam diorama with landscape elements (hills, buildings, rivers, bridges, vegetation, fences, etc) to represent a scene of a famous historical engagement. Students will each receive 1:72 scale miniature soldiers to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate the larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices.

    The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical background and circumstances leading up to the specific battle. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include: WWII from the Russian Perspective, Stalingrad/Berlin (1st quarter), WWII The Battle of the Bulge, 1944 (2nd quarter), WWII The USMC at Guadalcanal, 1945 (3rd quarter), and Korean War, 1950-1953 (4th quarter).

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    David Chelf
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    This is a complete course in high school Calculus which will cover fundamental concepts and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. Topics in Calculus include limits of functions (one-sided and two-sided limits, limits at infinity and infinite limits, limits of sequences, and continuity of functions), derivatives (various definitions of derivatives, estimating derivatives from tables and graphs, rules of differentiation, properties of derivatives, separable differential equations, and the Mean Value Theorem), applications of derivatives (related rates, optimization, and exponential growth and decay models), integrals (basic techniques of integration including basic antiderivatives and substitution), applications of integrals (in finding areas and volumes, describing motion, and as accumulation functions), and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem-solving.

    Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation PreCalculus in order to take this class.
    Level: This course is offered at two levels, Honors and Advanced Placement (AP). The scope and sequence are identical, however AP students may have additional practice problems. Students who wish to take the AP exam must register and pay for their own exam through the College Board in fall 2020 for the May 2021 exam.
    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Friday (day 1), lecture on Wednesday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Friday (day 8), and homework due the next Wednesday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Wednesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work.
    Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.
    Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by checking that weekly homework sets are complete and giving periodic take-home tests; class participation is also strongly encouraged. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade.
    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Calculus: Single Variable/Early Transcendentals, 8th edition by James Stewart (ISBN-13 9781305270336). A scientific calculator similar to the Casio fx-115ES PLUS is required for this class, and it is highly recommended that students preparing for the AP exam have a graphing calculator similar to the TI-83. Students without a graphing calculator must have access to desmos.com and/or wolframalpha.com for graphing assignments.
    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Calculus for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: PreCalculus

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    Taliesin Knol
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    Explore the State of Virginia from its earliest colonial settlement 400 years ago. The class will discuss the driving factors for colonization of the "New World" by European powers, especially Great Britain and The Virginia Company which founded the colony. In counterpoint, the existing Powhatan Confederacy of Native Americans will also be studied, as well as several failed attempts at colonizing and how Jamestown narrowly escaped complete destruction!

    Each student will create an individual diorama. Students will craft and hand-shape their scene on a 10 x 16 inch foam board using artistic, model-making techniques. They will customize their dioramas with landscape elements, waterways, structures of the time, and paint. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature figures and combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to create a larger terrain. Students will then compete in a history-based strategy game. This will reinforce lessons about the culture, economy, warfare, and politics of the time. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them. Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents.

    Note: This section will be held entirely ONLINE in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for the full year. Recordings will be made for students with schedule conflicts.

    There is a $25.00 materials fee that must be paid to the instructor one week before the start of class. The material fee includes a kit of supplies that will be shipped to the student.

    Topics in this year's series include Virginia History: Jamestown and the Powhatan Confederacy, 1607 (1st quarter), The American War of Independence (2nd quarter), The War of 1812 (3rd quarter), and The Civil War 1861-1865 (4th quarter).

    1
    Dr. Karleen Boyle
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Become a world-travelling eco adventurer and earth scientist without leaving Compass! Study the world's most exciting and diverse ecosystems and learn about the incredible biologic and geologic phenomena that shape them. Venture into caves and coasts, tundra and taiga, and forests and fjords. Each week student scientists will begin by locating the fascinating features on a map before learning about these incredible habitats from the ground-up, starting with the geology of a place, then working their way through the climate, biome, flora, and fauna. Hands-on labs and in-class activities will reinforce regional and ecological diversity by examining rock types, classifying plants, observing insects, or modelling weather phenomena. Throughout their journey to fascinating ecosystems, explorers will keep a science log to document their discoveries. Finally, students will link their studies to current events in these regions.

    First quarter, students will journey through the tundra, prairies, temperate rain forests, deciduous forests, and deserts of North and South America. We ll learn how global climate patterns form these different ecosystems, and learn about the amazing diversity of plants and animals that inhabit them. We'll investigate the rainshadow effect, and see why it forms deserts on the leeward side of coastal mountain ranges around the world. Then we ll jump from the tip of Chile across the roaring 40 s to explore one of our planet s most extreme ecosystems- Antarctica!

    Topics in this Series: The Americas and Antarctica (Quarter 1); Northern Latitudes (Quarter 2); Africa & Asia (Quarter 3); and All About Islands (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

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    Anne Sharp, Melanie Kosar
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    Overview

    Advanced Literary Criticism & Composition is a seminar-style course that introduces the high school student to a deeper investigation into literary movements and literary themes throughout the ages. Like art, literature is a writer's response to his world and a reflection of his society and contemporary culture. Literary genres evolved in response to significant events, prevailing philosophies, and impactful innovations and discoveries in the writer's lifetime. Literary movements create a timeline that reflects those influences. In this course, students will read and evaluate selections from a number of literary movements such as: Romanticism, Dark Romanticism, Gothic, Transcendentalism, Realism, Naturalism, Magical Realism, Stream of Consciousness, Expressionism, Harlem Renaissance, Modernism, Beat, etc., and make connections to significant effects of the period.

    Advanced composition in this course will move beyond personal interpretation of the work ("What do I think?") and transition into two Schools of Literary Criticism: Biographical Criticism, which views literature through the personal world of the writer ("What did the writer think?"), and Historical/Societal Criticism which views literature through the society/times of the writer ("What was going on around the writer?")

    Literature

    First semester of Advanced Literary Criticism will include a chronological grouping of literature in "movements" and a study of how movements combine to create genre. Students will be assigned brief, weekly mini-research assignments on history, geography (if applicable), music and art of the period, politics, religion, philosophy, author biography, etc, to establish a foundation and background information on the literary movement. Students will discover how literature reflects the people, events, discoveries, and ideology of the time and how literary movements provide clues to the philosophical, scientific, and societal climate. The class will look at wars and conflict as a creative element that drives evolution in literary movements. The types of literature used to examine movements will span novels, short stories, poetry, letters, political writings, slave narratives and analytical essays. Examples of literature that will be read first semester include selections from the Odyssey (Homer), Arabian Nights, Don Quixote, Jonathan Swift and poetry by Shakespeare. The full reading list will be presented in the course syllabus at the beginning of the term. In addition, students will be asked to read several selections over the summer.

    Composition

    First semester Composition will apply the Schools of Literary Criticism to craft essays that demonstrate and understanding of movements in the broader context of literature- across eras, across genre/form, across writers and across the world. Teens will write a series of short essays that use different "filters" or "lenses" to view literary genres. Students will develop skills in notetaking, adding research to their literary essays, and managing their writing portfolios. They will also perform parallel, independent research in literature to develop a presentation on a movement or era culminating a semester project.

    Class Structure This course is part of a custom curriculum developed and team-taught by Anne Sharp and Melanie Kosar. The courses are designed in a sequential program that complements the developmental skills of the adolescent learner. It is a seminar-style approach that mirrors university literature and writing classes. Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for fall semester. At the instructors' option, the class may transition to in-person instruction for second semester as COVID-19 scenarios improve.

    Topics in this Series: Overview of Literary Movements (Semester 1) and Survey of Themes in Literature (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at grade level. Students should have had a prior course in literature to have established a firm foundation in basic literary elements and form.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class. In addition, students should complete the summer assignments consisting of the literature identified above and a hand-out of literary terminology to learn.

    Assignments: will be posted on a Google Classroom.

    Assessments: are portfolio-based. Students will create a digital portfolio that incorporates annotated reading lists, reflects individual interests and accomplishments and showcases a variety of writing. See the Compass memorandum for more information on assessments in Language Arts.

    Textbook: Students should purchase or borrow the assigned literature. In some cases, specific editions will be identified with ISBN numbers so students can be on the "same page" (literally!)

    What to Bring: Students should bring paper or notebook, pen or pencil, current literature selection, and personal writing journal to both class meetings each week.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Edwige Pinover
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Bonjour and get ready for a full year of beginner level high school French! This is a conversation-focused program in which students will build their vocabulary quickly and learn essential grammar skills in French. Vocabulary will include the alphabet, numbers, time, dates, seasons, school, free time activities/hobbies, likes/dislikes, personal descriptions, family relationships, emotions, food/restaurants, places/locations in town, and shopping/clothing. There will be a strong emphasis on competency using regular and irregular present tense verbs and common grammar concepts such as articles, pronouns, adjectives, and comparative phrases.
    Class will be conducted primarily in French and will focus on listening and speaking skills, asking and answering questions, and correct use of grammar. At home, students will be responsible for memorizing vocabulary and grammar, completing homework assignments, and watching both grammar instruction and language immersion videos.

    Level: This class will be offered on two levels: Honors and On-Level. French I offers a substantive, full-credit experience taught at either level. All class members share core material and participate in the same class activities, but honors students will be given homework that requires higher level reasoning and advanced application of various grammar skills. All students will register online for the same course. Students must indicate which level they want to study via e-mail by August 15. Once the course has begun, students may move down a level (from honors to on-level) at any time. However, once classes have started, students may not "bump up" a level.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 30-45 per day, 4 days per week on homework outside of class.

    Assignments: Are sent by e-mail to parents and students. Students must have access to a computer and internet service for computer-based videos and practice tools that are assigned as homework and are essential to success in the class.

    Assessments: Quizzes, tests, and individual performance reviews will be given to all students at regular intervals to provide parents with sufficient feedback to assign a grade.

    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Bien Dit!: Student Edition Level 1 2013 (French Edition) (ISBN-13 978-0547871790)

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Foreign Language for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Edwige Pinover
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Salut! French with Friends is an introductory class for elementary aged beginner. The class will be taught in a predominantly immersion environment. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students or explain difficult concepts. French language instruction will be presented in a natural learning sequence beginning with nouns (such as colors, numbers, clothing, foods, animals, family members, days/dates, etc), adjectives, beginning verbs, greetings, and simple phrases. Songs, games, stories, and hands-on activities will be used in class to review vocabulary and phrases. Emphasis will be on conversation, but students will be encouraged to learn to spell and sound out written French. Aspects of Francophone culture such as holidays, foods, and traditions will be incorporated in the classes.
    Each quarter introduces new themes and new vocabulary in French, so continuing students can continue to build their language basics. However, themes and units are non-sequential, so students may enroll in this level in any quarter. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, and simple phrases while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Fluency should not be expected at this level. This is a 6-week class that will not meet on October 14.

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    Edwige Pinover
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Salut! French with Friends is an introductory class for elementary aged beginner. The class will be taught in a predominantly immersion environment. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students or explain difficult concepts. French language instruction will be presented in a natural learning sequence beginning with nouns (such as colors, numbers, clothing, foods, animals, family members, days/dates, etc), adjectives, beginning verbs, greetings, and simple phrases. Songs, games, stories, and hands-on activities will be used in class to review vocabulary and phrases. Emphasis will be on conversation, but students will be encouraged to learn to spell and sound out written French. Aspects of Francophone culture such as holidays, foods, and traditions will be incorporated in the classes.
    Each quarter introduces new themes and new vocabulary in French, so continuing students can continue to build their language basics. However, themes and units are non-sequential, so students may enroll in this level in any quarter. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, and simple phrases while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Fluency should not be expected at this level. This is a 6-week class that will not meet on October 14.

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    Dr. Danielle Rhodes
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Was the Tea Party a party? What really happened on Revere’s fateful ride? Meet Alexander Hamilton on a new stage! In this class, students will learn about American History through Graphic Novels. Kids will not even realize they are learning as they are absorbing factual information through the intriguing, illustrated short-form novels.

    Through colorful, dramatic graphics and an approachable conversational tone, graphic novels show kids that history can be thrilling! The first class will begin with a discussion about the graphic novel genre including vocabulary unique to the illustrations and format (panels, speech bubbles, etc.) by looking at many examples of graphic novels. Each week, students will read a different graphic novel at home organized around a cohesive historical theme. In each class, the novels and historical content will be discussed. Students will think they are talking about cool, comic-style books they have read, but the facilitated class discussion will weave in literary analysis and critical thinking skills.

    Students are expected to pre-read one graphic novel per week and may read individually or enjoy read aloud with their families. These novels are generally considered a reading level for ages 8-12. Students should purchase or check-out from the library all titles that will be read for the class. Students are also welcome to download digital versions of the graphic novels on Kindles or tablets.

  • The Fight for Freedom 1750-1783 by Saddle Back Educational Publishing (ISBN 978-1599053578)
  • True Stories of the Revolutionary War by Elizabeth Raum (ISBN 978-1429693424)
  • Nathan Hale’s Hazardous Tales: One Dead Spy by Nathan Hale (ISBN 978-1419703966)
  • Nathan Hale’s Hazardous Tales: Lafayette! by Nathan Hale (ISBN 978-1419731488)
  • Sons of Liberty by Marshall Poe (ISBN 978-1416950677)
  • Alexander Hamilton: The Fighting Founding Father by Mark Shulman (ISBN 978-1684125432)
  • Topics in this series include: The American Revolution (Quarter 1); Westward Expansion (Quarter 2); The Civil War (Quarter 3); The Age of Progress Century (late 1800s) (Quarter 4). Next year, watch for Graphic History of the 20th century, world wars, and civil rights.

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    Dr. Erica Hughes
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Archaeology is the field of study that unlocks the clues to past civilizations. Forensic archaeology applies these methods to solve puzzles. In this class, students will use physical evidence to try to understand or re-create what happened to an individual through life, death, and burial or to an object though its creation, use, and after it was lost, buried, or discarded. Students will practice field archaeological techniques such as surveys, excavation, and mapping, as well as documentation, analysis, and illustration of human material culture. This archaeological lab will be guided by a scholar of art and antiquity. Dr. Erica Hughes has traveled and participated in archaeological explorations throughout the ancient world. Students will "dig" her personal photos and stories. Class discussions, group activities, and individual hands-on experiences are designed to help teens understand the creation, recovery, and conservation of artifacts and remains.

    First semester, students will learn the field component of investigative archaeology. The class will first learn to plan their trench on grid paper and then practice actual excavation techniques in a field square. Students will learn to use the baulk trimming method in addition to using a total station and plumb bob. The instructor will teach methods of recording stratigraphy, drawing sections and trenches, and documenting artifacts through site photography and sketching. The class will learn about lighting, angles, and scales for photographing their finds. Archaeological illustration of bones, figurines, and pottery, metal, and stone vessels will be taught with pencil, and students will ink their best work for a grade.

    Topics in this Series: Field Methods (Semester 1), Forensics (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: 8th grade students may only enroll in this course if they successfully completed one of Dr. Hughes' 2019-20 archaeology classes.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates

    Assessments: Points will be assigned for class activities and demonstration of field techniques in addition to a semester project.

    Textbook/Materials: A pdf version of the required textbook will be posted on the class Canvas site for reading assignments.

    Supplies/Equipment: Students should purchase and bring with them each week the following tools and supplies:

  • - Archaeology Trowel- Recommended model (Digitup.com): Eco Archaeology Trowel- Soft Grip Handle. (Note: trowels from garden stores tend to have the wrong shape and are unsuitable.)
  • - Sketching Kit- Recommended model (Amazon): Drawing and Sketching Pencil Set in Zippered Carrying Case. (Includes: 6B, 5B, 4B,3B, 2B, B, HB, H, 2H, 3H, 4H, and 5H pencils as well as an eraser, pencil sharpener, and a sketch pad.)
  • Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Social Sciences for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: See course description regarding 8th grade enrollment

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    Beth Ross
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Little Doctors will learn about what physicians do, what tools they use, and key parts of the body! Students will learn about the major organs in the body and how they work such as the heart, lungs, eyes, and digestive system through role-playing and hands-on activities. Young doctors will learn about surgery and learn how to suture and tie surgical knots. They will also learn all about bone breaks and practice casting and splinting.

    Topics in this Series: Doctor, Doctor (Quarter 1); Calling All Doctors (Quarter 2); Little Dental School (Quarter 3); and Wilderness Medicine (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $43.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a set of high quality, take-home class materials including: a disposable lab coat, gloves, surgical mask, a real stethoscope, an eye model, and doctor's office diagrams and forms such as a human body chart and stickers, a physical exam chart, a heart worksheet, a broken bone assessment chart, suture supplies, and a class diploma.

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    Tia Murchie-Beyma
    Add

    Media Literacy in the Age of Misinformation is a two-semester high school course that looks at media literacy from both social science and journalism perspectives. Students will develop analytical skills, awareness of national and global current events, and an understanding of how news information is acquired and packaged for our consumption. You will read news each week and discuss current stories in our live meetings. We will examine arguments and evidence, considering reliability, verification, ethical standards, balance and bias, context, and more. We will study some logical fallacies, such as the Slippery Slope and Straw Man. By the end of this course, you will be a better-informed, smarter consumer of news -– and hopefully a more involved citizen, better able to take action on issues you care about.

    Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for fall semester. At the instructors' option, the class may transition to in-person instruction for second semester as COVID-19 scenarios improve.

    Topics in this Series: Media Literacy in the Age of Misinformation (Semester 1 and Semester 2). Although both semesters have the same title, content will naturally be different because of changing events and circumstances in national and world news. Students may register for either or both semesters independently. Continuing students from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Strong independent reading skills (or robust home support) are necessary, as much news material aims for a reading level pegged at approximately tenth grade. Students must also be able to discuss sometimes difficult and mature themes

    Schedule:The Friday class meetings will begin in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing— with the teacher's option to move to in-person instruction as COVID-19 scenarios improve. When that takes place, the full class will transition to an in-person meeting.

    Workload: Students should plan for 2-3 hours per week outside class meetings for reading and homework, a range which may vary based on reading speed. Additional time may be needed to pursue individual news interests, as the student wishes.

    Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post weekly assignments, such as readings, videos, podcasts, written work, and news quizzes, and scores. These are due by 10:00 AM each Thursday (the day before Friday in-person meetings) to promote active, knowledgeable discussion. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.

    Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by checking that weekly homework sets are complete and giving periodic take-home tests; class participation is also strongly encouraged. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade.

    Textbook/Materials: The cost of an individual subscription to New York Times Upfront, a high school current events magazine is included in the course fee. Families should budget approximately $30.00 for one additional paid news subscription (details to be provided in class). Other readings and materials will be provided by the instructor.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Social Science or Journalism for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Kathy Preisinger
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Music Makers explores many facets of the musical experience- singing, moving, dancing, listening, and playing instruments. The class will explore musical stories, famous composers, and different genres of music while playing a variety of percussion instruments (drums, sticks, triangles, woodblocks and more!). Students will learn to play a beginning pitched instrument on glockenspiels (a small barred instrument like the xylophone). Using an Orff-based approach, students will learn to read and write beginning musical notation and learn musical terminology all in the context of fun and play. Music Makers classes provide a fun, pressure-free environment to experience music and movement with the goal of general musicianship and excellent preparation for further, individual instrument lessons if desired. Music Makers helps every child acquire the essential building blocks for a future of musical learning! Students may join Music Makers at any quarter, and they may return again and again since new music, themes, and skills are constantly introduced.

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    Nick Grenier
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Look up in that tree! Why is that robin alarming? is there a hawk passing by? Is that a drey (a squirrel's nest)? What animal rubbed the bark off that sapling? Which plants are useful and which should be avoided?
    Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has lead for several years. Students will follow the paths and create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing fall season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world!
    Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

    0
    Nick Grenier
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Look up in that tree! Why is that robin alarming? is there a hawk passing by? Is that a drey (a squirrel's nest)? What animal rubbed the bark off that sapling? Which plants are useful and which should be avoided?
    Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has lead for several years. Students will follow the paths and create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing fall season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world!
    Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

    0
    Luc Atangana
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Students will be introduced to painting with acrylics in a relaxed, informal studio setting under the guidance of a professional paint instructor.

    Students will work on framed canvas and easels and will learn elements of art and principles of design in addition to methods in painting. Painters will learn basic techniques such as shading, blending, stippling, and broad stroke. Each quarter, the instructor will demonstrate techniques by developing a sample painting. Students may elect to follow the class sample or may apply the painting skills to an entirely unique composition. Students will complete one or two 16" X 20" canvases each quarter, depending on the level of detailing.

    First quarter, students will begin painting botanicals such as flowers, plants, or leaves. Through the botanical study, painters will learn to represent different textures and effects in natural subjects. Elements of art introduced in the first quarter projects include line, color, shape, and texture.

    This class is suitable for beginners who have never painted before, and for experienced art students who have worked in other mediums and are interested in exploring acrylic painting. Compass parents are welcome to register for this class to work alongside their teens, or to work on their own, while their teen is in another Compass class. Painting can provide a relaxing, needed break from rigorous academic classes and over-scheduled lives in a fun, supportive environment.

    Prerequisites: None

    Topics in this Series: Botanicals- Line, Color, Shape, & Texture (Quarter 1); Still Life- Values, Form, & Composition (Quarter 2); 3D Perspective- Space, Depth, & Distance (Quarter 3); and Landscapes- Unity & Harmony (Quarter 4).

    Workload: Work outside of class is optional, however students who want to continue to practice their painting techniques might want to purchase a tabletop easel (approx. $10.00) and set of basic acrylic paints ($30.00+) for home use.

    Assessments: Individual feedback is given in class. Formal assessments will not be given.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A new student class fee of $20.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for two canvases, a sketchbook, and use of shared class supplies (desktop easels, paints, brushes, paper products, etc.). Returning students who are continuing in this class from a prior quarter can continue using their sketchpad, but there is still a $14.00 fee for the other materials.

    What to Wear: Students may wish to wear an apron, smock, or paint shirt when working with acrylic paints.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

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    David Chelf
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    This is a full year course in Pre-Algebra that will provide an introduction to basic algebra concepts and a review of arithmetic algorithms with an emphasis on problem solving. The major topics covered in this course are Numbers and Operations, Expressions & Properties, Equations & Inequalities, Functional Relationships and Ratios, Percent & Proportions. Students will learn to use formulas to solve a variety of math problems encompassing geometry, measurement probability, and statistics. Students will also be applying their learning to real life scenarios to solve problems.

    Prerequisites: Students must be fluent in the four basic operations- addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. They will need to show proficiency and have a thorough command of basic computation. In addition, a basic, introductory understanding and ability to work with fractions and decimals is required to solve equations and simplify expressions. If you are unsure about your child's readiness for this class, the instructor will recommend one or more practice platforms and/or assessments to confirm placement.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class to complete practice problems, homework, and assessments.

    Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, link to quizzes and tests, track grades, and message the instructor and classmates.

    Assessments: All chapter tests will be taken outside of class with parental oversight to maximize in-class instructional time. Points will be assigned for completed homework, quizzes, and tests. A letter grade will not be assigned, but parents can use total points earned versus total points offered to assign a grade for purposes of a homeschool transcript. Parents can view total points earned at any time through the Canvas site.

    Textbook: The selected textbook is available free online, and a link will be posted on Canvas. Students who prefer a hard copy textbook may purchase or rent McDougall Littell's Pre-Algebra (ISBN #978-0618250035). As an alternative, for any student who struggles with reading, the textbook can be purchased as an audio CD (ISBN #978-0618478828). In addition, students will be assigned work in IXL and class note packets. (See Supply Fee notes below).

    Lab/Supply Fee: This course has a $65.00 supply fee which covers a 1-year subscription to IXL online math platform and a class binder with unit notes. The unit notes packet will be distributed at the beginning of each unit and includes additional examples, supplemental explanations, and practice problems. Please bring cash or a check made out to Compass on the first day of class.

    What to Bring: TI-34 calculator

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Mathematics for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: Middle school math

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    Donna Shackelford
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Science Kids is a lab-based science sampler program where our youngest scientists will be exposed to the concepts, acquire scientific vocabulary, and learn hands-on skills to needed to be comfortable with more advanced science classes as they get older. Your first or second grader will come home with an understanding of concepts like phases of matter, melting point, buoyancy, and life cycles. Most importantly, young students will gain confidence discussing science concepts and working with science equipment. Labs will teach students how to use a thermometer, take linear measurements, weigh items on a scale, peer into a microscope, record elapsed time, and make scientific sketches, for example.

    Each quarter will reinforce principles and lab skills around a central, unifying theme. Living World will introduce biology and life science concepts. Students will complete labs such as observing microscopic organisms in a microscope, examining life cycles and metamorphosis, and learning about biological functions such as respiration and digestion. Topics in this Series: Living World (Quarter 1), Earth/Space (Quarter 2), Chemistry (Quarter 3), and Physics (Quarter 4).

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    Dan Gallagher
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Have you wondered about re-usable, high altitude space planes? This simulation class will focus on building planes that can go into space and return to earth. Students will learn about the aeronautical principles of design, form, and fuel as they design and test high altitude space planes- on screen. Each week, students will also learn about aeronautical history and the physics of flight concepts such as lift, drag, and thrust-to-weight ratios.

    The class will use KerbalEDU simulation software on laptops to immerse themselves in a realistic, simulated environment to complete a series of challenging missions. In the KerbalEDU environment, students can design and build different high altitude planes, launch them, and use mission data to improve their designs.

    Topics in this Series: Aeronautical Engineering- High Altitude Space Planes (Quarter 1); Aerospace Engineering- Space Missions (Quarter 2); Astronautical Engineering- Space Station Design (Quarter 3); Marine Engineering- Ships & Submarines (Quarter 4) .

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    Judith Harmon
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    What's on the runways in 2020? Wide disco collars, chic trench coats, and layered skirts in simmering neons, crochet knits, and faux leather. Do you study the pages of Glamour, Vogue, Marie Claire, and wish to be involved in the world of trendy fashion? Perhaps you follow fashion influencers on Instagram. Or, do you enjoy the satisfaction of making things yourself, your way? If so, this class is for you. Each week this course will cover three parallel tracks: the history of fashion, fashion design, and sewing, with the first hour of each class being lessons and design work and the second hour dedicated to application and sewing.

    Fashion trends are often cyclical, and elements of style are reimagined every few decades. Students will seek inspiration for new designs and style remixes by learning about the history of fashion in eastern and western cultures for the last century. First semester, students will look at fashion trends by decade from 1900 through the 1960s. This semester will cover chapters 1 through 3 in the textbook.

    With inspiration from historical design trends, students will learn how to create fashion renderings, from initial concepts through a chic, coordinated collection. First semester, the class will learn about color theory, color psychology, and composing color palettes. They will learn to draw their designs by sketching a croquis (a quick, rough sketch of a garments on a proportioned figure.) Students will practice vision boarding and developing a story board.

    In this class, students will also learn to sew clothing as way of sharing- and wearing- fashions that they have designed. First semester, students will begin by getting-to-know their sewing machines including different components, attachments, and functions, along with care and use if their machines. Students will begin with simple stitching exercises, and their first project will be sewing a pin cushion that they will use throughout the year. The class will also learn the basics of hand sewing. The class will discover how garments are assembled by deconstructing an article of clothing from its seams. The group will learn how to read a sewing pattern and take measurements and will learn about different types of fabrics, their uses, and care. The group will learn about hems and elastic along with closures and how/where to use them. First semester's project will be sewing a custom pair of PJ pants.

    Students who practice at home will find that their sewing skills are refined and perfected more quickly. However, due to the complexity of constructing wearable, functional pieces of clothing, students should understand that by the end of the year, their sewn items will be more basic than the complex designs they render in the fashion design portion of the class. It takes years of practice before designers can create the complete, detailed collection that they have designed!

    Topics in this Series: Style Studio: Fashion Design and Sewing I (Semester 1), Style Studio: Fashion Design and Sewing I (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: First semester- none. A student who wishes to enroll in the second semester must know some of the beginning sewing and artistic skills (equivalent to first semester) and will require instructor approval to enroll.

    Levels: There will be different levels of the sewing instruction: a basic pattern for those new to the craft and a more complex version of the same project for those with more advanced sewing knowledge. Interested students with advanced sewing skills may take the course and sew their own projects during the second hour. These students would be asked to review their projects with the instructor in advance.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class on reading assignments and completing or practicing the sewing skill/step covered in class.

    Assignments: Projects and readings will be given out in class and will also be communicated via email.

    Assessments: Individual feedback is given in class. Formal assessments will not be given.

    Textbook: Students should purchase Fundamentals of Fashion Design, 3rd Edition, by Richard Sorger and Jenny Udale (ISBN# 978-1474270007) before the first class. Additional information will be distributed as handouts in class.

    Equipment/Fabric: Students must bring to class each week:

  • A portable sewing machine with bobbins. If you are purchasing a new sewing machine for the class, a Singer Heavy Duty Sewing Machine, 4400 series, model is recommended. These can be purchased from Amazon or Joann Fabrics for $160-$180. Students who are bringing a pre-owed or loaned sewing machine are expected to have the machine professionally serviced before the start of class.
  • The sewing machine owner's manual
  • An extension cord
  • Fabric for class assignments. A list of needed fabric and sewing patterns will be sent out the first day of class, with the recommended quantity, type, and deadlines.
  • Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a project box, including a sewing kit (with 1 pack of sewing machine needles, thread, and hand sewing essentials), sketchpad, folder, tracing paper, colored pencils, eraser. The supply fee also includes the shared cost and use of a lightbox for tracing. The cost of photocopied class documents is included in the course fee.

    What to Bring: Instructor-furnished sewing kit, art supplies, sewing machine, bobbins, owner's manual, extension cord, fabric, and images/sample photos, swatches, and other assigned materials.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts or Career Education for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

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    Becca Sticha
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Students will use LEGO to design and build simple engineering projects out of everyone's favorite building toy! In this 90 minute class, students will explore concepts and vocabulary in physics, mechanical engineering, structural engineering, aerospace engineering, and architecture while playing with their creations.

    First quarter, junior engineers will tackle Fantastic Fliers and Space Race with projects inspired by the Space Station, Shuttle, Mars Rover, Gondola Gliders, Helicopeters, and Airplanes.

    Each class begins with 10-minutes of free build from tubs of LEGO components followed by a short discussion and demonstration of the day's project and concepts. Students build individually or in groups. Instructors will provide individual assistance, facilitate challenges, performance testing, competitions, and modifications to projects. Some projects may have been introduced in prior year's sessions, but each new build is unique, and student's building skills and understanding will have grown.

    Notes:(1)Students must be minimum age 5 and able to separate from their parents for this class. (2) Projects are built from shared, Instructor-owned components, so students will not bring completed projects home. Parents, however, can step into class 15 minutes before the end of each session to photograph their child's construction.

    Topics in this Series: Fantastic Fliers & Space Racers (Quarter 1); Animal Architects (Quarter 2); Winter Workshop (Quarter 3); Amusement Park (Quarter 4)

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    Judith Harmon
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Ready for a laugh? Kick off the year with a comedy mash-up of humorous misunderstandings and hilarious mix-ups presented as a variety show of short, comedic sketches. Discover if you are you more witty or wisecracking, side-splitting or slapstick.

    Tweens will enjoy experimenting with the elements of comedy- irony, exaggeration, parody, surprise, satire, and exploiting the unexpected. Each class will begin with acting warm-ups and improv exercises. The group will begin with prepared scripts for several skits that they can work together to customize and individualize. In a collaborative process, the class will develop a series of short scene, or vignettes. Student who get the writing bug can try their hand at crafting a script for their classmates. Everyone will have the opportunity to improve their public speaking and stage presence skills while have a blast.

    This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, are flexible and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work in a collaborative group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class. The students will perform for family and friends at the end of the quarter.

    Topics in this Series: Comedy Mash-Up (Quarter 1); One Minute Plays (Quarter 2); Improv Scenes (Quarter 3); and Who Dunnit? (Quarter 4). Taken these classes before? No problem, you can take them again, as they offer a new and different experience every time!

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    David Chelf
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    This is a complete course in high school Algebra II which will cover fundamental concepts and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. Topics in Algebra II include linear functions, systems of equations and inequalities, quadratic functions and complex numbers, exponential and logarithmic functions, rational and irrational algebraic functions, and quadratic relations and systems. In addition, this course will cover higher degree functions with complex numbers, sequences and series, probability, data analysis, and trigonometric and circular functions. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem solving.

    Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation Algebra I in order to take this class.
    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Friday (day 1), lecture on Wednesday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Friday (day 8), and homework due the next Wednesday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Wednesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work.
    Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload. In lieu of a graphing calculator, students should have access to websites desmos.com and wolframalpha.com for graphing assignments.
    Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by checking that weekly homework sets are complete and giving periodic take-home tests; class participation is also strongly encouraged. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade.
    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Algebra and Trigonometry: Functions and Applications- Prentice Hall Classics (ISBN-10 0131657100, ISBN-13 978-0131657106). A scientific calculator similar to the Casio fx-115ES PLUS is required for this class.
    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Algebra II for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: Algebra

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    Daniel Frame
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Are you interested in learning a new language that is used right here in America? Are you intrigued by a modern language that has no written form? Do you want to find out why American Sign Language is much more closely linked to French Sign Language than British Sign Language? If so, American Sign Language (ASL) is a great language for you! In this class, students will learn the basic skills in production and comprehension of ASL while covering thematic units such as personal and family life, school, social life, and community. Each unit will include presentations and readings on Deaf culture and Deaf history. Students will learn fingerspelling and numbers, developing conversational ability, culturally appropriate behaviors, and fundamental ASL grammar. Class time will be dedicated to interactive ASL activities and face-to-face signing practice with the instructor and partners.

    ASL students will have a Deaf instructor. He regularly teaches all-hearing classes and is an excellent role model for students to meet and interact with a native speaker of ASL and to lean natural facial expressions, gestures, and body language used in Deaf communications. ASL students will have more confidence when they encounter Deaf instructors in college or greet speakers of ASL in social settings. Because the instructor is Deaf, students are not permitted to speak aloud in class. This approach improves visual attention and encourages immersion in the language. Students will be able to ask questions of the instructor by writing on individual white boards, but they will be encouraged to sign in order to communicate with the instructor. Lessons are facilitated with Power Point presentations, and a professional ASL interpreter will assist the class on the first day and in second semester for a Deaf culture lesson. Enrolled students are not expected to know any sign language prior to beginning ASL I.

    Hundreds of colleges and universities, including all public institutions of higher learning in Virginia, accept ASL as a distinct foreign language. This allows hearing and Deaf students to fulfill foreign language requirements for admission to college. Teens who have difficulty writing, spelling, or have challenging pronunciation in English, can be successful with ASL as a second or foreign language choice. Penn State University research demonstrated that the visual and kinesthetic elements of ASL helped to enhance the vocabulary, spelling, and reading skills in hearing students.

    Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for fall semester. At the instructors' option, the class may transition to in-person instruction for second semester as COVID-19 scenarios improve.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours each week outside of class on required vocabulary exercises, readings, and signing practice.

    Assignments: Homework assignments will be posted online in the Canvas digital classroom platform. There may be some brief written assignments, but for most homework assignments, students will be asked to post short videos of themselves signing. Students will need either a camera phone or webcam to complete these assignments.

    Assessments: The instructor will assign points using a class rubric for the parent's use in assigning a course grade. Course rubrics will evaluate students on their sign production, fingerspelling, ASL grammar, facial expressions including “above the nose” grammar (brows and body movement), and “below the nose” modifiers (lip expressions).

    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent "Signing Naturally Units 1-6 workbook" (ISBN# 978-1581212105) which includes a DVD or signing videos. This class will cover units 1-4.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in World Languages for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

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    Dr. Karleen Boyle
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    More than 70% of the Earth s surface is water! Understanding the earth s oceans and freshwater systems is critical to understanding life on our planet- from beginnings in the seas to the water cycle that supports ongoing life. The study of aquatic and marine biology provides a basis for understanding much of the chemistry, physics, biology, and meteorology on our planet. Budding marine biologists will travel inland to learn about freshwater systems like lakes and ponds, rivers and streams before returning to the coast to study marshes and estuaries followed by extreme marine environments- all under the guidance of an experienced marine biologist. The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in several demonstrations and experiments in each class.

    During first quarter, the class will focus on freshwater lakes and the variety of unique biomes that exist in them. Students will compare major lake systems around the world and learn about general limnological processes such as seasonal turnover and phytoplankton blooms. They will also explore the incredible range of lake biomes, from acidic, volcanic lakes and hot springs, to ancient temperate lakes like Lake Baikal. Students will learn about the extreme chemistry that occurs in some systems, like stratified lakes with toxic gas layers at the bottom, and will study the many unique, endemic species of plants and animals that have evolved in lake systems.

    Topics in this Series: Lakes & Ponds (Quarter 1); Roparian Biomes- Rivers and Streams (Quarter 2); Marshes and Estuaries, Where the River Meets the Sea (Quarter 3); and Extreme Marine (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

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    Shona D\'Cruz
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Young sculptors will enjoy working hands-on in 3-dimensions with a variety of sculpting materials. Sculpture is multi-sensory, and student sculptors enjoy the tactile experience of shaping, stacking, forming, flattening, and layering a selection of materials to create unique, personal projects. Sculpting engages a different artistic skillset than coloring, drawing, and writing and encourages creativity to represent objects in three dimensions. In this workshop, students will create original hand-made pieces inspired by different artists and sculpting techniques.

    First quarter, young sculptors will experiment with materials such as papier mache, airdry and polymer clays, wire, etc. to create sculptures. Possible projects may be a wire wave sculpture, layered paper collage, animal creation, or sculpey flower magnets. Some projects may take two weeks to complete with one week dedicated to forming and shaping the base sculpture and the second week focused on finishing techniques such as painting and embellishing. Each week, the instructor will show examples and introduce an artist who served as inspiration and worked in a similar style.

    There is a $40.00 per student material fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

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    Kouthar Muttardy
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    Civics Critics will explore themes related to the US Constitution through guided inquiry and evidence-based analysis. These topics are posed as a series of thought-provoking questions that students will research, debate, discuss, and form opinions about. First semester will examine themes such as the Articles of Confederation, branches of government, checks and balances, divided powers, the federal budget, and unalienable rights in a relevant, approachable, and interactive context. The class will apply this knowledge to analyze three big DBQ inquiries: The Ideals of the Declaration: Which is the Most Important? How Did the Constitution Guard Against Tyranny? and Should Schools Be Allowed to Limit Students' Online Speech?

    Civics Critics is an interactive, multi-disciplinary examination of some of the key issues in American Government using sources from The DBQ Project. DBQs, or document based questions, are derived from AP History exams and help develop high school level critical thinking skills. Students will review an array of primary sources such as letters, journal entries, inventories, ship's manifestos, newspaper articles, period maps, and court documents along with selected secondary sources like excerpts, charts, and graphs. Students will be guided through analyzing the documents, interpreting the data, drawing inferences, and forming conclusions. In some historical scenarios, the class will consider conflicting perspectives and be able to defend and debate multiple sides of a key issue. To demonstrate comprehension and a deeper understanding of the class themes, students will use factual findings to develop structured, evidence-based essays. Students will also complete additional short and interactive assignments throughout the semester.

    Note: This section will be held entirely ONLINE in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for the full year. Recordings will be made for students with schedule conflicts.

    Topics in this Series: Constitution Connection (Semester 1) and Bill of Rights Battles (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: Students should be able to read and write at grade level.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week on homework, investigation, or reading for this class.

    Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates.

    Assessments: The instructor may offer parent conferences to provide feedback on the student's work and participation.

    Lab/Supply Fee: The fee for a class notebook is included in the class tuition.

    What to Bring: Class notebook, paper, and pen or pencil.

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    Kouthar Muttardy

    Civics Critics will explore themes related to the US Constitution through guided inquiry and evidence-based analysis. These topics are posed as a series of thought-provoking questions that students will research, debate, discuss, and form opinions about. First semester will examine themes such as the Articles of Confederation, branches of government, checks and balances, divided powers, the federal budget, and unalienable rights in a relevant, approachable, and interactive context. The class will apply this knowledge to analyze three big DBQ inquiries: The Ideals of the Declaration: Which is the Most Important? How Did the Constitution Guard Against Tyranny? and Should Schools Be Allowed to Limit Students' Online Speech?

    Civics Critics is an interactive, multi-disciplinary examination of some of the key issues in American Government using sources from The DBQ Project. DBQs, or document based questions, are derived from AP History exams and help develop high school level critical thinking skills. Students will review an array of primary sources such as letters, journal entries, inventories, ship's manifestos, newspaper articles, period maps, and court documents along with selected secondary sources like excerpts, charts, and graphs. Students will be guided through analyzing the documents, interpreting the data, drawing inferences, and forming conclusions. In some historical scenarios, the class will consider conflicting perspectives and be able to defend and debate multiple sides of a key issue. To demonstrate comprehension and a deeper understanding of the class themes, students will use factual findings to develop structured, evidence-based essays. Students will also complete additional short and interactive assignments throughout the semester.

    Topics in this Series: Constitution Connection (Semester 1) and Bill of Rights Battles (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for fall semester. At the instructors' option, the class may transition to in-person instruction for second semester as COVID-19 scenarios improve.

    Prerequisites: Students should be able to read and write at grade level.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week on homework, investigation, or reading for this class.

    Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates.

    Assessments: The instructor may offer parent conferences to provide feedback on the student's work and participation.

    Lab/Supply Fee: The fee for a class notebook is included in the class tuition.

    What to Bring: Class notebook, paper, and pen or pencil.

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    Taliesin Knol
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Dive deep, back to the time of some of the first life on Earth, into prehistoric seas filled with monstrous and mysterious creatures that were the ancient ancestors of all life as we know it. This class will cover the early ocean life on Earth, from the darkest depths, where life exists because of geothermal vents, to the shallow inland sea that was the American Mid-West in the Jurassic age through the ancient seas as the dinosaurs swam them.

    We will learn to play "Submarine Safari" to simulate cooperative oceanographic research, exploring and cataloging ocean life, and an aquatic version of Try-To-Survive-Asaurus, where students role play as a shark or prehistoric marine reptile in their very own food chain. Over the course of the class, students should be able to explain the differences in the types of marine life over time and depth, and how these differences are reflected in their very own marine habitat boards.

    Each student will create an individual diorama. Students will craft and hand-shape their scene on a 10 x 16 inch foam board using artistic, model-making techniques. They will customize their dioramas with landscape elements, reefs, geothermal vents, and paint different ocean depths. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with miniature figures and combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to create a larger terrain. Students will then compete in a pre-history-based survival strategy game. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them. Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $15.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include Prehistoric Seas Survival (1st quarter), A Jurassic Survival Challenge (2nd quarter), Ice Age Survival (3rd quarter), and Sumerian Settlement (4th quarter).

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    Taliesin Knol
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Dive deep, back to the time of some of the first life on Earth, into prehistoric seas filled with monstrous and mysterious creatures that were the ancient ancestors of all life as we know it. This class will cover the early ocean life on Earth, from the darkest depths, where life exists because of geothermal vents, to the shallow inland sea that was the American Mid-West in the Jurassic age through the ancient seas as the dinosaurs swam them.

    We will learn to play "Submarine Safari" to simulate cooperative oceanographic research, exploring and cataloging ocean life, and an aquatic version of Try-To-Survive-Asaurus, where students role play as a shark or prehistoric marine reptile in their very own food chain. Over the course of the class, students should be able to explain the differences in the types of marine life over time and depth, and how these differences are reflected in their very own marine habitat boards.

    Each student will create an individual diorama. Students will craft and hand-shape their scene on a 10 x 16 inch foam board using artistic, model-making techniques. They will customize their dioramas with landscape elements, reefs, geothermal vents, and paint different ocean depths. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with miniature figures and combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to create a larger terrain. Students will then compete in a pre-history-based survival strategy game. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them. Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $15.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include Prehistoric Seas Survival (1st quarter), A Jurassic Survival Challenge (2nd quarter), Ice Age Survival (3rd quarter), and Sumerian Settlement (4th quarter).

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    Anne Sharp, Melanie Kosar
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    Overview

    Modern Narratives in Nonfiction Work is a seminar-style course that focuses on the incorporation of style, voice, and tone in literature and in writing. Viewing literature as "published writing", students will examine the products and processes of other writers in order to understand and refine their own. Through the analysis of professional and student works, students will explore what makes truly great writing.

    Literature

    First semester of Modern Narratives in Nonfiction will examine the works of great essayists. A partial list of reading selections includes I am Malala (Malala Yousafzai), I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (Maya Angelou), essays by Joan Didion and Ray Bradbury, speeches by Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, Martin Luther King, Abraham Lincoln, etc., Ted Talks, and an discussion of "real" versus "fake" news. In addition, the class will use style manuals and classic writing texts such as Strunk & White's The Elements of Style and William Zinsser's On Writing Well. The full reading list will be presented in the course syllabus at the beginning of the term. In addition, students will be asked to read several selections over the summer. Students will be assigned brief, individual research assignments and take turns leading the class discussion on topics related to the featured author or event.

    Composition

    First semester Senior Composition, dovetailing with the college admissions season, will focus on "the personal essay", writing to prompts, writing with a deadline, and ruthless editing (a.k.a. "meeting a word count"). Going beyond the five-paragraph template that encourages "cookie cutter" essays, students will create a unique architecture embedded with personal style, voice, and narrative structure. In short, students will uncover not just who they are as individuals, but who they are as writers... and how to fuse these two identities into a creative, organized, clear, and elegant essay.

    In the process, students will master their writing process and identify personal writing strengths. These strengths will be developed into a writing workshop that they will present to classmates and the Compass community. Portfolios (now a potential college resume addition) will be expanded to include essays, research papers, and extracurricular support (artwork, performances, PowerPoints, etc.).

    Class Structure This course is part of a custom curriculum developed and team-taught by Anne Sharp and Melanie Kosar. The courses are designed in a sequential program that complements the developmental skills of the adolescent learner. It is a seminar-style approach that mirrors university literature and writing classes. Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for fall semester. At the instructors' option, the class may transition to in-person instruction for second semester as COVID-19 scenarios improve.

    Topics in this Series: Modern Narratives in Nonfiction Works (Semester 1) and Nobel and Pulitzer Prize Writings (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at grade level.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class

    Assignments: will be posted on a Google Classroom.

    Assessments: are portfolio-based. Students will create a digital portfolio that incorporates annotated reading lists, reflects individual interests and accomplishments and showcases a variety of writing. See the Compass memorandum for more information on assessments in Language Arts.

    Textbook: Students should purchase or borrow the assigned literature. In some cases, specific editions will be identified with ISBN numbers so students can be on the "same page" (literally!)

    What to Bring: Students should bring paper or notebook, pen or pencil, current literature selection, and personal writing journal to both class meetings each week.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Edwige Pinover
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    Bonjour! French Foundations is an introductory class for middle school-aged students. The class will be taught in a predominantly immersion environment. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students or explain difficult concepts. French language instruction will be presented in a natural learning sequence beginning with nouns (such as colors, numbers, clothing, foods, animals, days/dates, etc), adjectives, greetings, and simple phrases. Students will learn beginning grammatical constructions such as noun-verb agreement, noun-adjective agreement, adjective placement, and the rules of regular verb conjugation. Students will be encouraged to speak aloud and converse with classmates, but also to learn to sound out, spell, and read beginning, written French. Aspects of Francophone culture such as holidays, foods, and traditions will be incorporated in the classes.
    Each quarter introduces new themes and new vocabulary in French, so continuing students can continue to build their language basics. However, themes and units are non-sequential, so students may enroll in this level in any quarter. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, grammar, and usage while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Students should be at grade level in their reading. Fluency should not be expected at this level. This is a 6-week class that will not meet on October 14.

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    Luc Atangana
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Students will be introduced to drawing in a relaxed, informal workroom setting, where they will learn the fundamentals of drawing along with the elements of art and principles of design.

    First quarter, teens will begin basic, freehand sketching of marine life such as fish, dolphins, coral, or seaweed to learn to represent the objects that they observe. Teen artists will learn techniques such as drawing a "good line", fading, shading, and blending using crosshatching and smudging. Through the objects study, artists will learn techniques with pencil to help them replicate different effects in light and surfaces. Elements of art that will be emphasized include line, shape, and texture. Over the course, students should progress to draw more carefully and more accurately and to represent more refined details in their drawings. Toward the end of the quarter, students may also choose to add color to their drawings.

    The instructor will demonstrate various techniques by developing a sample drawing. Students may elect to follow the class sample or may apply the drawing skills to an entirely unique drawing. This class is suitable for beginners who have never drawn before and for intermediate art students who have worked in other mediums and are interested in exploring drawing. Students who have two or more quarters of drawing with this instructor, may choose to draw with a digital stylus and iPad/laptop (owned and brought to class by the student), to create digital drawings. Drawing can provide a relaxing, needed break from rigorous academic classes and over-scheduled lives in a fun, supportive environment.

    Topics in this Series: Marine Life- Line, Shape & Texture (Quarter 1), Realistic Renderings- Value, Form & Composition (Quarter 2), The Built Environment- Space, Depth & Dimension (Quarter 3), and Fantasy Landscapes- Unity & Harmony (Quarter 4).

    Workload: Work outside of class is optional for those who wish to practice their drawing techniques.

    Assessments: Individual feedback is given in class. Formal assessments will not be given.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $15.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a sketchbook, a pencil box with pencils of varying hardness, and an eraser. Returning drawing students do not need to pay a supply fee and are expected to replace their drawing supplies as needed, with similar or better quality.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

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    Dr. John Kornacki
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    Where does the money come from for stimulus checks or a tax cut? How is a debt different than a deficit? These topics can be understood with a practical, everyday, concept-based approach to Economics. This course in applied economics spans key themes in micro-economics and macro-economics in a tangible, approachable way using cases and real examples from the community around us and avoids the traditional math-heavy, dull, and difficult study of the field.

    Economics is all about choosing and then deciding. It involves the study of how and why these choices and decisions are made and then determining their outcomes for a person, a firm, or even a nation. Sometimes the study of economics is referred to as the study of the political economy because it involves public decisions. For this course, we start off with smaller units first--often called micro-economics--and stress practical or applied concepts. Later on, the course will examine the larger-scale implications for using the tools of economics to better understand public policy formation and to explore case studies on such issues as alleviating poverty, addressing climate change, and protecting public health.

    In his classic text Economics, Paul Samuelson of MIT says economics is the study of how people choose and use limited resources having alternative uses. The material in this class incorporates his traditional often called neoclassical approach as well as the ideas from the so-called free-market Austrian-School economists like Henry Hazlitt and Milton Friedman. The course connects these concepts through the approachable books, Whatever Happened to Penny Candy? A Fast, Clear, and Fun Explanation of the Economics You Need For Success in Your Career, Business, and Investments and Economics in One Lesson

    In short, this course aims to build a better understanding of a teen’s personal stake in using the concepts and tools of economics in daily life as well as offering a way to visualize how they are used to create the public policies. The course starts small and moves to larger subjects over time. It offers students a chance to explore ideas, evaluate case studies, discuss them in class, and then write about them. The course encourages the development of critical thinking skills using the basic terms and concepts of applied microeconomics.

    Note: Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing. At the instructors' option, the class may transition to in-person instruction later in the year as COVID-19 scenarios improve.

    Prerequisites: None

    LevelsThe course provides a substantive, full-credit experience in either an Honors or On-Level track. All students complete the same assignments for Semester 1. Near the end of Semester 1, students may decide to differentiate their workload and continue On-Level or at an Honors level for Semester 2. Honors students will have more in-depth assignments with longer and additional readings, more practice of synthesis and analysis, and additional writing. Both tiers offer a sunstantial, full-credit experience. Students register online for the same course.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class on homework.

    Assignments: Assignments will consist of readings, worksheets, individual and group projects. All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates.

    Assessments: Points will be awarded for the competition of assignments, quizzes, and projects, and parents can assign a grade based on the number of points earned as compared to the number of points available.

    Textbook/Materials: A class bundle consisting of two books and a packet of photocopied articles will be provided. Additional readings, if selected, will be identified by August 15.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $38.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as full credit in Economics for purposes of a high school transcript.

    AP Exam Option: Students who take this course at the Honors level Semester 2 will have covered a substantial portion of the preparation for the AP exam in Microeconomics. The instructor will create a list of additional topics and analyses needed for any student who wishes to concurrently and independently study for the AP exam. Students who wish to take the AP exam must register and pay for on their own exam through the College Board in fall 2020 for the May 2021 exam.

    1
    Donna Shackelford
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Razor Scooters, Post It Notes, and electric tooth brushes are cool inventions that kids use all the time! In this class, students will practice creative thinking and be coached through the steps of the invention process. Students will be encouraged to identify a need by noticing a problem or inconvenience and thinking about ways to solve it. They will engage in hands-on, in-class activities to encourage imagination and effective brainstorming- the spontaneous, creative thinking where all ideas are considered. Recognizing that many great inventions are twists or remakes on existing goods or inspired by others ideas, kids will learn to apply the SCAMPER technique to the problems they identify: Substitute, Combine, Adapt, Minify, Magnify, Put to new use, Eliminate, and Reverse/Rearrange.

    Students will practice inventive thinking with a class problem and class invention in order to get them comfortable with working on their own inventions. They will learn to consider alternatives and pros and cons of a new idea and narrow down possible solutions. Students will be asked to keep an Inventor s Log (journal) to track all aspects of their inventing process. They will name their invention, sketch it, and build a prototype (model) of the invention.

    This class will use a curriculum based on the Project XL program that was developed by the US Patent and Trademark Office in conjunction with educators, inventors, scientists, and specialists. During their discoveries, students will also learn about some inventors and discover that an inventor can be old or young, male or female, and any color or nationality. They will also learn how patents and trademarks protect their ideas. Students will be encouraged to showcase their Invention Dimension creations at Compass s Show What You Know Expo on November 6. In class, the instructor will provide basic prototyping materials such as cardboard, tape, straws, wooden sticks, scissors, glue, and paper. If a student s model-building needs require other materials, his/her family made need to send supplies from home or purchase prototyping materials from a local craft or home improvement store.

    Topics in this Series: Inventors' Lab: Eureka (Quarter 1); Inventors' Lab: Going Green (Quarter 2); Kids' Engineering Lab: Aviation Challenge (Quarter 3); and Kids' Engineering Lab: Rocket Race (Quarter 4)

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    Becca Sticha
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Students will use LEGO to design and build simple engineering projects out of everyone's favorite building toy! In this 90 minute class, students will explore concepts and vocabulary in physics, mechanical engineering, structural engineering, aerospace engineering, and architecture while playing with their creations.

    First quarter, junior engineers will tackle Fantastic Fliers and Space Race with projects inspired by the Space Station, Shuttle, Mars Rover, Gondola Gliders, Helicopeters, and Airplanes.

    Each class begins with 10-minutes of free build from tubs of LEGO components followed by a short discussion and demonstration of the day's project and concepts. Students build individually or in groups. Instructors will provide individual assistance, facilitate challenges, performance testing, competitions, and modifications to projects. Some projects may have been introduced in prior year's sessions, but each new build is unique, and student's building skills and understanding will have grown.

    Notes:(1)Students must be minimum age 5 and able to separate from their parents for this class. (2) Projects are built from shared, Instructor-owned components, so students will not bring completed projects home. Parents, however, can step into class 15 minutes before the end of each session to photograph their child's construction.

    Topics in this Series: Fantastic Fliers & Space Racers (Quarter 1); Animal Architects (Quarter 2); Winter Workshop (Quarter 3); Amusement Park (Quarter 4)

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    Beth Ross
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Little Doctors will learn about what physicians do, what tools they use, and key parts of the body! Students will learn about the major organs in the body and how they work such as the heart, lungs, eyes, and digestive system through role-playing and hands-on activities. Young doctors will learn about surgery and learn how to suture and tie surgical knots. They will also learn all about bone breaks and practice casting and splinting.

    Topics in this Series: Doctor, Doctor (Quarter 1); Calling All Doctors (Quarter 2); Little Dental School (Quarter 3); and Wilderness Medicine (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $43.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a set of high quality, take-home class materials including: a disposable lab coat, gloves, surgical mask, a real stethoscope, an eye model, and doctor's office diagrams and forms such as a human body chart and stickers, a physical exam chart, a heart worksheet, a broken bone assessment chart, suture supplies, and a class diploma.

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    Kathy Preisinger
    Reg. Opens Aug 31 6:00 am

    Note: This is an alternate session that will be opened if the 12pm session fills.

    Music Makers explores many facets of the musical experience- singing, moving, dancing, listening, and playing instruments. The class will explore musical stories, famous composers, and different genres of music while playing a variety of percussion instruments (drums, sticks, triangles, woodblocks and more!). Students will learn to play a beginning pitched instrument on glockenspiels (a small barred instrument like the xylophone). Using an Orff-based approach, students will learn to read and write beginning musical notation and learn musical terminology all in the context of fun and play. Music Makers classes provide a fun, pressure-free environment to experience music and movement with the goal of general musicianship and excellent preparation for further, individual instrument lessons if desired. Music Makers helps every child acquire the essential building blocks for a future of musical learning! Students may join Music Makers at any quarter, and they may return again and again since new music, themes, and skills are constantly introduced.

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    Nick Grenier
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Look up in that tree! Why is that robin alarming? is there a hawk passing by? Is that a drey (a squirrel's nest)? What animal rubbed the bark off that sapling? Which plants are useful and which should be avoided?
    Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has lead for several years. Students will follow the paths and create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing fall season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world!
    Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 5 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

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    Nick Grenier
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Look up in that tree! Why is that robin alarming? is there a hawk passing by? Is that a drey (a squirrel's nest)? What animal rubbed the bark off that sapling? Which plants are useful and which should be avoided?
    Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has lead for several years. Students will follow the paths and create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing fall season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world!
    Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 5 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

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    Tia Murchie-Beyma
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    This full-year lab science course introduces classic biology topics updated for the 21st century. Biology studies living things and their relationships from microscopic to massive, ancient to modern, arctic to tropic. Our survey includes: (1) cellular and molecular biology, (2) ecology, (3) genetics, (4) biology of organisms (with selected human health and anatomy topics), and (5) evolution and diversity.

    You will observe microscopic organisms and give monarch butterflies a health exam before tagging them for their 2,800 mile migration to Mexico. You will extract DNA, model its processes, and learn how scientists manipulate this magnificent molecule to make mice glow. You will observe animal behavior, test your heart rate, and practice identifying and debunking pseudo-science.

    By the end of the course, students will be able to explain the nature of science as a system of knowing; cite evidence for foundational theories of modern biology; explain basic biological processes and functions; describe structures and relationships in living systems; outline systems of information, energy, and resources; demonstrate valid experimental design; discern ethical standards; relate their values and scientific ideas to decision-making; and apply biology knowledge to their own health.

    In this flipped classroom, students are responsible for covering new material such as readings from the textbook and additional popular and scholarly sources, videos, and animations prior to class meetings. In-person sessions focus on active discussion, clarification, exploration of content, review, modeling, and hands-on activities.

    Labs address not only technical skills and sequential operations, but also forming testable predictions, collecting data, applying math, drawing conclusions, and presenting findings. Hands-on dissection, always optional, is taught with preserved crayfish and fetal pigs.

    Sensitive issues: human reproduction is not taught separately, but mentioned as students learn about other, related topics such as sperm, eggs, stem cells, genetic disease, hormones, fetal development, breast-feeding, adolescence, and HIV. While there may be some debate-style discussion of topics such as GMO, abortion will not be debated. Birth control and sexuality education are not covered, but distinctions between gender and biological sex are discussed in detail in the genetics unit. Dissections are optional. Evolution is embedded in every topic, from molecular to ecological, inseparably from other content. It is addressed in a scientific context, not from a faith standpoint.

    The course provides a substantive, full-credit experience on either an Honors or On-Level track. All class members share core material and participate in the same labs. Honors has longer or additional readings, more analytical work, and more thorough and difficult assessments; it is appropriate for students who seek more challenge or plan to take the SAT Subject Test in Biology. Brief, required summer assignments are due in August for those who elect to take Honors. Students register online for the same course, but must indicate which level they wish to study via e-mail by August 15. Students may move down a level (from Honors to On-Level) at any time.

    Schedule: This section will be held entirely ONLINE as virtual conferences with a Monday morning meeting from 8:00 am - 8:55 am, and a Thursday afternoon meeting from 1:00 pm- 2:30 pm, with a 10-minute break, via Canvas Conference. Recordings will be made for students with schedule conflicts. Please note that this section is intended to be online for the full year for most. Openings in the live, in-person Friday morning section may be possible for a handful of students when COVID gathering limitations are lifted.

    Prerequisites: Students should be very strong, independent readers and able to understand graphs, tables, percentages, decimals, ratios, and averages.

    Workload: Homework includes term cards, brief written responses, weekly online quizzes, unit tests, occasional lab reports, and some creative assignments including sketching. Students will sometimes prepare short, in-class presentations, participate in group projects, run simulations, or conduct simple experiments at home. All students should expect to spend 4-6 hours outside of class reading and preparing homework.

    Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments; upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests; track grades; message instructor and classmates; and participate in a weekly conference held in addition to the in-person meeting at Compass. That online session is conducted live but can be viewed asynchronously if a student has a conflict.

    Assessments: Points will be assigned for completed homework, projects, quizzes, and tests. A letter grade will not be assigned, but parents can use total points earned versus total points offered to assign a grade for purposes of a homeschool transcript. Parents can view total points earned at any time through the Canvas site

    Textbook/Materials: Students must purchase or rent the textbook Biology (2010 edition with baby alligator cover) by Stephen Nowicki, published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt/Holt McDougal (ISBN# 9780547219479) An e-book version is also available (ISBN# 9780547221069). By second semester, those who elect to take the SAT Subject Test will also need the College Board's "Official SAT Subject Test in Biology Study Guide" (ISBN# 978-1457309205) and a prep book of their choice, such as the latest Princeton Review's Cracking the SAT Subject Test in Biology E/M or Barron's SAT Subject Test Biology E/M.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $130 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. The cost for the SAT Subject Test in Biology in spring or summer 2021 is not included. Each family is responsible for scheduling and paying for their student's exam through the College Board.

    Supplies/Equipment: Students will need access to a computer/internet, compound microscope with 400X magnification and cool lighting, splash goggles, water-resistant/acid-resistant lab apron, kitchen or postal scale, 3-ring binder, at least 400, 3"x5" index cards, and plain, lined, and graph paper. Some of these supplies are used at home. Students should watch class announcements on Canvas to know when to bring items to class.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Lab Science for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

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    Kouthar Muttardy
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    Why do we dream? What happens to your brain when you are in love? Why do all babies like peek-a-boo? The course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of behavior and mental processes of human beings. Students are exposed to psychological facts, principles and phenomena associated with each of the sub fields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice. Students will be challenged to think like a psychologist as they analyze research and design future experiments.

    This is a year-long, multi-level high school course. It will cover the nine major content areas covered on the College Board's AP Psychology Exam including: Scientific Foundations of Psychology; Biological Bases of Behavior; Sensation and Perception; Learning and Cognitive Psychology; Developmental Psychology; Motivation; Emotion and Personality; Clinical Psychology; and Social Psychology. Students will also learn to analyze data and psychological research studies. Themes in psychology are made tangible and approachable to students through rich, in-class discussion and debate, games, interactive models, and group work. Throughout the year, students will enjoy personalized surveys and assessments, such as those on learning style, parenting style, and personality type, and will complete individualized projects involving observations, case studies, interviews, or experiments.

    The class offers a substantive, full-credit experience and will be a mixture of lecture, discussion, group work, and short videos. There is some mature content discussed in this course, especially as it pertains to abnormal psychology. A section on sexual motivation, including homosexuality, must be covered for the AP test. These topics will be discussed in a purely scientific manner, and students need to be prepared to have a respectful discussion about these subjects.

    The course is offered at three levels, which meet together: Advanced Placement (AP), Honors, and On-Level. Students can pick their desired workload. Students can always do more if they would like, but at any level they are expected to keep up with weekly readings and homework which will prepare them for in-class discussions, assignments, and projects. Students who choose to take this class at the AP level will be prepared to take the AP Exam on Tuesday May, 11 2021.

    All students will register online for the same course. Upon completion of the summer assignment, students must indicate which level they want to study by e-mail to the instructor on August 28. Once the course has begun, students may move down a level (from AP to honors, or from honors to on-level) at any time. However, once classes have started, students may not "bump up" a level.

    Prerequisites: Students must be strong, independent readers at a high school or greater reading level. The text used is equivalent to a first year college textbook. Students can read a chapter excerpt here to confirm the reading level expected in the course.

    Workload: All students must be prepared to read approximately 30 pages per week and should expect to spend 4-5 hours outside of class for reading and homework, regardless of level. The amount and type of homework varies for on-level, honors, and AP students.

    Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message the instructor and classmates. Students will also have practice assignments in the Launchpad system from the publisher, and AP students will have work in the virtual AP classroom site through the College Board. Summer Assignment: Students will have two weeks of work to complete before classes begin. This will give students a feel for the different levels offered in the class. The summer assignment will cover Unit 1: Scientific Foundations of Psychology and will be due at the end of August. Successful completion of the summer assignment is a prerequisite take the course at the AP level.

    Assessments: Points will be assigned for completed homework, projects, quizzes, and tests. A letter grade will not be assigned, but parents can use total points earned versus total points offered to assign a grade for purposes of a homeschool transcript. Parents can view total points earned at any time through the Canvas site.

    Textbook: With their license fee, students will receive access to the electronic version of their textbook, Myers' Psychology for AP, Updated 3rd Edition. Hard copies of the textbook are available for separate purchase. Contact the course instructor for details on different editions of the textbook. AP students will also need to have an AP Classroom account through the College Board website.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $85.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for the access to the student Launchpad platform which includes the e-textbook and practice modules. The fee to take the AP exam in May 2021 is not included. Each family will be responsible for registering, scheduling, and paying for their student's AP exam.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete, full-year credit in Social Sciences for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Arthuretta Martin
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    -"Four score and seven years ago.."

    "Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country.."

    "I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character."

    What causes some phrases to be inked into history and some speeches to become a permanent part of our culture? What makes a speech memorable and quotable?

    In this class, students will work with a professional storyteller, keynote speaker, coach and Toastmasters leader to learn how to give great speeches by listening to great speakers and then practicing and presenting portions of someone else's great words. The pressure will be off student speakers to also be writers. Instead, they will hone public speaking skills such as timing, pauses, enunciation, eye contact, and gestures using familiar, well-known, time-tested and inspiring speeches. The class will listen to recordings and watch videos to critique some modern day speakers. Can you pronounce like FDR, persuade like Frederick Douglass, or proclaim like Patrick Henry? Students can select from among many genres of speakers- from history, entertainment, politics, commentary- even literature.

    This workshop is open to students new to public speaking or those with experience, and students may repeat the program to continue to refine their public speaking skills. Topics in this Series: The Great Speeches [Oratorical] (Quarter 1), Telling Your Story [Informative] (Quarter 2), Finding Your Voice [Expository] (Quarter 3), and Making Your Point [Persuasion] (Quarter 4)

    Note: This section will be held entirely ONLINE in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for the full year. Recordings will be made for students with schedule conflicts.

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    Donna Shackelford
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Science Kids is a lab-based science sampler program where our youngest scientists will be exposed to the concepts, acquire scientific vocabulary, and learn hands-on skills to needed to be comfortable with more advanced science classes as they get older. Your first or second grader will come home with an understanding of concepts like phases of matter, melting point, buoyancy, and life cycles. Most importantly, young students will gain confidence discussing science concepts and working with science equipment. Labs will teach students how to use a thermometer, take linear measurements, weigh items on a scale, peer into a microscope, record elapsed time, and make scientific sketches, for example.

    Each quarter will reinforce principles and lab skills around a central, unifying theme. Living World will introduce biology and life science concepts. Students will complete labs such as observing microscopic organisms in a microscope, examining life cycles and metamorphosis, and learning about biological functions such as respiration and digestion. Topics in this Series: Living World (Quarter 1), Earth/Space (Quarter 2), Chemistry (Quarter 3), and Physics (Quarter 4).

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    Hugh Gardner
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    Students will be immersed in detail and fully engaged in this intensive history course led by well- known homeschool instructor and historian Hugh Gardner. This history class is unlike other high school history course. Instead of learning a sequential set of names, dates, and battles, students will learn how to analyze and interpret history. Much like a college seminar, this approach to American History incorporates historiography (the history of the history.) Mr. Gardner does not teach a narrow view from a single textbook or static set of prepared notes. Instead, he presents the back story and multiple interpretations for the "why" questions in American history. Class discussion considers interpretations from a wide array of scholars and is updated as new sources are published. Rather than running through a timeline of outcomes, students will evaluate contributing factors (the "how" questions) and will learn about the personalities, prejudices, and biases of the people involved ("who").

    First semester will cover the background, events, and inter-war years leading up to the Second World War. The class will examine Hitler's rise to power, election in 1933, and his massive effort to rebuild the German war machine. They will discover Hitler's systematic takeover of eastern European countries before launching a blitzkrieg invasion of France. They will look at Britain acting alone to resist Germany through the deployment of commandos and special forces in targeted raids and the German threat to cross the Channel to invade Britain. The class will learn about military and naval engagements throughout the Mediterranean including north Africa, Sicily, and mainland Italy along with a fight in the Middle East to gain control of the oil supply. Finally, the class will study conflicts along the Eastern Front. The class will discuss the effects on the political, social, and economic climate as well as influences on the arts, science, literature, religion, and warfare. This is no ordinary history class as Mr. Gardner surrounds the students with vivid posters, maps, charts, primary sources, and artifacts to supplement his story-telling style. Students will be able to examine and handle period pieces such as antique and replica weapons and military accoutrements of the era while learning how these tools helped shape the battlefields and turning points in history. With an emphasis on primary sources, students will scrutinize historical atlases and original writings, all in a collaborative and interactive setting. Just for fun, students earn historical trading cards for class participation.

    Topics in this Series: WWII: From Looming War through Stalingrad (Semester 1), WWI: The Defeat of Germany and the Wars Against Japan (Semester 2). Continuing students from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

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    Note: This section will be held entirely ONLINE in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for the full year. This is not a pre-recording of the 9:30 am class. Recordings will be made for students with schedule conflicts.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class on assigned readings.

    Assignments: are given in class and e-mailed to parents and students.

    Assessments: Will not be given

    Textbook: Students should purchase two books: (1) Atlas of World War II by Richard Natkiel, published by The Military Press, 1985. (Note: hardback or paperback editions from the 1980s are preferred over more recent small format editions from 2011 -– on. Used copies available on Amazon.) (2) Collins Atlas of the Second World War, by John Keegan ed., published by HarperCollins, 2003. (Note: This is a very large format atlas in different editions with some titled Times instead of Collins; key is John Keegan as editor. Used copies available on Amazon.) For those families who want to investigate the course themes at a deeper level, an optional reading list will be furnished.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count two semesters of this course as a full credit in American or World History for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Alex Seminario
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    More than 4.4 billion people saw their personal data stolen in just three of the top data breeches in the last decade! Key personal, financial, and business data is unintentionally released, or worse, hacked, when digital information is not properly secured in cyberspace. Cyber-viruses crippled and compromised major businesses long before Coronavirus was in the news. This is why the cybersecurity industry is in high demand, with a job growth projection of 38% per year and starting salaries in excess of $100,000!

    This course is an introduction to fundamentals of cybersecurity in an interactive, information technology (IT) class taught by a cybersecurity expert and college professor. The course is designed to give students an overview of cybersecurity as a potential career field and get them interested in pursuing cybersecurity learning at a higher level.

    First semester, students will learn the basics about computer operating systems (OS) and hardware and how to secure them. The class will cover operating system components, drivers, applications, networking, troubleshooting, data protection, and preventing and responding to threats. Students will also examine personal computers (PCs) to understand all of the functions and components, such as processors, memory, motherboards, drivers, storage, and peripheral devices.

    Topics in this Series: Operating Systems/Hardware (Semester 1) and Networks (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: None.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class completing reading and virtual labs.

    Assignments: Homework will be a combination of reading chapters, completing online quizzes, virtual labs, and a semester project. All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates.

    Assessments: Points will be awarded for the competition of assignments, quizzes, and projects, and parents can assign a grade based on the number of points earned as compared to the number of points available.

    Textbook/Materials: First semester, students should purchase or rent CompTIA A+ Core 2 Exam: Guide to Operating Systems and Security, 10th edition, by Jean Andrews, Joy Dark, Jill West. (ISBN 978-0357108502). This text is available as an e-book or a loose-leaf publication.

    Software Fee: Students will have to pay a fee of $119 (estimated) for a one-year subscription to the Cengage online learning platform which allows students to complete virtual lab exercises.

    What to Bring/Equipment: Students must bring a PC or Mac laptop to class each week. These should be no more than 3 years old. Chromebooks and tablets cannot be used. Students should also bring their laptop charger and a 6 foot extension cord to class each week.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Technology or Career Exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

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    Taliesin Knol
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Why read about key military battles on maps or in books when you can learn about them hands-on, in three dimensions, using historical miniature gaming? In 3D History, pivotal engagements come alive for new and experienced students, as they navigate a table-top terrain, deploy hundreds of miniature soldiers, ships, and tanks... all while playing a military strategy game. Each student will have the opportunity to fight a battle from both sides, allowing them to test various strategies, try multiple scenarios, predict different outcomes, and rewrite history- an effective way to gain a deeper understanding of what actually happened and why!

    In 1914 the world was rocked by the Assassination of the Austro-Hungarian Archduke Franz Ferdinand. His death, and a tangled web of secret and public alliances would be the spark that dragged the whole world into a Great War. The Entente, the triple Alliance of France, Russia, and Great Britain would face off against the Central Powers of Imperial Germany and Austria Hungary, across "No Man's Land" the nightmare zone between the famous trenches of WWI, with all the world's industrialized militaries focused on them.

    This semester, students will study the early years of WWI, and how it settled into the stalemate on the Western Front with its infamous trench warfare, as well as the vast Eastern Front.

    Note: This is a 1 hour, 55 minute class with a 10-minute break part way through.

    Topics in this Series: WWI- No Man's Land 1914-1915 (Semester 1) and WWI- Over the Top 1916-1918 (Semester 2).

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Period maps, photographs, and re-creations will be posted on a class Google Drive, and video links from YouTube will be e-mailed to parents and students for homework or supplemental investigation.

    Assessments: Will not be given.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

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    Daniel Frame
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Students of ASL will continue to improve their fluency in this 2nd year course. As students become more advanced signers, emphasis will be on focusing on the meaning of a conversation (whole) rather than individual signs (parts). In conversation, students will learn to confirm information by asking questions in context. Second year students will continue to build their vocabulary, apply ASL grammar, and will learn to make requests, ask for advice, give opinions, make comparisons and use superlatives, and narrate stories. Other skills covered in ASL II include expressing year, phone numbers, time, and currency in numbers, appearance, clothing, giving directions, locations, etc. Each unit will include presentations and readings on Deaf culture and Deaf history. Class time will be dedicated to interactive ASL activities and signing practice.

    ASL students will have a Deaf instructor. He regularly teaches all-hearing classes and is an excellent role model for students to meet and interact with a native speaker of ASL and to lean natural facial expressions, gestures, and body language used in Deaf communications. ASL students will have more confidence when they encounter Deaf instructors in college or greet speakers of ASL in social settings. Because the instructor is Deaf, students are not permitted to speak aloud in class. This approach improves visual attention and encourages immersion in the language. Students will be able to ask questions of the instructor by writing on individual white boards, but they will be encouraged to sign in order to communicate with the instructor. Lessons are facilitated with Power Point presentations, and a professional ASL interpreter will assist the class on the first day and in second semester for a Deaf culture lesson. Enrolled students are not expected to know any sign language prior to beginning ASL I.

    Hundreds of colleges and universities, including all public institutions of higher learning in Virginia, accept ASL as a distinct foreign language. This allows hearing and Deaf students to fulfill foreign language requirements for admission to college. Teens who have difficulty writing, spelling, or have challenging pronunciation in English, can be successful with ASL as a second or foreign language choice. Penn State University research demonstrated that the visual and kinesthetic elements of ASL helped to enhance the vocabulary, spelling, and reading skills in hearing students.

    Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for fall semester. At the instructors' option, the class may transition to in-person instruction for second semester as COVID-19 scenarios improve.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours each week outside of class on required vocabulary exercises, readings, and signing practice.

    Assignments: Homework assignments will be posted online in the Canvas digital classroom platform. Through Canvas, students will be asked to post short videos of themselves signing as homework. Enrolled students will be asked to review ASL 1 vocabulary, grammar, and facial expressions.

    Assessments: The instructor will assign points using a class rubric for the parent's use in assigning a course grade. Course rubrics will evaluate students on their sign production, fingerspelling, ASL grammar, facial expressions including “above the nose” grammar (brows and body movement), and “below the nose” modifiers (lip expressions).

    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent "Signing Naturally Units 1-6 workbook" (ISBN# 978-1581212105) and "Signing Naturally Units 7-12 Student Workbook" (ISBN# 978-1581212211) which includes a DVD of signing videos. This class will cover units 5-8.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in World Languages for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

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    Dr. Kathleen Olsen
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Discover how anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, pathology, and biochemistry come together in the science of small animal medicine! Students will use actual case studies, anatomical dissections, and histopathology materials to understand how veterinarians and physicians diagnose a medical issue and formulate a treatment plan. The class will learn how the physical exam, imaging studies (radiographs, CT, MRI), laboratory findings, and other diagnostics provide clues in actual cases!

    This full-year class will include lectures on anatomy and physiology of selected body systems, dissections of representative organs (to include the brain, eye, heart, kidney, and other virtual dissections), and case presentations involving the body system being studied. Students will work with an emergency/ critical care veterinarian and use deductive reasoning and logic to piece together the clues of each case. This class is geared towards high school students interested in pursuing a career in the biological sciences, medicine, research, and related fields. Please note that some veterinary cases presented in this course may be repeated from cases reviewed in Veterinary Science in 2017-18 and 2018-19.

    Prerequisites:Introductory Biology

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Will be sent to parents and students by e-mail.

    Assessments: An exam will be given at the end of each quarter which parents can use to formulate a letter grade for their student.

    Textbook/Materials: Students will receive a class notebook from the Instructor with all required readings and lab handouts.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $150 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for the year's class notebook, dissection specimens, and lab supplies.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Laboratory Science for purposes of a high school transcript

    Prerequisites: None

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    Laura Albert
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    What makes a building "green"? Green paint? Plants? Students will explore the concepts of sustainable design, which will include LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design), landscaping with native vegetation, sustainable building material choices and renewable energy sources in the architectural design process through hands-on simulations, model-building, and team projects.

    Students will learn about net zero building design. They will calculate the energy usage for their own homes and learn about energy-reducing strategies. They will learn how insulation, window placement, thermal mass, surface colors, and site orientation play important roles in passive solar heating. Student designers will use this information to design and build their own model homes and test them for thermal gains and losses during a simulated day and night. Students will compare designs and make suggestions for improvement.

    In this exploration, students will learn about renewable energy sources. The class will explore solar energy by experimenting with a virtual solar cooker to discover the mathematical relationship among reflection, transmission, and absorption. Next, students will learn how to harness the energy of the wind to produce power. They will learn where to place wind turbines and advantages/disadvantages of using wind power over non-renewable energy sources. The class will use the design process to prototype and test types of wind turbines to discover which is most efficient.

    Students will also learn about the best practices and challenges to supplying clean water. Working in teams, students will design and construct small-scale models of a working water filtration system to simulate multi-stage wastewater treatment plants and test for quality and reclaimed quantities. They will conduct common tests to check the water quality before and after treatment, and will redesign for improvement.

    The students will work together on a final project which will incorporate the concepts learned throughout the semester and will present the projects on the final day of class.

    Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for first quarter. At the instructors' option, the class may transition to in-person instruction for later quarters as COVID-19 scenarios improve.

    Topics in this Series: Green Buildings- Sustainable Design and Renewable Energy (Semester 1), Inspired by Nature (Semester 2)

    Prerequisites: Students should be able to do pre-algebra-level math for some calculations and working with architectural/engineering scales.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class on assignment.

    Assignments: will be communicated in class and weekly e-mail updates.

    Assessments: feedback will be given in class on projects and assignments. Points will not be tracked, and formal grades will not be given.

    Textbook: None

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $50 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    What to Bring: See weekly assignments for project materials needed.

    Non-Meeting Days: None

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in fine arts, visual arts, or career/technical exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Kouthar Muttardy
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    Around the World is a creative, interactive examination of world geography! Geography is much more than just maps and mountain ranges! Students will make an in-depth investigation of all aspects of geography region-by-region. First quarter will explore the geography of North America, from Newfoundland, Canada, to Nome, Alaska, and the Neovolcanica region in Mexico.

    Students will engage in hands-on activities, such as games and scavenger hunts, to learn about the lands, features, inhabitants, and phenomena and five themes of geography (location, place, human and environment interaction, movements, and regions) for each area that they study. For each major region, the class will look at aspects of human geography: political boundaries, cities and communities, cultural, social, and economic themes (dominant languages, religions, ethnic groups, agriculture, and trade), along with aspects of physical geography such as landforms, waterways, climate zones, biomes, etc. The class will also touch on the geographic specialties of meteorology and hydrology to understand how these impact physical and human geography.

    Note: Map basics, including reading maps, types of maps, latitude and longitude, and understanding representations on maps, will only be covered during the first quarter of each year. Any student enrolling in the course after the first quarter will be expected to review map basics from a class packet of map information.

    Note: This section will be held entirely ONLINE in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for the full year. Recordings will be made for students with schedule conflicts.

    Topics in this Series: North America (Quarter 1); Central and South America (Quarter 2); Middle East & North Africa (Quarter 3); Sub-Saharan Africa (Quarter 4). Second year (2021-22) Europe (Quarter 5); Russia & East Asia (Quarter 6); South & Southeast Asia (Quarter 7); and Oceania, Antarctica & Earth's Oceans (Quarter 8). Lab/Supply Fee: Included in the course fee.

    1
    Shona D\'Cruz
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Young sculptors will enjoy working hands-on in 3-dimensions with a variety of sculpting materials. Sculpture is multi-sensory, and student sculptors enjoy the tactile experience of shaping, stacking, forming, flattening, and layering a selection of materials to create unique, personal projects. Sculpting engages a different artistic skillset than coloring, drawing, and writing and encourages creativity to represent objects in three dimensions. In this workshop, students will create original hand-made pieces inspired by different artists and sculpting techniques.

    First quarter, young sculptors will experiment with materials such as papier mache, airdry and polymer clays, wire, etc. to create sculptures. Possible projects may be a wire wave sculpture, layered paper collage, animal creation, or sculpey flower magnets. Some projects may take two weeks to complete with one week dedicated to forming and shaping the base sculpture and the second week focused on finishing techniques such as painting and embellishing. Each week, the instructor will show examples and introduce an artist who served as inspiration and worked in a similar style.

    There is a $40.00 per student material fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

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    Taliesin Knol
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Students will engage in a hands-on 3D battle strategy game using the military dioramas that they make!

    From Stalingrad to Berlin, the downfall of Nazi Germany. This quarter will cover the climactic urban battles of the Eastern Front in Europe, or as the Russians call it, The Great Patriotic War. The Eastern front is often sidelined in Western history, but it was quite possibly the most brutal theater of war in human history. The Germans invaded Eastern Europe to wage a war of extermination, and instead found themselves hunted like rats in the cities they destroyed. This is not the Blitzkrieg, where a modern German army used fancy new tactics to destroy larger armies. This is the rat warfare, brutal attrition more akin to the 1st World War, with the trenches swapped for bitter street fighting, where each side was literally fighting in their own homes, for everything they had.

    Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will each form a 10" X 16" shaped, foam diorama with landscape elements (hills, buildings, rivers, bridges, vegetation, fences, etc) to represent a scene of a famous historical engagement. Students will each receive 1:72 scale miniature soldiers to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate the larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices.

    The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical background and circumstances leading up to the specific battle. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include: WWII from the Russian Perspective, Stalingrad/Berlin (1st quarter), WWII The Battle of the Bulge, 1944 (2nd quarter), WWII The USMC at Guadalcanal, 1945 (3rd quarter), and Korean War, 1950-1953 (4th quarter).

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    Coder Kids
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Imagine a phone app that could quickly reunite lost pets, connect the poor with resources that they need, or report a problem in the community! Code for a Cause is the Compass-based Technovation hub where middle school girls will participate in the "world's largest technology entrepreneurship program for girls." Each year, Technovation teams solve real world problems through technology that they develop!

    Through Technovation, girls work with women mentors, identify a problem in their community, develop a mobile app, and launch a startup. Since 2010, 23,000 girls around the world have developed mobile apps and startups to solve problems around a diverse range of problems, including food waste, nutrition, women's safety, and much more. In this year-long program, girls will work in teams and learn the skills they need to change the world with technology.

    Girls will beging with get-to-know-you and team building activities before breaking into teams of 3-4. Each team will brainstorm to identify a problem in the community. They will propose a mobile app solution to their problem and conduct market research to see if their idea is the best possible solution. Next, the girls will learn to program their unique application using a web-based software called MIT App Inventor. In class, girls will be coached step-by-step on the process and logic of creating an interactive application. Finally, girls will learn how to brand their app, create a business plan, and look at what it would take to bring the app to market.

    Girls will work on laptops provided by the instructor to eliminate technology or connectivity problems in class. However, since the app inventor platform is web-based, girls may continue to code at home. The course tuition includes a technology use/access fee.

    Participation in Technovation gives girls the confidence to pursue more computer science courses (70%), and give many the foundation to eventually major in computer science (26%). Technovation teams are in 100 countries, and the program is sponsored by Oracle, Google, 3M, Adobe Foundation, and others. The Compass Technovation facilitator/instructor will be a coding coach from Coder Kids. This is a year-long program that follows the Compass Monday calendar.

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    Coder Kids
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Coding Workshop is a computer lab environment in which students work through the Coder Kids curriculum under the direction of computer science coaches. Work in the Coding Lab is self-paced which allows students to progress through skill-building activities and instructional coding modules at their own rate of learning. The Lab environment allows students to enroll at any quarter, fosters brand new coders, and encourages those with prior coding experience. Computer science-trained coaches work with small pull-out groups, pairs, or individuals to provide additional instruction and support on the skillset each needs each week.

    Kids are introduced to coding in the virtual world they already know and love. Students learn to enhance their Minecraft world through mods (modifications) that they program themselves. Young coders begin by creating custom structures and cool new effects using Python. Later they create mods that add custom items and blocks to the game using Java. Students use their imaginations to make Minecraft do what they want it to do- through the power of coding.

    Coder Kids proprietary curriculum is designed to meet and exceed the standards of the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA). Students work on modern MacBook Air laptops. Students may enroll in a Coding course at any quarter, as they can start with initial lessons at any time. Coaches send prompts for parents in the weekly e-mail updates to encourage discussion and reflection about what the student learned in class each week. The class tuition includes a student technology fee that covers repair/maintenance of hardware, software, and licenses. Students can continue from one quarter to the next with no repeat or overlap; instead they will just keep building and enhancing their ongoing projects.

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    Anne Sharp
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    This Literarians writing board is a home for students who love to write, who love to read writing, and who love to share writing with others. Writing is often a solitary act, but writers also need a community in which to grow. Mirroring the design of famous writing salons/groups like The Bloomsbury Group, The Algonquin Round Table, and The Inklings, this course fosters a Compass community that will encourage individual writers, promote literary collaboration and provide challenging feedback to boost creativity and artistic development.

    First semester will focus on building a personal writing portfolio strengthening students' passions for genres and forms they are comfortable with as well as trying writing that is new to them. Using writing workshops to capitalize on what they already know and to encourage experimentation in unfamiliar areas, students can expect to grow as writers, editors and leaders in our Compass community.

    Students will use their own work and the works of professional authors to understand what makes good writing, to improve technique, to experiment with new forms/genre and to understand the drafting, editing and publishing process. They will explore publishing options through online platforms and hardbound journals.

    Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for fall semester. At the instructor's option, the class may transition to in-person instruction for second semester as COVID-19 scenarios improve.

    Topics in this Series: A Creative Writing and Literary Magazine Board (Semesters 1 and 2, with registration by semester.) Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: Advanced reading, writing, and analytical skills.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class on investigation, writing, or editing for this class. Assignments: Writing and editing assignments will be delegated by the student board. Assessments: In lieu of a teacher-provided assessments, writers will receive peer feedback on their own work, and the finished product will be a printed anthology for their portfolio.

    Lab/Supply Fee: None

    What to Bring: Students should bring laptops to class to work collaboratively and real-time on shared documents and the class portal.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    1
    Donna Shackelford
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Students will investigate the comparative anatomy of a variety of organisms and organs through a semester-long dissection study. Students will complete dissections of organisms from a range of phyla, in order of increasing complexity of the organism. A preliminary list of dissections includes: a sponge, hydra, flatworms, clam, earth worm, starfish, grasshopper, crayfish, crab, squid, octopus, bony fish, and shark. Students will examine major systems in each such as digestion and respiration. Students will also investigate characteristics of major organ systems in higher order animals through the dissections of a heart, brain, kidney, eye, muscles/tendons, and intestines/stomach.

    The class will cover lab safety, practice proper dissection techniques, and learn how to set up and maintain a lab journal with notes and drawings of cells, organs, and organisms. Students will also use microscopes to look at tissue samples throughout the semester. In order to accommodate student distancing during the COVID-19 outbreak, all small organism and organ dissections will be done individually, not with a class partner. Dissections of larger, more complex organisms (such as shark), will be performed as an instructor-led, in-class demonstration.

    The final list of organs and organisms may vary depending on availability. This class will not include the dissection of amphibians, reptiles, or mammals due to cost, class duration, and ethical and safety concerns. The instructor will provide links to recommended, online virtual dissections of these additional phyla. Note: This class was last taught in two quarters in Fall 2019, and much content will be repeated.

    Prerequisites: Students must be able to read at grade level and have age/grade-level dexterity and fine motor skills for the detailed instrument work in this class.

    Topics in this Series: Comparative Anatomy Dissection Lab (Semester 1) and CSI Forensic Science Lab (Semester 2).

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0.5 -– 1.0 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Students will be given pre-lab work each week that must be completed before they will be allowed to begin the week's dissection.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A lab fee of $110 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

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    Donna Shackelford
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Students will investigate the comparative anatomy of a variety of organisms and organs through a semester-long dissection study. Students will complete dissections of organisms from a range of phyla, in order of increasing complexity of the organism. A preliminary list of dissections includes: a sponge, hydra, flatworms, clam, earth worm, starfish, grasshopper, crayfish, crab, squid, octopus, bony fish, and shark. Students will examine major systems in each such as digestion and respiration. Students will also investigate characteristics of major organ systems in higher order animals through the dissections of a heart, brain, kidney, eye, muscles/tendons, and intestines/stomach.

    The class will cover lab safety, practice proper dissection techniques, and learn how to set up and maintain a lab journal with notes and drawings of cells, organs, and organisms. Students will also use microscopes to look at tissue samples throughout the semester. In order to accommodate student distancing during the COVID-19 outbreak, all small organism and organ dissections will be done individually, not with a class partner. Dissections of larger, more complex organisms (such as shark), will be performed as an instructor-led, in-class demonstration.

    The final list of organs and organisms may vary depending on availability. This class will not include the dissection of amphibians, reptiles, or mammals due to cost, class duration, and ethical and safety concerns. The instructor will provide links to recommended, online virtual dissections of these additional phyla. Note: This class was last taught in two quarters in Fall 2019, and much content will be repeated.

    Prerequisites: Students must be able to read at grade level and have age/grade-level dexterity and fine motor skills for the detailed instrument work in this class.

    Topics in this Series: Comparative Anatomy Dissection Lab (Semester 1) and CSI Forensic Science Lab (Semester 2).

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0.5 -– 1.0 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Students will be given pre-lab work each week that must be completed before they will be allowed to begin the week's dissection.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A lab fee of $110 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

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    Dr. Karleen Boyle
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Geo-Detectives discover the many mysteries of Earth Science. From large scale disasters that come from inside the planet to microscopic contaminants in the water and soil, Geo-Detectives look high and low to understand the forces, systems, and cycles that continue to shape the Earth, its climates and ecosystems. Geo-Detectives will explore concepts as diverse as fossils to fault lines, ozone to ocean trenches, and trade winds to tundra. Hands-on labs and in-class activities will reinforce geological phenomena such as examining fossils, classifying rocks, reading the seismographic charts, or modelling the water cycle.

    First quarter, students will examine natural disasters that come from activity in the earth's layers such as volcanoes, tsunamis, and earthquakes. Students will study the geological forces that shape our planet by tracing the paths of volcanoes, earthquakes and tsunamis around the world. What do these occurrences tell us about tectonic plate theory? Students will learn about the rock cycle, subduction and spreading zones, and different types of earthquake faults. They will learn about fossils and other lines of evidence that support the theory of plate tectonics, and learn how the sizes, shapes and positions of land masses and oceans have changed through our planet's history.

    Topics in this Series: What a Disaster! Volcanoes, Tsunamis & Earthquakes
    (Quarter 1); Wacky World Weather (Quarter 2); Sensational Cycles and Seasons (Quarter 3); and Exploring Ecosystems (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

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    Becca Sticha
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Students will use LEGO to design and build simple engineering projects out of everyone's favorite building toy! In this 90 minute class, students will explore concepts and vocabulary in physics, mechanical engineering, structural engineering, aerospace engineering, and architecture while playing with their creations.

    First quarter, junior engineers will tackle Fantastic Fliers and Space Race with projects inspired by the Space Station, Shuttle, Mars Rover, Gondola Gliders, Helicopeters, and Airplanes.

    Each class begins with 10-minutes of free build from tubs of LEGO components followed by a short discussion and demonstration of the day's project and concepts. Students build individually or in groups. Instructors will provide individual assistance, facilitate challenges, performance testing, competitions, and modifications to projects. Some projects may have been introduced in prior year's sessions, but each new build is unique, and student's building skills and understanding will have grown.

    Notes:(1)Students must be minimum age 5 and able to separate from their parents for this class. (2) Projects are built from shared, Instructor-owned components, so students will not bring completed projects home. Parents, however, can step into class 15 minutes before the end of each session to photograph their child's construction.

    Topics in this Series: Fantastic Fliers & Space Racers (Quarter 1); Animal Architects (Quarter 2); Winter Workshop (Quarter 3); Amusement Park (Quarter 4)

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    Taliesin Knol
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    This class will examine the works of literature so good, they made history!

    It began with the forging of great rings… and it will end with the creation of great dioramas in this class. Lord of the Rings is the king of the fantasy genre of literature, but all the great authors were inspired by something. In JRR Tolkien’s case, it was Norse Mythology. In this class students will study the connection of Tolkien’s Middle Earth to our own history, how it influenced the source material, and how the series in turn influenced the real world. No background knowledge of the book is required before class starts, but it is suggested to read (or watch, if you prefer) the first two books/films of the trilogy while the class progresses, as we will focus on the first half of the story of The War of The Ring. As students student the book and discuss its influences, they will craft a faithful diorama recreation of the great struggle against the evil, Sauron, and his legions of orcs, goblins and trolls. LotR fans will model either small party adventures through familiar scenes in the book, like the Mines of Moria, or larger scale events, such as The Battle of Helm’s Deep.

    Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and descriptions from the source material, students will each form a 10" X 16" shaped, foam diorama with landscape elements (hills, buildings, rivers, bridges, vegetation, fences, etc) to represent a scene from the source book. Students will each receive 1:72 scale miniature characters to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate the larger scenes. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the historical influences of the book, while playing either a table-top strategy or Role-Playing-Game. Student strategists will use a simple gaming rule systems for moving characters and interacting. Along with their classmates, students will see how this story progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different game choices.

    The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical influences on and of a work. Course documents, such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include: LotR: The 3rd Age (Quarter 1); LotR: The War of the Ring (Quarter 2); The Hobbit: Laketown(Quarter 3); and The Hobbit: Erebor and Dale (Quarter 4).

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    Beth Ross
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Future Veterinarians will learn what it takes to care for dogs! Students will learn how to make measurements and assessments when a dog has come in for an exam. They will learn the ABC's of dog care including the importance of hydration and proper nutrition and discover what to do when a dog is sick or injured. Our future vets will learn about tick borne diseases, what to do when a dog has a tick, and tick prevention. They will learn how to give medicine to a dog and find out what a laceration is, how to suture, and the proper care of stitches. They will also view different types of radiographs and learn how to read them. Little vets will be able to label and explain the digestive organs and find out what happens when a foreign body becomes stuck in the digestive track. Finally, students will learn about dog behavior and how to identify different types of dog body language.

    Topics in this Series: Dog Veterinarian (Quarter 1); Cat Veterinarian (Quarter 2); Nutrition (Quarter 3) and Sports Medicine (Quarter 4).

    Materials/Supply FeeThere is a $43.00 material fee due on the first day of class and payable to the instructor for a set of high quality, take-home class materials including: a plush dog, dog bandana, adoption certificate, dog bowl, dog bone cookie cutter and recipe card, disposable lab coat, medical gloves, mask, sutures, syringe, tape measure, ruler, journal, dog anatomy worksheet, laminated x-ray and wax pencil, dog body language chart, and a class diploma.

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    David Chelf
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Math Lab is a tutoring center where students can go for weekly help on math homework! In Math Lab, students bring the math homework they are assigned- whether from a Compass math class, an online math program, or material taught at home. Help is available for all topics from middle school (6th-8th grade) math through Calculus I, encompassing concepts such as: number lines, integers, negative numbers, fractions, decimals, percentages, factoring, exponents, roots, order of operations, inequalities, coordinate plane, working with variables, solving equations, and word problems.

    Students will be expected to come to Math Lab with a current math assignment including any textbook, workbook, or worksheets and a pencil. They will work independently until they have a question, reach a stumbling block, or need clarification on a concept or computation. The Math Lab tutor will then work with them to check answers, remind them of a technique, or demonstrate a different way to solve the problem. Sometimes just hearing it from someone else will help a concept "click"!

    An experienced Compass math instructor will oversee the Math Lab and will be circling the room and continually checking in with students. The tutor will not prepare or deliver structured lessons, but will be giving on-the-spot support/guidance as needed and may suggest additional practice to reinforce a concept. Math Lab students will receive discounts on subscriptions to IXL Math, on an online, learning platform. See Compass Store for details on IXL subscriptions. A minimum of three (3) students must enroll in the Math Lab in order for the session to be held.

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    David Chelf
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Math Lab is a tutoring center where students can go for weekly help on math homework! In Math Lab, students bring the math homework they are assigned- whether from a Compass math class, an online math program, or material taught at home. Help is available for all topics from middle school (6th-8th grade) math through Calculus I, encompassing concepts such as: number lines, integers, negative numbers, fractions, decimals, percentages, factoring, exponents, roots, order of operations, inequalities, coordinate plane, working with variables, solving equations, and word problems.

    Students will be expected to come to Math Lab with a current math assignment including any textbook, workbook, or worksheets and a pencil. They will work independently until they have a question, reach a stumbling block, or need clarification on a concept or computation. The Math Lab tutor will then work with them to check answers, remind them of a technique, or demonstrate a different way to solve the problem. Sometimes just hearing it from someone else will help a concept "click"!

    An experienced Compass math instructor will oversee the Math Lab and will be circling the room and continually checking in with students. The tutor will not prepare or deliver structured lessons, but will be giving on-the-spot support/guidance as needed and may suggest additional practice to reinforce a concept. Math Lab students will receive discounts on subscriptions to IXL Math, on an online, learning platform. See Compass Store for details on IXL subscriptions. A minimum of three (3) students must enroll in the Math Lab in order for the session to be held.

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    David Chelf
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Math Lab is a tutoring center where students can go for weekly help on math homework! In Math Lab, students bring the math homework they are assigned- whether from a Compass math class, an online math program, or material taught at home. Help is available for all topics from middle school (6th-8th grade) math through Calculus I, encompassing concepts such as: number lines, integers, negative numbers, fractions, decimals, percentages, factoring, exponents, roots, order of operations, inequalities, coordinate plane, working with variables, solving equations, and word problems.

    Students will be expected to come to Math Lab with a current math assignment including any textbook, workbook, or worksheets and a pencil. They will work independently until they have a question, reach a stumbling block, or need clarification on a concept or computation. The Math Lab tutor will then work with them to check answers, remind them of a technique, or demonstrate a different way to solve the problem. Sometimes just hearing it from someone else will help a concept "click"!

    An experienced Compass math instructor will oversee the Math Lab and will be circling the room and continually checking in with students. The tutor will not prepare or deliver structured lessons, but will be giving on-the-spot support/guidance as needed and may suggest additional practice to reinforce a concept. Math Lab students will receive discounts on subscriptions to IXL Math, on an online, learning platform. See Compass Store for details on IXL subscriptions. A minimum of three (3) students must enroll in the Math Lab in order for the session to be held.

    0
    David Chelf
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Math Lab is a tutoring center where students can go for weekly help on math homework! In Math Lab, students bring the math homework they are assigned- whether from a Compass math class, an online math program, or material taught at home. Help is available for all topics from middle school (6th-8th grade) math through Calculus I, encompassing concepts such as: number lines, integers, negative numbers, fractions, decimals, percentages, factoring, exponents, roots, order of operations, inequalities, coordinate plane, working with variables, solving equations, and word problems.

    Students will be expected to come to Math Lab with a current math assignment including any textbook, workbook, or worksheets and a pencil. They will work independently until they have a question, reach a stumbling block, or need clarification on a concept or computation. The Math Lab tutor will then work with them to check answers, remind them of a technique, or demonstrate a different way to solve the problem. Sometimes just hearing it from someone else will help a concept "click"!

    An experienced Compass math instructor will oversee the Math Lab and will be circling the room and continually checking in with students. The tutor will not prepare or deliver structured lessons, but will be giving on-the-spot support/guidance as needed and may suggest additional practice to reinforce a concept. Math Lab students will receive discounts on subscriptions to IXL Math, on an online, learning platform. See Compass Store for details on IXL subscriptions. A minimum of three (3) students must enroll in the Math Lab in order for the session to be held.

    0
    Goretti Vinuales
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    What do Vivaldi's 1716 concerti 'The Four Seasons' and the enduring rock and roll hits of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons band have in common? Or 'A Hazy Shade of Winter' by Simon and Garfunkel and Ella Fitzgerald's 'Summertime? For one thing, they are all "classics" in their respective genres! This class is for students who enjoy listening to or playing music and would like to connect more with a wide range of classical musical pieces through an understanding of their elements and origins.

    In this course, students will be introduced to representative musical masterworks from a variety of historical periods and styles: ancient, classical, modern, jazz, and folk styles. By listening to and discussing relevant examples, students will gain an understanding of core musical elements-–melody, rhythm, harmony, texture-–and will develop a meaningful musical vocabulary in each genre that will help them think and talk about musical works, and, above all, expand their appreciation of music.

    First quarter, students will learn basic terminology to describe the elements of music and how standard notation for rhythm, pitch, and expressive elements are used to record musical ideas. Students will be introduced to compositions from the Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque eras including works from Vivaldi and Bach, and they will compare characteristics of musical pieces of different historical periods and styles.

    A different composer will be introduced each week. The class will listen to a musical piece and then learn to analyze and talk about it. Students will learn the context of each musical work, when it was written, and about the composer. They will listen to and learn about the melody and rhythm, the form and the harmony of a composition, and learn how to notate what they hear in the music. They we will ask the questions, How did the composer use the melody?, How did they use rhythm? And going more broadly, why is this score a classic example of its genre? Through these experiences, students will learn to recognize and describe music styles, and compositions.

    Students will leave this class with an ability to recognize, discuss, and connect to different genres of music from the styles and composers the class learned about. Additionally, this class will prepare students to learn to read, write, and listen to music, which are the foundational skills for someone who would like to learn an instrument (including voice), or is currently taking lessons. Like other fine arts classes, Music Appreciation is a fun break from academics, and enriches and educates students more broadly.

    Topics in this Series: Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque Styles (Quarter 1); The Classical Era of Music. Music (Quarter 2); Romanticism and Impressionism in Music. (Quarter 3); Music in the Twentieth Century and Beyond (Quarter 4). Continuing students from the prior quarter will receive priority pre-registration next quarter.

    Prerequisites:The ability to read music or play an instrument is not required for this course.

    Workload: Students will receive recommended readings to prepare for classroom discussion. Work outside of class is optional, however students are encouraged to listen to the classical pieces studied in class, to connect more with their learning.

    Assessments: Formal assessments will not be given.

    Textbook: Students should purchase "Music: An Appreciation" (11TH edition, 2014) by Roger Kamien (ISBN-13: 978-0078025204). A used copy is acceptable, and it does not need to include a CD or media access code. All musical pieces studied will be put on a Google Drive for student access at home.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A minimal material cost is included in the course fee for instructor-furnished paper with staves and sheet music.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

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    Nick Grenier
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Look up in that tree! Why is that robin alarming? is there a hawk passing by? Is that a drey (a squirrel's nest)? What animal rubbed the bark off that sapling? Which plants are useful and which should be avoided?
    Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has lead for several years. Students will follow the paths and create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing fall season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world!
    Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

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    Nick Grenier
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Look up in that tree! Why is that robin alarming? is there a hawk passing by? Is that a drey (a squirrel's nest)? What animal rubbed the bark off that sapling? Which plants are useful and which should be avoided?
    Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has lead for several years. Students will follow the paths and create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing fall season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world!
    Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

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    David Chelf
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    This is a complete course in high school PreCalculus which will cover fundamental concepts and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. Topics in Precalculus include functions: polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric (right angle and unit circle). In addition, the course will cover polar coordinates, parametric equations, analytic trigonometry, vectors, systems of equations/inequalities, conic sections, sequences, and series. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem solving.

    Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry in order to take this class.
    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Friday (day 1), lecture on Wednesday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Friday (day 8), and homework due the next Wednesday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Wednesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work.
    Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload. In lieu of a graphing calculator, students should have access to websites desmos.com and wolframalpha.com for graphing assignments.
    Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by checking that weekly homework sets are complete and giving periodic take-home tests; class participation is also strongly encouraged. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade.
    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Precalculus: Mathematics for Calculus, 6th edition by Stewart, Redlin, and Watson (ISBN-10 0840068077, ISBN-13 978-0840068071). A scientific calculator similar to the Casio fx-115ES PLUS is required for this class.
    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Precalculus for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: Algebra II

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    Judith Harmon
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Students will discover the art of crafting a cast of playful finger puppets from a variety of materials and techniques! Students will learn how to craft band or ring finger puppets and simple, single finger puppets. They will also transform a glove into five finger puppet friends to tell a tale such as Harry Potter + Hermione, Hagrid, Ron, and McGonagall; Goldilocks + 3 bears and a bed; or their own unique group of 5 story characters. Puppets will begin with a base that students decorate and embellish with facial features such as googly eyes and hair, miniature costumes, and accessories. Students should be able to use scissors for this class.

    Throughout the course, the instructor will also share tips and techniques for puppetry performances. At the end of each class, students will show and tell their classmates what they have crafted that week.

    By the end of this 6-week course, each student should have 7-10 unique finger puppets. Puppets will be kept by the instructor each week to allow glue to dry and to ensure that all puppets are present on the final day. During the final class meeting, students will showcase, from behind a curtain, a brief skit incorporating all of their puppet creations. Due to space constraints and distancing in the classroom, their audience will be limited to their teacher and classmates, but their performance will be videotaped and e-mailed to parents.

    Pair this class with Creative Storytelling, Playful Puppet Workshop, or Acting- Kids Theater to encourage more creative expression and theatrical basics. There is a $10.00 material fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this Series: Finger Puppets (Quarter 1); Hand Puppets (Quarter 2); Stick Puppets (Quarter 3), and Moving/String Puppets (Quarter 4).

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    Judith Harmon
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Are you ready to become the superhero you were always meant to be? In this workshop, kids will imagine themselves as superheroes and craft the costume elements they need to complete their super-persona. Using a variety of crafting techniques and a range of materials, students will learn how to make capes, masks, and utility belts.

    Kids will learn how to transfer common materials and simple supplies into spectacular, wearable items without sewing. Discover how something as simple as a plain t-shirt, tablecloth, or headband can be transformed. Learn tricks for no-sew hems and applying embellishments. Students should be able to use scissors for this class.

    Pair this class with Creative Storytelling, Playful Puppet Workshop, or Acting- Kids Theater to encourage more creative expression and theatrical basics. There is a $12.00 material fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this Series: Superheroes (Quarter 1), Magic Creatures (Quarter 2), Royal Robes (Quarter 3), and It's a Zoo (Quarter 4).

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    Jeanniffer Denmark
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Hola! Spanish Amigos is a fun, play-based, Spanish immersion class for young children. Much like learning their native language, children will be exposed to the sounds, vocabulary, and phrases in Spanish through songs, games, stories, interactive and hands-on activities. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students in the first few weeks. Spanish language instruction will be presented in a natural learning sequence beginning with themes about colors, numbers, clothing, foods, animals, family members, days/dates, parts of the house, common objects, body parts, etc. Greetings and simple phrases will be woven into the day's activities, as well as cultural traditions when applicable. Writing, spelling, and grammar will not be emphasized in this class. Each quarter introduces new themes and new vocabulary in Spanish, so continuing students can continue to build their language basics. However, themes and units are non-sequential, so students may enroll in this level in any quarter. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, and simple phrases while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Fluency should not be expected at this level. Students may join Spanish Amigos during any quarter.

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    Shannon McClain
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Writers @ Work is a fundamental writing class that will prepare seventh and eighth grade students for high school level composition. The class will progress from getting started on learning how to effectively structure purposeful paragraphs) (first semester) to multiple paragraphs linked into articulate and organized essays (second semester).

    First semester will be all about paragraphs! Early in the term, the goal will be writing fluency- encouraging students to get ideas onto paper. The class will introduce not only sentence structure, paragraph structure, and effective language, but will also help students define the objective of their paragraph. Students will be given broad prompts and a variety of writing options to encourage them to write about things they care about. Over the course of the semester, writers will compose descriptive and informative paragraphs encompassing fiction and non-fiction themes.

    Grammar concepts will be introduced throughout the year, and students will be encouraged to incorporate the technique in their next writing or revision. Grammar concepts will include a "toolbox" of writing techniques and rules such as sentence structure, complex and compound sentences, independent and dependent clauses, parts of speech, agreement, tense, use of dialogue and quotation marks, and correct use of punctuation. Students will also be taught techniques for brainstorming and outlining before beginning to write and will be given tips on choosing creative, interesting, and powerful words over mundane, vague, and over-used words.

    In both semesters, there will be an emphasis on revision. Writing is seldom just the way the author hopes in the first draft. At times, students will be encouraged to use the same paragraph for several weeks to build-upon their first draft, incorporate feedback, apply writing and grammar techniques, in order for them to see the benefits of revision. They will learn to read their own writing from a reader's perspective and develop strategies for improving it. Students will give and receive feedback from class peers and receive regular feedback from the instructor. Time will be set aside in most classes for dedicated, in-class writing (8-10 minutes.)

    Topics in this Series: Paragraphs with Purpose (Semester 1) and Papers with Pizzazz (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: None

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0.5-1 hour per week outside of class.

    Assignments: will be discussed in class and sent by e-mail to parents each week.

    Assessments: Informal instructor feedback will be given on papers.

    What to Bring: Paper or notebook and pen or pencil

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    Shona D\'Cruz
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Young sculptors will enjoy working hands-on in 3-dimensions with a variety of sculpting materials. Sculpture is multi-sensory, and student sculptors enjoy the tactile experience of shaping, stacking, forming, flattening, and layering a selection of materials to create unique, personal projects. Sculpting engages a different artistic skillset than coloring, drawing, and writing and encourages creativity to represent objects in three dimensions. In this workshop, students will create original hand-made pieces inspired by different artists and sculpting techniques.

    First quarter, young sculptors will experiment with materials such as papier mache, airdry and polymer clays, wire, etc. to create sculptures. Possible projects may be a wire wave sculpture, layered paper collage, animal creation, or sculpey flower magnets. Some projects may take two weeks to complete with one week dedicated to forming and shaping the base sculpture and the second week focused on finishing techniques such as painting and embellishing. Each week, the instructor will show examples and introduce an artist who served as inspiration and worked in a similar style.

    There is a $40.00 per student material fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

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    Joe Romano
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Curious coins, baffling balls, confounding cards, and puzzling papers! Students will learn tricks of the trade from pair of professional magicians! Each week, kids will receive a magic prop and learn how to perform a unique magic trick. Students will practice and perfect the illusion in class so they can come home and mystify their friends and family. Along with the actual magic, students will discuss a life skill each week that is essential to a good magician (and student) such as public speaking, presentation skills, practicing, being prepared, and reading your audience.

    A partial list of magic tricks to be learned this quarter includes: Nickels to Dimes (a stack of nickels magically transforms into a stack of dimes); Classic Chop Cup (a small ball disappears and reappears under an empty cup); and Card Fusion (a classic card trick that will confuse and confound your friends.)

    Note: These are all new magic tricks from those taught during 2019-20. Rather than coming from the Discover Magic curriculum, the tricks are coming directly from real-life performers and magicians, Joe Romano and Mike Hummer, who team-teach the class. Prior magic classes are not a prerequisite, and new magicians may enroll. Lab/Supply Fee: There is a $45.00 supply fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

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    Coder Kids
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Coding Lab is a computer lab environment in which students work through the Coder Kids curriculum under the direction of computer science coaches. Work in the Coding Lab is self-paced which allows students to progress through skill-building activities and instructional coding modules at their own rate of learning. The Lab environment allows students to enroll at any quarter, fosters brand new coders, and encourages those with prior coding experience. Computer science-trained coaches work with small pull-out groups, pairs, or individuals to provide additional instruction and support on the skillset each needs each week.

    Tweens and teens love their phones and tablets and have fun coding custom apps (applications) for them. Students start with the Swift programming language which is used for iOS devices like the iPhone and iPad. Later students move into programming responsive web design to create hybrid apps for both desktop and mobile devices using Web App Maker. In all app programming languages, students practice the iterative design process to define a problem, generate ideas, build, test, and improve their app.

    Coder Kids proprietary curriculum is designed to meet and exceed the standards of the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA). Students work on modern MacBook Air laptops. Students may enroll in a Coding course at any quarter, as they can start with initial lessons at any time. Coaches send prompts for parents in the weekly e-mail updates to encourage discussion and reflection about what the student learned in class each week. The class tuition includes a student technology fee that covers repair/maintenance of hardware, software, and licenses. Students can continue from one quarter to the next with no repeat or overlap; instead they will just keep building and enhancing their ongoing projects.

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    Taliesin Knol
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Explore the State of Virginia from its earliest colonial settlement 400 years ago. The class will discuss the driving factors for colonization of the "New World" by European powers, especially Great Britain and The Virginia Company which founded the colony. In counterpoint, the existing Powhatan Confederacy of Native Americans will also be studied, as well as several failed attempts at colonizing and how Jamestown narrowly escaped complete destruction!

    Each student will create an individual diorama. Students will craft and hand-shape their scene on a 10 x 16 inch foam board using artistic, model-making techniques. They will customize their dioramas with landscape elements, waterways, structures of the time, and paint. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature figures and combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to create a larger terrain. Students will then compete in a history-based strategy game. This will reinforce lessons about the culture, economy, warfare, and politics of the time. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them. Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $15.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include Virginia History: Jamestown and the Powhatan Confederacy, 1607 (1st quarter), The American War of Independence (2nd quarter), The War of 1812 (3rd quarter), and The Civil War 1861-1865 (4th quarter).

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    Beth Ross
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Future Veterinarians will learn what it takes to care for dogs! Students will learn how to make measurements and assessments when a dog has come in for an exam. They will learn the ABC's of dog care including the importance of hydration and proper nutrition and discover what to do when a dog is sick or injured. Our future vets will learn about tick borne diseases, what to do when a dog has a tick, and tick prevention. They will learn how to give medicine to a dog and find out what a laceration is, how to suture, and the proper care of stitches. They will also view different types of radiographs and learn how to read them. Little vets will be able to label and explain the digestive organs and find out what happens when a foreign body becomes stuck in the digestive track. Finally, students will learn about dog behavior and how to identify different types of dog body language.

    Topics in this Series: Dog Veterinarian (Quarter 1); Cat Veterinarian (Quarter 2); Nutrition (Quarter 3) and Sports Medicine (Quarter 4).

    Materials/Supply FeeThere is a $43.00 material fee due on the first day of class and payable to the instructor for a set of high quality, take-home class materials including: a plush dog, dog bandana, adoption certificate, dog bowl, dog bone cookie cutter and recipe card, disposable lab coat, medical gloves, mask, sutures, syringe, tape measure, ruler, journal, dog anatomy worksheet, laminated x-ray and wax pencil, dog body language chart, and a class diploma.

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    Taliesin Knol
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    According to Isaac Newton, what goes up must come down, but if you can’t wait for gravity to bring something down, a catapult was arguably the next best thing in the middle ages. Students will examine the physics, engineering, and history of the catapult, through "practical" application. Perfect for the mad scientist in everyone, students will use the Engineering Design Process to design and build their own catapults and knock objects over with them. Students will conduct rigorous testing and redesign to improve their catapults using both historic and modern materials. The instructor will demonstrate the mathematics and physics concepts behind the operations of their engines. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a catapult kit and building materials.

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    Jeanniffer Denmark
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Students will learn beginning Spanish through games, songs, stories, and skits in a predominantly immersion environment (limited cues in English). Each week students will work on the "basics" such as greetings, colors, numbers, adjectives and weather and will explore focused themes. Through age-appropriate games and activities, students will learn and practice the vocabulary and simple phrases related to the week's theme. Basic, beginners-level spelling, reading, and grammar will be introduced. Since the class is taught in "themes", or units, students may join during any quarter. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, and simple phrases while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Fluency should not be expected at this level.

    Topics in this Series: About Me (Quarter 1); My Family (Quarter 2); Around Town (Quarter 3); and Fun Times (Quarter 4).

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    Tia Murchie-Beyma
    Add

    As Thomas Jefferson wrote to Richard Price in 1788, "wherever the people are well informed they can be trusted with their own government." That's what this course aims to do!

    US Government and Politics is a year-long political science and civics course for high school students to build their knowledge of essential political structures and processes. Key themes in the course include Congress, Presidency, Bureaucracy, American Legal System and the Courts (30%); Constitutional Underpinnings of American Democracy (15%); Political Parties and Interest Groups (15%); Political Beliefs and Behavior (20%); and Civil Liberties and Civil Rights (15%).

    Students will learn about the formal and informal machinery that "makes the system go" -– including the so-called "fourth branch of government," the bureaucracy we know so well here in the Washington, DC metropolitan area. By the end of the course, students will also be able to explain the development of civil rights and liberties from their constitutional roots and through several Supreme Court cases; how political parties and interest groups work; the structure of elections; and the means by which citizens learn about politics and form political beliefs. Students will understand enduring issues, including separation of powers, checks and balances, and then tension between majority rule and minority rights.

    LevelsThe course provides a substantive, full-credit experience in either an Honors or On-Level track. Honors and On-Level students meet together and share core preparation each week, but assignments and assessments are differentiated, with longer readings, more practice of synthesis and analysis, and additional writing at the Honors level. Both tiers offer a serious, full-credit experience. A student who wishes to move up or down a level during the year may consult with the instructor. Students register online for the same course, but must indicate which level they wish to study via e-mail by August 15.

    Schedule: This section will be held entirely ONLINE as virtual conferences with a Monday morning meeting from 9:00 am - 9:55 am, and a Thursday afternoon meeting from 3:00 pm- 3:55 pm via Canvas Conference. Recordings will be made for students with schedule conflicts. Please note that this section is intended to be online for the full year for most. Openings in the live, in-person Friday morning section may be possible for a handful of students when COVID gathering limitations are lifted.

    Prerequisites: Students must be highly-skilled readers at the high school level or above; or else have very robust assistance at home with weekly reading assignments.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-5 hours per week outside class meetings for reading and homework, a range which may vary based on reading speed. Note that the core textbook is written at a basic college level, while other materials are targeted at either a high school audience or the news-reading public.

    Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates. These are due by 10 AM on Thursdays before each Friday meeting to promote active, knowledgeable discussion in class. There will be a summer assignment that is due on September 10, before the first class meeting. The class Canvas site will open on August 3 with introductory information, a syllabus, and the initial assignment.

    Assessments: Points will be assigned for completed homework, projects, quizzes, and tests. A letter grade will not be assigned, but parents can use total points earned versus total points offered to assign a grade for purposes of a homeschool transcript. Parents can view total points earned at any time through the Canvas site.

    This course was structured to allow interested students to prepare for the College Boards' CLEP exam in American Government. Time spent on major course themes intentionally mirror the CLEP test's percentages. Students interested in taking the CLEP exam will have to register and pay for those exams individually. This course is not offered at an AP level, but the instructor is willing to advise experienced students who wish to independently prepare for the AP United States Government and Politics exam in May 2021. Additional preparation outside of class, particularly in essay-writing and analysis of Supreme Court cases, would be needed for AP.

    https://clep.collegeboard.org/history-and-social-sciences/american-government
    https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/courses/ap-united-states-government-and-politics/exam

    Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase or rent Keeping the Republic: Power and Citizenship in American Politics, Brief 8th Edition by Christine Barbour and Gerald Wright (ISBN-13: 978-1544316215). Electronic versions are available. Be sure to purchase the EIGHTH (8th) edition that is also labeled "BRIEF." Other readings will be provided by the instructor.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component full year, one-credit course in US Government, Civics, or Humanities for purposes of a high school transcript

    Prerequisites: None

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    Bette Cassatt
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    You've dreamed about going to Hogwarts, and now is your chance to experience a year of magical classes! In this maker class, students will create projects inspired by their core classes at Hogwarts (Charms, Defense Against the Dark Arts, Herbology, Potions, and Transfiguration) and a Hogwarts guest professor. Students learn to work with a variety of materials and learn a broad range of crafting skills such as hand-sewing, painting, papercrafting (including precision cutting, folding stamping, and stenciling) sculpting, and wireworking to create magical pieces inspired by the World of Harry Potter.

    Welcome to the first term at Hogwarts! This term, we welcome Professor Dumbledore to inspire us as we create a Pensieve along with crafts related to your core classes such as a magic wand (Charms), Repelling Dementors (Defense Against the Dark Arts), pictures that "magically" change from one image to another (Transfiguration), and more!

    This is a great class for Harry Potter fans who love the magical world, even for those who have not read all of the books or watched all of the movies. Projects and class discussions are geared to not reveal significant series spoilers. Note: A few classes may include a Harry Potter-inspired food creation or personal care product. The ingredients will be identified in advance, and students with food or ingredient allergies or dietary restrictions will need to check before handling/consuming. Substitute ingredients cannot be provided for those with food allergies or restrictions.

    Topics in this Series: Guest Prof. Dumbledore (Quarter 1); Guest Prof. Snape (Quarter 2); Guest Profs. Snape & Slughorn (Quarter 3), and Guest Profs. Hagrid & Hooch (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $30.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: Students should bring good scissors for cutting paper/fabric, a ruler, and a (low temp, mini) hot glue gun to class each week, which will earn them house points.

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    Shannon McClain
    Reg. Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Scriptophobia. Break the block. Get past the paralysis. Every student struggles with writing at some point. Fearful writers worry what others will think. Reluctant writers have trouble getting started. Even strong, prolific writers experience roadblocks in their writing. Every teen can benefit from Writing Lab, a safe, supportive writing workshop where an experienced writing coach facilitates peer revision groups. Writing Lab is based on the idea of revision, revision, revision; teaching teens that writing does not have to be perfect; sometimes they just need to put words on paper to get started.

    Writing Lab will give students the opportunity to revise their own writing at their own pace. Writing Lab may be taken stand-alone or to complement other classes. Each class will include the opportunity to write to a prompt or on a topic of choice, to confer with classmates about writing, and to work on developing pieces. Each session will include dedicated writing time. Students may bring pieces of writing from another class or something they are working on at home-- history paper, English composition, lab report, short story, personal essay, etc. No two will be the same. If a student shows up with no in-progress writing, the instructor will provide sample prompts to get the writing process started. After writing, students will break up into groups of 3-4 students to share their work and receive feedback from peers. Writers will benefit from having an audience and receiving input on their drafts. That feedback will inspire further revision, refinement, and clarification of their writing as well as ideas for new pieces. Each week the writing coach will provide writing tips and guidance on everything from organizing big ideas and writing mechanics to how to give and receive constructive criticism.

    Revision is a vital step in the writing process in which writers consider what they have accomplished and what they can do to make their work more effective. Having the opportunity to revise is helpful to reluctant writers, who learn to free themselves of high expectations of every word they put to paper, as well as prolific writers, who benefit from honing their craft. Having models written by peers in addition to a peer audience is inspiring, and it trains writers to be critical readers who can give constructive feedback. Students will improve as writers if they choose to work on their pieces in class only, but working independently will significantly amplify the benefits of the class.

    Topics in this Series: Writing Lab will continue in Semester 2, and students may continue the course to further develop/improve their writing. Continuing students from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend time outside of class writing, however the time will vary based on the type of writing and students' goals for the writing.

    Assignments: Students should bring works-in-progress to lab. The number of assignments completed or advanced will depend on the amount of outside writing a student does and the length of his/her piece.

    Assessments: The writing coach will provide individual feedback on pieces that a student brings to work on in lab.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

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