Class Registration

Early registration for Fall 2022 classes begins on Tuesday, May 17, at 6:00 am. A 10% early registration discount is offered through June 30.

  • See the Compass Academic Calendar for 2022-23.
  • Read about the virtual formats some high school classes are being taught in.
  • Review our Registration FAQs.
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    Tia Murchie-Beyma
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    This full-year lab science course introduces classic biology topics updated for the 21st century. Biology studies living things and their relationships from microscopic to massive, ancient to modern, arctic to tropic. Our survey includes: (1) cellular and molecular biology, (2) ecology, (3) genetics, (4) biology of organisms (with selected human health and anatomy topics), and (5) evolution and diversity.

    You will observe microscopic organisms and give monarch butterflies a health exam before tagging them for their 2,800 mile migration to Mexico. You will extract DNA, model its processes, and learn how scientists manipulate this magnificent molecule to make mice glow. You will observe animal behavior, test your heart rate, and practice identifying and debunking pseudo-science.

    By the end of the course, students will be able to explain the nature of science as a system of knowing; cite evidence for foundational theories of modern biology; explain basic biological processes and functions; describe structures and relationships in living systems; outline systems of information, energy, and resources; demonstrate valid experimental design; discern ethical standards; relate their values and scientific ideas to decision-making; and apply biology knowledge to their own health.

    Students are responsible for pre-reading and reviewing new material such as readings from the textbook and additional popular and scholarly sources, videos, and animations PRIOR to class meetings. In-person sessions focus on active discussion, clarification, exploration of content, review, modeling, and hands-on activities.

    Labs address not only technical skills and sequential operations, but also forming testable predictions, collecting data, applying math, drawing conclusions, and presenting findings. Hands-on dissection, always optional, is taught with preserved crayfish and fetal pigs.

    Sensitive issues: human reproduction is not taught separately, but mentioned as students learn about other, related topics such as sperm, eggs, stem cells, genetic disease, hormones, fetal development, breast-feeding, adolescence, and HIV. While there may be some debate-style discussion of topics such as GMO, abortion will not be debated. Birth control and sex education are not covered, but distinctions between gender and biological sex are discussed in detail in the genetics unit. Evolution is embedded in every topic, from molecular to ecological, inseparably from other content. It is addressed in a scientific context, not from a faith standpoint.

    Levels:The course provides a substantive, full-credit experience on either an Honors or On-Level track. All class members share core material and participate in the same labs. Honors has longer or additional readings, more analytical work, and more thorough and difficult assessments. Brief, required summer assignments are due in August for those who elect to take Honors. Students register online for the same course, but must indicate which level they wish to study via e-mail by August 15. Students may move down a level (from Honors to On-Level) at any time.

    Schedule: Note:This class will be taught in a Hybrid format with an online lecture on Mondays (9:00 am - 9:55 am) over a live, online platform and in-person lab and activities on Fridays (9:30 am - 10:55 am).

    Prerequisites: Students should be very strong, independent readers and able to understand graphs, tables, percentages, decimals, ratios, and averages.

    Workload: All students should expect to spend 4-6 hours outside of class reading and preparing homework. Homework includes term cards, brief written responses, weekly online quizzes, unit tests, occasional lab reports, and some creative assignments including sketching. Students will sometimes prepare short, in-class presentations, participate in group projects, run simulations, or conduct simple experiments at home.

    Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments; upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests; track grades; message instructor and classmates; and attend virtual conferences.

    Assessments: Completed homework, projects, quizzes, and tests receive points and narrative feedback. Parents can calculate a letter grade using the student's points earned divided by points available, in weighted categories that include assignments, reading quizzes, tests, and participation and presentations. Parents may view all scoring and comments at any time through the Canvas site.

    Textbook/Materials: Students must purchase or rent the textbook Biology (2010 edition with baby alligator cover) by Stephen Nowicki, published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt/Holt McDougal (ISBN# 9780547219479) An e-book version is also available (ISBN# 9780547221069). Core textbook readings are supplemented by the instructor with updated information drawn from sources such as peer-reviewed science journals, popular science publications, and podcasts.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $130 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Supplies/Equipment: Students will need access to a computer/internet, compound microscope with 400X magnification and cool lighting, splash goggles, water-resistant/acid-resistant lab apron, kitchen or postal scale, 3-ring binder, approximately 400- 3"x5" index cards; and plain, lined, and graph paper. Some of these supplies are used at home. Weekly "Read Me First" web pages and class announcements on Canvas tell students what items to bring to class.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Lab Science for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2
    Becca Sticha
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    Does your child learn best by hands-on activities, crafts, games, and stories? Number Ninjas is based on the belief that children need to work with mathematics in a concrete, physical, and tangible way in order to learn fundamental concepts. Young students will love learning numerical concepts in this interactive, exploration-based class where work with numbers feels like a game.

    First quarter, students will explore the concepts of even and odd numbers, comparing and ordering, place value, rounding, counting by 2, 5, 10, 25, and money. Example activites include building an abacus, solving skip counting puzzles, and more!

    This class covers many of the 1st and 2nd grade Standards of Learning for math. Weekly update e-mails to parents will include suggestions for practice at home and extension activities.

    Topics in the Series: Play with Place Value & Money (Quarter 1), Measurement Madness (Quarter 2), Super Shapes (Quarter 3), and Fun with Fractions (Quarter 4).

    Supply Fee: Included

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
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    Acting is an adventure! Young actors work together to create and perform their very own play with unique characters and an original storyline. Will they encounter a silly sloth, a jolly jaguar, a crazy crocodile, an angry anaconda, or other tropical pals on their equatorial escapades?

    Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other and to begin to brainstorm about their original play. Through group activities and guided discussion, the young actors will decide on characters, conflict, and conclusion, and the story they want to tell. The script will be developed and customized for this class with input from the students.

    Young actors will explore skills such as sensory awareness, listening, stage movement, character development, emotional expression, and observation/concentration while learning to portray their original character. Young actors will learn aspects of acting by script read-through, blocking, costume/prop discussion, and planning the show. Through individual and group activities, young actors build confidence in preparation for a final sharing for parents.

    Students will work from a simple, written script, but emerging readers can be accommodated. Parents will be emailed the script after the 3rd or 4th class and will be expected to help their children memorize their lines and assemble a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity. All actors must be at least age 6 to sign up for this class.

    Topics in this Series: Rainforest Rescue (Quarter 1), Candy Craze (Quarter 2), Safari Surprise (Quarter 3) and Animal Amusement Park (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Keely Kirk
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    The prickly private eye; the upwardly mobile mobster; or the coquettish cocktail waitress. Who will you invent? In this class, student actors and improv artists will be guided through the process of developing an original character! In this introduction to character work, students will invent and discover a strong, compelling character, complete with unique ways of speaking, moving, body language, and a unique, individual presence. Students will develop a back story to justify and solidify the character's point of view and interactions with other characters. Students will be guided to think through choices about their character so they can create a natural, believable embodiment of the individual they are portraying. This is a skill that is needed by both improvisational actors and those who work from a script. Students will be coached on how to break the mold and step out of the comfort zone from characters they may have portrayed previously and from their own reality. They will learn how to convey their character through first impressions, possibly even before speaking and without costuming, and then eventually transition between characters with smooth and subtle changes in voice, posture, or movement.

    Character actors will improve their ability to think on-their-feet, play off each other, and react with spontaneous wit, sarcasm, and irony. Actors' creative thinking and communication skills will be strengthened as they work "outside-of-the-box" and learn to read their audience. No previous experience is needed. Beginners are welcome, and experienced students will further develop their skills. This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, flexible, and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work collaboratively in a group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class.

    Format: All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing

    Topics in this Series: Characters Wanted! (Semester 1), What a Character! (Semester 2), etc. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hour per week outside of class.

    Assignments: If any, will be sent to parents and students by e-mail.

    Assessments: Informal, qualitative feedback will be given in class throughout the semester. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Juan Urista
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    SpaceX, Blue Origins, NASA’s new Space Launch System! There is a new space race going on, and Aerospace Engineering is a more exciting, dynamic field in 2022 that is has been in 50 years. This class will examine the history of space exploration beginning with WWII rocketry and Operation Paperclip. Next, the group will journey to the 1960 with the manned Mercury and Gemini programs and the Soviet Vostok initiative. Next, the group will look at the Apollo program which took Americans to the moon followed by the Space Shuttle program of the 1980s-2000s. The class will learn about ongoing space research and microgravity experiments that are conducted on the 25-year-old International Space Station, an orbiting lab that is a collaboration among the 15 nations. Students will review the space exploration of other nations such as Russia, China, India, Japan, Israel, and Europe in addition to the US. Discover other space efforts such as long-distance fly-by missions, orbiters, probes, landers, and rovers that have observed or explored every planet in the solar system, asteroids, Kuiper belt, and the moons of other planets. Once our engineers understand past explorations, they will look at the present and future missions such as private efforts and public initiatives like the upcoming return to the moon (Artemis), Dragonfly mission to Saturn’s moon Titan, and future travel to Mars.

    Apprentice aerospace engineers will learn about the principles of rocket design, staging, launch systems, and fuels by building and testing model rockets. Hands-on activities will be integrated into weekly discussions with projects such as building a model of the International Space Station, viewing images of the Hubble Space Telescope, and planning a virtual trip to Mars. Guest speakers from NASA, the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum, and/or the aerospace industry will be invited to present to the class, and students will each prepare a space-related project of their choice.

    2
    Dr. Albert Thompson
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    In this class, students will engage with American History from a unique, thoughtful perspective, facilitated by college professor and doctoral candidate Albert Thompson who is a “researcher, problem solver, and educator.” Professor Thompson is considered a historian of the state, culture, and conflict. He was homeschooled through high school and will guide high school students to use “ historical data to advance solutions to contemporary problems.”

    First semester will cover American History I from 1607 through the start of the War of 1812. The class will uncover history that is often overlooked or downplayed, such as the Inter-Colonial Wars as a precursor to the American Revolution. Professor Thompson encourages students to think deeply about history by introducing individuals and groups in a way that lets students put themselves in others’ places. He covers the worldviews that were dominant at the time as a way to explain what motivated historical figures and decisions of the day. Conflicts will be closely examined since throughout history, war is always a catalyst that causes economic and social conditions to change dramatically in the shortest period of time. Major themes that will be covered this semester include Indigenous America, Colliding Cultures, British North America, Colonial Society, the American Revolution, a New Nation, and the Early Republic.

    Topics in this Series: First Settlement to First Crisis, 1607-1812 (Semester 1), Civil War to Reconstruction, 1812-1890 (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: None

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week on readings. Readings should be treated as pre-readings which students complete before class in order to engage in in-class discussion.

    Assignments: Reading assignments will be communicated weekly to students. This class will not have written assignments or projects.

    Assessments: The instructor will not give quizzes or provide assessments. Parents may elect to administer online quizzes that are available through the e-textbook website for purposes of assessment their own student’s understanding of major themes.

    Textbook/Materials: The class will use The American Yawp, and open-source online textbook from Stanford University Press (www.americanyawp.com). Students may read chapters online or download a pdf.

    What to Bring: Paper or notebook; pen or pencil; assigned chapter.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in American history for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Kerry Diederich
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    Elementary artists can get in on the action as they learn about a different artist or artistic style each week and create a representative piece using a wide range of artistic supplies such as tempura and water color paints, pastels, pencils, cray pas, oil pastel crayons, specialty papers, sculpting media, and embellishments.

    First quarter, students will meet famous artists such as Grandma Moses, Mary Cassatt, Eric Carle, Patrick Dougherty, Alex Calder, Helen Frankenthaler and River Lobe. They will develop unique projects that highlight the methods, material and media used by each artist such as painting, sculpting, drawing, and inspired creations.

    Topics in this Series: Media of the Masters (Quarter 1); Animal Artists (Quarter 2); Murals, Monuments, and Museums (Quarter 3); Stellar Celestial Subjects (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Becca Sticha
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    Discover the world of robotics using kids' favorite, interlocking building bricks! Students will build and program 3-4 different whimsical, mechanized projects each quarter using the WeDo 2.0 robotics system by LEGO Education.

    First quarter, students will build, program, and model fascinating friends from under the sea such as a whale, shark, crab, and sea turtle.

    Their robots will be built using special-shaped LEGO components from the WeDo Educational set, motors, motion sensors, tilt sensors and a programmable, Bluetooth control unit ("brain"). Student will use classroom tablets to program the control units using an intuitive drag-and-drop coding modules.

    Prior experience with LEGO or coding is not required. All equipment is furnished.

    Topics in this Series: Under the Sea (Quarter 1), Wings and Things (Quarter 2); Perfect Pets (Quarter 3), and Reptiles Rule (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Dr. Michele Forsythe
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    Kids are naturally curious about chemistry! Chemistry explains the properties, behaviors, and interactions of materials around us: things we eat, drink, clean with, wear, drive, and even play with. Kids can use chemistry to understand how things taste, smell, mix, melt, combust, feel, and whether they are recyclable or rubbish, helpful or harmful, nutritious or not. Chemistry is key to understanding the world around us, including other areas of science. In this class, kids begin to use scientific words to describe their observations and will become familiar with some science apparatus.

    First quarter kids will learn about chemistry using everyday ingredients and techniques from the kitchen! Students will use food products to experiment with the chemical and physical properties of matter and will begin to learn the vocabulary of chemistry with substances that are safe, fun, and yummy to work with! For example, find out just how (and why) seaweed is used as an ingredient in gummy bears! Examine acids and bases using fruit juices and vinegar and find out what happens chemically when milk goes bad. Discover the chemistry involved in making ricotta and mozzarella cheese. Witness supersaturation in solutions in an at-home experiment when making rock candy and find out what happens when you change conditions. Learn about melting point and recording temperatures when making chocolates. Figure out what is gelatin and how is it different from agar. Observe viscosity when working with fats and oils and find out how eggs behave differently in baking versus mayonnaise. The class will discover the chemical behaviors of yeast, baking soda, and baking powder, and more! (Note: this is not a cooking class, and foods will not be eaten.)

    Topics in this series include: Chemistry in the Kitchen (Quarter 1), Chemistry in Action (Quarter 2), Chemistry at Home (Quarter 3), and Chemistry of Toys (Quarter 4). There is a supply fee of $15.00 due payable to the instructor on the first day of classes.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Peter Snow
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    Students will enjoy the logic and challenge of the timeless strategy board game as they learn and play chess with classmates. In Beginning Chess 1, students will learn beginner basics such as: how all pieces move and capture, castling, pawn promotion, en passant, checks and how to get out of them, checkmate and stalemate, scholars mate, fools mate, notation, and chess etiquette. Skills are taught in progressive levels of challenge as the year progresses.

    Learning and playing chess supports problem solving, decision making, critical and creative thinking, general cognitive ability, scholastic skills, and mathematical achievement (Univ. of Minnesota). Experts suggest that the game of chess teaches analytical and disciplined thinking skills, while raising self esteem, teaching motivation and determination, and sportsmanship (Kasparov Foundation). Each class will be spent half on technique and half in practice matches with classmates while the instructor coaches.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Peter Snow
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    Students will enjoy the logic and challenge of the timeless strategy board game as they learn and play chess with classmates. In Intermediate Chess 1, students will learn skills that build upon each other such as: 8 questions to ask before you move, mating nets, piece defenses against common tactics, forcing combinations, king and pawn endings, offensive opening tactics, and review of two-move checkmates tactics.

    Learning and playing chess supports problem solving, decision making, critical and creative thinking, general cognitive ability, scholastic skills, and mathematical achievement (Univ. of Minnesota). Experts suggest that the game of chess teaches analytical and disciplined thinking skills, while raising self esteem, teaching motivation and determination, and sportsmanship (Kasparov Foundation). Each class will be spent half on technique and half in practice matches with classmates while the instructor coaches. Students should have 30+ hours of chess instruction prior to enrolling in Intermediate Chess, a working knowledge of most skills taught in the Compass Beginner and Advanced Beginner Chess levels, or instructor permission.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mimi Nyman

    In this cooking class, the focus will be on what kids can eat, not what they can't. If kids with food allergies are tired of safe, single ingredient foods and long for creative, "composed" recipes, they will enjoy this class's menus which omit the top 9 food allergens: eggs, milk, nuts/tree nuts, soy, wheat, sesame, and fish/shellfish. Each week, students will make a delicious recipe with fresh ingredients and creative substitutions that the whole family will enjoy. The quarter's menu includes:

  • Rice Balls
  • Tomato Vegetable Chicken Soup
  • Chickpea Salad
  • Roasted Vegetables
  • Pumpkin Lasagna
  • Thai-Inspired Zucchini Noodles
  • Eggless Pancakes with Blueberry Sauce
  • Students will be taste-testing what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.

    Please note that this class is offered first thing in the morning, after the kitchen has been sanitized and before other cooking classes that use conventional ingredients. Every effort will be made to avoid cross-contamination, but students with air-borne sensitivities should know that conventional ingredients, such as flour, milk, and eggs may be stored in closed containers in cabinets in the same kitchen. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Wyndy Frederick
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    In the style of “High School Musical” or a glee club, Compass Chorale is for tween singers who want to have fun taking their vocal performance to the next level. This semester-long program will focus on choral arrangements of contemporary pieces with 2- and 3- part harmonies. Singers will be expected to memorize pieces and will be required to participate in the semester performance (December 20).

    This program includes instruction on vocal development and performance such as posture, breathing, intonation, and the principles of blending vocal harmonies. Basic musical notation will be introduced as well as melodic and harmonic intervals.

    Compass Chorale is for students who took Learn to Sing class(es) at Compass, those who have other musical theater experience. First time new singers and younger students who have choral experience must receive instructor approval to enroll. Students are encouraged to enroll early because the number, ages, experience, and vocal parts of the students will determine which songs selected. This is a 12-week program with no class meetings on October 11 or October 18. There is a $25.00 fee for a music notebook due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    2
    Danielle Mercadal
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    Can your child sit in a circle for story time? Line up for lunch? Take turns talking? This one-day, 3-hour (half-day) program is a "taste" of kindergarten for 5- year-olds. Start your child's week off right with "Monday mornings with Miss M" at Compass Kindergarten. Children will work in a small group with an experienced early elementary educator for this dynamic, play-based program that offers regular interaction and socialization.

    This fun, activity-based program will create rhythm and routine in a homeschooled kindergartner's week and give them a sense of community and a peer group. Children will practice routines and transitions as they move through the morning. Each session will include some simple structure such as a daily arrival song/greeting, circle time, story, snack time, activity, lunch, active game, and closing/goodbyes. Through games and activities, they will also practice key childhood social skills such as sharing, taking turns, and entering play with others. Academic basics such as the ABCs, days of the week, colors, shapes, and number sense will be integrated into activities involving fairy tales, nature and art. The teacher will provide ideas for parents to work on at home with their child during the week.

    Children can be dropped-off for this program (different than Compass's school-year policies for 55 minute classes.) Children should bring a snack, bagged lunch, and water bottle to each session. There is a $40.00 material fee for class consumables due payable to the teacher on the first day of class. Registration for this program is by half-year (semester). Students must be age five (5) at the start of the program. For families who want to extend the experience for an additional hour, consider registering for the Kinder Kitchen class at 1:00 pm.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mimi Nyman
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    Students will enjoy making flavorful fall recipes and family favorites that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Fall Fare recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

  • Sweet Pumpkin Dip
  • Chicken Vegetable Soup
  • Caprese Salad Bites
  • Honey Glazed Carrots
  • Spinach Artichoke Meatballs
  • Pineapple Coconut Cupcakes
  • Cheesy Rice Casserole with Green Chilies
  • Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.

    Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group.

    Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mimi Nyman
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    Students with a curiosity for culinary careers will explore many aspects of cooking for the hospitality industry and for themselves. In this advanced cooking class, students will make delicious, advanced recipes and learn skills that are the foundation for a future career in culinary arts. This class will get students excited about new foods, flavors, and techniques as they gain a working knowledge of food planning and preparation.

    Each quarter, new technical, kitchen skills are introduced, and each week, a new recipe is made in class that demonstrates the featured food group or cooking style. Students will also prepare a base or food pairing that showcases the featured recipe.

    First quarter technical skills will include kitchen essentials, basic kitchen first aid, and knife skills-focusing on the Chef Knife. Chapters covered in the text include Level 1 book, Chapter 3, 4 and 6. First quarter recipes that showcase the lessons on Vegetables include:

    • Table-side Guacamole
    • Caramelized Onion Flatbread
    • Divine Water Chestnuts
    • Hot Spinach Dip
    • Stuffed Mushrooms
    • Corn Cake
    • Swiss Chard Parmesan

    Culinary vocabulary will also be introduced each week. Students will leave this class with an introduction to culinary careers in the hospitality industry and a beginning foundation in culinary arts. Additionally, students will be able to take charge of a home kitchen, prepare advanced dishes, and adhere to safety and hygiene standards. They will have nutrition-planning and cooking skills that will enrich the lives of their friends and families.

    Notes Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. Pork will be used in the proteins unit during 3rd quarter. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market available ingredients. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics.

    Topics in this Series: Stocks, Soups and Sauces (Quarter 1), Potatoes, Grains, and Legumes (Quarter 2), Meat, Poultry, and Seafood (Quarter 3), and Fruits and Vegetables (Quarter 4). Students continuing from the prior quarter will receive priority pre-registration for next quarter.

    Prerequisites: Students must be in 9th grade (minimum age 14) to take this class. 7th-8th graders may not enroll. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Cooking assignments, practicing skills at home, and related homework will be given in class and e-mailed to students and parents. Brief written assignments may be given, such as recipe modification or development. There will also be a brief summer assignment before the start of Quarter 1.

    Assessments: Individual feedback will be given in class. Formal assessments will not be given. At the end of the second quarter, enrolled students will be required to complete an online Virginia Food Handler Course for food safety certification through the county health department, which will cost $25.00

    https://courseforfoodsafety.com/states/VA?gclid=CjwKCAjw7LX0BRBiEiwA__gNw4AfZHgp_eOVTeiEXudxZhhF11E2UMggiIeYo6qL33xlUaDXbUeB5RoCG1cQAvD_BwE

    Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase or rent the selected textbooks and workbooks. Used copies are acceptable.

    • -Foundations of Restaurant Management & Culinary Arts: Level 1, published by National Restaurant Association (ISBN# 978-0138019389)
    • -Foundations of Restaurant Management & Culinary Arts: Level 2, published by National Restaurant Association (ISBN# 978-0131380226)
    • -Activity Guide for Foundations of Restaurant Management and Culinary Arts Level 1, published by National Restaurant Association (ISBN# 978-0137070503)
    • -Activity Guide for Foundations of Restaurant Management and Culinary Arts Level 2, published by National Restaurant Association (ISBN# 978-0131380714)

    Required Tools/Materials Culinary students will be expected to begin to acquire their own tools. Students should purchase and bring with them each week the following basic, minimum tools and supplies:

     

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Black Rocket

    In Digital Workshop, students will learn on of the world's fastest-growing programming languages: Python. It is the programming language used by Google, NASA, YouTube, and the CIA! Students will learn how to code with Python to create apps and games.

    Digital Workshop is a computer lab environment in which students work through the Black Rocket curriculum under the direction of computer science coaches. The lab environment allows students to enroll at any quarter, fosters brand new coders, and encourages those with prior coding experience. In the "Intro" level of a course (i.e., Part 1), students will work through the fundamentals of a new digital skill. In the "Continuing" level (i.e., Part 2), students who continue from "Intro" will develop new skills and will design and code an individual project. New students who enroll in "Intro" will begin with the introductory lessons. In order to differentiate instruction between new and continuing students, coaches work with small pull-out groups, pairs, or individuals to provide additional support as needed. The class tuition includes a student technology fee that covers the use of instructor-provided classroom laptops loaded with the required software, applications, and licenses. At the end of the class, students will receive access to Black Rocket's interactive learning platform to continue their coding journey at home.

    Topics in this Series: Python Programmers (Quarters 1, 2); Minecraft Designers (Quarters 3, 4)

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Karen Shumway
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    Dissection! The critical lab skill that schools skip and parents hate hosting at home. This lab can be paired with any independent study or online course in high school biology or anatomy in order to gain significant hands-on experience to complete a lab science credit.

    Students will investigate major organs and organ systems though a through a semester-long dissection study. Students will examine the major functions and features of a system one week and perform a related dissection the following week: circulatory system (cow heart), nervous system (sheep brain), excretory system (cow kidney), senses (cow eyeball), and musculoskeletal system (chicken wings and cow femur).

    The class will cover lab safety, practice proper dissection techniques, and learn how to set up and maintain a lab journal with notes and drawings of organs and organisms. Students will also use microscopes to look at tissue samples throughout the semester. Students will have a pre-lab activity (video and/or packet) to complete each week as "admission" to the following session's dissection.

    Topics in this Series: Organ Systems (Semester 1) and Organisms (Quarter 2), etc. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: Students must have age/grade-level dexterity and fine motor skills for the detailed instrument work in this class.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1 hour per week outside of class.

    Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates. Students will have a mandatory pre-lab assignment that must be completed and will serve as the student's "ticket" into the lab session each week.

    Assessments: Will not be given

    Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase The Anatomy Coloring Book (ISBN-13 : 978-0321832016)

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $50.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    What to Bring: Students should bring a paper or a notebook, pen or pencil, and a set of colored pencils to class each week.

    What to Wear: Students should not wear any loose, drapey clothing to lab. They should also come to class with long hair tied back and should wear closed toe shoes.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in a laboratory science for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2
    The Science Place

    Become a world-traveling eco adventurer and earth scientist without leaving Compass! Study the world's most exciting and diverse ecosystems and learn about the incredible biologic and geologic phenomena that shape them. Venture into caves and coasts, tundra and taiga, and forests and fjords. Each week student scientists will begin by locating the fascinating features on a map before learning about these incredible habitats from the ground-up, starting with the geology of a place, then working their way through the climate, biome, flora, and fauna. Hands-on labs and in-class activities will reinforce regional and ecological diversity by examining rock types, classifying plants, observing insects, or modelling weather phenomena. Throughout their journey to fascinating ecosystems, explorers will keep a science log to document their discoveries. Finally, students will link their studies to current events in these regions.

    First quarter, students will journey through the tundra, prairies, temperate rain forests, deciduous forests, and deserts of North and South America. We ll learn how global climate patterns form these different ecosystems, and learn about the amazing diversity of plants and animals that inhabit them. We'll investigate the rainshadow effect, and see why it forms deserts on the leeward side of coastal mountain ranges around the world. Then we ll jump from the tip of Chile across the roaring 40 s to explore one of our planet s most extreme ecosystems- Antarctica!

    Topics in this Series: The Americas and Antarctica (Quarter 1); Northern Latitudes (Quarter 2); Africa & Asia (Quarter 3); and All About Islands (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Judith Harmon
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    In this fashion masterclass, we will be looking at some of the world’s most outrageous fashion trends: why they are remembered, and will they be repeated?

    The class will critique fads in fashion from powdered wigs and padded bustles to today’s sheer and slashed garments. Students will learn about fashion faux pas that were often governed by laws, dress codes, and social and religious mores. Consider fabrics limited by law based on your class or caste or having to request police permission to wear pants in Paris. Women were fired for styling their hair in a bob, and men in Los Angeles were attacked in riots for wearing baggy, oversized zoot suits. The class will also look at fashions fails which caused injury or death to the wearer such as green dresses dyed with arsenic, felt hats seeped in mercury, crinolines that caught fire, and corsets that compressed internal organs- all for the sake of fashion. The class will review catalog illustrations, print ads from magazines and newspapers, sewing patterns, fashion journals, and video clips to overview fashion flubs of the past.

    Topics in this Series: Fashion: Fads, Faux Pas, and Failures (Semester 1), Fashion: Fiction, Fantasy, and Future (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: None

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1 hour per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Weekly reading or viewing assignments or brief investigation homework will be posted on a password-protected Google classroom site.

    Assessments: Points will be awarded for completed assignments as a means of encouraging engagement and participation. Parents may use total points earned and total points available for calculating a course grade, if desired.

    Lab/Supply Fee: None

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Edwige Pinover
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    Bonjour et bienvenue dans notre classe de francais 3 ! Welcome to the third year of high school French. This is a conversation-focused program in which students will build more vocabulary and will be able to communicate using more and more complex sentences. The class will continue using the present tense, the future proche (a future), the passe recent (recent past), the passe-compose and imparfait (two forms of past tense) and will learn the future and the conditional forms of verb. Vocabulary will include school activities, professions, the theme of fairy tales, nature and environment, and the media. At this point in learning French, students should be using all of the vocabulary they know to become better listeners, more fluent speakers, and stronger writers.

    Class will be conducted primarily in French and will focus on listening and speaking skills, asking and answering questions, and correct use of grammar. At home, students will be responsible for memorizing vocabulary and grammar, completing homework assignments, and watching both grammar instruction and language immersion videos.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 30-45 minutes per day, 4 days per week on homework outside of class.

    Assignments: Are sent by e-mail to parents and students. Students must have access to a computer and internet service for computer-based videos and practice tools that are assigned as homework and are essential to success in the class.

    Assessments: Quizzes, tests, and individual performance reviews will be given to all students at regular intervals to provide parents with sufficient feedback to assign a grade.

    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Bien Dit!: Student Edition Level 3, 2013 edition (ISBN-13: 978-0547871691)

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Foreign Language for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    Prerequisites: French II

    2
    Edwige Pinover

    Salut! French with Friends is an introductory French class for elementary-aged students. The class will be taught in a predominantly immersion environment. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students or explain difficult concepts. French language instruction will be presented in a natural learning sequence beginning with nouns (such as colors, numbers, clothing, foods, animals, family members, days/dates, etc), adjectives, beginning verbs, greetings, and simple phrases. Songs, games, stories, and hands-on activities will be used in class to review vocabulary and phrases. Emphasis will be on conversation, but students will be encouraged to learn to spell and sound out written French. Aspects of Francophone culture such as holidays, foods, and traditions will be incorporated in the classes.
    Each quarter introduces new themes and new vocabulary in French, so continuing students can continue to build their language basics. However, themes and units are non-sequential, so students may enroll in this level in any quarter. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, and simple phrases while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Fluency should not be expected at this level.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Judy Okun
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    Geography Spotlight is virtual class facilitated by a college professor of geography and history. Through live, online presentations and rich discussions, teens will examine the globe, region-by-region, to gain an understanding of each corner of the world. Geography is much more than just political boundaries, bodies of water, and land forms! Physical geography will be reviewed, but the class will also take students on a tour of ethnic groups, languages, religions, population trends, migrations, trade, economy, agriculture, natural resources, cultural highlights, and the history that shaped the region. The group will review today's news to understand headlines and hot spots in the region and how happenings there impact the rest of the world. First semester will include a detailed tour through the Old World consisting of Europe, Middle East, and Africa. This is a survey course in which students are expected to be active online participants, but there is no homework or assessments.

    Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing.
    Topics in this Series: The Old World: Europe, Middle East & Africa (Semester 1), The New World: South, Central & North America (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.
    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in geography or humanities for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2
    Wyndy Frederick
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    Handchimes, also known as choirchimes, are a great beginner percussion instrument. Handchimes produce bright, clear, beautiful tones which some have said are among the purest tones in the musical world. Handchimes allow brand new ringers immediate success with the instrument. Students simply hold the instrument and snap their wrists to create perfect notes. With handchimes, new musicians avoid months of frustration of tuning an instrument, learning proper fingering, or fighting with the embouchure of a mouthpiece. Student who play handchimes learn to read musical notation and learn timing, rhythm, harmony, and melody, while experiencing the joy of playing with a group. If you are unfamiliar with handchimes, see this YouTube video for a student rendition of Ode to Joy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wI9iZTdzqp4 or this YouTube video of technical specifications and information from a manufacturer. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Waa7K5gJR5Y Handchimes are sometimes considered a precursor to handbells.

    In this class, students will enjoy playing as an ensemble and contributing to simple but beautiful songs with handchimes while learning to read music. A small concert at the end of the semester will showcase what the students have learned. Handchimes will be provided for students to use in class but will remain in the class set and not sent home for practice. Students will receive a notebook with rhythm exercises and theory pages to take home weekly. There is a $15.00 material fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class for the notebook and photocopies of sheet music.

    2
    Judith Harmon
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    You've dreamed about going to Hogwarts, and now is your chance to experience a year of magical classes! In this maker class, students will create projects inspired by their core classes at Hogwarts (Charms, Defense Against the Dark Arts, Herbology, Potions, and Transfiguration) and a Hogwarts guest professor. Students learn to work with a variety of materials and learn a broad range of crafting skills such as hand-sewing, painting, papercrafting (including precision cutting, folding, and stenciling) sculpting, and wireworking to create magical pieces inspired by the World of Harry Potter.

    Welcome to the first term at Hogwarts! In addition to your core wizarding classes, special projects will be inspired by guest Professor Quirrell such as a Time Turner, a Constellation Caster, and an Embossed Dragon Box.

    This is a great class for Harry Potter fans who love the magical world, even for those who have not read all of the books or watched all of the movies. Projects and class discussions are geared to not reveal significant series spoilers. Note: A few classes may include a Harry Potter-inspired food creation or personal care product. The ingredients will be identified in advance, and students with food or ingredient allergies or dietary restrictions will need to check before handling/consuming. Substitute ingredients cannot be provided for those with food allergies or restrictions.

    Topics in this Series: Quirrell's Creations (Quarter 1); Pomfrey's Potions (Quarter 2); Flitwick's Favorites (Quarter 3); and Lockhart's Fabrications (Quarter 4) Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $35.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: Students should bring good scissors for cutting paper/fabric, a ruler, and a low temp, mini hot glue gun to class each week.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Manal Hussein

    This year-long, hands-on science course is a survey of key concepts in the fields of Life Science, Physical Science, and Earth Science which will give 8th and 9th grade students the fundamentals they need to tackle high school-level Biology, Chemistry, Physics, or Environmental Science. Topics covered in this course will not only provide a foundation for higher level science, but will also boost the student's confidence and fluency in discussing scientific issues, applying scientific terminology, and using scientific equipment. Content covered in this course will also enable a teen to become a more educated reader and consumer of scientific news and information.

    General themes life sciences include life cycles, food webs, scientific classification, cell structure, and human body systems. Topics in chemistry include states of matter, atomic structure, elements and the Periodic Table, and chemical reactions and solutions. Themes in physics include motion, position, speed and acceleration, weight (mass), gravity, friction, buoyancy and density, and electricity and magnetism. The earth science unit will cover the rock cycle, minerals, rocks, fossils, weathering and erosion.

    In this class, students will learn about the principles of scientific investigations and engineering practices, the Scientific Method, and preparation of formal lab reports. They will practice taking measurements, recording data, converting units of measure, and related mathematical concepts such as significant figures, International System of Units, scientific notation, graphs, and data analysis. Students will learn how to provide evidence to support explanations and solutions for their investigations.

    This class is appropriate for a tween or teen who had limited middle school level science and who expects to pursue high school level science classes on a college-preparatory track. This class is also appropriate for a student who will likely pursue an arts- or vocational- focused path and for whom an overview of high school science concepts is sufficient.

    In general, a topic will be discussed one week and then the corresponding lab or activity will be performed in class the following week. Microscope work will be used in some life science labs. For a more robust introduction to life and lab sciences, students may want to concurrently register for the Dissection Lab class and/or the Bio Chem Learning Labs program.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class on reading and homework assignments.

    Assignments: All class announcements and assignments will be communicated via a Google Classroom.

    Assessments: Informal, qualitative and constructive feedback will be given on submitted assignments. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided.

    Textbook: Students should purchase Everything You Need to Ace Science in One Big Fat Notebook: The Complete Middle School Study Guide by Workman Publishing (ISBN # 978-0761160953)

    Materials: Students should bring the following supplies to each class: colored pencils, glue stick, pens or pencils to write with, and a ruler.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A lab fee of $50.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Credit: Homeschool families of 9th grade students may wish to count this course as a full credit in

    0
    Black Rocket
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    Do you want to learn the world's fastest growing programming language that is used by Google, NASA, YouTube and the CIA? Python is a versatile, easy-to-learn beginner-level programming language and gateway to foundational concepts in computer science.

    Students will learn how to code apps and games as they practice the computer science design cycle of writing code, executing the code, interpreting the results, revising the code syntax based on the output. The class will cover the fundamental building blocks of programming including: variables, mathematical operators, logical operators, and boolean arithmetic. They will also learn about data types, built-in functions, conditional statements, for- loops, defining functions, function stacks, interpreting error messages, exception handling, and add-on libraries. At each step, the class will create basic programs and fun, interactive content.

    Topics in this Series: Python Programming (Semester 1), JavaScript Programming (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: Algebra I, recommended

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Will be given in class.

    Assessments: Will not be given.

    Lab/Supply Fee: The class tuition includes a student technology fee that covers the rental of classroom laptops and all software and licenses installed on the laptops.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Technology or Career Elective for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2
    Kerry Diederich
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    This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week, students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art, artist, or culture and view sample works. Then, they will create a project in the style of the featured artist or culture using a wide variety of materials, colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.

    First quarter, Junior Artists will learn about French Artists from the genres of Impressionism and Post Impressionism to include Rodin, Cezanne, Seurat, Degas, Renior, Monet, Matisse and Gauguin. These artists were sculptors, painters, draftsmen, and print makers. Each artist influenced the art world with style, color study and interpretation in their own personal way. Students will discuss which artist featured dancers in his subjects, who experimented in color, and which was multi talented artist using many mediums. Junior artist's projects will vary, from painting, to doing draft drawings, to sculpting, and color study.

    Topics in this Series: Imitate the Impressionists (Quarter 1); Famous Photography (Quarter 2); Multi-Media Masters (Quarter 3); Native American Art (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Becca Sticha
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    Students will use LEGO to design and build simple engineering projects out of everyone's favorite building toy! In this 90 minute class, students will explore concepts and vocabulary in physics, mechanical engineering, structural engineering, aerospace engineering, and architecture while playing with their creations.

    First quarter, junior engineers will tackle Fantastic Fliers and Space Race with projects inspired by the Space Station, Shuttle, Mars Rover, Gondola Gliders, Helicopeters, and Airplanes.

    Each class begins with 10-minutes of free build from tubs of LEGO components followed by a short discussion and demonstration of the day's project and concepts. Students build individually or in groups. Instructors will provide individual assistance, facilitate challenges, performance testing, competitions, and modifications to projects.

    Notes:(1)Students must be minimum age 5 and able to separate from their parents for this class. (2) Projects are built from shared, Instructor-owned components, so students will not bring completed projects home. Parents, however, can step into class 15 minutes before the end of each session to photograph their child's construction.

    Topics in this Series: Fantastic Fliers & Space Racers (Quarter 1); Animal Architects (Quarter 2); Winter Workshop (Quarter 3); Amusement Park (Quarter 4)

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Karen Shumway
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    Why do I have to get shots? What is an appendix? Why do I get a fevers? Kids have lots of questions about their own bodies and development. Kids’ Clinic answers these questions and more in the context of fun, age-appropriate medical lessons and in-class activities which will introduce children to themes in science, medicine, anatomy, and biology. First quarter, kids will learn how to conduct a basic medical examination using the correct tools: stethoscope, blood pressure cuff, otoscope, and thermometer. The class will learn about vaccines, ear infections, colds, and food allergies. Finally, the class will begin human anatomy by learning several major organ systems of the human body- circulatory, respiratory, and musculoskeletal. There is a supply fee of $18.00 due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a take-home kit consisting of a medical coat, doctor name tag, class notebook, and a real stethoscope.

    Topics in this Series: Doctor (Quarter 1); Nutritionist (Quarter 2), Wilderness Medic (Quarter 3), ENT/Dentist- Hearing, Taste, Smell (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mimi Nyman
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    Kinder-aged cooks will enjoy making flavorful fall recipes and family favorites foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Festive Fall recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. In Kinder Kitchen, young chefs will make the same recipes as all other, higher level Compass cooking classes, however, some foods may be pre-cut and some steps may be simplified or completed by the cooking teacher in to support the speed and skills of the younger students. Students must be age 5 for this class. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

  • Sweet Pumpkin Dip
  • Chicken Vegetable Soup
  • Caprese Salad Bites
  • Honey Glazed Carrots
  • Spinach Artichoke Meatballs
  • Pineapple Coconut Cupcakes
  • Cheesy Rice Casserole with Green Chilies
  • Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get young students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.

    Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Students must be age 5 for this class. (3- and 4- year olds cannot be accommodated. No exceptions.)

    Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Rebecca Sticha
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    LEGO Robotics Training Team is a semester-long “boot camp” and training ground for future Compass FIRST LEGO League (FLL) teams. FLL is a time-intensive extracurricular activity with fall competitions, meaning competing teams must “hit the ground running” at the beginning of the school year. The Training Team will allow potential team members to work through a complete FLL challenge at a more relaxed pace to ensure that they understand the project and enjoy the process before forming Compass competition teams in 2023.

    Compass Training Team members will complete a full FLL challenge from a previous year. They will learn 21st century skills in robotics and programming while enjoying the camaraderie of working as a team to solve challenges. Kids will gain confidence and build skills in leadership and communication. The Training Team members will compete in-house against each other, but will not participate in a regional competition in 2022-23.

    FIRST LEGO League (FLL) is an accessible, guided, beginners’ robotics program that encourages teamwork, discovery, innovation, and problem-solving. The FLL competition is comprised of three components: the Robot Game, an Innovation Project, and Core Values. The Robot Game is an annual theme-based challenge that encourages kids to think of technology solutions to real-world problems. Teams design and program an autonomous robot that scores points on a themed table-top playing field. Past challenges have been inspired by environment, transportation, accessibility, and exploration. FLL team members engage in brainstorming, research, design, and coding while practicing the engineering design process of building, testing, re-building, re-testing, etc. Students will work with LEGO Mindstorms EV3 robotics components and use drag-and-drop coding blocks to program their robots on laptop computers. No robotics or programming experience is necessary to join the Training Team.

    FLL members have fun with friends, encourage and support each other, and learn the art of gracious competition. In addition to the robot challenge, FLL team members compete in short, on-the-spot challenge problems in the Innovation Project phase of the competitions. FLL is also known for its philosophies of “professionalism” and “cooperation” which are expressed in the organization’s Core Values of discovery, innovation, impact, inclusion, teamwork, and fun. Teams are also judged on how well they promote and exhibit these core values.

    The Compass Training Team is open to students in 2nd- 7th grade* with the expectation that they could form FLL teams in the 3rd-5th grade* or 6th-8th grade* categories the next year. (Please note that grade determined by age-based enrollment if the student were in traditional school without acceleration, grade skipping, or delayed entry.) The Training Team will also expose Compass parents to the FLL program which will require parents to serve as assistant coaches and team parents on a future team.

    There is a $40.00 supply/equipment fee payable to Compass on the first day for practice competition materials.

    2
    Dr. Anne Taranto
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    Roundtable is a seminar-style literature analysis and discussion class for high school students. Instead of a broad, general survey of literature, Roundtable students will examine a focused, "special topic" in literature through critical evaluation and rich discussion. Written works will be selected for their contribution to a specific genre and their influence on society.

    First semester, the class will examine the genre of dystopian literature with a critical eye on what elements are found in all dystopian fiction works. The class will examine the role of government and society in the imagined, oppressive or apocalyptic realms through a study of works such as: Brave New World (1932) by Aldous Huxley; Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949) by George Orwell; The Lottery (1948), a short story by Shirley Jackson; Farenheit 451 (Ray Bradbury)and Handmaid's Tale (1985) by Margaret Atwood. Genre-aligned short fiction will be incorporated throughout the semester.

    For this course, students should be engaged readers who come to class prepared to participate in intellectual discussion. Students are also expected to take part in in weekly class discussions by sharing their reflections and reactions to the readings and drawing conclusions and comparisons with other works. For each novel, the instructor will provide a guide with thoughtful questions and prompts on the reading that students must come to class prepared to discuss with textual evidence. The course instructor will serve as a facilitator-moderator to lead Socratic, "roundtable" discussions in addition to other in-class activities, such as partner and small group work, to further the class's understanding of the literature. This course will focus on comprehension and analysis through discussion rather than composition. Students will be assigned creative, short assignments to enhance and demonstrate their understanding of each novel such as re-writing a scene, imagining a conversation between characters from different books, developing a prequel or sequel scene, writing a review, etc.

    When discussing written works, students will be expected to give textual references such as specific quotes and examples- a higher-order high school and college-level skill that will be needed in later courses which require written analysis of literature. A key skill that will be taught in this class is how to annotate texts. Students will begin by examining samples of the instructor's own annotated novels then move to annotating the first short story in class as a group. For each novel, students will be given specific details to search for and annotate such as major plot points, character traits, interesting word choice, setting details, quotations, or questions. Later, students will be prepared to annotate automatically as they read with their own questions and reactions, a skill that can also be applied to the readings in other courses.

    Topics in this Series: Dystopian Discourse (Semester 1) and the Historical Novel (Semester 2). Continuing students from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: Students should be able to read and comprehend at a minimum 9th grade level for this course. Per Compass guidelines, accelerated 8th grade students may register for this course, however, in addition to the 9th+ grade reading level, they must possess the maturity to handle high school level topics and more mature discussion.

    Workload: Students should expect to read approximately 100 pages per week. For students who have challenges with reading, audio books may be used, but students should still be prepared to follow along and annotate in the physical novel.

    Assignments: Weekly assignments will be posted in the Canvas classroom management system. Students will need their own e-mail addresses to access the system, and parents may be set up as additional "observers" to their teen's Canvas account.

    Assessments: Points will be assigned for preparation, participation, and short assignments, and parents may use the total points earned to calculate a grade.

    Textbook/Materials: Because students will need clean, inexpensive copies of each novel to mark in, and because they must be able to refer to the passages on the same page numbers, a "class bundle" of mass market paperbacks will be pre-purchased for students. (See Supply Fee below).

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $41.50 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for the class book bundle.

    What to Bring: Students should bring the current novel, paper, pen or pencil and highlighter to class each week. Some students may wish to bring paper clips, adhesive flags or post-it notes for marking pages.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript. For a full credit in English, families would need to "bundle" this course with additional coursework in composition.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Natural Leaders
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    Natural Leaders is an outdoor education and leadership program. Each week, the group will venture into the woods surrounding Lake Fairfax for an authentic, immersive adventure featuring hiking, outdoor skills, leadership, and camaraderie. At each meeting, students take turns in different roles that are key to the group's success, safety, and fun such as: coordinator (plan out the group's schedule for the day); navigator (following the map, practice orienteering); naturalist (investigate and present a lesson about local plants, animals or ecology); skills coaches (research, practice, and demonstrate a skill to others, such as knot tying or whittling); game master (plan and teach an group game or challenge); and safety officer (present on a safety or first aid topic) They will also learn survival skills such as fire-building, outdoor edibles, building shelters, use of knives, and safety/first aid.

    The student-led portions of the program promote group cohesion, cooperation, and friendship, while students benefit from the positive peer pressure to come prepared for their weekly roles and responsibilities. Tweens and teens will also become more confident and comfortable as leaders and outdoor adventurers as their self-reliance skills grow. Natural Leaders is supervised by an experienced Natural Leaders mentor, trained and supported in providing a positive experience and managing safety. They typically have a passion for sharing nature with kids, and may have a background in a range of skills such as wilderness first aid, survival skills, tracking, primitive skills, and experience in hiking, camping, rock climbing, water sports, etc. Natural Leaders meets weekly rain, snow, or shine, in all temperatures. Students should always dress is layers for the forecasted weather conditions. Registered students will receive more detailed instructions about what to wear, what to bring, and where to meet prior to the start of the program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sandy Preaux
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    A substantial snowfall in Sapporo or record rain in Ratnapura are noteworthy, but what about methane snow on Pluto's peaks and helium rain with ammonia hailstones on Jupiter? There is nothing new about twice-daily tides at Tybee island, but did you know there is tidal activity on the moon Titan? We know Alaska's Mount Veniaminof is volcanic, but did you know there are also volcanoes on Venus? Seismic activity is called earthquakes on Earth but called marsquakes on Mars!

    Planetary science is an interdisciplinary field that combines geology, physics, chemistry, astronomy, seismology, and biology to our understanding of forces and phenomena on Earth and other planets. The class will examine Earth processes such as planetary formation and structure, cratering, tectonics, rock cycle, water cycle, sedimentary cycle, and aspects of oceanography and atmospheric science and evaluate the similar and different conditions on other planets and moons. Students will learn how space expeditions such as the Cassini, Galileo, and Kepler missions have collected valuable images and data on the conditions of other planets and their moons. They will discover how exoplanets have been identified and discuss what conditions might be found on these out-of-solar system planets. Just for fun, the class will tackle the contentious debate on whether Pluto and some other Kuiper belt bodies should be planets.

    In this year-long laboratory science course, students will pair weekly discussions with experiments and activities that demonstrate concepts such as crater-dating, energy impact of asteroids in crater formation, erosion/degradation of craters, rock classification, tectonics using an earthquake table, spectra/light analyses to determine mineral content, and more. The class will also learn about the tools of planetary science on earth and in space. Students' laboratory work may also include citizen scientist initiatives using data and images collected by NASA and other institutions. Some lab activities may use computers and a spreadsheet to analyze publicly available data.

    Note: This course will include select astronomy topics as they relate to the formation of planets and the solar system and the discovery of exoplanets, but this is not a course in astronomy. Themes such as galactic dynamics and life cycle of stars will not be covered. Also, while this course will include some concepts in atmospheric and oceanic sciences, there will be minimal overlap with the 2021-22 Atmospheric and Oceanic Science course at Compass, so students may take this course without substantial duplication.

    Class Meetings: This course meets two days per week with a one-hour lecture on Monday mornings at 10:00 am and a laboratory on Fridays at 10:00 am. Students register for the lab section, and enrollment in the lecture section is automatic.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class on reading and assignments.

    Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates.

    Assessments: Completed assignments will be assessed points. Parents can calculate a letter grade using the student's points earned divided by points available, in weighted categories that include assignments, labs, quizzes, tests, projects, and presentations. Parents may view all scoring and comments at any time through the Canvas site.

    Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase or rent Envisioning Exoplanets: Searching for Life in the Galaxy by Michael Carroll (ISBN: 978-1588346919)

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $100.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    What to Bring: Paper or notebook, pen or pencil

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit lab science for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2
    David Chelf
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    This is a complete course in high school PreCalculus which will cover fundamental concepts and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. Topics in Precalculus include functions: polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric (right angle and unit circle). In addition, the course will cover polar coordinates, parametric equations, analytic trigonometry, vectors, systems of equations/inequalities, conic sections, sequences, and series. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem solving.

    Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry in order to take this class.
    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Friday (day 1), lecture on Tuesday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Friday (day 8), and homework due the next Tuesday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Tuesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work.
    Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload. In lieu of a graphing calculator, students should have access to websites desmos.com and wolframalpha.com for graphing assignments.
    Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by checking that weekly homework sets are complete and giving periodic take-home tests; class participation is also strongly encouraged. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade.
    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Precalculus: Mathematics for Calculus, 6th edition by Stewart, Redlin, and Watson (ISBN-10 0840068077, ISBN-13 978-0840068071). A scientific calculator similar to the Casio fx-115ES PLUS is required for this class.
    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Precalculus for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: Algebra II

    2
    David Chelf
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    Preparation for Pre-Algebra is a year-long curriculum that will teach the fundamentals a student must master before embarking pre-algebra, algebra, and beyond. The class will review arithmetic skills, operations, and number theory. Key topics include fractions, rates, ratios, decimals, and percentages. Students will learn the computational operations of adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing fractions and decimals. They will learn what decimals stand for, how they relate to fractions, and how to convert between the two. They will discover how rates and ratios are also fractions. Students will learn how to work with negative numbers including strategies for completing all four common operations with negative numbers. The class will also cover exponents and orders of magnitude to make sense of really small and really big numbers and common operations.

    This class will also emphasize real world applications of the mathematical concepts through word problems so students become comfortable switching between prose (written descriptions) and mathematical representation (numbers, symbols) of real world examples such as money, mileage, weights, percentages, and scientific measures.

    Prerequisites: This course can be considered a pre-pre-algebra class that will teach the core concepts typically covered in later elementary school/early middle school after a general arithmetic curriculum and before pre-algebra. While different curriculums and student pacing will vary, this class would be appropriate for a student who has successfully covered long division, multiplication of multiple digit numbers, and an introduction to simple fractions and who has complete mastery of multiplication facts, skills often aligned with 5th grade mathematics.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class to complete practice problems, homework, and assessments.

    Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.

    Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by: checking that weekly homework sets are complete; spot-checking the full solution 1-2 select problems in class each week, and giving quarterly take-home tests. Points will also be awarded for class participation. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade.

    Textbook: Students should purchase the two class texts: "The Complete Book of Math, Grades 5-6" (ISBN# 978-1561896776) and "EP Math 5/6 Workbook" (ISBN# 979-8643323693).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Kathy Preisinger
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    Preschool Players introduces 3-year-olds and 4-year-olds to many facets of the music- singing, moving, dancing, listening, and playing instruments. The class will explore musical stories, famous composers, and different genres of music while playing a variety of percussion instruments (maracas, egg shakers, drums, sticks, triangles, woodblocks and more). Preschool players provide a fun, pressure-free environment to experience music and movement. Preschool Players helps every child acquire the essential building blocks for a future of musical learning! Students may join this class at any quarter, and they may return again and again since new music, themes, and activities are constantly introduced. Preschool Players has 40 minutes of structured activity, running from 10:05-10:45, with time before and after for gathering and transitions.

    2
    Dr. Michele Forsythe
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    Every parent knows that kids are curious, captivated, and quick to learn technology-based products. Programming Projects builds on that curiosity to introduce computer science basics, problem-solving, and computational thinking through play-based learning.

    First quarter, students will work with the Sphero indi car. The indi car is a color-sensing learning robot that encourages open-ended, imaginative solutons, and programming fundamentals for early learners. Indi learning robots have an on-board color sensor that detects the color it travels over. Each color gives a specific instruction to the indi robot (such as red = turn 90 degrees left). Students begin with screenless programming using colored block tiles to direct the travel of the indi car. Once students have mastered the screenless programming, they learn to decode the default responses and recode the indi car to react to new color-activated commands. Using the Sphero Edu Jr app on a phone or tablet, students will learn how to re-program the car by changing its response to each color and adding new features such as lights, sounds, or music. Students will enjoy building custom mazes and solving puzzles with the indi robotic car. All equipment and devices will be provided by the instructor. See the indi car here.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wWo3QBNPRRE

    Topics in this series include: Sphero indi Robotic Cars (Quarter 1), Scratch Coding (Quarter 2), Sphero Robotic Ball Quarter 3) and Tinkercad Design (Quarter 4)

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Natalie Di Vietri
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    Why do we see faces in inanimate objects? Why is yawning contagious? Why do all babies like peek-a-boo? The course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of behavior and mental processes of human beings. Students are exposed to psychological facts, principles and phenomena associated with each of the sub fields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice. Students will be challenged to think like a psychologist as they analyze research and design future experiments.

    This is a year-long, multi-level high school course. It will cover the nine major content areas covered on the College Board's AP Psychology Exam including: Scientific Foundations of Psychology; Biological Bases of Behavior; Sensation and Perception; Learning and Cognitive Psychology; Developmental Psychology; Motivation; Emotion and Personality; Clinical Psychology; and Social Psychology. Students will also learn to analyze data and psychological research studies. Themes in psychology are made tangible and approachable to students through rich, in-class discussion and debate, games, interactive models, and group work. Throughout the year, students will enjoy personalized surveys and assessments, such as those on learning style, parenting style, and personality type, and will complete individualized projects involving observations, case studies, interviews, or experiments.

    The class offers a substantive, full-credit experience and will be a mixture of lecture, discussion, group work, and short videos. There is some mature content discussed in this course, especially as it pertains to abnormal psychology. A section on sexual motivation, including homosexuality, will be covered for the AP curriculum. These topics will be discussed in a purely scientific manner, and students must be prepared to have a respectful discussion about these subjects.

    This class is offered in an online format, with the instructor and students connecting remotely to a virtual classroom using the Zoom conferencing platform. In order to ensure class participation and discussion, all students must have a laptop with a working camera and be visible, i.e. "on camera" at all times.

    The course is offered at two levels which meet together: Advanced Placement (AP), and Honors. Students can pick their desired workload. Students can always do more if they would like, but at both levels they are expected to keep up with weekly readings and homework which will prepare them for in-class discussions, assignments, and projects. All students will register online for the same course. Upon completion of the summer assignment, students must indicate which level they want to study by e-mail to the instructor by Sept 7, 2022.

    Advanced Placement (AP) AP courses allow a high school student to demonstrate academic rigor to colleges. There are two advantages to taking a course at the AP level: (1) Students who take the class at the AP level can earn an additional "quality" point in their GPA calculation (i.e. an A=5, B=4, etc.) for the challenging work. (2) AP students can elect to take an exam in the spring. Many colleges will award credit for an AP test score of 4 or 5. A student who takes the course at the AP level will be prepared for the exam in May 2023, but is not required to take the exam. AP students must make the decision about the exam in mid-October, after they have taken the first unit test in this course. Once the course has begun, students may move down a level (from AP to honors) at any time. However, once classes have started, students may not "bump up" a level from honors to AP.

    AP Practice Test For students who plan to take the AP test, there will be a mandatory practice test session during Compass's spring break in April 2023. The practice test session will be in-person at Compass in Herndon, VA, and students will receive same-day, in-person feedback from the instructor on their essays and responses to test questions. This is a valuable final step in preparing for the AP exam, and an online option is not available.

    Prerequisites: Students must be strong, independent readers at a high school or higher reading level. The text used is equivalent to a first year college textbook. Students can read a sample module HERE to confirm the reading level expected in the course.

    Workload: All students must read 2-4 modules (approximately 30 pages) per week and should expect to spend 4-5 hours outside of class for reading and homework, regardless of level. The amount and type of homework varies between honors and AP students.

    Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message the instructor and classmates. AP students will have additional work in the virtual AP classroom site through the College Board. Summer Assignment: Students will have one week of work to complete before classes begin. This will give students a feel for the different levels offered in the class. The summer assignment will cover Unit 1: Part 1 Psychology's History and Approaches and will be due prior to the first class. Successful completion of the summer assignment is a prerequisite take the course at the AP level.

    Assessments: Points will be assigned for participation, completed homework, projects, quizzes, and tests. Bonus assignments will also be made available throughout the year. A letter grade will not be assigned, but parents can use total points earned versus total points offered to assign a grade for purposes of a homeschool transcript. Parents can view total points earned at any time through the Canvas site.

    Textbook/Materials: Students should rent or purchase UPDATED Myers' Psychology for AP, 3rd edition (ISBN-13: 978-1319362546). All students must have a laptop with a working camera, as participation with the camera "on" is a class requirement. AP students will also need to have a no-cost AP Classroom account through the College Board website.

    Lab/Supply Fee: There is an additional class fee of $150.00 for students taking the class at the AP level to compensate the instructor for additional grading, preparation, and practice test session. Families of AP students will be invoiced for this fee in September. The fee to take the AP exam in May 2023 is not included. Each family will be responsible for registering, scheduling, and paying for their student's AP exam.

    Schedule: This course has several schedule changes to the Compass standard calendar to accommodate AP testing. Course meeting dates will be reflected on the Canvas site. Changes are as follows: 1/12/23 & 3/16/23 classes will be held. 4/6/23: AP practice exam. 5/11/23 & 5/18/23: classes will not meet.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete, full-year credit in Social Sciences for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Taliesin Knol

    The Industrial Revolution fueled national industries and drove the global demand for scarce resources. Empires rose and fell because of access to and dire need of key resources: from coal and iron to oil and food. Global empires leveraged their worldwide presence by importing resources needed at home and exporting goods and materials to far flung markets, building economic resilience, but also sparking envy from neighboring nations with imperial ambitions. These conflicts led to fierce competition, both commercially and militarily, as empires vied for the resources to feed their economies and populations.

    In this class, students will model the complex and interconnected economies of post-Industrial Revolution in the early twentieth century. The class will use a custom role-playing game (RPG) to simulate multiple, interacting industrial economies and global supply chains. Each student will begin the semester as the Head-of-State of a world power. They will make decisions within the framework of their historically accurate government type, such as the absolute monarchy of Tsarist Russia or a republic like France, but in true role-playing fashion, they will create characters and build their "backstories" to these heads of state. Students will practice managing labor forces and forging commercial and military alliances with classmates to secure resources and economic prosperity for their nations. Students will learn to balance the role of government in directing resources during war and peace to keep their populations safe, fed, and happy using the tools available to them.

    By the end of the semester, students will understand how each national economy is interdependent on others and the benefits of cooperative alliances versus forceful acquisition. They will see what role a good (or bad) government plays in encouraging and safeguarding investments, and for whose benefit? The class simulation will also stress the importance of keeping orderly records, making safe versus highly rewarding investments, and managing successful political relationships. By recreating the circumstances early 20th-century global economy and navigating the role playing game, students should understand the why and how of the history they've simulated.

    Topics in this Series: Global Supply Chain of the Early Twentieth Century (Semester 1), Global Supply Chain of Today (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: None

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Course documents including period plans, photographs and recreations will be made available through a class Google Drive link emailed to parents (and students who provide their email address), as well as a class reading list of articles/excerpts and YouTube playlist for any videos watched in class or assigned as homework.

    Assessments: Informal assessments will be given at the instructor's discretion, but assignments will not be scored or graded. Each student's financial success in the game will be an indicator of their learning and participation for purposes of assigning a grade. Parents will also be given shared access to their student's business plan with instructions and ledger, with instructor comments at the conclusion of class.

    Textbook/Materials: None

    What to Bring: Paper or notebook, pen or pencil

    Credit: Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History, Economics, or Business for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Taliesin Knol
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    This class will re-enact the great unseen intelligence battles of the Civil War- and learn about far more than spying in the process- using an RPG (role playing game).

    The Civil War was America's deadliest conflict and was fought on all the fronts that existed at the time- on land, at sea, and underground. Knowing your enemy is the surest way to defeat them, and in the Civil War everyone did their part. This class will focus on the clandestine activities of one of America's most successful spies, Elizabeth Van Lew, leader of the Richmond Underground, a Union spy ring which operated under the nose of the highest levels of the Confederate government. The class will role play as Richmond high society, simulating the wartime economy of the Capitol of the South, while working to either support the war effort or undermine it. (Or the third option, war profiteering by playing both sides.)

    The class will use a Role-Playing Game system, designed by the instructor for the Spy Games series of classes, to allow for "Dungeons and Dragons" style game play. Students will attempt to bluff, sneak, and steal their way into positions of power, completing secret objectives while trying to avoid detection and capture. Missions and information will have to be passed via historic methods, such as shift ciphers and code wheels, and as such, part of class will include lessons on basic cryptography. This will of course culminate in the Siege of Richmond, as the Union Army grinds its way into the South, and our student spies will be able to see and affect the scale of the outcomes of this (and other) major Civil War battles.

    Topics in this Series: Early American Spying in The Civil War (Semester 1), Modern American Spying in the Cold War (Semester 2)

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Period maps, photographs, and re-creations will be posted on a class Google Drive, and video links from YouTube will be e-mailed to parents and students for homework or supplemental investigation.

    Assessments: Will not be given.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mallory Shear
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    From superhero blockbusters to Shakespearian plays, musketeers to mythological heroes, and pirates and princesses, great stories on stage and screen have great fight scenes! Picture buccaneers Barbossa and Blackbeard in Pirates of the Caribbean or Rey versus Ren in the Star Wars sagas. Sometimes they use weapons and sometimes just their bare hands. Fight scenes can be thrilling, heart-breaking, or hilarious. This is the art of Stage Combat- creating the illusion of violence for storytelling in entertainment!

    First quarter, students will explore unarmed fighting techniques, like those used in a one-on-one fist fight or a backstreet brawl. The class will practice basic punches, basic kicks, and a sit-fall. They will also learn a realistic-looking hair pull and ear grab and how to portray realistic pain responses.

    Aspects of stage combat may look like fencing and martial arts, but are instead a different set of theatrical skills that mimic the contact sports, often in a dramatic and choreographed manner meant to convey conflict on stage or screen. Emphasis in stage combat is on safety, so techniques are learned and rehearsed in slow-motion and at increased distance between partners. Students will work with blunt, wooden dowels instead of bladed training weapons. The instructor will present and frequently review class safety rules. This class is best suited for students who are focused, have self-discipline, can follow instructions, and can work in a group.

    Topics in this Series: Bare Fists and Brawls- Unarmed Combat (Quarter 1); Comedy in Combat (Quarter 2), Swashbuckling, Single-Handed Sword (Quarter 3) Dueling, Double-Handed Broadsword (Quarter 4)

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Monica Dorosheff
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    Learn to play the violin! Students will learn the fundamentals of playing the violin using the Suzuki method. They will begin by learning how to hold the instrument, how to correctly grasp the bow, parts of the instrument, and the names of the open strings. Students will be taught sequential techniques by adding one finger at a time to each string until they can play a complete scale. The class will be taught to play in unison from a songbook of arranged works. At the end of the semester, the class will be able to play several simple tunes and will demonstrate for the parents.

    Music education enhances teamwork and cooperative learning and provides children with a path for self-expression. Scientific research has shown that music lessons not only improve organizational skills and executive functioning but that they also develop self-confidence.

    Class Expectations: Students will be asked to bring their violin, bow, and case to every class. In order to fully benefit from the in-class instruction, daily, at-home practice is expected. A student violin can be purchased or rented from most music stores and should be set up professionally by a local music store or a string luthier. The cost of the class sheet music is included. This is a 13-week semester class, and the week off will be announced by the instructor.

    2
    Jeff Virchow
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    Snappy comebacks, one-liners, sarcasm, exaggeration, irony...and teenagers. These things just go together! Improv gives kids an outlet for fun, creative stories and spontaneous humor. Teens who find amusement in the unexpected and humor in the unpredictable will enjoy improvisational acting!

    First semester, actors will explore the basics of improvisation, story-telling, and stagecraft through activities and exercises that encourage cooperation, communication, and teamwork. With fun, interactive improv games such as "Yes, and.." and "Improved Stories," students will learn how to use short form improv to play off each other to convey character, emotion, situation, setting, and to highlight their scene partners. The variety of improv activities each week will help develop the "group mind" and class dynamic. Small group and partner work will boost teens' confidence and trust in a supportive environment.

    Improvisation is the art of entertaining with connected, unpredictable twists and turns often seen from the great comedians and best live entertainers. Improv students will improve their ability to think on-their-feet, play off each other, and react with spontaneous wit, sarcasm, and irony. Actors' creative thinking and communication skills will be strengthened as they work "outside-of-the-box" and learn to read their audience.

    Improv can be for everyone! No previous experience is needed. Beginners are welcome, and experienced students will further develop their improv skills. If you have taken this class before, go ahead and take it again because no two classes are ever alike. This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, flexible, and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work collaboratively in a group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class.

    Topics in this Series: Innovative Improv (Semester 1), Immersive Improv (Semester 2. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hour per week outside of class.

    Assignments: If any, will be sent to parents and students by e-mail.

    Assessments: Informal, qualitative feedback will be given in class throughout the semester. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Taliesin Knol
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    First semester begins with the last successful occupation of Britain, the Norman Conquest by William, Duke of Normandy. The class will examine the background of Normandy and how the conquest succeeded in eliminating the existing Saxon nobility. Students will learn how the Normans were able to maintain control of the countryside with a comparatively small occupying force, using control of language, law, and lethal force. In addition, we will study the resistance, both the real forces and the legends the resistance inspired in the English people. The class will evaluate the history of resistance with the earlier British peoples, comparing how previous conquests affected their culture. The class will transition to where the refugees of William’s purges fled, the Byzantine Empire, but at an earlier date, when mega empires still vied for control of the Middle East. We will see how once again a new religion would inspire a total cultural overhaul with the Arab Conquests.

    Students will examine case studies taken from primary source documents in art and literature to learn how warfare, architecture, politics, law, and religion interplay to create the history of the world. The class will create a mock feudal system in which students will take collaborative and/or competitive roles with classmates to better understand medieval society.

    Topics in this Series: Medieval Upheaval 1066 (Semester 1), Crusades and Conquests (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. Prerequisites: None Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class on readings. Assignments: Reading assignments will be assigned in class and noted in the weekly e-mail. Assessments: Short, open note in-class quizzes will be given. In addition, students will complete a semester project based on the Bayeux Tapestry. Textbook/Materials: A list of needed texts will be e-mailed to students mid-summer.What to Bring: Paper or notebook; pen or pencil; assigned texts. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in world history for purposes of a high school transcript. For a more complete high school credit in Medieval History, students could take Fall 2022 courses in Ancient Justice and Art History.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    YMCA
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    Compass now offers Homeschool Swim Lessons through Reston YMCA! The YMCA is a clean, bright modern recreation facility located at 12196 Sunset Hills Road, Reston, VA 20190 (0.9 miles/ 3 minute drive from Compass's classroom facility.) Lessons are offered at 3 age levels: "Sunfish" (ages 3.5-5), "Stingrays" (ages 6-8, grades 1-3), and "Sharks" (ages 9-12, grades 4-6) and 2 ability levels: Beginners and Intermediate.

    Lessons at the Sunfish Beginner level will progress through the YMCA's swimming curriculum to include: water acclimation, floatation, water movement, putting face in the water, swimming 5 feet without a floatation device, and becoming comfortable on back in water. Please note that these skills will be introduced and progress at different rates depending on the comfortable level and experience of enrolled students and may take more than one quarter to complete. At times, students might be moved to a different swimming group (same day, same time, different instructor) to better match the experience level of enrolled children.

    Lessons are 40 minutes long, running from 0:05 until 0:45 after the hour, leaving enough time to towel dry, change clothes, and return to Compass for your next class. Students should bring a swimsuit, towel, and change of clothes. Googles and swim caps are optional.

    A parent (or parent proxy) is required to remain on site. Parents may wait on poolside benches or lobby seating. YMCA waivers must be signed and returned for each swimmer. All registration is completed through Compass. All YMCA swimming classes are taught by certified, experienced, background-checked adult instructors with experience teaching children.

    Class sizes are small with 3-5 children. If there is greater interest per hour or per level, please add your child's name to the waitlist because YMCA may be able to add instructors. Consider enrolling your child in both Tuesday and Thursday classes to improve their rate of learning.

    2
    YMCA
    Add

    Compass now offers Homeschool Swim Lessons through Reston YMCA! The YMCA is a clean, bright modern recreation facility located at 12196 Sunset Hills Road, Reston, VA 20190 (0.9 miles/ 3 minute drive from Compass's classroom facility.) Lessons are offered at 3 age levels: "Sunfish" (ages 3.5-5), "Stingrays" (ages 6-8, grades 1-3), and "Sharks" (ages 9-12, grades 4-6) and 2 ability levels: Beginners and Intermediate.

    Lessons at the Sunfish Beginner level will progress through the YMCA's swimming curriculum to include: water acclimation, floatation, water movement, putting face in the water, swimming 5 feet without a floatation device, and becoming comfortable on back in water. Please note that these skills will be introduced and progress at different rates depending on the comfortable level and experience of enrolled students and may take more than one quarter to complete. At times, students might be moved to a different swimming group (same day, same time, different instructor) to better match the experience level of enrolled children.

    Lessons are 40 minutes long, running from 0:05 until 0:45 after the hour, leaving enough time to towel dry, change clothes, and return to Compass for your next class. Students should bring a swimsuit, towel, and change of clothes. Googles and swim caps are optional.

    A parent (or parent proxy) is required to remain on site. Parents may wait on poolside benches or lobby seating. YMCA waivers must be signed and returned for each swimmer. All registration is completed through Compass. All YMCA swimming classes are taught by certified, experienced, background-checked adult instructors with experience teaching children.

    Class sizes are small with 3-5 children. If there is greater interest per hour or per level, please add your child's name to the waitlist because YMCA may be able to add instructors. Consider enrolling your child in both Tuesday and Thursday classes to improve their rate of learning.

    2
    YMCA
    Add

    Compass now offers Homeschool Swim Lessons through Reston YMCA! The YMCA is a clean, bright modern recreation facility located at 12196 Sunset Hills Road, Reston, VA 20190 (0.9 miles/ 3 minute drive from Compass's classroom facility.) Lessons are offered at 3 age levels: "Sunfish" (ages 3.5-5), "Stingrays" (ages 6-8, grades 1-3), and "Sharks" (ages 9-12, grades 4-6) and 2 ability levels: Beginners and Intermediate.

    Lessons at the Sunfish Intermediate level will progress through the YMCA's swimming curriculum to include: all of beginner-level skills plus: swimming 15 feet with face in water and arms out of water without a floatation device; swimming 15 feet on back without a floatation device; swimming one length of the pool on back and front; and treading water for 30 seconds. Please note that these skills will be introduced and progress at different rates depending on the comfortable level and experience of enrolled students and may take more than one quarter to complete. At times, students might be moved to a different swimming group (same day, same time, different instructor) to better match the experience level of enrolled children.

    Lessons are 40 minutes long, running from 0:05 until 0:45 after the hour, leaving enough time to towel dry, change clothes, and return to Compass for your next class. Students should bring a swimsuit, towel, and change of clothes. Googles and swim caps are optional.

    A parent (or parent proxy) is required to remain on site. Parents may wait on poolside benches or lobby seating. YMCA waivers must be signed and returned for each swimmer. All registration is completed through Compass. All YMCA swimming classes are taught by certified, experienced, background-checked adult instructors with experience teaching children.

    Class sizes are small with 3-5 children. If there is greater interest per hour or per level, please add your child's name to the waitlist because YMCA may be able to add instructors. Consider enrolling your child in both Tuesday and Thursday classes to improve their rate of learning.

    Prerequisites: Beginner Level

    2
    YMCA
    Add

    Compass now offers Homeschool Swim Lessons through Reston YMCA! The YMCA is a clean, bright modern recreation facility located at 12196 Sunset Hills Road, Reston, VA 20190 (0.9 miles/ 3 minute drive from Compass's classroom facility.) Lessons are offered at 3 age levels: "Sunfish" (ages 3.5-5), "Stingrays" (ages 6-8, grades 1-3), and "Sharks" (ages 9-12, grades 4-6) and 2 ability levels: Beginners and Intermediate.

    Lessons at the Sunfish Intermediate level will progress through the YMCA's swimming curriculum to include: all of beginner-level skills plus: swimming 15 feet with face in water and arms out of water without a floatation device; swimming 15 feet on back without a floatation device; swimming one length of the pool on back and front; and treading water for 30 seconds. Please note that these skills will be introduced and progress at different rates depending on the comfortable level and experience of enrolled students and may take more than one quarter to complete. At times, students might be moved to a different swimming group (same day, same time, different instructor) to better match the experience level of enrolled children.

    Lessons are 40 minutes long, running from 0:05 until 0:45 after the hour, leaving enough time to towel dry, change clothes, and return to Compass for your next class. Students should bring a swimsuit, towel, and change of clothes. Googles and swim caps are optional.

    A parent (or parent proxy) is required to remain on site. Parents may wait on poolside benches or lobby seating. YMCA waivers must be signed and returned for each swimmer. All registration is completed through Compass. All YMCA swimming classes are taught by certified, experienced, background-checked adult instructors with experience teaching children.

    Class sizes are small with 3-5 children. If there is greater interest per hour or per level, please add your child's name to the waitlist because YMCA may be able to add instructors. Consider enrolling your child in both Tuesday and Thursday classes to improve their rate of learning.

    Prerequisites: Beginner Level

    2
    Taliesin Knol
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    Why read about key military battles on maps or in books when you can learn about them hands-on, in three dimensions, using historical miniature gaming? In 3D History, pivotal engagements come to life for new and experienced students, as they navigate a table-top terrain, deploy hundreds of miniature soldiers, ships, and tanks... all while playing a military strategy game. Each student will have the opportunity to fight a battle from both sides, allowing them to test various strategies, try multiple scenarios, predict different outcomes, and rewrite history- an effective way to gain a deeper understanding of what actually happened and why!

    When America entered the war in 1941, the Allied leaders agreed they had one priority: the destruction of Nazi Germany's ability to wage war and Hitler's nightmare regime. However, an army is not built overnight, and it took time to learn how to fight in the modern era. It was not enough to simply have the most tank or planes. An army had to be able to leverage them on the battlefield with proper coordination and up-to-date tactics. Learned in the bloody North Africa campaign, the US Army joined its allies to sweep across the Mediterranean into Italy. Their hope was to knock the birthplace of facism out of the war quickly and enter Germany to end the war in a fast, blitzkrieg style. This was not to be, as the Allies still had some lessons to learn, necessitating the most famous invasion in history, Operation Overlord, and the liberation of France by punching through the vaunted Atlantic Wall into Fortress Europe. This began the road to V-day in Europe for the Allied powers who reached the Soviet Union's Eastern Front in just under a year. In that year, the entire population of Germany was in the path of destruction as the Allies fought non-stop an increasingly desperate German army that was losing its dream of a thousand-year empire.

    Students will fight the last battles of the European theater on land, sea, and air using a wide range of miniature soldiers, vehicles, and ships. From the largest amphibious invasions in history to tank battles across France, Italy, and Germany, students will study the technical and strategic elements that led to the outcomes of the battle. They will attempt to recreate the Axis or Allied successes (or failures) in a miniature strategy game. Upon completing the semester, every student will understand the consequences of the war, the objectives of both sides, and how successful or realistic these objectives were. This will be supported with primary sources, newsreels from the time, propaganda material, and modern analysis.

    Note: This is a 1 hour, 55 minute class with a 10-minute break part way through.

    Topics in this Series: WWII- The Invasion of Fortress Europe 1943-45
    (Semester 1) and WWII- Operation Downfall 1944-45 (Semester 2).

    Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Period maps, photographs, and re-creations will be posted on a class Google Drive, and video links from YouTube will be e-mailed to parents and students for homework or supplemental investigation.

    Assessments: Will not be given.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon

    Kids take to the stage as they collaboratively write and perform their very own play with unique characters and an original storyline. What happens when campers have to deal with tent troubles, campfire calamities, a bothersome bear and other camping catastrophes?

    Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other, then read through the two, prepared scripts together. Through group activities and guided discussion, they will create new characters, brainstorm variations, craft plot changes, add lines, and cast their parts. The instructor will then update and customize the class script with the students' input.

    The class will learn the practical aspects of acting, as they work on script read-through, blocking, costume/prop design, and planning the show. Students will develop their own "actor's toolkit" of voice, body, and imagination in this creative process! Actors will grow in confidence and communication skills in preparation for a final sharing with parents on the final day of the quarter.

    Once the script is fully developed with everyone's parts, about half-way through the quarter, it will be emailed to parents. Parents will be expected to help their children memorize their script/lines/cues and assemble a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity. Note: Students who are emerging readers (not able to read at a 3rd/4th grade level) would be better suited to the Young Actor's Playhouse class, rather than this level.

    Topics in this Series: Camping Catastrophe (Quarter 1), Mystery after Midnight (Quarter 2), Fractured Fairy Tales (Quarter 3), Upside-Down Universe (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Jeff Virchow

    Social dancing does not have to be slow or stuffy! There is energy in the ballroom with Action Dance! Students will learn the dynamic, rhythmic dances of the Caribbean: Salsa (Mexican-Cuban), Merengue (Dominican Republic), Rhumba (Afro-Cuban), and Cha-Cha (triple step Cuban). Emphasis in the class will be on having fun and learning techniques to help dancers be comfortable and relaxed. Social dances encourage confidence, social presence, posture, and poise in teens. Social dancing is partner-based dance; consider signing up with a friend! Please note that in order to demonstrate some steps and forms, students may occasionally be invited to partner with their instructor.
    Topics in this Series: Action Dance: Caribbean & Latin (Semester 1), Action Dance: Swing & Shag (Semester 2), etc. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.
    Prerequisites: None
    Assessments: Informal feedback will be given in class. Formal assessments or grades will not be given.
    What to Wear: Students should wear loose, comfortable clothing.
    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in fine arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    David Chelf
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    This is a complete course in high school Algebra II which will cover fundamental concepts and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. Topics in Algebra II include linear functions, systems of equations and inequalities, quadratic functions and complex numbers, exponential and logarithmic functions, rational and irrational algebraic functions, and quadratic relations and systems. In addition, this course will cover higher degree functions with complex numbers, sequences and series, probability, data analysis, and trigonometric and circular functions. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem solving.

    Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation Algebra I in order to take this class.
    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Friday (day 1), lecture on Tuesday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Friday (day 8), and homework due the next Tuesday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Tuesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work.
    Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload. In lieu of a graphing calculator, students should have access to websites desmos.com and wolframalpha.com for graphing assignments.
    Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by checking that weekly homework sets are complete and giving periodic take-home tests; class participation is also strongly encouraged. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade.
    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Algebra and Trigonometry: Functions and Applications- Prentice Hall Classics (ISBN-10 0131657100, ISBN-13 978-0131657106). A scientific calculator similar to the Casio fx-115ES PLUS is required for this class.
    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Algebra II for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: Algebra I

    2
    Fatimah Aziz
    Add

    Are you interested in learning a new language that is used right here in America? Are you intrigued by a modern language that has no written form? Do you want to find out why American Sign Language is much more closely linked to French Sign Language than British Sign Language? If so, American Sign Language (ASL) is a great language for you! In this class, students will learn the basic skills in production and comprehension of ASL while covering thematic units such as personal and family life, school, social life, and community. Each unit will include presentations and readings on Deaf culture and Deaf history. Students will learn fingerspelling and numbers, developing conversational ability, culturally appropriate behaviors, and fundamental ASL grammar. Class time will be dedicated to interactive ASL activities and face-to-face signing practice with the instructor and partners.

    ASL students will have a Deaf instructor. She regularly teaches all-hearing classes and is an excellent role model for students to meet and interact with a native speaker of ASL and to lean natural facial expressions, gestures, and body language used in Deaf communications. ASL students will have more confidence when they encounter Deaf instructors in college or greet speakers of ASL in social settings. Because the instructor is Deaf, students are not permitted to speak aloud in class. This approach improves visual attention and encourages immersion in the language. Students will be able to ask questions of the instructor by writing on individual white boards, but they will be encouraged to sign in order to communicate with the instructor. Lessons are facilitated with Power Point presentations, and a professional ASL interpreter will assist the class on the first day of class. Enrolled students are not expected to know any sign language prior to beginning ASL I.

    Hundreds of colleges and universities, including all public institutions of higher learning in Virginia, accept ASL as a distinct foreign language. This allows hearing and Deaf students to fulfill foreign language requirements for admission to college. Teens who have difficulty writing, spelling, or have challenging pronunciation in English, can be successful with ASL as a second or foreign language choice. Penn State University research demonstrated that the visual and kinesthetic elements of ASL helped to enhance the vocabulary, spelling, and reading skills in hearing students.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours each week outside of class on required vocabulary exercises, readings, and signing practice.

    Assignments: Homework assignments will be posted online in the Canvas digital classroom platform. There may be some brief written assignments, but for most homework assignments, students will be asked to post short videos of themselves signing. Students will need either a camera phone or webcam to complete these assignments.

    Assessments: The instructor will assign points using a class rubric for the parent's use in assigning a course grade. Course rubrics will evaluate students on their sign production, fingerspelling, ASL grammar, facial expressions including "above the nose" grammar (brows and body movement), and "below the nose" modifiers (lip expressions).

    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent "Signing Naturally Units 1-6 workbook" (ISBN# 978-1581212105) which includes a DVD or signing videos. This class will cover units 1-4.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in World Languages for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2
    Ney Mello
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    If you like to "Turn Up the Music" (Chris Brown, 2012), "Play That Funky Music" (Wild Cherry, 1976), or "Dance to The Music" (Sly & The Family Stone, 1967), then you know that there is an impressive variety of American music. America is the birthplace of some of the most influential genres of music and musicians in the world. Much of the world's modern music has roots in American blues, jazz, or rock, while American music has elements from West Africa, the West Indies, and diverse communities such as New Orleans, Detroit, Memphis, St. Louis, Nashville, Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and the Bronx. American music has influenced behavior and culture such as dance, entertainment, fashion, technology, popular opinion, lexicon, marketing, and more.

    This is a focused class in music appreciation for students who enjoy listening to or playing music. The class will evaluate a century of American music by listening to and discussing influential performers, writers, and producers. Students will learn to identify music elements unique to each genre- melody, rhythm, harmony- and will develop a musical vocabulary to help them think and talk about musical works. They will also explore innovations in instruments and technologies that evolved with the music, such as drums being placed in a "set" at the advent of jazz music, the rise of electric instruments, and electronic production/mixing.

    First semester will explore music from the 1920s to the 1960s encompassing the genres of blues, ragtime, jazz, boogie-woogie, swing, soul, rhythm and blues, rock-and-roll, Motown, pop, funk, disco. Featured artists will include Louis Armstrong, Miles Davis, Marvin Gaye, Chuck Berry, Elvis, James Brown, Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell, Simon & Garfunkel, Fleetwood Mack, Robert Johnson, Scott Joplin, John McLaughlin, and many others. Find out why the Rolling Stones and the Beatles claim they were influenced by Little Richard, and why the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame described Jimi Hendrix as "arguably the greatest instrumentalist in the history of rock music."

    Like other fine arts classes, music appreciation is a fun break from academics which enriches and engages students in a topic they enjoy. Genres that will not be highlighted in this course include gospel, folk, country, western, tejano, reggae, zydeco, or salsa.

    Topics in this Series: 19202-1960s (Semester 1), 1970s-2020s (Semester 2), etc. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. .

    2
    Peter Snow
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    Students will enjoy the logic and challenge of the timeless strategy board game as they learn and play chess with classmates. In Advanced Beginner Chess 1, students will learn skills and strategies that build upon each other such as: including a review of castling, pawn promotion, and en passant rules, notation, basic mates, drawing a game and draw rules, battery and back-rank checkmates, development of bishops and rooks in the middlegame, and overextended pieces.

    Learning and playing chess supports problem solving, decision making, critical and creative thinking, general cognitive ability, scholastic skills, and mathematical achievement (Univ. of Minnesota). Experts suggest that the game of chess teaches analytical and disciplined thinking skills, while raising self esteem, teaching motivation and determination, and sportsmanship (Kasparov Foundation). Each class will be spent half on technique and half in practice matches with classmates while the instructor coaches. Students should have 15-20 hours of chess instruction prior to enrolling in Advanced Beginner Chess, or a working knowledge of most skills taught in the Compass Beginner Chess level.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mimi Nyman

    Students will enjoy making flavorful fall recipes and family favorites that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Fall Fare recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

  • Sweet Pumpkin Dip
  • Chicken Vegetable Soup
  • Caprese Salad Bites
  • Honey Glazed Carrots
  • Spinach Artichoke Meatballs
  • Pineapple Coconut Cupcakes
  • Cheesy Rice Casserole with Green Chilies
  • Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.

    Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group.

    Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Mimi Nyman
    Add

    Students will enjoy making flavorful fall recipes and family favorites that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Fall Fare recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

  • Sweet Pumpkin Dip
  • Chicken Vegetable Soup
  • Caprese Salad Bites
  • Honey Glazed Carrots
  • Spinach Artichoke Meatballs
  • Pineapple Coconut Cupcakes
  • Cheesy Rice Casserole with Green Chilies
  • Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.

    Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group.

    Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mimi Nyman
    Add

    Students will enjoy making flavorful fall recipes and family favorites that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Fall Fare recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

  • Sweet Pumpkin Dip
  • Chicken Vegetable Soup
  • Caprese Salad Bites
  • Honey Glazed Carrots
  • Spinach Artichoke Meatballs
  • Pineapple Coconut Cupcakes
  • Cheesy Rice Casserole with Green Chilies
  • Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.

    Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group.

    Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Dr. Anne Taranto
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    In Cover-to-Cover, middle school-aged students will read renowned classics and award-winning young adult literature. This book discussion group will examine a different theme each quarter to introduce students to literary analysis. Students will read, examine, and compare two full-length novels that share similar themes through facilitated discussions and extension activities which encourage students to make personal connections to what is read. The group will evaluate themes, characters, setting, and writing style.

    First quarter, students will examine the genre of adventure novel with The Lord of the Flies by William Golding and The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Orczy.

    Assigned chapters are expected to be read at home, either as read-aloud, individual silent reading, or listening to the unabridged audiobook. Students should come to class prepared to discuss the reading. Classroom discussions will emphasize the use of textual evidence when explaining thoughts and opinions. Students will be assigned creative, short assignments to enhance and demonstrate their understanding of each novel such as quote explications, thematic questions, or imagining a conversation between characters from different books.

    Topics in this Series: Adventure (Quarter 1); Historical Fiction (Quarter 2); Fantasy (Quarter 3); and Sci-Fi (Quarter 4).

    Textbook/Materials: Because students will need clean, inexpensive copies of each novel to mark in, and because they must be able to refer to the passages on the same page numbers, copies of mass market paperbacks will be pre-purchased and bundled for students. (See Supply Fee below).

    Supply Fee: A class fee of $18.50 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class.

    What to Bring: Students should bring the current novel, paper, pen or pencil and highlighter to class each week. Some students may wish to bring paper clips, adhesive flags or post-it notes for marking pages.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Becca Sticha

    Students will learn the language of undercover agents in this children's cryptology class. Cryptology is the science of secret writing which uses math and logical reasoning to decode and create mystery alphabets. Each week, students will learn one or more ciphers and will practice using them to decode messages and write secret messages to each other!

    Student operatives will begin their stealth options by making their own cipher wheels, cipher strips, and experimenting with shift ciphers. They will learn about algorithms and keys and test different recipes for invisible ink. The quarter will culminate in a collaboration to crack a variety of codes to flee a classroom Escape Room which may include challenges such as coded letters, picture clues, mirror image writings, puzzling word searches, and cryptograms. We will also share the stories of famous writers and code-crackers including some female cryptologists and Navajo Code Talkers.

    Topics in the Series: Spies (Quarter 1), Secret Agents (Quarter 2), Sleuths (Quarter 3), and Superheroes (Quarter 4).

    Supply Fee Included.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Black Rocket
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    Middle schoolers embrace technology and easily navigate digital sources like apps, webpages, and online video platforms. In Digital Studio, they will transform from users of these tools to the designer and coders of their own content. Learn the techniques used by Hollywood masters to create FX magic and visual illusions in videos such as Avengeres, Star Wars, and Harry Potter. Amaze your friends when you have edited a video to place a lightsaber in your hands or to walk out of a raging fire. Whether you want to enhance your YouTube videos or animate a scene for a project, this class teaches the visual effects tools you need such as the dynamics of camera angles, editing, graphic layering, and sound effects. Then watch as your new creations take your YouTube channel content to the next level!.

    Digital Studio is a computer lab environment in which students work through the Black Rocket curriculum under the direction of computer science coaches. The class tuition includes a student technology fee that covers the use of instructor-provided classroom laptops loaded with the required software, applications, and licenses. At the end of the class, students will receive access to Black Rocket's interactive learning platform to continue their coding journey at home.

    Topics in this Series: YouTube FX Masters (Semester 1) and Virtual Reality (Semester 2),

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
    Add

    Imagine young Jim Hawkins hiding on the schooner, Hispaniola, when he learns that the crew are secretly ex-pirates led by the one-legged cook, Long John Silver who plans a mutiny to murder the captain and steal the treasure. How would you portray this scene on stage?

    Have you ever wondered what happens behind the scenes to bring a production to stage? It takes a team of people to put on a show: stage managers, specialized designers for costumes, sets, props, lighting, music, and sound. There are also choreographers, fight directors, a dramaturge, a technical director, casting director, publicist, producer, and stage director to guide them all.

    This class will explore the different roles of the production team, designers, and crew responsibilities as students analyze a script and make decisions as if they were the Director. Under the guidance of a theater professional, students will learn how the pre-production and design teams develop the director's vision to bring a production to life!

    Students will begin with reading and analyzing a script without stage directions or notes. The group will make technical and artistic decisions to formulate a vision for the production. Students will learn to notate stage directions (such as 'stumble in from downstage right') and how to block scenes. They will make aesthetic decisions on set design and props, costuming, and technical effects such as lighting, sound effects, or music. The class will consider casting requirements and discuss the audition process. Example class projects include sketching costume concepts, creating a miniature set, and preparing audition notices.

    This class is recommended for beginners as well as experienced theatre and production students. Every script is different and offers new sets of challenges. The emphasis in this course is on the vision, design decisions, and the teamwork required to bring a performance to stage, but the class will not be putting on an actual production. Students who want to further their study of theatrical production might wish to co-register for the 2022-23 courses on sewing, Crafting for Cosplay, stage combat, or one of several acting/improvisation classes.

    Topics in this Series: Treasure Island (Semester 1) and Phantom of the Opera (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: None

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Will be summarized and posted on a Google classroom site.

    Assessments: Informal qualitative feedback will be given in class throughout the semester. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided.

    Textbook/Materials: Script furnished by instructor.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $30.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a copy of the licensed script and project materials.

    What to Bring: Script and notes.

    Non-Meeting Days: In addition to the scheduled days-off on the published Compass schedule, this class does not meet on 10/31/2022.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts, Performing Arts, or Career Exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    The Science Place
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    A powerful hurricane season forecasted. Polar ice caps receding. Hydraulic fracking. Solar power. Everywhere we look, Environmental Science is in the news! Environmental science is an exciting interdisciplinary study that merges the fields of geology, biology, chemistry, and meteorology to explain the earth as an interconnected system with both natural and human-made influences. This year middle schoolers will sample Environmental Science topics in a hands-on, lab-based investigation.

    First quarter, students will begin their study of Geology and Soil Sciences and discover the ways geology, paleontology, soil science and agricultural sciences are used in environmental research. The class will learn about techniques such as carbon dating, and sediment and ice core analysis, that scientists use to investigate current environmental issues such as human impacts to carbon and nitrogen cycling, pesticide use, the use of genetically modified organisms to improve agricultural yields, and the ongoing loss of pollinators. Students will do in-class labs to make predictions, collect and graph data, draw conclusions, and develop models of key Environmental Science processes. Topics in this year s class series include: Geology and Soil Sciences (first quarter); Atmospheric Science (second quarter); Water Science (third quarter); and Current Issues in Environmental Science (fourth quarter). There is a $10.00 lab fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for consumable materials.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Edwige Pinover

    Bonjour! French Foundations is an introductory class for middle school-aged students. The class will be taught in a predominantly immersion environment. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students or explain difficult concepts. French language instruction will be presented in a natural learning sequence beginning with nouns (such as colors, numbers, clothing, foods, animals, days/dates, etc), adjectives, greetings, and simple phrases. Students will learn beginning grammatical constructions such as noun-verb agreement, noun-adjective agreement, adjective placement, and the rules of regular verb conjugation. Students will be encouraged to speak aloud and converse with classmates, but also to learn to sound out, spell, and read beginning, written French. Aspects of Francophone culture such as holidays, foods, and traditions will be incorporated in the classes.
    Each quarter introduces new themes and new vocabulary in French, so continuing students can continue to build their language basics. However, themes and units are non-sequential, so students may enroll in this level in any quarter. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, grammar, and usage while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Students should be at grade level in their reading. Fluency should not be expected at this level.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Edwige Pinover
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    Bonjour and get ready for a full year of beginner level high school French! This is a conversation-focused program in which students will build their vocabulary quickly and learn essential grammar skills in French. Vocabulary will include numbers, time, dates, seasons, school, free time activities/hobbies, likes/dislikes, personal descriptions, family relationships, emotions, food/restaurants, and places/locations in town. There will be a strong emphasis on competency using regular and irregular present tense verbs and common grammar concepts such as articles, pronouns, adjectives, and comparative phrases.

    Class will be conducted primarily in French and will focus on listening and speaking skills, asking and answering questions, and correct use of grammar. At home, students will be responsible for memorizing vocabulary and grammar, completing homework assignments, and watching both grammar instruction and language immersion videos.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 30-45 minutes per day, 4 days per week on homework outside of class.

    Assignments: Are sent by e-mail to parents and students. Students must have access to a computer and internet service for computer-based videos and practice tools that are assigned as homework and are essential to success in the class.

    Assessments: Quizzes, tests, and individual performance reviews will be given to all students at regular intervals to provide parents with sufficient feedback to assign a grade.

    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Bien Dit!: Student Edition Level 1 2013 (French Edition) (ISBN-13 978-0547871790)

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Foreign Language for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Iman Castaneda
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    FUNctional Fitness is a dynamic kids' PE program that incorporates well-rounded exercises to get kids up and moving mid-day! No two workouts are the same, but each day's activities incorporate exercises that target 10 areas: cardio-vascular endurance, stamina, strength, flexibility, power, speed, coordination, agility, balance, and accuracy. FUNctional Fitness focuses on functional movements that are fundamental to all aspects of play and exercise- pulling, pushing, running, throwing, climbing, lifting, and jumping. Work-outs are scalable and adaptable to different individual's own level, and the emphasis is on fun, safety, and personal accomplishment rather than competition among classmates. When the weather permits, some exercises may be taken outdoors. The physical challenges of FUNctional Fitness will foster self-confidence, focus, and help instill a foundation for a lifetime of fitness. All equipment is furnished. Students are asked to wear loose, comfortable clothing, such as running pants or sweatpants, and comfortable, supportive athletic shoes. FUNctional Fitness continues each quarter, and students may repeat the class to continue to improve fitness. No two workouts are the same! Students must be minimum age 7 to take this class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Tia Murchie-Beyma
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    Wish you could take anthropology, environmental science, and economics, but don't have enough space in your high school schedule? Human geography blends all these with a dose of pop culture, cuisine, politics, and sports. Here is a classic interdisciplinary course for people interested in everything!

    This challenging, year-long, college prep social science course studies how human activity and the surface of our planet interact. While not an AP course, it is based on the seven themes of the latest College Board's Advanced Placement (AP) Human Geography curriculum: (1) thinking geographically; (2) population and migration; (3) cultural patterns and processes; (4) political patterns and processes, (5) agriculture and rural land use, (6) cities and urban land use, and (7) industrial and economic development.

    Human geography explores questions spatially, asking "where?" and "why there?" How many pizza parlors can survive in Schenectady, NY? Why is French spoken in Madawaska, Maine? How did K-Pop become popular in Cairo? Where are refugees most likely to travel? Why is this neighborhood experiencing gentrification?

    This discipline studies people, cultures, and places. Places are not just coordinates and locations, but have meaning. A mountain might be described mathematically in terms of height, geologically in terms of plate tectonics, or biologically in terms of clines. From the human perspective, however, the same mountain may be a buffer between countries, a place of recreation, a site for toxic waste disposal, a national symbol, or a sacred sanctuary.

    Class Meetings: There are two weekly meetings: (1) Friday in-person for all class members; and (2) Monday online from 10:00 AM-11:00 AM (in virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing and recorded for those who cannot attend live).

    Levels: This class is offered at two levels: On-Level and Honors which meet together. Materials are written at a college level, but the amount and type of homework is differentiated, with honors emphasizing more analysis and writing.

    AP Alignment:This course is not offered at the AP level in 2022-23, but the instructor can advise those interested in self-studying for the 2023 AP Human Geography exam. The Honors track of this course will cover 70% of content from the AP curriculum. Students should be committed to significant independent preparation and familiar with the AP approach to self-study the remaining 30%.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 4-5 hours per week outside of class meetings for reading and homework, regardless of level.

    Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students will access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates. Parents may have their own "observer" account to Canvas to view assignments, total points earned, and other feedback.

    Assessments: Completed homework, projects, quizzes, and tests receive points and narrative feedback. Parents can calculate a letter grade using the student's points earned divided by points available, in weighted categories that include assignments, reading quizzes, tests, and participation and presentations. Parents may view all scoring and comments at any time through the Canvas site.

    Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase or rent the 2021 edition of AP Human Geography by Hildebrandt's (ISBN 978-1319192242).

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Human Geography (social science) for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2
    Kerry Diederich
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    This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week, students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art, artist, or culture and view sample works. Then, they will create a project in the style of the featured artist or culture using a wide variety of materials, colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.

    First quarter, Junior Artists will learn about French Artists from the genres of Impressionism and Post Impressionism to include Rodin, Cezanne, Seurat, Degas, Renior, Monet, Matisse and Gauguin. These artists were sculptors, painters, draftsmen, and print makers. Each artist influenced the art world with style, color study and interpretation in their own personal way. Students will discuss which artist featured dancers in his subjects, who experimented in color, and which was multi talented artist using many mediums. Junior artist's projects will vary, from painting, to doing draft drawings, to sculpting, and color study.

    Topics in this Series: Imitate the Impressionists (Quarter 1); Famous Photography (Quarter 2); Multi-Media Masters (Quarter 3); Native American Art (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Kerry Diederich
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    This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week, students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art, artist, or culture and view sample works. Then, they will create a project in the style of the featured artist or culture using a wide variety of materials, colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.

    First quarter, Junior Artists will learn about French Artists from the genres of Impressionism and Post Impressionism to include Rodin, Cezanne, Seurat, Degas, Renior, Monet, Matisse and Gauguin. These artists were sculptors, painters, draftsmen, and print makers. Each artist influenced the art world with style, color study and interpretation in their own personal way. Students will discuss which artist featured dancers in his subjects, who experimented in color, and which was multi talented artist using many mediums. Junior artist's projects will vary, from painting, to doing draft drawings, to sculpting, and color study.

    Topics in this Series: Imitate the Impressionists (Quarter 1); Famous Photography (Quarter 2); Multi-Media Masters (Quarter 3); Native American Art (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Karen Shumway
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    Why do I have to get shots? What is an appendix? Why do I get a fevers? Kids have lots of questions about their own bodies and development. Kids’ Clinic answers these questions and more in the context of fun, age-appropriate medical lessons and in-class activities which will introduce children to themes in science, medicine, anatomy, and biology. First quarter, kids will learn how to conduct a basic medical examination using the correct tools: stethoscope, blood pressure cuff, otoscope, and thermometer. The class will learn about vaccines, ear infections, colds, and food allergies. Finally, the class will begin human anatomy by learning several major organ systems of the human body- circulatory, respiratory, and musculoskeletal. There is a supply fee of $18.00 due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a take-home kit consisting of a medical coat, doctor name tag, class notebook, and a real stethoscope.

    Topics in this Series: Doctor (Quarter 1); Nutritionist (Quarter 2), Wilderness Medic (Quarter 3), ENT/Dentist- Hearing, Taste, Smell (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Wyndy Frederick
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    Everyone can learn to sing! If you want to learn to sing like Belle, Ariel, Elsa, Aladdin, or even the Beast, this class is for you! Selections from this quarter come from Hal Leonard's "More Disney Solos for Kids" with select hits from Cinderella, The Lion King, Bambi, Sleeping Beauty, Mary Poppins, Pinocchio, Aladdin, Snow White, Toy Story, and Song of the South.

    The quarter's repertoire will include at least one group choral number. Students will work on other music as solos, duets, or small group numbers. This introduction to vocal development and performance includes posture, breathing, intonation, and the principles of blending vocal harmonies. Basic musical notation will be introduced as well as melodic and harmonic intervals. No previous musical experience is required- just the joy of singing! Prior to the start of class, the instructor will identify song book(s) and accompaniments for students to purchase. Topics in this Series: Best of Disney (Quarter 1); Holidays Around the World (Quarter 2); Music from the Heart (Quarter 3); and Broadway Bound (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $25.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for a class songbook. Schedule: This is a 5-week class that does not meet on October 11 or October 18.

    2
    Becca Sticha

    LEGO Mindstorms components and motors are not just for building robots! These interconnecting pieces can be constructed into an infinite number of unique, mechanized machines- much like an erector set!

    Each quarter, students will build three or four unique inventions like a tank, a 4-legged walker, and an inchworm car. Students will incorporate simple machines, complex machines, and small motors into their projects. They will work with wheels, axles, beams, pulleys, tracks, gears, and specialty components used only in these classes.

    Topics in this Series: Inventions (Quarter 1); Creations (Quarter 2): Innovations (Quarter 3); and Apparatus (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Kathy Preisinger
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    Music Makers explores many facets of the musical experience- singing, moving, dancing, listening, and playing instruments. The class will explore musical stories, famous composers, and different genres of music while playing a variety of percussion instruments (drums, sticks, triangles, woodblocks and more!). Students will learn to play a beginning pitched instrument on glockenspiels (a small barred instrument like the xylophone). Using an Orff-based approach, students will learn to read and write beginning musical notation and learn musical terminology all in the context of fun and play. Music Makers classes provide a fun, pressure-free environment to experience music and movement with the goal of general musicianship and excellent preparation for further, individual instrument lessons if desired. Music Makers helps every child acquire the essential building blocks for a future of musical learning! Students may join Music Makers at any quarter, and they may return again and again since new music, themes, and skills are constantly introduced.

    2
    Sevim Kalyoncu
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    Have fun the final weeks of summer! Look forward to early fall! Animals are active and sunning themselves. Plants are mature, and flowers have gone to seed. The stream may have slowed down from summer drought, but discoveries at the water's edge abound.

    Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

    A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

    Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

    (PK-K) Each week, ONE parent volunteer (with no baby/toddler in tow) will be asked to accompany the group into the woods to be the extra set of hands and eyes! Students must be minimum age 4 by the start of class, be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of class and must be able to stay in a group and follow instructions.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sevim Kalyoncu
    Add

    Have fun the final weeks of summer! Look forward to early fall! Animals are active and sunning themselves. Plants are mature, and flowers have gone to seed. The stream may have slowed down from summer drought, but discoveries at the water's edge abound.

    Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

    A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

    Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

    (PK-K) Each week, ONE parent volunteer (with no baby/toddler in tow) will be asked to accompany the group into the woods to be the extra set of hands and eyes! Students must be minimum age 4 by the start of class, be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of class and must be able to stay in a group and follow instructions.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    David Chelf
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    This is a complete course in Pre-Algebra that will provide an introduction to basic algebra concepts and a review of arithmetic algorithms with an emphasis on problem solving. The major topics covered in this course are Numbers and Operations, Expressions & Properties, Equations & Inequalities, Functional Relationships and Ratios, Percent & Proportions. Students will learn to use formulas to solve a variety of math problems encompassing geometry, measurement probability, and statistics. Students will also be applying their learning to real life scenarios to solve problems.

    Prerequisites: Students must be fluent in the four basic operations- addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. They will need to show proficiency and have a thorough command of basic computation. In addition, a basic, introductory understanding and ability to work with fractions and decimals is required to solve equations and simplify expressions. If you are unsure about your child's readiness for this class, the instructor will recommend one or more practice platforms and/or assessments to confirm placement.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class to complete practice problems, homework, and assessments.

    Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, link to quizzes and tests, track grades, and message the instructor and classmates.

    Assessments: All chapter tests will be taken outside of class with parental oversight to maximize in-class instructional time. Points will be assigned for completed homework, quizzes, and tests. A letter grade will not be assigned, but parents can use total points earned versus total points offered to assign a grade for purposes of a homeschool transcript. Parents can view total points earned at any time through the Canvas site.

    Textbook: The selected textbook is available free online, and a link will be posted on Canvas. Students who prefer a hard copy textbook may purchase or rent McDougall Littell's Pre-Algebra (ISBN #978-0618250035). As an alternative, for any student who struggles with reading, the textbook can be purchased as an audio CD (ISBN #978-0618478828).

    What to Bring: TI-34 calculator

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Mathematics for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: Preparation for Pre-Algebra, or equivalent 6th/7th math

    2
    Dr. Michele Forsythe
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    Every parent knows that kids are curious, captivated, and quick to learn technology-based products. Programming Projects builds on that curiosity to introduce computer science basics, problem-solving, and computational thinking through play-based learning.

    First quarter, students will work with the Sphero indi car. The indi car is a color-sensing learning robot that encourages open-ended, imaginative solutons, and programming fundamentals for early learners. Indi learning robots have an on-board color sensor that detects the color it travels over. Each color gives a specific instruction to the indi robot (such as red = turn 90 degrees left). Students begin with screenless programming using colored block tiles to direct the travel of the indi car. Once students have mastered the screenless programming, they learn to decode the default responses and recode the indi car to react to new color-activated commands. Using the Sphero Edu Jr app on a phone or tablet, students will learn how to re-program the car by changing its response to each color and adding new features such as lights, sounds, or music. Students will enjoy building custom mazes and solving puzzles with the indi robotic car. All equipment and devices will be provided by the instructor. See the indi car here.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wWo3QBNPRRE

    Topics in this series include: Sphero indi Robotic Cars (Quarter 1), Scratch Coding (Quarter 2), Sphero Robotic Ball Quarter 3) and Tinkercad Design (Quarter 4)

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Heather Sanderson
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    Read it! Act it! Students will enjoy this two-hour, semester-long workshop with Shakespearian coach Heather Sanderson, who hails from England, and is known for instilling a love of Shakespeare into the hearts of students at Compass and throughout the Greater DC area. The class will explore Shakespeare's timeless tragedy, Macbeth, and analyze its characters, plot, themes, and motives. Students will take on the personas of King Duncan, General Macbeth, Lady Macbeth, the Three Witches, and a cast of courtesans, soldiers, murders, and apparitions in this tale of corruption, political ambition, and paranoia.

    Students will read different roles, study and act out scenes, practice monologues, and work through the literature while having fun with fellow teens in a virtual setting. Theatre games adapted for online work, will be used to encourage collaboration, and specially designed improv exercises will be used to stretch teens' imaginations and help them get "in character". The class will use read-aloud and in-class dramatization to decipher the original language, word choices, and to identify humor, satire, mockery, betrayal, and rejection in this mixed-up comedic tale of mistaken identity. The class will work from complete texts (not redacted, abridged, or simplified school versions) to hear and practice Elizabethan lingo. (How did someone of Shakespeare's time hurl insults or woe a woman?) Students will learn how the Bard crafted scenes and conveyed the primary storyline and sub-plots in a comedy that has endured for over 400 years.

    Instructor Heather Sanderson shares a teaching style based on actions and interactions, developed from years of experience coaching Shakespeare in a way that appeals to students. Her approach brings abstract concepts, complex themes, and difficult language to the students' level, so that they can relate to and appreciate Shakespeare.

    Topics in this Series: MacBeth (Semester 1), Merchant of Venice (Quarter 3), and Most Memorable Mistaken Identities (Quarter 4). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for quarters 3 and 4.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hour per week outside of class reading and memorizing sections.

    Assignments: Sections will be assigned in class and included in the weekly e-mail to parents/students.

    Assessments: Informal, qualitative feedback will be given in class throughout the semester. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided.

    Textbook: The cost of the class text is included in the course fee.

    Non-Meeting Days: This is an 11-week class that concludes on 11/18/22. In addition to the scheduled days-off on the published Compass schedule, this class does not meet on 12/2/22, 12/9/22, and 12/16/22.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English Literature or Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sarah Fraser
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    Quizzes, tests, homework, projects, reports, teams, clubs, jobs, internships, volunteer work, applications, life decisions arghhh! The demands of high school can be overwhelming or downright intimidating to most teens, even those who are homeschooled! And guess what? That variety of new responsibilities and expectations doesn t go away. They will likely increase in the later years of high school and into college. But don t worry- there are strategies and core skills that will help prepare a teen for success in high school and beyond.

    Study skills and college success basics include a toolbox of key life skills that will help your teen tackle high school and prepare for college. These skills are taught through in-class activities, some at-home trials, and by evaluating best practices. They are not taught as a one-size-fits all, but rather a range of options to accomplish the same thing for individual learners and different learning styles. Skills that will be addressed in this class include time management skills and tools like planners, to-do lists, calendars, and reminders- paper or electronic- what are the options, and what works best? Students will look at ways to manage short-term and long-term assignments; setting goals; how to break a bigger project into manageable steps and milestones; and how to avoid procrastination. The class will also learn fundamentals such as how to tackle a new chapter, read to retain, recall details, annotate, make margin notes, and take notes from readings, lectures, or videos; outline, and the art of brainstorming. Students will learn how to study and prepare for tests.

    In their toolbox, teens will also learn soft skills needed in school such as communicating and coordinating with a team on group projects and how to ask for information from teachers, employers, and other adults. The group will complete a career inventory and think about what they might be interested in doing in the future and will get tips on internships, mentor relationships, and options for junior/senior summer or a gap year. Finally, the class will look at sleep, diet, stress, screen time, and other personal habits that can impact a teen's work and effectiveness.

    2
    Monica Dorosheff
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    Students who play violin, viola, cello, or bass are invited to join this homeschool string ensemble! Musicians will have an opportunity to develop orchestral skills and enjoy the experience of practicing, playing, and performing as a group. The class will start each week with tuning and warm-ups such as playing musical scales and simple exercises. Then the class will work on several group songs each semester where they will improve musical literacy, learn to follow the directions from the conductor, and learn to play in different keys-- as a group. During the final class of the semester, a concert will be held for friends and family.

    This orchestra is intended for advanced beginner, intermediate, and advanced strings students who are currently and concurrently enrolled in private lessons. As a guideline, a student should be able to play a D major scale in two octaves on his/her instrument. Students are expected to be able to locate notes on their instruments, read music and be able to identify all rhythmical patterns. Students with less experience will be asked to play for the conductor or to submit a brief video to help establish placement.

    The instructor will provide the ensemble repertoires, and these arrangements will be specially composed to accommodate the range of abilities of all stringed players in the orchestra. Participants are expected to prepare and practice at home for at least 15 - 20 minutes per day. The cost of the class music is included. This is a 13-week semester program, and the week off will be announced by the instructor.

    Prerequisites: See description for proficiency level needed

    2
    Dr. Michele Forsythe

    "S" is for science, and "A" is for art in the study of STEAM, but have you thought about the science in art? Artists must understand the science of the materials that the use: how they tint and texturize, mix and melt, dye and dry, blend or bend. There is a complex community of scientists and engineers with specialties in polymers, glass, chemicals, paper, and textiles who design the materials that artists use to create their art. This class will learn about the science and properties of some unique artistic processes and materials and how and why they work.

    First quarter, the class will work with resins and polymers. Students will learn what are polymers and resins and about the chemical and physical properties of special plastics. They will look at real-life applications of resins and polymers such as sealants, countertop construction, molds, and sculptures. Students will work with resin to encase small specimens, such as tiny flowers, small drawings, or objects to make a decorative, durable piece of art. The class will spend 7 weeks examining natural and synthetic resins as well as learning what polymers are and making things with products that have different catalysts for polymerization. Students will make items using epoxy resin, clay, Sculpey or Fimo, Shrinky Dinks, and Perler beads.

    Topics in this series: Resins & Polymers (Quarter 1), Paints & Dyes (Quarter 2), Optical Illusions & Color (Quarter 3), and Paper Engineers (Quarter 4). There is a supply fee of $20.00 due payable to the instructor on the first day.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Wyndy Frederick
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    Did you know that the ukulele is not just a miniature guitar? It is a member of the Portuguese lute family, but its sound was popularized in Hawaiian music. Ukulele's fun, compact size also appeals to kids and is a great "first" stringed instrument! In this class, kids will learn how to hold and strum the ukulele. Students will learn basic chords and chord progressions, musical notation and theory, and notes in the first position. Sample songs taught at this level include “Skip to My Lou”, “Stand By Me”, “Ode to Joy”, and “When the Saints Go Marching In.” Each student should purchase or rent a good quality ukulele for the class. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $15.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a music notebook. This is a 12-week semester class that will not meet on October 13 or 20.

    2
    YMCA
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    Compass now offers Homeschool Swim Lessons through Reston YMCA! The YMCA is a clean, bright modern recreation facility located at 12196 Sunset Hills Road, Reston, VA 20190 (0.9 miles/ 3 minute drive from Compass's classroom facility.) Lessons are offered at 3 age levels: "Sunfish" (ages 3.5-5), "Stingrays" (ages 6-8, grades 1-3), and "Sharks" (ages 9-12, grades 4-6) and 2 ability levels: Beginners and Intermediate.

    Lessons at the Stingrays and Sharks Beginner level will progress through the YMCA's swimming curriculum to include: water acclimation, water movement, swimming half of the pool (15-20 yards) on front with face in water and becoming comfortable in some level in deep water. Please note that these skills will be introduced and progress at different rates depending on the comfortable level and experience of enrolled students and may take more than one quarter to complete. At times, students might be moved to a different swimming group (same day, same time, different instructor) to better match the experience level of enrolled children.

    Lessons are 40 minutes long, running from 0:05 until 0:45 after the hour, leaving enough time to towel dry, change clothes, and return to Compass for your next class. Students should bring a swimsuit, towel, and change of clothes. Googles and swim caps are optional.

    A parent (or parent proxy) is required to remain on site. Parents may wait on poolside benches or lobby seating. YMCA waivers must be signed and returned for each swimmer. All registration is completed through Compass. All YMCA swimming classes are taught by certified, experienced, background-checked adult instructors with experience teaching children.

    Class sizes are small with 3-5 children. If there is greater interest per hour or per level, please add your child's name to the waitlist because YMCA may be able to add instructors. Consider enrolling your child in both Tuesday and Thursday classes to improve their rate of learning.

    2
    YMCA
    Add

    Compass now offers Homeschool Swim Lessons through Reston YMCA! The YMCA is a clean, bright modern recreation facility located at 12196 Sunset Hills Road, Reston, VA 20190 (0.9 miles/ 3 minute drive from Compass's classroom facility.) Lessons are offered at 3 age levels: "Sunfish" (ages 3.5-5), "Stingrays" (ages 6-8, grades 1-3), and "Sharks" (ages 9-12, grades 4-6) and 2 ability levels: Beginners and Intermediate.

    Lessons at the Stingrays and Sharks Beginner level will progress through the YMCA's swimming curriculum to include: water acclimation, water movement, swimming half of the pool (15-20 yards) on front with face in water and becoming comfortable in some level in deep water. Please note that these skills will be introduced and progress at different rates depending on the comfortable level and experience of enrolled students and may take more than one quarter to complete. At times, students might be moved to a different swimming group (same day, same time, different instructor) to better match the experience level of enrolled children.

    Lessons are 40 minutes long, running from 0:05 until 0:45 after the hour, leaving enough time to towel dry, change clothes, and return to Compass for your next class. Students should bring a swimsuit, towel, and change of clothes. Googles and swim caps are optional.

    A parent (or parent proxy) is required to remain on site. Parents may wait on poolside benches or lobby seating. YMCA waivers must be signed and returned for each swimmer. All registration is completed through Compass. All YMCA swimming classes are taught by certified, experienced, background-checked adult instructors with experience teaching children.

    Class sizes are small with 3-5 children. If there is greater interest per hour or per level, please add your child's name to the waitlist because YMCA may be able to add instructors. Consider enrolling your child in both Tuesday and Thursday classes to improve their rate of learning.

    2
    YMCA
    Add

    Compass now offers Homeschool Swim Lessons through Reston YMCA! The YMCA is a clean, bright modern recreation facility located at 12196 Sunset Hills Road, Reston, VA 20190 (0.9 miles/ 3 minute drive from Compass's classroom facility.) Lessons are offered at 3 age levels: "Sunfish" (ages 3.5-5), "Stingrays" (ages 6-8, grades 1-3), and "Sharks" (ages 9-12, grades 4-6) and 2 ability levels: Beginners and Intermediate.

    Lessons at the Stingrays and Sharks Intermediate level will progress through the YMCA's swimming curriculum to include: all skills in beginner-level class plus: water stamina, swimming one length of the pool (25 yards), performing elementary backstroke, rotary breathing, becoming comfortable in deep water, and stroke introduction to include: front crawl, backstroke, and elementary breaststroke. Please note that these skills will be introduced and progress at different rates depending on the comfortable level and experience of enrolled students and may take more than one quarter to complete. At times, students might be moved to a different swimming group (same day, same time, different instructor) to better match the experience level of enrolled children.

    Lessons are 40 minutes long, running from 0:05 until 0:45 after the hour, leaving enough time to towel dry, change clothes, and return to Compass for your next class. Students should bring a swimsuit, towel, and change of clothes. Googles and swim caps are optional.

    A parent (or parent proxy) is required to remain on site. Parents may wait on poolside benches or lobby seating. YMCA waivers must be signed and returned for each swimmer. All registration is completed through Compass. All YMCA swimming classes are taught by certified, experienced, background-checked adult instructors with experience teaching children.

    Class sizes are small with 3-5 children. If there is greater interest per hour or per level, please add your child's name to the waitlist because YMCA may be able to add instructors. Consider enrolling your child in both Tuesday and Thursday classes to improve their rate of learning.

    Prerequisites: Beginner Level

    2
    YMCA
    Add

    Compass now offers Homeschool Swim Lessons through Reston YMCA! The YMCA is a clean, bright modern recreation facility located at 12196 Sunset Hills Road, Reston, VA 20190 (0.9 miles/ 3 minute drive from Compass's classroom facility.) Lessons are offered at 3 age levels: "Sunfish" (ages 3.5-5), "Stingrays" (ages 6-8, grades 1-3), and "Sharks" (ages 9-12, grades 4-6) and 2 ability levels: Beginners and Intermediate.

    Lessons at the Stingrays and Sharks Intermediate level will progress through the YMCA's swimming curriculum to include: all skills in beginner-level class plus: water stamina, swimming one length of the pool (25 yards), performing elementary backstroke, rotary breathing, becoming comfortable in deep water, and stroke introduction to include: front crawl, backstroke, and elementary breaststroke. Please note that these skills will be introduced and progress at different rates depending on the comfortable level and experience of enrolled students and may take more than one quarter to complete. At times, students might be moved to a different swimming group (same day, same time, different instructor) to better match the experience level of enrolled children.

    Lessons are 40 minutes long, running from 0:05 until 0:45 after the hour, leaving enough time to towel dry, change clothes, and return to Compass for your next class. Students should bring a swimsuit, towel, and change of clothes. Googles and swim caps are optional.

    A parent (or parent proxy) is required to remain on site. Parents may wait on poolside benches or lobby seating. YMCA waivers must be signed and returned for each swimmer. All registration is completed through Compass. All YMCA swimming classes are taught by certified, experienced, background-checked adult instructors with experience teaching children.

    Class sizes are small with 3-5 children. If there is greater interest per hour or per level, please add your child's name to the waitlist because YMCA may be able to add instructors. Consider enrolling your child in both Tuesday and Thursday classes to improve their rate of learning.

    Prerequisites: Beginner Level

    2
    Diane Wright Cobb
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    This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Preschoolers will experiment with a wide variety of materials such as tempera paints, finger paints, watercolors, color pencils, markers, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, tissue paper, and specialty papers through a guided, weekly themed project. First quarter, preschool artists will learn all about Color through mixing and experimenting with a variety of media. Students must be a minimum of 3-1/2 years old for this class and be able to work in a small group setting independent of their parent or caregiver. Note: This is a 45 minute class that meets from 11:10 am - 11:55 am (students may not enter classroom until 11:10 am) Topics in this Series: Creative Color (Quarter 1); Super and Shapes (Quarter 2), Terrific Texture (Quarter 3), and Fun with Forms (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $12.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Karen Shumway
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    Tween builders will use a LEGO construction components in this hands-on engineering class. Each week, students will build a different project from the LEGO Education 9686 curriculum which will introduce concepts in simple machines, mechanical engineering, or structural engineering. Using the engineering design process, students will build a basic mechanism, test it, gather data, and then modify their design to improve performance. Students will gain experience in taking measurements such as distance traveled, using the stopwatch, and recording their findings on paper. This approach introduces applied physics concepts in a subtle way, encouraging observation of physical phenomena such as forces and relationships without being bogged down by equations. Students will work with ordinary LEGO bricks, beams, and plates along with specialized components such as gears, toothed elements, wheels and axles, pulleys, and motors. First semester projects will be simple machines and structures such as a crane, fishing rod, and sail car. Topics in this series include Simple Machines & Structures (Semester 1) and Powered Machines & Mechanisms (Semester 2). There is a $50.00 supply and equipment fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Manal Hussein
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    This is a full-year, lab-based course that covers traditional concepts in physics.
    Physics is a college-preparatory course that encourages students to engage in scientific inquiry, investigations, and experimentation so they develop a conceptual understanding and basic scientific skills. Physics will help students understand phenomena in the physical world such as the forces on a roller coaster, wave action at the beach, speakers for their music, batteries in electric cars, and the electronics that power their favorite devices.

    Students will develop an in-depth conceptual and analytical understanding of principles such as Newton's laws of motion, work and energy, momentum, circular motion, thermodynamics, sound, properties of light, electric fields and energy, and magnetism. This course will use algebra- and trigonometry- based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe mechanics. The course is designed to emphasize scientific thinking and reasoning, problem solving, and experimentation.

    Schedule: This class will be taught in a hybrid format with two weekly class meetings: an online lecture on Mondays (9:00 am- 9:55 am) over an interactive, synchronous, virtual classroom and in-person session on Wednesdays (11:30 am - 12:55 am) for applied learning activities may include applications of theories, revision sessions, word problem solving sessions, and hands-on experiments.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Students should have completed Algebra I, Geometry, and basic, right-angle trigonometry before taking this course. Students should be concurrently enrolled in Algebra II or PreCalculus when taking this course. For those students who have not covered trigonometry or other key Algebra II topics prior to encountering them in this course, the instructor will recommend resources and videos for independent review or instruction. Students are encouraged to buy the textbook over the summer to work through the Math Review section before September. The emphasis in this course is teaching/learning physic concepts, not teaching or re-teaching mathematical concepts.

    Class Expectations: For both in-person and virtual class meetings, students are expected to come prepared, have class materials, and be ready to participate in class discussions and activities. During virtual lectures (Mondays), students are expected to be seated at a desk or table and have their cameras on.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 4 - 6 hours of independent study/homework every week consisting of pre-reading chapters, taking detailed notes on concepts before class, completing problem-solving activities, analyzing data, and writing formal lab reports.

    Assignments: All assignments and announcements will be posted on Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments; upload lab reports, take automated quizzes and tests; track grades; message instructor and classmates; and attend virtual conferences. Parents can have observer accounts in Canvas to check their student's workload and progress in the course.

    Assessments: The instructor will assign points for correct answers on quizzes and tests, and points/feedback for lab reports. Homework assignments will be marked as complete or incomplete. Parents can calculate a letter grade using the student's points earned divided by points available.

    Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase or rent Physics by James S. Walker (2014 ed.) (ISBN #9780131371156.)

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $100.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Supplies/Equipment: Students will need access to a computer with working camera, internet, a graphing calculator, a ruler, writing supplies, colored pens for graphs, highlighters, plain, lined, and graph paper, a 1-inch three ring binder, and a Five Star, 8.5" X 11" Quadrille-Ruled Notebook.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component full credit in laboratory science for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry with minimum co-requisite Algebra II

    2
    Judith Harmon

    Kids take to the stage as they collaboratively write and perform their very own play with unique characters and an original storyline. Grab your sword and summon the squires. Will we have a mix-up or a masterpiece when we meddle with monarchs, mischief-makers, merry men, and maidens?

    Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other, then read through the two, prepared scripts together. Through group activities and guided discussion, they will create new characters, brainstorm variations, craft plot changes, add lines, and cast their parts. The instructor will then update and customize the class script with the students' input.

    The class will learn the practical aspects of acting, as they work on script read-through, blocking, costume/prop design, and planning the show. Students will develop their own "actor's toolkit" of voice, body, and imagination in this creative process! Actors will grow in confidence and communication skills in preparation for a final sharing with parents on the final day of the quarter.

    Once the script is fully developed with everyone's parts, about half-way through the quarter, it will be emailed to parents. Parents will be expected to help their children memorize their script/lines/cues and assemble a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity. Note: Students who are emerging readers (not able to read at a 3rd/4th grade level) would be better suited to the Young Actor's Playhouse class, rather than this level.

    Topics in this Series: Medieval Mayhem (Quarter 1), Wacky Wednesday (Quarter 2), Detective Drama (Quarter 3), Kooky Cooking Contest (Quarter 4)

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Becca Sticha
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    Which planet rotates backwards? How many moons does the red planet have? Why do the north and south poles of our Sun change every 11 years? Find out the answers to these mysteries and other great discoveries about our Inner Solar System comprised of the four terrestrial (rock) planets- Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars-, their moons, the Sun, and the asteroid belt. Astronomy enthusiasts will enjoy exploring details about the inner workings of outer space with an amateur astronomer and engineer.

    Each class will explore concepts relevant to our corner of the universe- the inner solar system- with supporting activities such as modeling to understand relative distance and sizes. The class will demonstrate the rotation and orbits of planets and moons and their effects on days, seasons, and the measure of years! The young astronomers will uncover the difference between asteroids, meteors, meteorites, while making a dry ice comet. The class will also examine lunar and solar eclipses, phases of the moon, and tides while also considering our Sun! Finally, the class will discuss the exploration of our inner solar system from satellites, telescopes, probes, landers, rovers, moon landings, and the future, manned expedition to Mars. Future themes in this series include: Inner Solar System (Quarter 1); Outer Solar System (Quarter 2); Stars, Galaxies, and the Cosmos (Quarter 3); and Exoplanets and the Search for Extraterrestrial Life (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Fatimah Aziz
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    Students of ASL will continue to improve their fluency in this 2nd year course. As students become more advanced signers, emphasis will be on focusing on the meaning of a conversation (whole) rather than individual signs (parts). In conversation, students will learn to confirm information by asking questions in context. Second year students will continue to build their vocabulary, apply ASL grammar, and will learn to make requests, ask for advice, give opinions, make comparisons and use superlatives, and narrate stories. Other skills covered in ASL II include expressing year, phone numbers, time, and currency in numbers, appearance, clothing, giving directions, locations, etc. Each unit will include presentations and readings on Deaf culture and Deaf history. Class time will be dedicated to interactive ASL activities and signing practice.

    ASL students will have a Deaf instructor. She regularly teaches all-hearing classes and is an excellent role model for students to meet and interact with a native speaker of ASL and to lean natural facial expressions, gestures, and body language used in Deaf communications. ASL students will have more confidence when they encounter Deaf instructors in college or greet speakers of ASL in social settings. Because the instructor is Deaf, students are not permitted to speak aloud in class. This approach improves visual attention and encourages immersion in the language. Students will be able to ask questions of the instructor by writing on individual white boards, but they will be encouraged to sign in order to communicate with the instructor. Lessons are facilitated with Power Point presentations, and a professional ASL interpreter will assist the class on the first day of class.

    Hundreds of colleges and universities, including all public institutions of higher learning in Virginia, accept ASL as a distinct foreign language. This allows hearing and Deaf students to fulfill foreign language requirements for admission to college. Teens who have difficulty writing, spelling, or have challenging pronunciation in English, can be successful with ASL as a second or foreign language choice. Penn State University research demonstrated that the visual and kinesthetic elements of ASL helped to enhance the vocabulary, spelling, and reading skills in hearing students.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours each week outside of class on required vocabulary exercises, readings, and signing practice.

    Assignments: Homework assignments will be posted online in the Canvas digital classroom platform. Through Canvas, students will be asked to post short videos of themselves signing as homework. Enrolled students will be asked to review ASL 1 vocabulary, grammar, and facial expressions.

    Assessments: The instructor will assign points using a class rubric for the parent's use in assigning a course grade. Course rubrics will evaluate students on their sign production, fingerspelling, ASL grammar, facial expressions including "above the nose" grammar (brows and body movement), and "below the nose" modifiers (lip expressions).

    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent "Signing Naturally Units 1-6 workbook" (ISBN# 978-1581212105) and "Signing Naturally Units 7-12 Student Workbook" (ISBN# 978-1581212211) which includes a DVD of signing videos. This class will cover units 5-8.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in World Languages for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: ASL I

    2
    Taliesin Knol

    This class will explore the judicial processes of Europe following the collapse of Rome. From witch trials and Viking blood feuds, then back again to the real barbarians, lawyers! Like a traditional mock trial program, the class will hear cases, and students will defend themselves. Real historical cases will be studied, and trial parts assigned to the class, which will be debated from the perspective of Royal Courts, Church Ordeals, or a Viking assembly they creatively called "a Thing." The class will serve as the jury and, if necessary, select period-appropriate verdicts and explain how they arrived at their decisions, while striving for period accuracy. Second semester will move to codified Renaissance legal systems, leading up to the direct Ancestor to American legal traditions, Common Law.

    Topics in this Series: Crime & Punishment in Medieval Times (Semester 1), Crime and Punishment in the Early Modern Era (Semester 2).

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Period maps, photographs, and re-creations will be posted on a class Google Drive, and video links from YouTube will be e-mailed to parents and students for homework or supplemental investigation.

    Assessments: A mid-term and final exam may be given.

    Textbooks: None. Case documents are provided in class.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History or Civics for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Dr. Erica Hughes
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    Students will travel through time and around the world in this survey of the history of art! The class will look at images of art as religious icons, records of historical events, myths, portraits, propaganda, conveyors of power and authority, and fantasy to answer the big question, "What is the function of art aside from being aesthetically pleasing?" Students will be asked to predict how their definition of art will change throughout the course of the year.

    This unique exploration of art history will be enlivened by rich class discussions, projects, visits to exhibits, and the instructor's own creative style and personal experience at significant historical sites throughout the ancient world. Students will learn about the people and concepts behind each type of art, considering that the conditions of the time influenced the art and architecture: physical location, settlement, innovation, warfare, politics, beliefs, religion, funerary practices, and interconnections to other, contemporary cultures.

    This study of the history of art will begin with the early Renaissance in Northern Europe and the innovation of oil painting. This technique was used to evoke different ideas in Burgundy, Flanders, France and the remains of the Holy roman Empire. Students will discover how etching and engraving are different and explore the illustration of printed books. Next, the investigation turns to Quattrocento Florence and the influence of Humanistic principles and innovations in perspective. Women's participation in Italian art during the High Renaissance will be introduced through the works of several female artists. The allegorical symbols and minute details of the North will be contrasted with the joyful mythologies of Italy. The class will then examine the changes brought about by Mannerism, and how these were expressed in both Italy and the North, as well as the difference in focus of Protestant and Catholic artists. Looking at spectacular Baroque art, the class will discuss the continuation of patronage with an art market and without royalty. The study of the Dutch vanitas paintings will open a discussion of the importance of the household and of personal contribution to society and science. After a century of revolutions, European art has a quick dalliance with the Rococo, then the enlightenment focuses artists on a more austere neoclassicism. Next, the exploration will take students to the effects on art of the Industrial Revolution through materials, technologies and subjects. Students will learn about the political and artistic revolutions that led to the Romantic spirit, the Realist reaction against Romanticism, and how landscape painting was somewhere between the two. The 19th century brings the first public art museum, prefabricated architecture, and the advent of photography. Finally, we will investigate the end of the 19th century and the beginning of Modernism in art: Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, symbolism, and the first skyscrapers.

    Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing.

    Topics in this Series: Renaissance to Recent, Western Art Part 2 (Semester 1), Asia to Africa, Non-Western Art (Semester 2)

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments, quizzes, and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload. For each chapter, there will be open book quizzes, and students should be able to describe their three favorite works. There will be a semester project based on the creation of one's own myth and culture. Image recognition is key to learning art history. Each semester, students will be assigned approximately 60 images to identify on the midterm and final.

    Assessments: Points will be assigned for projects, quizzes, chapter summaries, and exams, and parents may use the total points earned to assign a class grade. Quizzes will be administered through Canvas.

    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent Gardner's Art through the Ages: A Global History, 15th Edition by Fred Kleiner (ISBN 13- 978-285754994).

    Credit:Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History or Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2
    Kerry Diederich
    Add

    Elementary artists can get in on the action as they learn about a different artist or artistic style each week and create a representative piece using a wide range of artistic supplies such as tempura and water color paints, pastels, pencils, cray pas, oil pastel crayons, specialty papers, sculpting media, and embellishments.

    First quarter, students will meet famous artists such as Grandma Moses, Mary Cassatt, Eric Carle, Patrick Dougherty, Alex Calder, Helen Frankenthaler and River Lobe. They will develop unique projects that highlight the methods, material and media used by each artist such as painting, sculpting, drawing, and inspired creations.

    Topics in this Series: Media of the Masters (Quarter 1); Animal Artists (Quarter 2); Murals, Monuments, and Museums (Quarter 3); Stellar Celestial Subjects (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Peter Snow
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    Students will enjoy the logic and challenge of the timeless strategy board game as they learn and play chess with classmates. In Beginning Chess 1, students will learn beginner basics such as: how all pieces move and capture, castling, pawn promotion, en passant, checks and how to get out of them, checkmate and stalemate, scholars mate, fools mate, notation, and chess etiquette. Skills are taught in progressive levels of challenge as the year progresses.

    Learning and playing chess supports problem solving, decision making, critical and creative thinking, general cognitive ability, scholastic skills, and mathematical achievement (Univ. of Minnesota). Experts suggest that the game of chess teaches analytical and disciplined thinking skills, while raising self esteem, teaching motivation and determination, and sportsmanship (Kasparov Foundation). Each class will be spent half on technique and half in practice matches with classmates while the instructor coaches.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Diane Wright Cobb
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    Kids will be introduced to watercolor painting in a small group class under the guidance of a professional painter and art teacher. The class will learn the theory of color mixing and the techniques of blending, building up color, creating gradients, and applying light washes. The class will learn how to select the right brush and how to use water to create different effects. Our new painters will practice using paint and brush strokes to create effects like light and shadow, dimension, and texture, and how to develop backgrounds, foregrounds, and detail work. Students will try techniques such as applying and removing paint, layering, stippling, and dabbing, along with wet and dry brush techniques. Students will complete several paintings on watercolor paper (please note that "canvas" in the class name may in fact be specialty paper, depending on the type of paint). A variety of subjects, such as still life, animals, florals, landscapes, seascapes, fantasy, abstracts, or "mimic the masters" will be introduced to illustrate different painting techniques through in-class projects. Topics in this series include: Watercolor Painting (Quarter 1), Tempera Painting (Quarter 2), Acrylic Painting (Quarter 3), and MultiMedia Painting (Quarter 4). There is an $20.00 supply fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mimi Nyman
    Add

    Students will enjoy making flavorful fall recipes and family favorites that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Fall Fare recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

  • Sweet Pumpkin Dip
  • Chicken Vegetable Soup
  • Caprese Salad Bites
  • Honey Glazed Carrots
  • Spinach Artichoke Meatballs
  • Pineapple Coconut Cupcakes
  • Cheesy Rice Casserole with Green Chilies
  • Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.

    Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group.

    Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mimi Nyman
    Add

    Students will enjoy making flavorful fall recipes and family favorites that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Fall Fare recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

  • Sweet Pumpkin Dip
  • Chicken Vegetable Soup
  • Caprese Salad Bites
  • Honey Glazed Carrots
  • Spinach Artichoke Meatballs
  • Pineapple Coconut Cupcakes
  • Cheesy Rice Casserole with Green Chilies/li>

    Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.

    Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group.

    Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

  • 2
    Judith Harmon

    Kratos wears a leather baldric. Captain America grasps a shield. Harley Quinn sports spiked wrist cuffs, and Lara Croft wouldn't go to war without her weaponry. Great accessories and carefully crafted garments make great cosplay. If you are interested in the world of cosplay and want to bring some of your favorite characters to life, this class will teach you the skills to craft costumes and accessories.

    First quarter, students will learn to work with EVA foam and thermal plastics. They will learn to use patterns, cut, layer, glue, carve, heat-shape, and paint foam and thermal plastic accessories. Projects for the quarter include a dagger and breastplate.

    In this class, students will follow templates and patterns provided by and demonstrated by the instructor. Pieces will be individualized through paint and embellishments, but the goal is for cosplayers to learn specialized crafting techniques that they can use at home to make additional, unique pieces. There is a $55.00 supply fee for in-class materials, the shared use of classroom tools/supplies, and some take-home tools to continue crafting at home. First quarter, students will take home 2 types of Exacto knives, a small cutting mat, patterns, and foam remnants.

    Projects are all-new from the 2021-22, so students may take this course again to hone their proficiency with various crafting techniques and fabricate new accessories. Cosplayers who would like to create original fabric costume elements such as capes, vests, skirts, and more, may want to co-register for this instructor's Learn to Sew classes.

    Topics in this Series: Foam and Plastics (Quarter 1), Resins and Metal Work (Quarter 2), Leather Work (Quarter 3), Mending and Alterations (Quarter 4) etc. Students continuing from one quarter receive priority pre-registration for the next quarter.

    Prerequisites: None

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Will be communicated in weekly e-mails and posted in a Google classroom.

    Assessments: Informal, qualitative feedback will be given in class throughout the semester. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided.

    Textbook/Materials: All materials will be furnished.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $55.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in fine arts/theater for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Judith Harmon
    Add

    Children are full of stories and bubbling over with big ideas! In this class, students will learn how to capture their creative vision into a simple story that they will write and illustrate. First quarter, our storytellers will tell the tale of a great race. They will describe who was in the chase, what was their pace, and why the great haste.

    Students will learn how to build a Story Arc through guided, weekly activities. They will discover the key elements to composing a story such as crafting characters, posing a problem, advancing the action, constructing the climax, and writing the resolution- through brainstorming questions like, "Who is in your story?", "Where does this take place?", "What does that look like?" and "What happened after ____?"

    Emerging writers or readers are welcome and will receive support, if needed, to get their own words written down. Psst- don't tell your child, but this class helps lay the foundation in language arts for more advanced creative writing and composition. Pair this class with Acting: Kids Theater or Writing Well to further encourage communication and storytelling skills. The supply fee is included in the class tuition. Topics in this Series: A Great Race (Quarter 1); A Magical Mountain (Quarter 2); A Time Machine (Quarter 3); and A Fantastical Forest (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Black Rocket
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    In Digital Clubhouse, our youngest designers will explore computer science by creating and coding their own digital Pokemon-style custom digital card game and learning to model in 3D printing. No prior experience is necessary.

    Digital Clubhouse is a computer lab environment in which students work through the Black Rocket curriculum under the direction of computer science coaches. The lab environment allows students to enroll at any quarter, fosters brand new coders, and encourages those with prior coding experience. In the "Intro" level of a course (i.e., Part 1), students will work through the fundamentals of a new digital skill. In the "Continuing" level (i.e., Part 2), students who continue from "Intro" will develop new skills and will design and code an individual project. New students who enroll in "Intro" will begin with the introductory lessons. In order to differentiate instruction between new and continuing students, coaches work with small pull-out groups, pairs, or individuals to provide additional support as needed. The class tuition includes a student technology fee that covers the use of instructor-provided classroom laptops loaded with the required software, applications, and licenses. At the end of the class, students will receive access to Black Rocket's interactive learning platform to continue their coding journey at home.

    Topics in this Series: Pokemon Masters (Quarters 1, 2); Minecraft Animators (Quarters 3, 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Pete Van Riper
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    Students will draw in a relaxed, informal studio setting, where they will learn the fundamentals of drawing along with the elements of art and principles of design.

    First quarter, teens will begin basic, freehand sketching of simple, everyday objects to learn to represent the objects that they observe. Teen artists will learn techniques such as fading, shading, and blending using crosshatching and smudging. Through the objects study, artists will learn techniques with pencil to help them replicate different effects in light and surfaces.

    The instructor will demonstrate various techniques by developing a sample drawing. Students may elect to follow the class sample or may apply the drawing skills to an entirely unique drawing. This class is suitable for beginners who have never drawn before and for intermediate art students who have worked with other media and are interested in exploring drawing. Drawing can provide a relaxing, needed break from rigorous academic classes and over-scheduled lives in a fun, supportive environment.

    Topics in this Series: Everyday Objects (Quarter 1), Textures & Patterns (Quarter 2), Creating Narrative (Quarter 3), and Imitating Illustration Styles (Quarter 4).

    Workload: Work outside of class is optional for those who wish to practice their drawing techniques.

    Assessments: Individual feedback is given in class. Formal assessments will not be given.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $18.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a sketchbook, a pencil box with pencils of varying hardness, and an eraser. Returning drawing students do not need to pay a supply fee and are expected to replace their drawing supplies as needed, with similar or better quality.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2
    Taliesin Knol
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    As the Roman Empire was in collapse, and legions were recalled from the British Aisles to defend Italy, a new threat pushed north of Hadrian's Wall. There, "uncivilized" Britons (by Roman standards), faced an onslaught of "Sea Wolves"- Angles, Saxons, Jutes, and Frisian tribes who flooded the undefended shores of Britain and would never leave. These "English" as they would come to be known, would eventually reach almost every coastal nation on Earth.

    Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will create a 10" X 14" diorama representing the Saxon Conquest of Britain, choosing from coastal villages, crumbling Ruins, or the famous Badon Hill. They will customize their dioramas with landscape elements, waterways, structures of the time, and paint. They will populate the diorama with 1:72 scale invading armies and their adversaries for historical re-enactments. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate a larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the conquest while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a custom historical wargaming rule system for moving troops and siege equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how battles progressed and test different scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices.

    Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. Topics in this series include: The Saxon Invasions (Quarter 1), Persia v. Byzantium (Quarter 2), The 100 Years War, France v. England (Quarter 3), The Wars of Scottish Independence(Quarter 4). There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Taliesin Knol

    Dive deep, back to the time of some of the first life on Earth, into prehistoric seas filled with monstrous and mysterious creatures that were the ancient ancestors of all life as we know it. This class will cover the early ocean life on Earth, from the darkest depths, where life exists because of geothermal vents, to the shallow inland sea that was the American Mid-West in the Jurassic age through the ancient seas where aquatic dinosaurs, ancient crocodiles, and prehistoric sharks swam.

    Each student will create an individual diorama. Students will craft and hand-shape their scene on a 10" X 14" foam board using artistic, model-making techniques. They will customize their dioramas with landscape elements, reefs, geothermal vents, and paint to reflect different ocean depths. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with miniature figures and combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to create a larger terrain. Students will then compete in a pre-history-based survival strategy game. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them.

    The class will learn to play "Submarine Safari" to simulate cooperative oceanographic research, exploring and cataloging ocean life, and an aquatic version of Try-To-Survive-Asaurus, where students role play as a shark or prehistoric marine reptile in their very own food chain. Over the course of the class, students should be able to explain the differences in the types of marine life over time and depth, and how these differences are reflected in their very own marine habitat boards.

    Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. Students must be minimum age 7 to take this class. Topics in this series include: Ancient Seas (Quarter 1), Cretaceous North America and Asia (Quarter 2), Cretaceous South America and Africa (Quarter 3), Ice Age Giants (Quarter 4). There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Dr. Anne Taranto
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    This full-credit high school English class will focus on developing critical reading and writing skills through the study of a range of canonical and post-colonial genres and texts written in English. Through exposure to a variety of voices across time periods and geographical regions, students will investigate major themes, such as the importance of language as a locus of power, the continuity of human nature, and the role of the imagination.

    Fall semester will focus on canonical British texts such as the epic poem Beowulf, Milton’s Paradise Lost, selections from Canterbury Tales (Chaucer), Shakespeare’s Macbeth, and a selection of Augustan and Romantic poetry.

    Writing Lab: An essential component of this course will be an in-class Writing Lab. Students will write two or three critical response papers and a full-scale literary analysis essay each term. Students will continue to hone the components of academic writing, including how to construct a thesis statement that makes an argument, how to support their ideas effectively with textual evidence, how to organize an argument logically, and how to cite sources in MLA format. Students should bring a laptop to class one day per week for in-class writing.

    Topics in this Series: British Literature, Part I (Semester 1) and British Literature, Part II (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at grade level and have completed Introduction to Genre or equivalent high school level writing class. Students are expected to take an active role in discussion and complete all writing assignments.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: All assignments will be posted in a Google Classroom management site. Students will need their own gmail accounts to access Google Classroom.

    Assessments: Students' written assignments will be graded using a rubric and assigned points that the homeschool parent can use when assigning an overall class grade.

    Textbook/Materials: Because students will need clean, inexpensive copies of each novel to mark in, and they must be able to refer to the passages on the same page numbers, copies of mass market paperbacks will be pre-purchased and bundled for students. (See Supply Fee below).

    Supply Fee: A class fee of $43.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for the class pack of books and handouts.

    What to Bring: Students should bring the current literature, paper, pen or pencil and highlighter to class each week. Some students may wish to bring paper clips, adhesive flags or post-it notes for marking passages/pages.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a half-credit (one semester) or full credit (both semesters) in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: Intro to Literary Genres or Equivalent

    2
    Karen Shumway
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    Through the study of chemistry, high school students will learn the science behind things they observe every day! Chemistry explains properties of the food we eat, the beverages we drink, the medicines we take, the fibers we wear, and fuels in the cars we drive. Chemistry is a foundation to understanding the world around us and fundamental to other sciences such as biology, physics, geology, and environmental science.

    This full-year laboratory course makes chemistry come alive through at-home readings, practice problems, supplementary activities, and in-person hands-on labs to demonstrate key concepts. Course themes include matter, changes in state, scientific measurement, atomic structure, electrons in atoms, and characteristics of the periodic table. Students will then study ionic, metallic, and covalent bonding, chemical names and formulas, and chemical reactions. Further chemistry topics include the behavior of gases, water and aqueous solutions, acids, bases, and salts; oxidation-reduction reactions, solutions, and thermochemistry.

    Students will learn the skills necessary for successful study of chemical reactions and molecular phenomena, using common high school laboratory chemicals, glassware, and techniques. This is not a course done in microscale using pre-mixed solutions: students will learn to calculate molarity and use dimensional analysis to mix solutions, calculate yields, analyze errors, and construct graphs. Example labs include experiments in molar mass, hydrates, precipitates, filtration, density, distillation, reactants, single and double displacement, acid/base titration, polymers, heat of fusion, heat of vaporization, and stoichiometry. Class demonstrations will model other chemical concepts and processes, such as a radioactive cloud chamber.

    Note:This course has two class meetings: In-person Lecture from 12:00 pm- 12:55 pm and in-person Lab from 12:00 pm- 1:30 pm on Fridays. Students must enroll in both sections.

    Prerequisites: High school Algebra I

    Levels: This course provides a substantive, full-credit experience on either an on-level or honors track. All class members complete the same core material and participate in the same labs. Students taking the course at the honors level have additional assignments and alternative scoring. Honors students' homework will be graded and recorded as part of the students' total earned points. Honors students will complete an additional research paper each semester on a chemistry topic of their choice using a minimum of 5 sources, and Honors students will be asked to memorize the polyatomic ions. On-level students' homework will be corrected and graded, but not factored into their total earned points. Students must identify their level prior to the start of class. At any point in the year, a student may transition from honors to on-level if the workload exceeds the students' expectations. In addition, at the parents' discretion, students may take this course as an "audit" in which they still read chapters, attend lectures, participate in labs, but do not do problem sets or laboratory reports. This approach provides an experiential and conceptual overview of chemistry, but should not be counted as a full year credit.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class on pre-reading, problem sets, and lab reports. Pre-reading and pre-lab work is required so in-person class time can be spent on highlights, clarification of challenging topics, class discussion, homework review, demonstrations, labs, and activities. In addition, most weeks students should plan for additional meeting time and coordination with their lab partners in-person, by phone, shared documents, or via virtual meeting. Students will also be required to read one scientific, non-fiction book or current events article each quarter and prepare a 2-page summary and response book report.

    Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates. Parents can have an observer account in Canvas to review assignments and graded work. Students will have weekly readings, practice problems, and mandatory pre-lab assignments. The pre-lab assignment must be completed prior to lab and will serve as the student's "ticket" into the lab session each week.

    Assessments: Students will earn points for completed homework, unit tests, lab reports, book reports, and semester exams. Parents can calculate a letter grade using the student's points earned divided by points available. Parents may view all scoring and comments at any time through the Canvas site.

    Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase or rent Prentice Hall Chemistry by Wilbraham, Staley, et. al. 2008 edition (ISBN #978-0132512107).

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $125 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a composition notebook, graph paper, lab equipment and supplies, and safety supplies.

    What to Bring: Students should bring a paper or a notebook, pen or pencil, and a scientific calculator each week.

    What to Wear: Students should not wear any loose, drapey clothing to lab. They should also come to class with long hair tied back and should wear closed toe shoes.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Lab Science for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: Algebra I

    2
    The Science Place

    Geo-Detectives discover the many mysteries of Earth Science. From large scale disasters that come from inside the planet to microscopic contaminants in the water and soil, Geo-Detectives look high and low to understand the forces, systems, and cycles that continue to shape the Earth, its climates and ecosystems. Geo-Detectives will explore concepts as diverse as fossils to fault lines, ozone to ocean trenches, and trade winds to tundra. Hands-on labs and in-class activities will reinforce geological phenomena such as examining fossils, classifying rocks, reading the seismographic charts, or modelling the water cycle.

    First quarter, students will examine natural disasters that come from activity in the earth's layers such as volcanoes, tsunamis, and earthquakes. Students will study the geological forces that shape our planet by tracing the paths of volcanoes, earthquakes and tsunamis around the world. What do these occurrences tell us about tectonic plate theory? Students will learn about the rock cycle, subduction and spreading zones, and different types of earthquake faults. They will learn about fossils and other lines of evidence that support the theory of plate tectonics, and learn how the sizes, shapes and positions of land masses and oceans have changed through our planet's history.

    Topics in this Series: What a Disaster! Volcanoes, Tsunamis & Earthquakes
    (Quarter 1); Wacky World Weather (Quarter 2); Sensational Cycles and Seasons (Quarter 3); and Exploring Ecosystems (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Ney Mello
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    Learn the fundamentals of playing the guitar! In this class, students will learn basic melodies such as Happy Birthday, Jingle Bells, Twinkle Twinkle Little Star, as well as classic rock favorites like Smoke on the Water, etc. Kids will learn to play chords and strumming patterns for familiar songs chosen by the instructor and students. Students are encouraged to bring in music they are interested in learning. New chords and new songs will be added each week as students also learn to read music and basic music theory. Students will also learn how to hold, tune, and care for their guitars. Each student will need a least a beginner level acoustic guitar. Students should be able to read at grade level for this class and should plan to practice at home several times each week. Students should expect to spend 20-30 minutes per day most days practicing chords and melodies from class. There is a materials fee of $8.00 payable to the Compass on the first day of class for a tablature notebook.

    2
    Ney Mello
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    Learn the fundamentals of playing the guitar! In this class, teens will learn basic melodies such as Happy Birthday, Jingle Bells, Twinkle Twinkle Little Star, as well as classic rock favorites like Smoke on the Water, etc. They will learn to play chords and strumming patterns for familiar songs chosen by the instructor and students. Students are encouraged to bring in music they are interested in learning. New chords and new songs will be added each week as students also learn to read music and basic music theory. Students will also learn how to hold, tune, and care for their guitars. Each student will need a least a beginner level acoustic guitar. Students should be able to read at grade level for this class and should plan to practice at home several times each week. Adults are permitted to enroll in this class.

    Topics in this Series: Guitar for Teen Beginners I (Semester 1), Guitar for Teen Beginners II (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 20-30 minutes per day, most days practicing chords and melodies from class.

    Assignments: New material will be introduced in class.

    Assessments: Will not be given.

    Lab/Supply Fee: There is a materials fee of $8.00 payable to the Compass on the first day of class for a tablature notebook.

    What to Bring: Students should purchase or rent an acoustic guitar. In addition, picks, an electric tuner or tuner app installed on a phone, and pen/pencil.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in fine arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2
    Dr. Michele Forsythe
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    What is a lower calorie lunch: McDonald’s Big Mac or Panera’s Mac & Cheese (it’s not what you think!) How much sleep does a tween really need? Is vaping a safe alternative to smoking? Tweens fall in the awkward gap between childhood and teen years and face many personal and physical changes. This class will cover the health topics tweens should be prepared for such as healthy habits and developing bodies.

    The class will examine nutrition including specific recommendations for this age group and a look at the effects of favorites like sugar, caffeine, and fast food. Students will brainstorm safety topics such as internet safety, situational safety, risk-taking, and personal boundaries. Students will also learn about sleep recommendations and healthy sleep habits, exercise, and the effects of screen time, and students will be encouraged to keep a personal log to see how they fare on these measures.

    When it comes to feelings such a depression, anxiety, and fear, the class will discuss what is normal, and when you should start to worry. Tweens will learn about eating disorders and self-harm, and when it is time to speak up and get adult help for themselves or a friend. The group will also examine brain development in the tween years and how it is different than that of a toddler and adult, and what this means for thought processes such as impulsivity.

    The class will cover the usage of alcohol, illicit drugs, prescription drugs, smoking, and vaping including the effects they can have on a tween; common names, and new threats “on the street” such as drugs that look like candy, bath salts, or edibles. Students will learn how to identify addiction in themselves or someone else and how to get help.

    Puberty and human reproduction will be taught from a purely biological perspective including male and female anatomy, pregnancy and fetal development, and sexually transmitted diseases. These topics will be covered in a mixed classroom of boys and girls. This class will not cover birth control, abortion, or gender identity issues, and parents will have the opportunity to preview the material covered before it is taught to ensure it is right for their tween.

    This class will be structured as a facilitated discussion with ample opportunities for students to get their questions answered by an “outside” authority, a Compass science teacher with a PhD and work experience at the National Institutes of Health who has teenagers of her own. The class will incorporate some video clips, in-class activities, demonstrations, work with partners, and personal assessments/surveys. Some homework will be given in the form of logs to track sleep, screen time, etc. Class materials will include pamphlets and fliers put out by public health agencies and associations. A textbook will also be selected for the class, and families will be sent the ISBN of the book to purchase or rent for class. There is a supply fee of $20.00 due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Note: This class was taught in Fall semester 2022 and is a repeat session for a new class of students.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Angela Goodhart
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    Learn the art, craft, and history of photography for hobby, home, or as a possible profession. Students will discuss observation, perspective, and choosing their subjects. They will learn about the exposure triangle and elements of photographic composition, including lighting and exposure. The class will review different genres of photography such as portraiture, nature, sports, black and white, etc., and discuss finding their own "voice" in their photographs. Each week, class time will be split between hands-on practice and review of photographic examples, including works by noteworthy photographers. The instructor will also teach photo-editing with a free web-based software

    For this class, students will be required to prepare two projects: a presentation on a photographer of their choice and a special photography project of their choice. On the last day, there will be an art show for the parents.

    Prerequisites: None

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: In addition to the two projects described, students will have weekly homework taking photographs and occasional quizzes.

    Assessments: Students will receive ongoing, informal assessments and feedback on their photographs.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $15.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    What to Bring: Students are encouraged to bring digital SLR cameras, but any digital camera that is better than a phone camera will be adequate.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2
    Kerry Diederich
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    This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week, students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art, artist, or culture and view sample works. Then, they will create a project in the style of the featured artist or culture using a wide variety of materials, colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.

    First quarter, Junior Artists will learn about French Artists from the genres of Impressionism and Post Impressionism to include Rodin, Cezanne, Seurat, Degas, Renior, Monet, Matisse and Gauguin. These artists were sculptors, painters, draftsmen, and print makers. Each artist influenced the art world with style, color study and interpretation in their own personal way. Students will discuss which artist featured dancers in his subjects, who experimented in color, and which was multi talented artist using many mediums. Junior artist's projects will vary, from painting, to doing draft drawings, to sculpting, and color study.

    Topics in this Series: Imitate the Impressionists (Quarter 1); Famous Photography (Quarter 2); Multi-Media Masters (Quarter 3); Native American Art (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sarah Reynolds
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    Krav Maga is the Israeli martial art which teaches self defense and fitness. Students of Krav Maga are taught a series of strategies to assess and respond to common situations, such as facing a bully. Kids are always taught first and foremost to get away, to get help, and to try to deescalate the situation. When that fails, students practice a technique that includes a warning strike followed by escape, and finally, they learn how to stand up for themselves and how to counterattack if a situation escalates and becomes threatening. Kids are empowered and gain confidence when they rehearse how to handle real-life situations. Exercises and in-class practice incorporate balance, coordination, energy, and other key elements of fitness along with life skills such as confidence, teamwork, respect, discipline, and respect.

    Students may enroll in Krav Maga at any time, and everyone will begin as a white belt. Each quarter, students will practice the full range of skills, but there will be two "featured" moves that a student can earn a belt stripe for being able to demonstrate. Featured moves will include a combative strike and a defensive escape technique. No one stripe is a prerequisite for any other color, and color stripes can be earned in any order.

    First quarter, students will have the chance to earn a Blue Stripe. Featured moves include: cover defense and wrist locks (red stripe); straight punch defense and bear hugs (orange stripe); head movement defense and front 2-handed choke (yellow stripe); round kick defense and back 2-handed choke (green stripe); front kick defense and guillotine choke (blue stripe); clinch defense and rear choke (purple stripe); ground striking defense and head lock defense (brown stripe); and 360 defense and full Nelson (black stripe).

    Students will be able to test for belt promotions to move through the ranks of white belt, yellow belt, orange belt, etc. On average, it is estimated that a student will be ready for a belt test after four quarters/four color stripes. Belt testing will be by coach approval.

    Topics in this Series: Blue Stripe (1st Quarter), Purple Stripe (2nd Quarter), Brown Stripe (3rd Quarter) and Black Stripe (4th Quarter). Assessments: Belt testing for promotion will be by coach recommendation, but on average will take 4 quarters. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for the t-shirt and white belt (new students) or $5.00 for the white belt (returning students). A belt test fee of $25.00 is due payable to the instructor when a student is ready to test for promotion. What to Bring: Refillable water bottle. What to Wear: In lieu of a full martial arts uniform, participants should wear their class t-shirt and belt along with shorts, leggings, or loose, comfortable athletic pants, and comfortable athletic shoes or sneakers.Non-Meeting Days: This is a 6-week class that does not meet on October 5.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sarah Reynolds
    Add

    Krav Maga is the Israeli martial art which teaches self defense and fitness. Students of Krav Maga are taught a series of strategies to assess and respond to common situations, such as facing a bully. Kids are always taught first and foremost to get away, to get help, and to try to deescalate the situation. When that fails, students practice a technique that includes a warning strike followed by escape, and finally, they learn how to stand up for themselves and how to counterattack if a situation escalates and becomes threatening. Kids are empowered and gain confidence when they rehearse how to handle real-life situations. Exercises and in-class practice incorporate balance, coordination, energy, and other key elements of fitness along with life skills such as confidence, teamwork, respect, discipline, and respect.

    Students may enroll in Krav Maga at any time, and everyone will begin as a white belt. Each quarter, students will practice the full range of skills, but there will be two "featured" moves that a student can earn a belt stripe for being able to demonstrate. Featured moves will include a combative strike and a defensive escape technique. No one stripe is a prerequisite for any other color, and color stripes can be earned in any order.

    First quarter, students will have the chance to earn a Blue Stripe. Featured moves include: cover defense and wrist locks (red stripe); straight punch defense and bear hugs (orange stripe); head movement defense and front 2-handed choke (yellow stripe); round kick defense and back 2-handed choke (green stripe); front kick defense and guillotine choke (blue stripe); clinch defense and rear choke (purple stripe); ground striking defense and head lock defense (brown stripe); and 360 defense and full Nelson (black stripe).

    Students will be able to test for belt promotions to move through the ranks of white belt, yellow belt, orange belt, etc. On average, it is estimated that a student will be ready for a belt test after four quarters/four color stripes. Belt testing will be by coach approval.

    Topics in this Series: Blue Stripe (1st Quarter), Purple Stripe (2nd Quarter), Brown Stripe (3rd Quarter) and Black Stripe (4th Quarter). Assessments: Belt testing for promotion will be by coach recommendation, but on average will take 4 quarters. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for the t-shirt and white belt (new students) or $5.00 for the white belt (returning students). A belt test fee of $25.00 is due payable to the instructor when a student is ready to test for promotion. What to Bring: Refillable water bottle. What to Wear: In lieu of a full martial arts uniform, participants should wear their class t-shirt and belt along with shorts, leggings, or loose, comfortable athletic pants, and comfortable athletic shoes or sneakers.Non-Meeting Days: This is a 6-week class that does not meet on October 7.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sevim Kalyoncu
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    Have fun the final weeks of summer! Look forward to early fall! Animals are active and sunning themselves. Plants are mature, and flowers have gone to seed. The stream may have slowed down from summer drought, but discoveries at the water's edge abound.

    Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

    A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

    Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 6 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sevim Kalyoncu
    Add

    Have fun the final weeks of summer! Look forward to early fall! Animals are active and sunning themselves. Plants are mature, and flowers have gone to seed. The stream may have slowed down from summer drought, but discoveries at the water's edge abound.

    Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

    A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

    Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 6 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Becca Sticha

    Student engineers will be challenged to design, build, and program a robot to complete several unique mazes in the fastest possible time. Students will learn to program their robots to make "decisions" when exploring an unfamiliar maze such as "go straight until you encounter a wall" and "turn to the right if you run into an obstacle."

    Students will use the LEGO MINDSTORMS Education EV3 robotics sets. They will build with motors, wheels/axles, gears, levers, and special components. Students will have to install touch, sound, color, gyro, ultrasonic, and/or infrared sensors while also learning to program sequences and commands that use input/output devices for controlled movements and precise turns. Using the drag-and-drop EV3 programming menu, students will learn to program their robots while experimenting with key concepts such as fixed values, variables, loops, and logic constructs.

    This course integrates science, engineering and computational thinking while introducing physical constraints, units of measurement, and coordinate systems. But, don't worry, this is a beginning robotics class. Prior experience is not expected, but returning students are welcome. Each student will build his/her own robotic project, so students can progress and customize at their own pace. In general, in this class, students will spend two weeks assembling, three weeks programming, and two weeks testing and re-designing. Topics in this Series: Maze Runner (Quarter 1), Sumo Bots (Quarter 2), Mars Rover (Quarter 3), and Explore Atlantis (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Sirdley Taborga
    Add

    Hola! Spanish Para Pequenos (Spanish for Little Ones) is a fun, play-based, Spanish immersion class for young children. Much like learning their native language, children will be exposed to the sounds and words in Spanish through songs, games, stories, interactive and hands-on activities. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students in the first few weeks. The teacher will bring toys and objects to give young children tangible, hands-on examples of the vocabulary being introduced. Vocubulary covered may include simple greetings, color words, numbers, animals, and articles of clothing, and these will be repeated often due to the young age of the students. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds and basic vocabulary words while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. All instruction will be verbal in this class. Reading, writing, and spelling will not be expected. Fluency should not be expected at this level.

    Note: Students must be minimum age 4 in order to enroll in this class. (no 3-year-olds). Students must be comfortable speaking to others in English, able to follow directions, and separate from their parent for the 55-minute duration of the class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mimi Nyman
    Add

    The tantalizing aroma of cookies in the oven. A mouth-watering burst of mint. The silky feel of melted chocolate. The sticky sweet of fresh-made caramel. A subtle hint of lemon. Student bakers will enjoy these delicious sensations- and more- as they explore the world of baking homemade desserts.

  • Eclair Squares
  • Fruit and Cheese Danish
  • Blueberry Zucchini Bread
  • Sweet Fruit Pizza
  • Berry Galette
  • French Crepes with Lemon Sauce
  • Baked Apples
  • Sweet Shop treats are scrumptious, fun, and simple to make. Each week they will prepare a fresh, handmade dessert or sweet such as: pies, cakes, cookies, tarts, trifles, mousses, puddings, candies, fudge, brittle, or chocolate. The class will include some icing, decorating, and garnishing techniques for completed desserts. This quarter, the Compass bakers' culinary adventures will include:

  • Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. This engaging sweets class will get students excited about helping in the kitchen and entertaining. They will learn important baking skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary is introduced each week.

    Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a small group.

    Topics in this Series: Decadent Delights (Quarter 1); Gooey Goodies (Quarter 2), Best Bon Bons (Quarter 3), and Casual Confections (Quarter 4).

    Assessments: Qualitative Feedback will be given in class. Formal grades/assessment will not be given.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided.

    What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in career exploration, fine arts, or electives for purposes of a high school transcript. For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

  • 2
    Mimi Nyman
    Add

    The tantalizing aroma of cookies in the oven. A mouth-watering burst of mint. The silky feel of melted chocolate. The sticky sweet of fresh-made caramel. A subtle hint of lemon. Student bakers will enjoy these delicious sensations- and more- as they explore the world of baking homemade desserts.

  • Eclair Squares
  • Fruit and Cheese Danish
  • Blueberry Zucchini Bread
  • Sweet Fruit Pizza
  • Berry Galette
  • French Crepes with Lemon Sauce
  • Baked Apples
  • Sweet Shop treats are scrumptious, fun, and simple to make. Each week they will prepare a fresh, handmade dessert or sweet such as: pies, cakes, cookies, tarts, trifles, mousses, puddings, candies, fudge, brittle, or chocolate. The class will include some icing, decorating, and garnishing techniques for completed desserts. This quarter, the Compass bakers' culinary adventures will include:

  • Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. This engaging sweets class will get students excited about helping in the kitchen and entertaining. They will learn important baking skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary is introduced each week.

    Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a small group.

    Topics in this Series: Decadent Delights (Quarter 1); Gooey Goodies (Quarter 2), Best Bon Bons (Quarter 3), and Casual Confections (Quarter 4).

    Assessments: Qualitative Feedback will be given in class. Formal grades/assessment will not be given.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided.

    What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in career exploration, fine arts, or electives for purposes of a high school transcript. For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

  • 2
    Judith Harmon

    Tweens take over as they collectively brainstorm and collaboratively write own play. Find out what happens when tweens "act out" the unique characters and an original storyline they created. Just in time for Halloween! What horrors haunt the house on the hill? Will our tweens uncover the undead or greet ghosts and ghouls galore?

    Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other and to begin to brainstorm about their original play. Through group activities and guided discussion, the actors will decide on characters, conflict, and conclusion, and the story they want to tell. The script will be developed and customized for this class with the students' input.

    The class will learn the practical aspects of acting, as they work on script read-through, blocking, costume/prop design, and planning the show. Students will develop their own "actor's toolkit" of voice, body, and imagination in this creative process! Actors will grow in confidence and communication skills in preparation for a final sharing with parents on the final day of the quarter.

    Once the script is fully developed with everyone's parts, about half-way through the quarter, it will be emailed to parents. Parents will be expected to help their children memorize their script/lines/cues and assemble a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity.

    Topics in this Series: Haunted House of Horrors (Quarter 1), Chaos in the Courtroom (Quarter 2), No Exit Escape Room (Quarter 3) and Rock Start Rivalry (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Black Rocket
    Add

    What does it take to make a game? Art, music, storytelling, programming? All these things and more. Whether you are interested in game art, game design or coding, Unity is the place where it all comes together. Unity is a professional game development environment that has been used to create AAA games like Hearthstone and Kerbal Space Program and can also be used to create fun learning games, like ball rolling and pickup games. Unity games can be compiled for Mac, Windows, iOS, Android or Web GL, all from the same project file.

    Students will learn their way around the Unity development environment. They will learn to incorporate audio and art assets from the internet, as well as any original audio or art students have created. The class will use Unity's non-coding features to create action and will also do some scripting in C#. Students will create their own game, either chosen from Unity's catalog of beginner game tutorials or designed from scratch, and learn to deploy on the platform of their choice.

    First semester will focus on 3D game design and will cover concepts like manipulating game objects in 3D space, working with 3D models, and using first- and third- person perspective. Students will learn techniques to create games like action, adventure, strategy and sandbox games. Even if you are most interested in 2D games, a good foundation in 3D game development will make learning Unity's 2D features even easier.

    This course is for teens who are interested in either the artistic/graphic design aspect or programming aspect of video game development. Students should bring a laptop and charger to class each week. A gaming laptop with enhanced graphics card is preferred. No prior coding experience is expected.

    Topics in this Series: Video Game Designer: 3D (Semester 1) and Video Game Designer: 2D (Semester 2) Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Will be given in class and noted in the weekly e-mails.

    Assessments: Will not be given.

    What to Bring: A laptop and charger to class each week.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Career Exploration, Technology, or Applied Computer Science for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2
    Judith Harmon

    Students will become immersed in the imaginary worlds they construct in this unique course that encompasses elements of fiction writing, sociology, and anthropology. Worldbuilding is the foundation of speculative fiction, such as sci-fi and fantasy, role-playing games, videos, comics, and other visual media. Countless examples of Worldbuilding exist in the movies and books we consume every day such as Tolkien's Middle Earth, the many elaborate settlements of the Star Wars franchise, and the popular RPG, Dungeons and Dragons.

    In this course, students will develop a fictional locale. Will it be a small village in a known place, a new planet, or an original universe? Students will be guided through an interactive, iterative process of "top-down" design of their unique world, determining broad characteristics first then then elaborating with increasing detail. Builders will make coherent and integrated decisions on geography, climate, ecology, flora, fauna, inhabitants, races, history, social customs, language, religion, origin story, powers/magic, legal system, currency, and technology. The class will read excerpts and watch clips of well-known fictional works which will provide strong examples of each of the elements.

    First semester, the class will create fantasy-inspired worlds. Students, along with their instructor, will develop an in-class world as an example. Students will use the lessons and exercises reviewed in class to further develop their individual world project.

    Students will be expected to keep a notebook of decisions and details as they progress through designing the elements of their world. The class will use World Anvil, a web-based subscription service which allows students to create maps, timelines, and other tools to organize their made-up world. Each student will be expected to make a PowerPoint presentation at the end of the semester which addresses each of the built-world elements.

    Topics in this Series: Fantasy (Semester 1), Science Fiction (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: None

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 2 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Will be posted in a Google Classroom

    Assessments:

    Textbook/Materials: Students will need to create a login and pay for a Master Level subscription to World Anvil (worldanvil.com) for approximately $35.00.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $15.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Non-Meeting Days: In addition to the scheduled days-off on the published Compass schedule, this class does not meet on November 4, 2022.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Karen Hickman
    Add

    In Writers' Workshop, middle school students will expand essential communication skills- reading, retaining, discussing, composing, revising, and even listening and speaking- by reviewing short selections of renowned literature and putting pen to paper! Each quarter, students will write about a popular theme using the elements they observe in the example classics.

    A bold, boisterous buccaneer. A lonely little llama. A precocious princess: these are colorful characters! The class will read selections of classic literature to define what makes a strong, interesting character in a good story. Creating characters is a complex, cognitive process, so the class will use character sketching, guided imagery, and other in-class activities to envision new and compelling characters and bring them to life in their writing. Students will complete exercises and stepping stones to determine how their colorful characters fit into the story elements in the construction of an original short story. An anthology of student stories will be published at the end of the quarter.

    Imagination and creativity come easily to most young writers, but acquiring technical skills is also important. Each quarter, students will focus on specific skills. The skills are a part of the Writer's Tool Kit that includes: understanding parts and kinds of sentences, plurals, possessives, and punctuation. Across the four quarters of this class, students will also learn how to use a dictionary and a thesaurus, as well as higher-level, middle school level skills such as summarizing, outlining, note taking, writing a book report, or citing sources. In class, students will share drafts and in-progress works to receive peer feedback and promote revising and editing skills.

    Homework: Students are expected to write in a journal for a minimum of four minutes per day and respond to prompts that are sent home on an assignment bookmark. They will also be asked to read short assignments such as a chapter or excerpt in preparation for class discussions.

    Topics in this Series: Creating Colorful Characters (Quarter 1), Fantasy Fun (Quarter 2), Learn to Research- Life in a Castle (Quarter 3) and Prose, Poetry, & Paintings- A Passport Adventure (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    YMCA
    Add

    Compass now offers Homeschool Swim Lessons through Reston YMCA! The YMCA is a clean, bright modern recreation facility located at 12196 Sunset Hills Road, Reston, VA 20190 (0.9 miles/ 3 minute drive from Compass's classroom facility.) Lessons are offered at 3 age levels: "Sunfish" (ages 3.5-5), "Stingrays" (ages 6-8, grades 1-3), and "Sharks" (ages 9-12, grades 4-6) and 2 ability levels: Beginners and Intermediate.

    Lessons at the Stingrays and Sharks Beginner level will progress through the YMCA's swimming curriculum to include: water acclimation, water movement, swimming half of the pool (15-20 yards) on front with face in water and becoming comfortable in some level in deep water. Please note that these skills will be introduced and progress at different rates depending on the comfortable level and experience of enrolled students and may take more than one quarter to complete. At times, students might be moved to a different swimming group (same day, same time, different instructor) to better match the experience level of enrolled children.

    Lessons are 40 minutes long, running from 0:05 until 0:45 after the hour, leaving enough time to towel dry, change clothes, and return to Compass for your next class. Students should bring a swimsuit, towel, and change of clothes. Googles and swim caps are optional.

    A parent (or parent proxy) is required to remain on site. Parents may wait on poolside benches or lobby seating. YMCA waivers must be signed and returned for each swimmer. All registration is completed through Compass. All YMCA swimming classes are taught by certified, experienced, background-checked adult instructors with experience teaching children.

    Class sizes are small with 3-5 children. If there is greater interest per hour or per level, please add your child's name to the waitlist because YMCA may be able to add instructors. Consider enrolling your child in both Tuesday and Thursday classes to improve their rate of learning.

    2
    YMCA
    Add

    Compass now offers Homeschool Swim Lessons through Reston YMCA! The YMCA is a clean, bright modern recreation facility located at 12196 Sunset Hills Road, Reston, VA 20190 (0.9 miles/ 3 minute drive from Compass's classroom facility.) Lessons are offered at 3 age levels: "Sunfish" (ages 3.5-5), "Stingrays" (ages 6-8, grades 1-3), and "Sharks" (ages 9-12, grades 4-6) and 2 ability levels: Beginners and Intermediate.

    Lessons at the Stingrays and Sharks Beginner level will progress through the YMCA's swimming curriculum to include: water acclimation, water movement, swimming half of the pool (15-20 yards) on front with face in water and becoming comfortable in some level in deep water. Please note that these skills will be introduced and progress at different rates depending on the comfortable level and experience of enrolled students and may take more than one quarter to complete. At times, students might be moved to a different swimming group (same day, same time, different instructor) to better match the experience level of enrolled children.

    Lessons are 40 minutes long, running from 0:05 until 0:45 after the hour, leaving enough time to towel dry, change clothes, and return to Compass for your next class. Students should bring a swimsuit, towel, and change of clothes. Googles and swim caps are optional.

    A parent (or parent proxy) is required to remain on site. Parents may wait on poolside benches or lobby seating. YMCA waivers must be signed and returned for each swimmer. All registration is completed through Compass. All YMCA swimming classes are taught by certified, experienced, background-checked adult instructors with experience teaching children.

    Class sizes are small with 3-5 children. If there is greater interest per hour or per level, please add your child's name to the waitlist because YMCA may be able to add instructors. Consider enrolling your child in both Tuesday and Thursday classes to improve their rate of learning.

    2
    YMCA
    Add

    Compass now offers Homeschool Swim Lessons through Reston YMCA! The YMCA is a clean, bright modern recreation facility located at 12196 Sunset Hills Road, Reston, VA 20190 (0.9 miles/ 3 minute drive from Compass's classroom facility.) Lessons are offered at 3 age levels: "Sunfish" (ages 3.5-5), "Stingrays" (ages 6-8, grades 1-3), and "Sharks" (ages 9-12, grades 4-6) and 2 ability levels: Beginners and Intermediate.

    Lessons at the Stingrays and Sharks Intermediate level will progress through the YMCA's swimming curriculum to include: all skills in beginner-level class plus: water stamina, swimming one length of the pool (25 yards), performing elementary backstroke, rotary breathing, becoming comfortable in deep water, and stroke introduction to include: front crawl, backstroke, and elementary breaststroke. Please note that these skills will be introduced and progress at different rates depending on the comfortable level and experience of enrolled students and may take more than one quarter to complete. At times, students might be moved to a different swimming group (same day, same time, different instructor) to better match the experience level of enrolled children.

    Lessons are 40 minutes long, running from 0:05 until 0:45 after the hour, leaving enough time to towel dry, change clothes, and return to Compass for your next class. Students should bring a swimsuit, towel, and change of clothes. Googles and swim caps are optional.

    A parent (or parent proxy) is required to remain on site. Parents may wait on poolside benches or lobby seating. YMCA waivers must be signed and returned for each swimmer. All registration is completed through Compass. All YMCA swimming classes are taught by certified, experienced, background-checked adult instructors with experience teaching children.

    Class sizes are small with 3-5 children. If there is greater interest per hour or per level, please add your child's name to the waitlist because YMCA may be able to add instructors. Consider enrolling your child in both Tuesday and Thursday classes to improve their rate of learning.

    Prerequisites: Beginner Level

    2
    YMCA
    Add

    Compass now offers Homeschool Swim Lessons through Reston YMCA! The YMCA is a clean, bright modern recreation facility located at 12196 Sunset Hills Road, Reston, VA 20190 (0.9 miles/ 3 minute drive from Compass's classroom facility.) Lessons are offered at 3 age levels: "Sunfish" (ages 3.5-5), "Stingrays" (ages 6-8, grades 1-3), and "Sharks" (ages 9-12, grades 4-6) and 2 ability levels: Beginners and Intermediate.

    Lessons at the Stingrays and Sharks Intermediate level will progress through the YMCA's swimming curriculum to include: all skills in beginner-level class plus: water stamina, swimming one length of the pool (25 yards), performing elementary backstroke, rotary breathing, becoming comfortable in deep water, and stroke introduction to include: front crawl, backstroke, and elementary breaststroke. Please note that these skills will be introduced and progress at different rates depending on the comfortable level and experience of enrolled students and may take more than one quarter to complete. At times, students might be moved to a different swimming group (same day, same time, different instructor) to better match the experience level of enrolled children.

    Lessons are 40 minutes long, running from 0:05 until 0:45 after the hour, leaving enough time to towel dry, change clothes, and return to Compass for your next class. Students should bring a swimsuit, towel, and change of clothes. Googles and swim caps are optional.

    A parent (or parent proxy) is required to remain on site. Parents may wait on poolside benches or lobby seating. YMCA waivers must be signed and returned for each swimmer. All registration is completed through Compass. All YMCA swimming classes are taught by certified, experienced, background-checked adult instructors with experience teaching children.

    Class sizes are small with 3-5 children. If there is greater interest per hour or per level, please add your child's name to the waitlist because YMCA may be able to add instructors. Consider enrolling your child in both Tuesday and Thursday classes to improve their rate of learning.

    Prerequisites: Beginner Level

    2
    Taliesin Knol
    Add

    Why read about key military battles on maps or in books when you can learn about them hands-on, in three dimensions, using historical miniature gaming? In 3D History, pivotal engagements come to life for new and experienced students, as they navigate a table-top terrain, deploy hundreds of miniature soldiers, ships, and tanks... all while playing a military strategy game. Each student will have the opportunity to fight a battle from both sides, allowing them to test various strategies, try multiple scenarios, predict different outcomes, and rewrite history- an effective way to gain a deeper understanding of what actually happened and why!

    When America entered the war in 1941, the Allied leaders agreed they had one priority: the destruction of Nazi Germany's ability to wage war and Hitler's nightmare regime. However, an army is not built overnight, and it took time to learn how to fight in the modern era. It was not enough to simply have the most tank or planes. An army had to be able to leverage them on the battlefield with proper coordination and up-to-date tactics. Learned in the bloody North Africa campaign, the US Army joined its allies to sweep across the Mediterranean into Italy. Their hope was to knock the birthplace of facism out of the war quickly and enter Germany to end the war in a fast, blitzkrieg style. This was not to be, as the Allies still had some lessons to learn, necessitating the most famous invasion in history, Operation Overlord, and the liberation of France by punching through the vaunted Atlantic Wall into Fortress Europe. This began the road to V-day in Europe for the Allied powers who reached the Soviet Union's Eastern Front in just under a year. In that year, the entire population of Germany was in the path of destruction as the Allies fought non-stop an increasingly desperate German army that was losing its dream of a thousand-year empire.

    Students will fight the last battles of the European theater on land, sea, and air using a wide range of miniature soldiers, vehicles, and ships. From the largest amphibious invasions in history to tank battles across France, Italy, and Germany, students will study the technical and strategic elements that led to the outcomes of the battle. They will attempt to recreate the Axis or Allied successes (or failures) in a miniature strategy game. Upon completing the semester, every student will understand the consequences of the war, the objectives of both sides, and how successful or realistic these objectives were. This will be supported with primary sources, newsreels from the time, propaganda material, and modern analysis.

    Note: This is a 1 hour, 55 minute class with a 10-minute break part way through.

    Topics in this Series: WWII- The Invasion of Fortress Europe 1943-45
    (Semester 1) and WWII- Operation Downfall 1944-45 (Semester 2).

    Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Period maps, photographs, and re-creations will be posted on a class Google Drive, and video links from YouTube will be e-mailed to parents and students for homework or supplemental investigation.

    Assessments: Will not be given.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
    Add

    Acting is an adventure! Young actors work together to create and perform their very own play with unique characters and an original storyline. What happens when a crazy captain, suspicious scallywag, and a precocious parrot meet on a ship sailing the seven seas?

    Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other and to begin to brainstorm about their original play. Through group activities and guided discussion, the young actors will decide on characters, conflict, and conclusion, and the story they want to tell. The script will be developed and customized for this class with input from the students.

    Young actors will explore skills such as sensory awareness, listening, stage movement, character development, emotional expression, and observation/concentration while learning to portray their original character. Young actors will learn aspects of acting by script read-through, blocking, costume/prop discussion, and planning the show. Through individual and group activities, young actors build confidence in preparation for a final sharing for parents.

    Students will work from a simple, written script, but emerging readers can be accommodated. Parents will be emailed the script after the 3rd or 4th class and will be expected to help their children memorize their lines and assemble a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity. All actors must be at least age 6 to sign up for this class.

    Topics in this Series: Pirate's Paradise (Quarter 1), Outback Odyssey (Quarter 2), Suddenly Small (Quarter 3), and Clown College (Quarter 4)

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    David Chelf

    This is a complete course in high school Algebra I which will cover fundamental concepts in algebra and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. This course is designed to emphasize the study of algebraic problem-solving with the incorporation of real-world applications. Topics in Algebra I include number systems, linear systems, rational numbers, complex numbers, exponents, roots, radicals, quadratic equations, polynomials, factoring, absolute values, ratios, and proportions. In addition, the course will cover solving and graphing systems of functions, linear equations, and inequalities. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem-solving.

    Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation in pre-algebra topics in order to take this class.
    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Thursday (day 1), lecture on Monday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Thursday (day 8), and homework due the next Monday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Wednesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work.
    Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.
    Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by checking that weekly homework sets are complete and giving periodic take-home tests; class participation is also strongly encouraged. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade.
    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Algebra I: Expressions, Equations, and Applications by Paul A. Foerster. It is available in a few different editions, each of which is virtually identical: 2nd edition (ISBN-10 020125073X, ISBN-13 978-0201250732), 3rd edition (ISBN-10 0201860945, ISBN-13 978-0201860948), and Classic edition (ISBN-10 020132458X, ISBN-13 978-0201324587). It is also available under the title Foerster Algebra I, Classics edition (ISBN-10 0131657089, ISBN-13 978-0131657083). A calculator is not needed for this course.
    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Algebra I for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: Pre-Algebra

    0
    Taliesin Knol

    In the aftermath of Germany's failed summer offensive on the Eastern Front, all that remained was for the newly bolstered Allied powers to launch their own attack to end the First World War. This offensive was enabled by the torrent of American reinforcements that had arrived in Europe. Backed with airpower, tanks, and fresh troops, the Allies would not only retake all the ground Germany had won in their last gasp attack the previous summer but also break the German war machine and push through the Hindenburg line into Germany itself, finally ending the war.

    Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will each form a 10" X 14" shaped, foam diorama with landscape elements (hills, trenches, rivers, ridges, vegetation, barbed wire, etc.) to represent a scene of a famous historical engagement. Students will each receive 1:72 scale miniature soldiers to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate the larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical wargaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices.

    The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical background and circumstances leading up to the specific battle. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. Topics in this series include: WWI Naval Conflict- Jutland (Quarter 1). WWI- The 100 Day's Offensive and the end of Germany (Quarter 2), WWII- Operation Torch, Invasion of North Africa (Quarter 3), and Battle Strategies & Dioramas: WWII Naval Conflict- The Philippine Sea (Quarter 4).sta Note: This is an 8-week class whose end date overlaps with the start of the typical Compass Quarter 2. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Taliesin Knol
    Add

    In the aftermath of Germany's failed summer offensive on the Eastern Front, all that remained was for the newly bolstered Allied powers to launch their own attack to end the First World War. This offensive was enabled by the torrent of American reinforcements that had arrived in Europe. Backed with airpower, tanks, and fresh troops, the Allies would not only retake all the ground Germany had won in their last gasp attack the previous summer but also break the German war machine and push through the Hindenburg line into Germany itself, finally ending the war.

    Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will each form a 10" X 14" shaped, foam diorama with landscape elements (hills, trenches, rivers, ridges, vegetation, barbed wire, etc.) to represent a scene of a famous historical engagement. Students will each receive 1:72 scale miniature soldiers to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate the larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical wargaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices.

    The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical background and circumstances leading up to the specific battle. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. Topics in this series include: WWI Naval Conflict- Jutland (Quarter 1). WWI- The 100 Day's Offensive and the end of Germany (Quarter 2), WWII- Operation Torch, Invasion of North Africa (Quarter 3), and Battle Strategies & Dioramas: WWII Naval Conflict- The Philippine Sea (Quarter 4).sta Note: This is an 8-week class whose end date overlaps with the start of the typical Compass Quarter 2. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Becca Sticha
    Add

    Discover the world of robotics using kids' favorite, interlocking building bricks! Students will build and program 3-4 different whimsical, mechanized projects each quarter using the WeDo 2.0 robotics system by LEGO Education.

    First quarter, students will build, program, and model fascinating friends from under the sea such as a whale, shark, crab, and sea turtle.

    Their robots will be built using special-shaped LEGO components from the WeDo Educational set, motors, motion sensors, tilt sensors and a programmable, Bluetooth control unit ("brain"). Student will use classroom tablets to program the control units using an intuitive drag-and-drop coding modules.

    Prior experience with LEGO or coding is not required. All equipment is furnished.

    Topics in this Series: Under the Sea (Quarter 1), Wings and Things (Quarter 2); Perfect Pets (Quarter 3), and Reptiles Rule (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Diane Wright Cobb
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    Tweens will be introduced to watercolor painting in a small group class under the guidance of a professional painter and art teacher. The class will learn the theory of color mixing and the techniques of blending, building up color, creating gradients, and applying light washes. The class will learn how to select the right brush and how to use water to create different effects. Our new painters will practice using paint and brush strokes to create effects like light and shadow, dimension, and texture, and how to develop backgrounds, foregrounds, and detail work. Students will try techniques such as applying and removing paint, layering, stippling, and dabbing, along with wet and dry brush techniques. Students will complete several paintings on watercolor paper (please note that "canvas" in the class name may in fact be specialty paper, depending on the type of paint) . A variety of subjects, such as still life, animals, florals, landscapes, seascapes, fantasy, abstracts, or "mimic the masters" will be introduced to illustrate different painting techniques through in-class projects. Topics in this series include: Watercolor Painting (Quarter 1), Tempera Painting (Quarter 2), Acrylic Painting (Quarter 3), and MultiMedia Painting (Quarter 4). There is an $20.00 supply fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mimi Nyman
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    Students will enjoy making flavorful fall recipes and family favorites that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Fall Fare recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

  • Sweet Pumpkin Dip
  • Chicken Vegetable Soup
  • Caprese Salad Bites
  • Honey Glazed Carrots
  • Spinach Artichoke Meatballs
  • Pineapple Coconut Cupcakes
  • Cheesy Rice Casserole with Green Chilies
  • Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.

    Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group.

    Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mimi Nyman

    Students will enjoy making flavorful fall recipes and family favorites that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Fall Fare recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

  • Sweet Pumpkin Dip
  • Chicken Vegetable Soup
  • Caprese Salad Bites
  • Honey Glazed Carrots
  • Spinach Artichoke Meatballs
  • Pineapple Coconut Cupcakes
  • Cheesy Rice Casserole with Gren Chilies
  • Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.

    Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group.

    Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Dr. John Kornacki
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    Deciphering the Founding Documents: The Declaration, Constitution, and Bill of Rights
    Jefferson dramatized the grievances of the colonies. Madison plagiarized fellow Virginian George Mason. Opposing men of great distinction resorted to name-calling. There are little-known backstories to the great debates that went into the writing of The Declaration of Independence, The United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights. These founding documents are more than dusty relics. The debate over their meanings and role in government and society continues today.

    In this course, teens will examine the motivations of political factions and major compromises behind the Constitution including a widespread publicity campaign to rally support for the new document (The Federalist Papers). Students will read and discuss articles and amendments to the Constitution, various extrapolations, and famous Supreme Court cases formalizing those interpretations. They will scrutinize the powers left to the people in the Bill of Rights and how those were meant to limit the federal government. The class will look at additional Amendments which abolished slavery, expanded voting rights, placed limits on executive power, and established the frequently cited 'equal protection' standard. Finally, students will understand the modern views of strict constructionism (or original intent) versus living document debate over how closely the Constitution should be followed or interpreted for modern issues.

    In this course, guest lecturers from the National Archives and presidential libraries will be invited to join the students virtually and present alternative views or interpretations of the Founding Documents. Class discussions are Socratic Q & A style facilitated by a retired college professor who served on an advisory committee on preserving historical records for the National Archives and the US Congress.

    Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing.

    Workload: Each week, students will be asked to write a one-page reaction brief summarizing the main points of the discussion.

    Topics in this Series: Deciphering the Founding Documents (Semester 1), TBD first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.
    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in US Government or Civics for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2
    Shona D'Cruz

    Student artists will enjoy working hands-on, in 3-dimensions with a variety of sculpting and crafting materials to create original Decorative Arts. Assembling decorative items is multi-sensory, and students enjoy the tactile experience of shaping, stacking, forming, flattening, and layering a selection of materials to create unique, personal projects. Decorative art engages a different artistic skillset than coloring, drawing, and writing, and encourages creativity to represent objects in three dimensions. In this studio environment, students will create original hand-made pieces using a range of artistic techniques and a myriad of materials to choose from.

    First quarter, students will create one-of-a-kind sculptures and will learn to work with materials such as papier mache, air-dry and polymer clays, wire, plaster, etc. Example past projects include a wire wave sculpture, layered paper collage, clay animals, or sculpey flowers. Some projects may take two weeks to complete with one week dedicated to forming and shaping the base sculpture and the second week focused on finishing techniques such as painting and embellishing. A supply fee of $40.00 per student is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Topics in this Series: Sculpture Skills (Quarter 1), Marvelous Mosaics (Quarter 2), Fiber Arts Fun (Quarter 3), and Upcycled, Recycled Projects (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Black Rocket
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    In Digital Lab, students will explore elements of game design by creating and animating their own character sprites, objects, and backgrounds. Start with a name, develop the character's personality, signature moves, special powers, and a story line. Finish with a fully animated character to be used in future games. Students do not need any prior experience in game design, animation, or sketching.

    Digital Lab is a computer lab environment in which students work through the Black Rocket curriculum under the direction of computer science coaches. The lab environment allows students to enroll at any quarter, fosters brand new coders, and encourages those with prior coding experience. In the "Intro" level of a course (i.e., Part 1), students will work through the fundamentals of a new digital skill. In the "Continuing" level (i.e., Part 2), students who continue from "Intro" will develop new skills and will design and code an individual project. New students who enroll in "Intro" will begin with the introductory lessons. In order to differentiate instruction between new and continuing students, coaches work with small pull-out groups, pairs, or individuals to provide additional support as needed. The class tuition includes a student technology fee that covers the use of instructor-provided classroom laptops loaded with the required software, applications, and licenses. At the end of the class, students will receive access to Black Rocket's interactive learning platform to continue their coding journey at home.

    Topics in this Series: Video Game Animation (Quarters 1, 2); Code Your Own Adventure (Quarters 3, 4)

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Dr. Anne Taranto
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    This full-credit English course is designed to prepare students for college level academic writing. It will deepen student’s critical reading and textual analysis skills by asking students to think critically about the “American Dream” and what it means to be an American by reading texts that engage with these topics from the 18th century to today. In this course, students will read and respond in writing to both fiction and non-fiction texts, and our analytical method will focus on rhetorical context (subject, purpose and audience).

    Fall Semester will feature The House of Mirth (Edith Wharton), Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (Harriet Jacobs), A Raisin in the Sun (Lorraine Hansberry) and Beloved (Toni Morrison).

    Writing Lab: An essential component of this course will be an in-class Writing Lab. Students in this class should have mastered the basics of academic writing, such as constructing a thesis statement that makes an argument and organizing their thoughts through effective topic sentences and transition statements. This class will deepen students' textual analysis skills with a focus on developing rhetorical analysis, the study of how a text makes meaning. Over the course of the year, students will develop familiarity with a variety of writing styles and forms including rhetorical analysis, literary analysis, critical response, close reading, opinion essay, and personal essay. Students should bring a laptop to class one day per week for in-class writing.

    Prerequisites: Students taking this class should have mastered the foundations of Introduction to Genre and British Literature (or similar English courses), are expected to take an active role in discussion and complete all writing assignments.

    Topics in this Series: American Literature, Part I (Semester 1) and American Literature, Part II (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: All assignments will be posted in a Google Classroom management site. Students will need their own gmail accounts to access Google Classroom.

    Assessments: Students' written assignments will be graded using a rubric and assigned points that the homeschool parent can use when assigning an overall class grade.

    Textbook/Materials: Because students will need clean, inexpensive copies of each novel to mark in, and they must be able to refer to the passages on the same page numbers, copies of mass market paperbacks will be pre-purchased and bundled for students. (See Supply Fee below).

    Supply Fee: A class fee of $41.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for the class pack of books and handouts.

    What to Bring: Students should bring the current literature, paper, pen or pencil and highlighter to class each week. Some students may wish to bring paper clips, adhesive flags or post-it notes for marking passages/pages.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a half-credit (one semester) or full credit (both semesters) in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: Intro to Literary Genres or Equivalent

    2
    Fencing Sports Academy
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    Fencing is the clashing of steel and competitive spirit combined with the battle of the wits. Apply the rules of Olympic fencing, and you have a physically and mentally challenging game of strategy, often called, "physical chess." In Beginning Fencing, students will learn the rules of the sport as well as footwork, attacks, parries, responses, and how to judge matches. Beginning students will use the epee, a thin, lightweight sword with broad hand guard and will wear a wireless electronic scoring sensor over layers of protective gear. Returning students will work with both the epee and foil. The physical benefits of fencing are an increase in agility, balance and coordination. Fencing also provides mental benefits such as improved focus, strategy and confidence. Fencing is safety-oriented with blunt tip weapons, chest protectors, chest/sleeve pads, fencing jacket, gloves, and face mask. Students may enroll any quarter. All equipment is provided by the instructor. Students are asked to wear comfortable athletic pants such as running pants or sweatpants (no jeans, no dresses), and low-heeled athletic shoes.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Edwige Pinover

    Inquire about private tutoring and semi-private instruction in French and other subjects.

    Bonjour and welcome to the second year of high school French. This is a conversation-focused program in which students will build their vocabulary quickly and learn essential grammar skills in French. Students will cover the broad themes and vocabular for: my family and my friends, celebrations, shopping, high school, a typical day, and the good old days. The class will begin with a review of adjective-noun agreement, negations, and regular -er, ir-, and -re verbs. They will review and continue to expand their list of irregular verbs such as avoir (to have) and etre (to be). Students will be introduced to the passe compose and Imparfait (imperfect) tenses, and they will learn how to use negations, direct and indirect pronouns, and reflexive verbs with present, past, and imperfect tenses. They will practice comparative and superlative statements, and will continue to have brief cultural lessons integrated in their units.

    Class will be conducted primarily in French and will focus on listening and speaking skills, asking and answering questions, and correct use of grammar. At home, students will be responsible for memorizing vocabulary and grammar, completing homework assignments, and watching both grammar instruction and language immersion videos.

    French I: None

    Level: This class will be offered on two levels: Honors and On-Level. French I offers a substantive, full-credit experience taught at either level. All class members share core material and participate in the same class activities, but honors students will be given homework that requires higher level reasoning and advanced application of various grammar skills. All students will register online for the same course. Students must indicate which level they want to study by the end of the first month of class.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 30-45 minutes per day, 4 days per week on homework outside of class.

    Assignments: Are sent by e-mail to parents and students. Students must have access to a computer and internet service for computer-based videos and practice tools that are assigned as homework and are essential to success in the class.

    Assessments: Quizzes, tests, and individual performance reviews will be given to all students at regular intervals to provide parents with sufficient feedback to assign a grade.

    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Bien Dit! Level II: Student Edition Level 1 2018 edition (ISBN-13 978-0544861343)

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Foreign Language for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Iman Castaneda
    Add

    FUNctional Fitness is a dynamic kids' PE program that incorporates well-rounded exercises to get kids up and moving mid-day! No two workouts are the same, but each day's activities incorporate exercises that target 10 areas: cardio-vascular endurance, stamina, strength, flexibility, power, speed, coordination, agility, balance, and accuracy. FUNctional Fitness focuses on functional movements that are fundamental to all aspects of play and exercise- pulling, pushing, running, throwing, climbing, lifting, and jumping. Work-outs are scalable and adaptable to different individual's own level, and the emphasis is on fun, safety, and personal accomplishment rather than competition among classmates. When the weather permits, some exercises may be taken outdoors. The physical challenges of FUNctional Fitness will foster self-confidence, focus, and help instill a foundation for a lifetime of fitness. All equipment is furnished. Students are asked to wear loose, comfortable clothing, such as running pants or sweatpants, and comfortable, supportive athletic shoes. FUNctional Fitness continues each quarter, and students may repeat the class to continue to improve fitness. No two workouts are the same! Students must be minimum age 7 to take this class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    The Science Place
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    Geo-Detectives discover the many mysteries of Earth Science. From large scale disasters that come from inside the planet to microscopic contaminants in the water and soil, Geo-Detectives look high and low to understand the forces, systems, and cycles that continue to shape the Earth, its climates and ecosystems. Geo-Detectives will explore concepts as diverse as fossils to fault lines, ozone to ocean trenches, and trade winds to tundra. Hands-on labs and in-class activities will reinforce geological phenomena such as examining fossils, classifying rocks, reading the seismographic charts, or modelling the water cycle.

    First quarter, students will examine natural disasters that come from activity in the earth's layers such as volcanoes, tsunamis, and earthquakes. Students will study the geological forces that shape our planet by tracing the paths of volcanoes, earthquakes and tsunamis around the world. What do these occurrences tell us about tectonic plate theory? Students will learn about the rock cycle, subduction and spreading zones, and different types of earthquake faults. They will learn about fossils and other lines of evidence that support the theory of plate tectonics, and learn how the sizes, shapes and positions of land masses and oceans have changed through our planet's history.

    Topics in this Series: What a Disaster! Volcanoes, Tsunamis & Earthquakes
    (Quarter 1); Wacky World Weather (Quarter 2); Sensational Cycles and Seasons (Quarter 3); and Exploring Ecosystems (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    David Chelf
    Add

    This is a complete course in high school Geometry which will cover fundamental concepts and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. Students will learn deductive reasoning, and logic by completing geometric proofs. Topics in geometry include: lines, angles, congruence, concurrence, inequalities, parallel lines, quadrilaterals, transformations, area, similarity, right triangles, circles, regular polygons, and geometric solids. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem- solving.

    Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation Algebra I in order to take this class.
    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Friday (day 1), lecture on Tuesday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Friday (day 8), and homework due the next Tuesday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Tuesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work.
    Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.
    Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by checking that weekly homework sets are complete and giving periodic take-home tests; class participation is also strongly encouraged. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade.
    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Geometry: Seeing, Doing, Understanding, 3rd edition (ISBN-10 0716743612, ISBN-13 978-0716743613) A calculator is not needed for this course.
    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Geometry for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: Algebra I

    2
    Ney Mello
    Add

    Students will learn more advanced techniques of playing the guitar! In this class, students will continue to learn melodies, chords, and strumming patterns for familiar songs from a variety of genres chosen by the instructor and students. Students are encouraged to bring in music they are interested in learning. Students will learn more advanced chords, beyond pure major and minor chords. Songs with more than 3 chords will be covered, and songs in 3/4 and 6/8 will be introduced. Each student will need a least a beginner level acoustic guitar. Students should be able to read at grade level for this class and should plan to practice at home several times each week. Students should expect to spend 20-30 minutes per day most days practicing chords and melodies from class. There is a materials fee of $8.00 payable to the Compass on the first day of class for a tablature notebook for any student who does not have one from a prior class. New students who wish to enroll in Advanced Beginner should have approximately 24-30 hours of prior instruction in order to match the pace of the enrolled students.

    Prerequisites: Guitar for Beginners I and II, or equivalent

    2
    Shannon McClain

    High school research paper. The mere mention strikes dread into the heart of most teens and perhaps even their parents. Yet inquiry-based research writing is a foundational high school skill for any teen who intends to pursue higher education. The good news is that research writing can be broken down into manageable, easy-to-master steps.

    In this course, students will learn to write a research paper through guided inquiry. They will explore areas of interest (or a topic from another class) and learn to find answers to their questions and synthesize them in their writing. Students will explore print and electronic resources while refining their ability to determine informational needs. In addition, they will learn how to select the best and most reliable resources for their investigation and not merely the first one that "pops up."

    Students will practice crafting effective questions to focus their research. In order to spot and avoid plagiarism, students will learn note-taking skills and discuss how to summarize, paraphrase, and correctly cite sources. The class will discuss the ethical use of information and learn how to create an accurate bibliography through an online bibliography generator. Finally, students will learn how to bring all of the information from different sources together cohesively. In addition to shorter pieces, the goal for each semester will be a 3-5 page research paper with proper source citation.

    Each class session will include dedicated investigation or writing time. Some weeks, the instructor will ask students to bring laptops or tablets to class to research online sources. After writing, students may break up into groups of three to four to share their drafts and receive feedback from peers. That feedback will inspire further revision, refinement, and clarification of their writing. Revision is a vital step in the writing process in which writers consider what they have accomplished and what they can do to make their work more effective. Each week the writing coach will provide writing tips and guidance on everything from organizing big ideas and writing mechanics to how to give and receive constructive feedback.

    Topics in this Series: Inquiry-Based Research Writing (Semester 1),
    Writing Lab (Semester 2). Continuing students from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours outside of class writing, however the time will vary based on the student's stage of research and writing.

    Assignments: Students will be assigned shorter works, research assignments, drafts/in-progress pieces, and a 3-5 page paper.

    Assessments: The writing coach will provide individual feedback on pieces that a student brings to work on in lab.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Mimi Nyman
    Add

    Kinder-aged cooks will enjoy making flavorful fall recipes and family favorites foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Festive Fall recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. In Kinder Kitchen, young chefs will make the same recipes as all other, higher level Compass cooking classes, however, some foods may be pre-cut and some steps may be simplified or completed by the cooking teacher in to support the speed and skills of the younger students. Students must be age 5 for this class. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

  • Sweet Pumpkin Dip
  • Chicken Vegetable Soup
  • Caprese Salad Bites
  • Honey Glazed Carrots
  • Spinach Artichoke Meatballs
  • Pineapple Coconut Cupcakes
  • Cheesy Rice Casserole with Green Chilies
  • Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get young students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.

    Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Students must be age 5 for this class. (3- and 4- year olds cannot be accommodated. No exceptions.)

    Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Joe Romano
    Add

    Abracadabra! Amuse your friends with simple magic tricks. Amaze your parents with newfound knowledge. Young students will have fun learning from a professional magician using a new curriculum from Discover Magic, makers of our Ultimate Magic Academy "wand" curriculum.

    Activities were developed for students ages 5-7 to help them have fun, make friends, and feel special. The magic makes the fun happen, and the fun makes the learning easy. Many tricks such as Monster Mix-Up!, Presto Paint, Upside Down Art, and The Vanishing Bird will teach students basic math, primary colors, health and hygiene, and more. Kids will create magic with crafts, practice, and in-class demonstrations. All props are provided and by the end of class, each student will have the knowledge and ability to share their tricks for their friends and family. There is a $25.00 material fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    2
    Judith Harmon
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    Who doesn't love a good "Whodunnit" mystery? In this workshop, teens actors will work together to bring a cast of characters to life through creative adaptations and interpretive improvisation. Using materials from a commercial murder mystery role playing game (RPG), students will assume the personas of outrageous and offbeat characters. As the drama unfolds in rounds guided by clue cards, eclectic evidence, and fictitious forensics, a victim, a motive, and eventually the murderer will be revealed.

    Student actors will be guided through the development of a strong, compelling character, complete with unique ways of speaking, gesturing, and moving, an original costume, a backstory, and of course, an alibi.

    At the annual Witch's Brew Social, the who's who of the supernatural community gather at the historical Toadwart Inn. Magical guests partake in the latest flavors of witch's brew and juicy gossip. Guests arrive on the most outlandish and latest models of brooms in their best hats and capes, and the Merlin's Daily reporters are on the scene recording the festivities. With so many in attendance, it seems unlikely that no one saw the crime. Who could have done it?

    In this workshop, students benefit from experimenting with acting and improvisation and working as a team. This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, are flexible and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and enjoy working in a collaborative group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class.

    Topics in this Series: Murder at Toadwart Inn (Quarter 1), The Greatest Murder on Earth (Quarter 2), Til Death Do We Part (Quarter 3), Murder & Mayhem at the Old Doom Mansion (Quarter 4), etc. Students continuing from the prior quarter will receive priority pre-registration for next quarter.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-1.5 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Will be posted in a Google classroom.

    Assessments: Informal qualitative feedback will be given in class throughout the semester. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $25.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a script and costs related to props and performance license fee.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in fine arts or performing arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sevim Kalyoncu
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    Have fun the final weeks of summer! Look forward to early fall! Animals are active and sunning themselves. Plants are mature, and flowers have gone to seed. The stream may have slowed down from summer drought, but discoveries at the water's edge abound.

    Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

    A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

    Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 6 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sevim Kalyoncu
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    Have fun the final weeks of summer! Look forward to early fall! Animals are active and sunning themselves. Plants are mature, and flowers have gone to seed. The stream may have slowed down from summer drought, but discoveries at the water's edge abound.

    Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

    A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

    Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 6 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Anne Sharp
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    The PenPoint writing board is a home for students who love to write, who love to read writing, and who love to share writing with others. Writing is often a solitary act, but writers also need a community in which to grow. Mirroring the design of famous writing salons/groups like The Bloomsbury Group, The Algonquin Round Table, and The Inklings, this course fosters a Compass community that will encourage individual writers, promote literary collaboration and provide challenging feedback to boost creativity and artistic development.

    First semester will focus on building a personal and creative writing portfolio to strengthen students' passions for genres and forms they are comfortable with as well as trying writing that is new to them. Using writing workshops to capitalize on what they already know and to encourage experimentation in unfamiliar areas, students can expect to grow as writers, editors and leaders in the homeschool community.

    Students will use their own work and the works of professional authors to understand what makes good writing, to improve technique, to experiment with new forms/genre and to understand the drafting, editing and publishing process. They will explore publishing options through online platforms and hardbound journals.

    Note:This is an online class with some meetings in a virtual classroom providing live, synchronous collaboration.

    Topics in this Series: Creative Writing (Semester 1), Publishing (Semester 2) Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: Advanced reading, writing, and analytical skills.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class on investigation, writing, or editing for this class. Assignments: Writing and editing assignments will be delegated by the student board. Assessments: In lieu of a teacher-provided assessments, writers will receive peer feedback on their own work, and the finished product will be a printed anthology for their portfolio.

    Lab/Supply Fee: None

    What to Bring: Students should bring laptops to class to work collaboratively and real-time on shared documents and the class portal.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Dr. John Kornacki
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    Seventy-seven percent of Americans ages 18 - 34 do not recognize either senator from their home state and 53 percent of millennials cannot name even one US Supreme Court justice. Yet there are celebrities from Hollywood, the NFL, and the music industry who have recognition rates of 98%. Why are so many young Americans disconnected and disinterested in politics, government, economics, and most current events? One reason may be because these subjects seem dull and dated. They require looking backward and may appear devoid of things teens care about. Yet, an understanding of these issues is what is needed to ensure engaged, informed citizens who understand our country's policies and politics.

    This course will examine the top stories and news of the day and put them in the context of our political institutions and free enterprise system. The class will select topics and trends from the news and evaluate what is "really" behind them. Migrants gathering along our southern border: Can a president change our immigration policy? Mounting student loan burden: Can Congress erase the debt? Governors failing their states: What is a recall? This class will help students understand current events and contemporary controversies by connecting them to the building blocks of political science: American history, government, politics, and economics.

    This class will employ a Socratic method of teaching. Students should be active, engaged contributors, who come to class prepared to participate in weekly discussions. Students are also expected to take the lead by introducing current events that they have followed or investigated. Each class meeting will be approximately 2/3 discussion of current topics and 1/3 discussion/lecture on connecting the issue to relevant principles in political science and public policy. Students will be assigned weekly readings or videos which will provide background and context on the issues they are discussing. Guest speakers will include current and former public officials.

    Students may take this course on-level or at the Honors level. Honors students will be assigned additional readings each week and will have a one research or position paper due each semester.

    Prerequisites: None Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class on homework. Assignments: Assignments will consist of readings and individual and group projects. All assignments will be posted on Google Classroom site. Assessments: Points will be awarded for the competition of assignments, quizzes, and projects, and parents can assign a grade based on the number of points earned as compared to the number of points available. Textbook/Materials: The instructor will provide pdfs of articles. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as partial credit in American Government for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2
    Judith Harmon
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    Students will discover the art of crafting a cast of playful finger puppets from a variety of materials and techniques! Students will learn how to craft band or ring finger puppets and simple, single finger puppets. They will also transform a glove into five finger puppet friends to tell a tale such as Harry Potter + Hermione, Hagrid, Ron, and McGonagall; Goldilocks + 3 bears and a bed; or their own unique group of 5 story characters. Puppets will begin with a base that students decorate and embellish with facial features such as googly eyes and hair, miniature costumes, and accessories. Students should be able to use scissors for this class.

    Throughout the course, the instructor will also share tips and techniques for puppetry performances. At the end of each class, students will show and tell their classmates what they have crafted that week.

    By the end of this class, each student should have 7-10 unique finger puppets. Puppets will be kept by the instructor each week to allow glue to dry and to ensure that all puppets are present on the final day. During the final class meeting, students will showcase, from behind a curtain, a brief skit incorporating all of their puppet creations. Due to space constraints in the classroom, their audience will be limited to their teacher and classmates, but their performance will be videotaped and e-mailed to parents.

    Pair this class with Creative Storytelling or Acting- Young Actors Playhouse to encourage more creative expression and theatrical basics. There is a $15.00 material fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this Series: Finger Puppets (Quarter 1); Hand Puppets (Quarter 2); Stick and Shadow Puppets (Quarter 3) and Moving and String Puppets (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    TBD
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    Students will explore the science and technology of robotics in an open workshop environment. They will work in pairs by experience level and interests to plan, conceptualize, build, program, and test a robot of their own design. Student partners will set their own design and performance criteria for their robot. Will it be one that plays a game, gathers data, or completes a mission using custom code that the team has written and tested? This laboratory is open to beginners as well as returning students with prior experience.

    The class will focus on construction and programming, with the goal of having functional robots by the end of the semester. There will be an emphasis on the engineering-design process with repeated build-test-redesign iterations until the robot performs as expected. Student pairs will be encouraged to think creatively and apply problem-solving skills to find unique solutions to their scenario. Groups will move at their own pace, and completed robots may have different levels of complexity depending on the experience of the team.

    An experienced robotics professional will serve as a mentor and facilitator during the lab. He will not teach formal lessons but will instead circulate among the partner teams to trouble-shoot and offer advice on hardware and software issues, spending more time with newer builders and programmers. Students will enjoy the collaboration and camaraderie that comes from watching the successes, missteps, and eventual solutions of other teams. They will build with Tetrix Prime metal robotics components, incorporate sensors [such as, ultrasonic distance, infrared (IR) proximity, mini-LIDAR (laser radar), touch, line-following, color- sensing, or sound sensors], electronics, and motors from Tetrix Prizm, and code using the Arduino IDE. Please note: Prior experience with robotics and coding are not required. Also, students do not get to keep finished projects.

    2
    Judith Harmon
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    Kids will learn the basics of hand sewing and discover it is "sew fun" to create items that can play with and use every day. First quarter, kids will sew eight small felt stuffies from the zoo including a monkey, panda, elephant, lion, tiger, giraffe, zebra, and red macaw.

    Kids will learn practical sewing skills such as pinning and placement, a running stitch, attaching a button, scissor skills, stuffing, and working with simple patterns. The group will be working with pre-cut felt components from kits that will be enhanced with buttons and embellishments. Since students may work at different rates, some projects may not be completed in class and will be sent home to finish sewing with the newly learned skills. Students should be at age/grade level for fine motor skills for this class. A material fee of $35.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this series include: Zookeeper's Critters (Quarter 1), 3D Decor (Quarter 2), Wearable Accessories (Quarter 3), and Cool Characters- Marvel, Star Wars and Disney Princesses (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Heather Sanderson
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    Read it! Act it! Students will enjoy this two-hour, weekly virtual workshop with Shakespearian coach Heather Sanderson, who hails from England, and is known for instilling a love of Shakespeare into the hearts of students at Compass and throughout the Greater DC area. The class will explore one of Shakespeare's historical tragedies and analyze its characters, plot, themes, and motives. Students will meet the elderly King Lear of Britain, his trio of daughters- Goneril, Regan, and Cordelia, noble Gloucester and his two sons in this dark tale of betrayal and loss which encompasses a poisoning, a suicide, an execution, a duel, an invasion, and the decline into insanity. The class will complete the featured play after approximately 10 weeks, so in the spirit of Lear, the remaining portion of the semester will examine other famous scenes of doom and despair in Shakespeare's works.

    Students will read different roles, study and act out scenes, practice monologues, and work through the literature while having fun with fellow teens in a virtual setting. Theatre games adapted for online work, will be used to encourage collaboration, and specially designed improv exercises will be used to stretch teens' imaginations and help them get "in character". The class will use read-aloud and in-class dramatization to decipher the original language, word choices, and to identify humor, satire, mockery, betrayal, and rejection in this mixed-up comedic tale of mistaken identity. The class will work from complete texts (not redacted, abridged, or simplified school versions) to hear and practice Elizabethan lingo. (How did someone of Shakespeare's time hurl insults or woe a woman?) Students will learn how the Bard crafted scenes and conveyed the primary storyline and sub-plots in a comedy that has endured for over 400 years.

    Instructor Heather Sanderson shares a teaching style based on actions and interactions, developed from years of experience coaching Shakespeare in a way that appeals to students. Her approach brings abstract concepts, complex themes, and difficult language to the students' level, so that they can relate to and appreciate Shakespeare.

    Format: All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for the full semester.

    Topics in this Series: King Lear (Semester 1), The Tempest (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hour per week outside of class reading and memorizing sections.

    Assignments: Sections will be assigned in class and included in the weekly e-mail to parents/students.

    Assessments: Will not be given.

    Textbook: The cost of the class text is included in the course fee.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English Literature or Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Ney Mello
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    Students will learn a fun, simplified way to write songs from a professional, award-winning, soundtrack composer. Each week, students will tackle a different phase of songwriting. This class is open to students who play instruments, sing, write lyrics, or a combination of all three talents!

    The group will learn about the song structure that is popular today with verse, chorus, pre-chorus, pre-verse, intros, and outros. They will listen to some examples of songs to convey what a verse, chorus, and bridge are, and will cover an overview of the basics of functional and classical harmony.

    Each week, the group will approach a different stage of the songwriting process, working through ideas on their instruments, writing lyrics, or both. Student artists will be guided through making their own background tracks to encourage self- expression and to allow individual voices to emerge. They can use songs they know as inspiration, but they will be encouraged to create everything like a real songwriter. Musicians will be given ready-made chord options so their focus can remain on the creative aspects of songwriting.

    If the student is only writing lyrics, he/she will be assigned a songwriting partner student who will write the melody and chords. In this case, the lyricist student will be provided with that song's work in progress tracks to write to at home.

    Students who wish to record their songs should download the free Abbey Road 'Topline' app for Android or Apple smartphones. (The instructor uses this app professionally to share songs and concepts via e-mail, text message, or over social media with colleagues.) The app allows the artist to record songs in sections and play back all together. Microphones will not be needed.

    The workshop is open to all instrument and voice students, not just guitar. Any style of music is acceptable (pop, folk, country, etc), but all lyrics must be rated "E" for everyone.

    Topics in this Series: Secrets of Songwriting (Semester 1), Secrets of Songwriting (Semester 2), etc. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. .

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class .

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in fine arts or electives for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2
    Sirdley Taborga
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    Buenos dias! Spanish Amigos (Friends) is a fun, play-based, Spanish immersion class for young students. Much like learning their native language, students will be exposed to the sounds, vocabulary, and phrases in Spanish through songs, games, stories, interactive and hands-on activities. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students in the first few weeks. The teacher will bring toys and objects each week to give kids tangible, hands-on examples of the vocabulary being introduced.

    First quarter, young students will learn Todo Sobre Mi (All About Me) and will practice vocabulary and simple phrases such as saying their name and age, parts of the body, birthdays, and personal descriptors (hungry, sleepy, happy, etc.) Every quarter, basics such as numbers, colors, the alphabet, and greetings will be incorporated.

    Each quarter introduces new themes and new vocabulary in Spanish, so children can continue to build their language basics. However, themes and units are non-sequential, so students may enroll in this level in any quarter. While the theme might be the same as that of a younger level of instruction, more vocabulary will be introduced at the older level. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, and simple phrases while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Instruction will be predominantly verbal, but key vocabulary words may be written down for students to begin a sense of spelling. Students will be encouraged to write down new words each week, but reading, writing, spelling, and note-taking will not be expected. Fluency should not be expected at this level.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sirdley Taborga
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    Get ready for a full year of beginner level high school Spanish! This is a conversation-focused program in which students will build their vocabulary quickly beginning with the alphabet, numbers, time, dates, seasons, school, free time activities/hobbies, likes/dislikes, personal descriptions, family relationships, emotions, food/restaurants, places/locations in town, and shopping/clothing. There will be a strong emphasis on conversation with common grammar concepts such as articles, pronouns, adjectives, comparative phrases, and present tense and regular past tense verbs learned and practiced in the context of conversation (rather than stand-along grammar exercises).

    Class will be conducted primarily in Spanish and will focus on listening and speaking skills, asking and answering questions. At home, students will be responsible for practicing vocabulary and grammar and completing written assignments, and watching language immersion video clips.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 30-45 per day approximately 4 days per week on homework outside of class.

    Assignments: Are sent by e-mail to parents and students. Students must have access to a computer for videos that are assigned.

    Assessments: Quizzes and tests will be scored with a points system that parents can use in calculating a grade .

    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent Avancemos!: Student Edition Level 1, 2018 edition (ISBN # 978-0544861213)

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Foreign Language for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2
    Dr. Erica Hughes
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    Many students begin their study of ancient history with classical Greece and Rome. But there were vast, influential civilizations and significant human history well before these Euro-centric antiquities. This class will travel the ancient world to examine the Most Ancient History. This unique exploration will be enlivened by rich class discussions, projects, artifacts, and the instructor's personal experience at significant historical sites throughout the ancient world.

    First semester, the class will explore the some of the first-known human civilizations in Africa. Surprising to many, the earliest history on the African continent originated well beyond the Kingdom of Egypt. Discover the Kushite Empire in modern day North Sudan and the civilizations of Napata, a significant capital in the ancient world, and Meroe, a wealthy metropolis and trading center. The kingdom of Axum in modern day Ethiopia existed before Christianity and flourished as a dominant power on the Red Sea until the 9th century. Roman history sometimes touches on the kingdom of Carthage in modern day Tunisia, but was the legendary Queen Dido memorialized in Virgil's epic poem, the Aeneid, a real person? Learn about the great kingdoms of Mali, whose imperial armies controlled the gold and salt trades, and Great Zimbabwe, a once thriving trading empire now enshrined in extensive stone ruins.

    Levels:This course is offered at two levels, On-Level and Honors. The levels will meet together and use the same textbook, but have different workloads. Honors students will be given additional reading and will be expected to complete a semester project. The Most Ancient History curriculum will be spread over the course of four semesters (two years) in order to appreciate the depth and complexities of the topic. However, any student with an interest in only one or more distinct regions may enroll in any semester.

    Topics in this Series: Africa (Semester 1) and the Far East (Semester 2) Workload: Honors students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class; on-level students should expect to spend 1 hour outside of class. Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments, quizzes, and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload. Assessments: Points will be assigned for projects, quizzes, chapter summaries, and exams, and parents may use the total points earned to assign a class grade. Quizzes will be administered through Canvas. Textbook: Students should purchase or rent UNESCO General History of Africa volume 2: Ancient Civilizations of Africa (abridged, 1990), by G. Mokhtar (Editor), James Currey (publisher) (ISBN 978-0852550922). Other class readings will be uploaded to the Canvas system as pdfs. Registration: All students will register online for the same course. Students must designate their intent to take the On-Level or Honors after the first week of class. Once the course has begun, students may move down a level (from honors to on-level) at any time. However, once classes have begun, students may not "bump up" a level. Credit:Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in World History for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2
    Karen Shumway
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    A chihuahua needs a check-up. A beagle with a bellyache. Vaccinations for Vizsla pups. Sometimes even our canine friends need medical care! Lots of kids love animals, and some even think about becoming veterinarians and animal specialists. There is a lot of science in the care and keeping of animals.

    In this class, future dog veterinarians will learn all about dog care (nutrition, exercise, grooming), dog anatomy, and dog behavior. Kids will learn to recognize signs that a dog is unfriendly, afraid, aggressive or unwell. They will learn to perform steps of a well-pet check-up and identify some common medical care and preventatives recommended for dogs. The class will also learn about dog behavior and training. Kids will discover some of fun and fascinating facts, similarities, and differences in dog groups and specific breeds. Students will learn about dog's relationship with humans and the many jobs and duties that dogs perform for humans. Finally, students will take one class session to journey to other corners of the continents to meet some wild members of the dog (Canidae) family such as the dingo, jackal, wild dog, fox, and wolf species (and, hey, why aren't hyenas on the list?)

    Each class meeting will include hands-on and interactive demonstrations, simulations, role-playing, activities, games, stories, or short video clips to convey the information. During the first week, students will receive a lab coat and clinic name tag, a plush dog for demonstrations, and a class workbook. They will "adopt" and name their dog, and during the final week, they will receive a diploma. (Pets, lab coats, name tags, and workbooks will remain at Compass between classes so they are not forgotten at home). There is a $31.00 supply fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Topics in this series include: Discover Dogs (Quarter 1), Pocket Pets (Quarter 2), Reptile Roundup (Quarter 3) and Wildlife Rescue (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Shannon McClain

    Writing is a fundamental skill for school and for life, and it gives kids a voice! In this class, third and fourth graders will explore writing in many different ways. They will learn the basics of good writing and the art of revision. Classes will consist of simple lessons on writing plus in-class writing practice. Students will always be encouraged to write about what interests them, but they will also always be given fun, creative writing prompts so no one feels the panic of figuring out "what to write."

    First quarter, students will write about personal experiences and memories. This is one of the easiest themes for children to start writing about, as they are usually bubbling over with stories to tell. They will learn to organize their recollections into a logical structure of what happened first, second, last, etc.

    The goal for this course is for young students to gain confidence, increase writing fluency, and learn how to incorporate writing into everyday work and play. Each week, the instructor will share brief lessons on grammar such as correct capitalization, agreement, tenses, parts of speech, use of adjectives/adverbs, etc. They will also learn the steps of the writing process: prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing, and strategies for each state. Student must be minimum age 8 to take this class and should be on grade level for reading and handwriting.

    Topics in this Series: My Memories (Quarter 1); Transforming Tales (Quarter 2), Fun with Fiction (Quarter 3), and Fact Finder (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Becca Sticha
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    Young girls will be encouraged to explore STEM through LEGO to design and build simple engineering projects out of everyone's favorite building toy! In this 90 minute class, girls will explore concepts and vocabulary in physics, mechanical engineering, structural engineering, aerospace engineering, and architecture while playing with their creations.

    First quarter, the class will build models of world architecture with projects such as Big Ben, the Eiffel Tower, Great Pyramids, Empire State Building, the Colasseum, and a wind mill.

    Each class begins with 10-minutes of free build from tubs of LEGO components followed by a short discussion and demonstration of the day's project and concepts. Throughout the quarter, famous female architects, engineers, and scientists will be introduced. Students build individually or in groups. Instructors will provide individual assistance, facilitate challenges, performance testing, competitions, and modifications to projects. Some projects may have been introduced in prior year's sessions, but each new build is unique, and student's building skills and understanding will have grown.

    Notes:(1) Students must be minimum age 5 and able to separate from their parents for this class. (2) Projects are built from shared, Instructor-owned components, so students will not bring completed projects home. Parents, however, can step into class 15 minutes before the end of each session to photograph their child's construction.

    Topics in this Series:World Architecture (Quarter 1), Farm Fun (Quarter 2), Best Boats (Quarter 3), and Around Town (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Pete Van Riper
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    Students will be introduced to painting with acrylics in a relaxed, informal studio setting under the guidance of a professional art instructor. Students will work on canvas boards and will learn elements of art, principles of design, and color theory in addition to methods in painting. Each week, the instructor will demonstrate a different technique in acrylic painting rather than a different subject. Techniques will include mixing and blending paints, wet and dry brush techniques, sponge techniques, glazing, washing, gradient relief, sgraffito, impasto, smudging, dot techniques, stippling, pouring, splattering, dabbing, underpainting, and detailing. The emphasis will be on methods and effects so that each student has a “toolbox” of techniques for working in acrylics. Students will have the freedom to mix and match the techniques that they have learned to create original pieces. In the open studio concepts, each student will have a different goal and unique project in-progress such as still life, floral, landscape, portrait, fantasy, abstract, or pop art. Student will complete two or three boards each quarter, depending on the level of detailing.

    This class is suitable for beginners who have never painted before, and for experienced art students who have worked in other mediums and are interested in exploring acrylic painting. Compass parents are welcome to register for this class to work alongside their teens, or to work on their own, while their teen is in another Compass class. Painting can provide a relaxing, needed break from rigorous academic classes and over-scheduled lives in a fun, supportive environment.

    Prerequisites: None

    Workload: Work outside of class is optional, however students who want to continue to practice their painting techniques might want to purchase a tabletop easel (approx. $10.00) and set of basic acrylic paints ($30.00+) for home use.

    Assessments: Individual feedback is given in class. Formal assessments will not be given.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $25.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for canvas boards and shared class supplies (paints, brushes, paper products, etc.).

    What to Wear: Students may wish to wear an apron, smock, or paint shirt when working with acrylic paints.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2
    Judith Harmon
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    What happens when you don't have enough time to tell or watch the whole story? Well, you can always try the abridged version! On stage, abridged versions can fast-paced, quirky compilations or hilarious highlights of familiar full-length stories. Teens will enjoy the creativity and camaraderie of selecting, casting, rehearsing, and performing an abridged, one-act play. The class will begin by reading through three* possible scripts to select one that bests suits their group and grabs their interest from among:

    • The Greek Mythology Olympiaganza
    • The Norse Mythology Ragnasplosion
    • The Brothers Grimm Spectaculathon

    Students, along with their acting coach, will cast, rehearse, and coordinate a class performance. Teens will enjoy taking on unusual personas and bringing their characters to life while interacting with classmates. They will be encouraged to design and assemble simple costumes, props, and backdrops from items at home. They will be expected to learn their lines and fully participate in planning their performance. The group will perform the 45-60 minute piece for family and friends at the end of the semester.

    Classes in acting and theater education build a teen's confidence along with improving their social and communication skills. This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, are flexible and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work collaboratively in a group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class.

    (*An additional script might be introduced based on final cast size.)

    Topics in this Series: Theater Abridged (Semester 1), It's Not What it Seems (Semester 2). Continuing students from the prior quarter will receive priority pre-registration for next semester.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: If any, will be posted in a Google Classroom.

    Assessments: Informal, qualitative feedback will be given in class throughout the semester. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided.

    Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a copy of the licensed script, performance royalty, and project materials. Non-Meeting Days: In addition to the scheduled days-off on the published Compass schedule, this class does not meet on 11/4/2022.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
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    Have you considered that valuable life lessons can be told by the lifeless undead? That's right, zombies can offer a unique philosophical perspective on life and death while showing us that brains are not everything, you are what you eat, and "what doesn't kill you makes you..more alive"? Tweens will appreciate the quirky, off-beat humor of the scripted comedy, "All I Really Needed to Know I Learned from Being A Zombie." They will enjoy the creativity and camaraderie of working together to bring this humorous piece "to life."

    Students, along with their acting instructor, will cast, rehearse, and coordinate a class performance of this comedy. Students will be encouraged to design and assemble simple costumes, props, and backdrops from items at home. Student actors will be expected to learn their lines and participate fully. This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, are flexible and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work in a collaborative group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class. The students will perform for family and friends at the end of the semester.

    Topics in this Series: All I Really Needed to Know I Learned from Being A Zombie (Semester 1) and 13 Signs You Should Stop Being a Pirate (Semester 2). Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a copy of the licensed script, performance royalty, and project materials. This is a 13-week class that does not meet on 11/3/2022.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Fatimah Aziz
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    Students of ASL will continue to improve their fluency in this 3rd year course. As students become more advanced signers, emphasis will be on focusing on the meaning of a conversation (whole) and storytelling rather than individual signs (parts) or phrases. In conversation, students will learn to confirm information by asking questions in context. Third year students will continue to build their vocabulary, apply ASL grammar, and will learn to describe places, giving directions, giving opinions about others, discussing plans and goals, ask for advice, give opinions, make comparisons and use superlatives, and narrate stories. Other skills covered in ASL III include expressing year, phone numbers, time, and currency in numbers, giving directions, locations, etc. Each unit will include presentations and readings on Deaf culture and Deaf history. Class time will be dedicated to interactive ASL activities and signing practice.

    ASL students will have a Deaf instructor. She regularly teaches all-hearing classes and is an excellent role model for students to meet and interact with a native speaker of ASL and to lean natural facial expressions, gestures, and body language used in Deaf communications. ASL students will have more confidence when they encounter Deaf instructors in college or greet speakers of ASL in social settings. Because the instructor is Deaf, students are not permitted to speak aloud in class. This approach improves visual attention and encourages immersion in the language. Students will be able to ask questions of the instructor by writing on individual white boards, but they will be encouraged to sign in order to communicate with the instructor. Lessons are facilitated with Power Point presentations, and a professional ASL interpreter will assist the class on the first day of class.

    Hundreds of colleges and universities, including all public institutions of higher learning in Virginia, accept ASL as a distinct foreign language. This allows hearing and Deaf students to fulfill foreign language requirements for admission to college. Teens who have difficulty writing, spelling, or have challenging pronunciation in English, can be successful with ASL as a second or foreign language choice. Penn State University research demonstrated that the visual and kinesthetic elements of ASL helped to enhance the vocabulary, spelling, and reading skills in hearing students.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours each week outside of class on required vocabulary exercises, readings, and signing practice.

    Assignments: Homework assignments will be posted online in the Canvas digital classroom platform. Through Canvas, students will be asked to post short videos of themselves signing as homework. Enrolled students will be asked to review ASL 1 and 2 vocabulary, grammar, and facial expressions.

    Assessments: The instructor will assign points using a class rubric for the parent's use in assigning a course grade. Course rubrics will evaluate students on their sign production, fingerspelling, ASL grammar, facial expressions including "above the nose" grammar (brows and body movement), and "below the nose" modifiers (lip expressions).

    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent "Signing Naturally Units 7-12 Student Workbook" (ISBN# 978-1581212211) which includes a DVD of signing videos. This class will cover units 9-12.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in World Languages for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: ASL II

    2
    The Science Place
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    More than 70% of the Earth s surface is water! Understanding the earth s oceans and freshwater systems is critical to understanding life on our planet- from beginnings in the seas to the water cycle that supports ongoing life. The study of aquatic and marine biology provides a basis for understanding much of the chemistry, physics, biology, and meteorology on our planet. Budding marine biologists will travel inland to learn about freshwater systems like lakes and ponds, rivers and streams before returning to the coast to study marshes and estuaries followed by extreme marine environments- all under the guidance of an experienced marine biologist. The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in several demonstrations and experiments in each class.

    During first quarter, the class will focus on freshwater lakes and the variety of unique biomes that exist in them. Students will compare major lake systems around the world and learn about general limnological processes such as seasonal turnover and phytoplankton blooms. They will also explore the incredible range of lake biomes, from acidic, volcanic lakes and hot springs, to ancient temperate lakes like Lake Baikal. Students will learn about the extreme chemistry that occurs in some systems, like stratified lakes with toxic gas layers at the bottom, and will study the many unique, endemic species of plants and animals that have evolved in lake systems.

    Topics in this Series: Lakes & Ponds (Quarter 1); Roparian Biomes- Rivers and Streams (Quarter 2); Marshes and Estuaries, Where the River Meets the Sea (Quarter 3); and Extreme Marine (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Dr. Erica Hughes
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    Archaeology is the field of study that unlocks the clues to past civilizations. Forensic archaeology applies these methods to solve puzzles. In this class, students will use physical evidence to try to understand or re-create what happened to an individual through life, death, and burial or to an object though its creation, use, and after it was lost, buried, or discarded. Students will practice field archaeological techniques such as surveys, excavation, and mapping, as well as documentation, analysis, and illustration of human material culture. This archaeological lab will be guided by a scholar of art and antiquity. Dr. Erica Hughes has traveled and participated in archaeological explorations throughout the ancient world. Students will "dig" her personal photos and stories. Class discussions, group activities, and individual hands-on experiences are designed to help teens understand the creation, recovery, and conservation of artifacts and remains.

    First semester, students will learn the field component of investigative archaeology. The class will first learn to plan their trench on grid paper and then practice actual excavation techniques in a field square. Students will learn to use the baulk trimming method in addition to using a total station and plumb bob. The instructor will teach methods of recording stratigraphy, drawing sections and trenches, and documenting artifacts through site photography and sketching. The class will learn about lighting, angles, and scales for photographing their finds. Archaeological illustration of bones, figurines, and pottery, metal, and stone vessels will be taught with pencil, and students will ink their best work for a grade.

    Topics in this Series: Field Investigation (Semester 1), Forensic Investigation (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: Due to the robust content and college-style/paced lectures, 10th grade students may enroll only with the permission of the director or instructor if they can demonstrate prior success with advanced, honors, or dual enrollment coursework.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates

    Assessments: Points will be assigned for class activities and demonstration of field techniques in addition to a semester project.

    Textbook/Materials: A pdf version of the required textbook will be posted on the class Canvas site for reading assignments.

    Supplies/Equipment: Students should purchase and bring with them each week the following tools and supplies:

  • - Archaeology Trowel- Recommended model (Digitup.com): Eco Archaeology Trowel- Soft Grip Handle. (Note: trowels from garden stores tend to have the wrong shape and are unsuitable.)
  • - Sketching Kit- Recommended model (Amazon): Drawing and Sketching Pencil Set in Zippered Carrying Case. (Includes: 6B, 5B, 4B,3B, 2B, B, HB, H, 2H, 3H, 4H, and 5H pencils as well as an eraser, pencil sharpener, and a sketch pad.)
  • Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Social Sciences for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2
    David Chelf
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    This is a complete course in high school Calculus which will cover fundamental concepts and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. Topics in Calculus include limits of functions (one-sided and two-sided limits, limits at infinity and infinite limits, limits of sequences, and continuity of functions), derivatives (various definitions of derivatives, estimating derivatives from tables and graphs, rules of differentiation, properties of derivatives, separable differential equations, and the Mean Value Theorem), applications of derivatives (related rates, optimization, and exponential growth and decay models), integrals (basic techniques of integration including basic antiderivatives and substitution), applications of integrals (in finding areas and volumes, describing motion, and as accumulation functions), and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem-solving.

    Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation PreCalculus in order to take this class.
    Level: This course is offered at two levels, Honors and Advanced Placement (AP). The scope and sequence are identical, however AP students may have additional practice problems. Students who wish to take the AP exam must register and pay for their own exam through the College Board in fall 2020 for the May 2021 exam.
    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Friday (day 1), lecture on Tuesday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Friday (day 8), and homework due the next Tuesday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Tuesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work.
    Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.
    Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by checking that weekly homework sets are complete and giving periodic take-home tests; class participation is also strongly encouraged. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade.
    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Calculus: Single Variable/Early Transcendentals, 8th edition by James Stewart (ISBN-13 9781305270336). A scientific calculator similar to the Casio fx-115ES PLUS is required for this class, and it is highly recommended that students preparing for the AP exam have a graphing calculator similar to the TI-83. Students without a graphing calculator must have access to desmos.com and/or wolframalpha.com for graphing assignments.
    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Calculus for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: PreCalculus

    2
    Karl Peterson
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    Teens will enjoy the logic and challenge of the timeless strategy board game as they learn and play chess with classmates. This is a multi-level class open to Beginners, Advanced Beginners, or Intermediate Players. Instruction will be differentiated based on the make-up of the class, and teens will be placed in pairs or groups depending on experience. Since teens move quickly through lessons and enjoy the interaction of the game, instruction will be approximately 20 minutes, with 35 minutes reserved for weekly in-class matches that are monitored and supported by the coach. Beginners may play as a group against the instructor which is a low-pressure way to learn the game. Teens who are engrossed in their games may continue their play into Friday Teen Game Night.

    Learning and playing chess supports problem solving, decision making, critical and creative thinking, general cognitive ability, scholastic skills, and mathematical achievement (Univ. of Minnesota). Experts suggest that the game of chess teaches analytical and disciplined thinking skills, while raising self esteem, teaching motivation and determination, and sportsmanship (Kasparov Foundation).

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in logic/reasoning or and elective for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Various
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    Students will tour the globe in this unique world dance workshop! Each quarter, two teaching artists will lead a 3- or 4-week workshops to instruct students on dances from different cultures. Students will learn the role that dance plays in celebrations and storytelling around the world. They will experience the instruments, tempos, and harmonies of the global music accompanying the dances as they learn about the culture, customs, and costumes. This is not a sit-down performance series- students will be stepping, swinging, and swirling as they learn the world dances. This class is suitable for girls and boys as the selected dances are used by all in the respective countries. The world dance tour will feature: Egypt & Polynesia (Quarter 1), Scotland & Mexico (Quarter 2), India & Bolivia (Quarter 3), Korea & Spain (Quarter 4).

    2
    Shona D'Cruz

    Student artists will enjoy working hands-on, in 3-dimensions with a variety of sculpting and crafting materials to create original Decorative Arts. Assembling decorative items is multi-sensory, and students enjoy the tactile experience of shaping, stacking, forming, flattening, and layering a selection of materials to create unique, personal projects. Decorative art engages a different artistic skillset than coloring, drawing, and writing, and encourages creativity to represent objects in three dimensions. In this studio environment, students will create original hand-made pieces using a range of artistic techniques and a myriad of materials to choose from.

    First quarter, students will create one-of-a-kind sculptures and will learn to work with materials such as papier mache, air-dry and polymer clays, wire, plaster, etc. Example past projects include a wire wave sculpture, layered paper collage, clay animals, or sculpey flowers. Some projects may take two weeks to complete with one week dedicated to forming and shaping the base sculpture and the second week focused on finishing techniques such as painting and embellishing. A supply fee of $40.00 per student is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Topics in this Series: Sculpture Skills (Quarter 1), Marvelous Mosaics (Quarter 2), Fiber Arts Fun (Quarter 3), and Upcycled, Recycled Projects (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Taliesin Knol

    After the Fall of Rome, people kept stories alive of the heroes who defended civilization in the face of barbarian invasions. In Britain, and perhaps all of Europe, there is none more famous than the legend of King Arthur. The Myth of Arthur begins with Saxon invasions and "the last Roman," Artorius Rex, in the 5th century CE, but the tale wasn't written down until the 9th century and not popularized until the 12th century! Cleric Geoffrey of Monmouth adapted earlier legends in his work, "The History of the Kings of Britain" where he introduced characters like Merlin the wizard, Arthur's family, and his sword Excalibur. These would be further "medievalized" by other authors to give us the Knights of the Round Table at Camelot, the Quest for the Holy Grail, and other medieval romances and tales of Chivalry.

    Each student will create an individual diorama recreating or interpreting a scene from Arthurian Myth: castles on hills, European battlefields, or dragon's lairs! Students will craft and hand-shape their scene on a 10" x 14" foam board using artistic, model-making techniques. They will customize their dioramas with landscape elements, waterways, structures of the time, and paint. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature warriors, then combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to create larger terrain. Students will then compete in history-based survival strategy games. This will reinforce lessons about the culture, economy, warfare, and mythology of the time. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them.

    Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. Topics in this series include: King Arthur (Quarter 1), 1001 Arabian Nights (Quarter 2), Joan of Arc (Quarter 3), William Wallace and the Scottish Uprising (Quarter 4). There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Dr. Anne Taranto
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    In this bridge high school English workshop, students be introduced to the concepts of literary genres and analytical writing. Each quarter, the class will examine one select work or genre. Students will learn to recognize figurative language, tone, subtext and diction, identify symbolism and imagery, and develop an awareness of narrative perspective and of the social-historical contexts in which these works were created. First quarter will feature The Novel: Catcher in the Rye (J. D. Sallinger).

    Composition: Students will also learn the fundamental components of academic writing, including how to construct a thesis statement that makes an argument, how to support their ideas effectively with textual evidence, how to organize an argument logically, and how to cite sources in MLA format. Some class periods will be dedicated Writing Lab session in which students write in-class in order to get on-the-spot support and feedback from the teacher. Students should bring laptops to these class sessions.

    Topics in this Series: The Novel (Quarter 1), The Play (Quarter 2), Poetry (Quarter 3), and Short Fiction (Quarter 4). Students who continue from one quarter to the next will receive priority registration.

    Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at grade level, and it is recommended that students have had a middle school writing class.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: All assignments will be posted in a Google Classroom management site. Students will need their own gmail accounts to access Google Classroom.

    Assessments: Students' written assignments will be graded using a rubric and assigned points that the homeschool parent can use when assigning an overall class grade.

    Textbook/Materials: Because students will need clean, inexpensive copies of each novel to mark in, and they must be able to refer to the passages on the same page numbers, copies of mass market paperbacks will be pre-purchased and bundled for students. (See Supply Fee below).

    Supply Fee: A class fee of $15.75 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for the select novel.

    What to Bring: Students should bring the current novel, paper, pen or pencil and highlighter to class each week. Some students may wish to bring paper clips, adhesive flags or post-it notes for marking passages/pages.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component, or partial credit, in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2
    Fencing Sports Academy
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    Fencing is the clashing of steel and competitive spirit combined with the battle of the wits. Apply the rules of Olympic fencing, and you have a physically and mentally challenging game of strategy, often called, "physical chess." In Beginning Fencing, students will learn the rules of the sport as well as footwork, attacks, parries, responses, and how to judge matches. Beginning students will use the epee, a thin, lightweight sword with broad hand guard and will wear a wireless electronic scoring sensor over layers of protective gear. Returning students will work with both the epee and foil. The physical benefits of fencing are an increase in agility, balance and coordination. Fencing also provides mental benefits such as improved focus, strategy and confidence. Fencing is safety-oriented with blunt tip weapons, chest protectors, chest/sleeve pads, fencing jacket, gloves, and face mask. Students may enroll any quarter. All equipment is provided by the instructor. Students are asked to wear comfortable athletic pants such as running pants or sweatpants (no jeans, no dresses), and low-heeled athletic shoes.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Melissa Schaaf
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    Would you know what to do if you cut yourself in the kitchen? What if a friend had an anaphylactic reaction to a food or your teacher suddenly collapsed? Whether you play outdoors, participate in sports, go to the pool, cook at home, supervise siblings, or just hang out with friends, you should know what to do when an emergency arises! First Aid and CPR are the practical life skills you hope you don't have to use, but are thankful for if you do. Earn four American Heart Association certifications in one course in preparation for working as a camp aide, babysitter, assistant coach, counselor-in-training, or part time employee.

    This workshop will be taught in two hald-day workshops by a certified AHA instructor. Topics include: First Aid and Choking Relief; Adult CPR, AED (automatic external defibrillators), and Child/Infant CPR. The course will use the AHA pediatric first aid curriculum which also emphasizes safety and prevention of accidents and injury, particularly in young children. Key topics include: lacerations/bleeding, broken bones, burns, allergic reactions, breathing problems, heat-related complications, cold-related injuries, bites/stings, fainting/unconsciousness, use of AEDs, chest compressions, rescue breathing, and more. Students will have hands-on practice with many skills and will have to demonstrate competency at certain steps to be "signed off" on learned skills.

    At the end of the course, students will be certified in First Aid, Adult CPR, Child CPR, and Infant CPR. The certifications will be good for two years, and students will be able to print out their certifications for coaches, employers, scout leaders, or their own records from an online AHA portal. Students must attend both sections in order to earn the certifications. Students registered in the course will receive a 185 page, full color textbook from the AHA, their own face shield for rescue breathing, and have their AHA registration fees covered.

    This course is recommended for students ages 14+. At a minimum, students must be 5 feet tall and weigh at least 100 pounds to be able to properly perform chest compressions.

    06.04.23.06

    2
    Danielle Mercadal
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    Discover geography and diverse cultures in this interactive, imaginary tour of the world. Each quarter, students will take a classroom journey to two distinct nations. They will locate the highlighted countries on the world map and complete a map project before buckling in for a fictional flight to the featured locales. Once they have "arrived" in the country, they will begin with an introduction to home and school life by meeting a child through a story or video. Students will learn to recognize similarities and appreciate differences when they compare that child's home, clothing, food, town, daily activities, and school to their own. In subsequent weeks, our Globe Trotters will learn about the culture and traditions of the country through songs, games, projects, and activities that highlight elements like folktales, customs, celebrations, distinct features, language, points of interest, or native species.

    First quarter, students will journey to Indonesia and Morocco. Did you know that Indonesia is home to over 100 endangered animals? Meet the mouse deer, the "orange tree man" (orangutan), and Komodo dragon, and learn about a land of volcanoes and 17,000 islands. Discover that Morocco is home to camels, elaborate painted tile, and exquisite tea. Learn about the nomadic peoples and massive marketplaces. Example projects from these countries may include: Make Indonesian-inspired shadow puppets, batik printed fabric, detailed henna hand designs and tile painting.

    Students will be excited by geography and culture when approached through this engaging, multi-disciplinary exploration of diverse countries of the globe! Topics in this Series include Indonesia and Morocco (Quarter 1), Sweden and Mexico (Quarter 2), Ireland and Japan (Quarter 4), Peru and India (Quarter 4)A supply fee of $15.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    David Chelf
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    The odds of winning the Powerball jackpot are 1 in 292 million. 77% of teens ages 12-17 have cell phones. One out of every two of youth voters cast a ballot in 2020. From election polls to stock market data and weather reports to medical test results, statistics and probability are all around us. They are quoted in the podcasts we listen to, the news we watch, and the textbooks and articles we read. Statistics and probability are used in almost every field of study and career for forecasting, decision making, and tracking progress. In 2021-22, the government will release a tsunami of 2020 census statistics about our country's population. (Coincidentally, the odds of a tsunami hitting the east coast- less than the Powerball win.) But statistics and probability are also often misused, misquoted or incorrectly applied, so having a solid understanding of what these numbers represent will help make teens informed consumers and decision-makers.

    This course will explore the collection and analysis of data, inferences and conclusions, and the use of this information. Themes include relationships between variables, gathering data, interpreting categorical versus quantitative data. The class will also cover sample surveys, experiments, and observational studies and evaluate randomness and probability. Finally, students will learn about making inferences, justifying conclusions, and using probability to make decisions.

    Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation Algebra I and Geometry in order to take this class. It is an ideal class for a student who needs an additional credit in high school math, but who may not wish to pursue more advanced mathematics courses such as Algebra II and Pre-Calculus.

    Levels:The course provides a substantive, full-credit experience on either an Honors or On-Level track. All class members share core material and participate in the same class lectures. Honors students will receive additional, more challenging problems. Students register online for the same course, but must indicate which level they wish to follow by the first day of class. Students may move down a level (from Honors to On-Level) at any time.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-1.5 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on an approximately 11-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Thursday (day 1), lecture on Monday (day 4), questions and answers on the next Thursday (day 8), and homework due the next Monday (day 11). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the next lecture. Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work.

    Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.

    Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by: checking that weekly homework sets are complete; spot-checking the full solution 1-2 select problems in class each week, and giving quarterly take-home tests. Points will also be awarded for class participation. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade.

    Textbook: The required textbook for this class is "Stats In Your World" 1st edition by David E. Bock (ISBN-13 : 978-0131384897).

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Probability & Statistics for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: Algebra II

    2
    Becca Sticha
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    Students will use LEGO to design and build simple engineering projects out of everyone's favorite building toy! In this 90 minute class, students will explore concepts and vocabulary in physics, mechanical engineering, structural engineering, aerospace engineering, and architecture while playing with their creations.

    First quarter, junior engineers will tackle Fantastic Fliers and Space Race with projects inspired by the Space Station, Shuttle, Mars Rover, Gondola Gliders, Helicopeters, and Airplanes.

    Each class begins with 10-minutes of free build from tubs of LEGO components followed by a short discussion and demonstration of the day's project and concepts. Students build individually or in groups. Instructors will provide individual assistance, facilitate challenges, performance testing, competitions, and modifications to projects.

    Notes:(1)Students must be minimum age 5 and able to separate from their parents for this class. (2) Projects are built from shared, Instructor-owned components, so students will not bring completed projects home. Parents, however, can step into class 15 minutes before the end of each session to photograph their child's construction.

    Topics in this Series: Fantastic Fliers & Space Racers (Quarter 1); Animal Architects (Quarter 2); Winter Workshop (Quarter 3); Amusement Park (Quarter 4)

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mimi Nyman

    Toffee. Taffy. Truffles... End the day on a sweet note! Students will enjoy making and eating delicious confections. Each week they will prepare a fresh, handmade dessert or sweet such as: pies, cakes, cookies, tarts, trifles, mousses, puddings, candies, fudge, brittle, or chocolates. The class will include some icing, decorating, and garnishing techniques for completed desserts. This quarter, the Compass bakers' culinary adventures will include:

  • Eclair Squares
  • Fruit and Cheese Danish
  • Blueberry Zucchini Bread
  • Sweet Fruit Pizza
  • Berry Galette
  • French Crepes with Lemon Sauce
  • Baked Apples
  • Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. This engaging sweets class will get students excited about helping in the kitchen and entertaining. They will learn important baking skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary is introduced each week.

    Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a small group.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Mimi Nyman
    Add

    Toffee. Taffy. Truffles... End the day on a sweet note! Students will enjoy making and eating delicious confections. Each week they will prepare a fresh, handmade dessert or sweet such as: pies, cakes, cookies, tarts, trifles, mousses, puddings, candies, fudge, brittle, or chocolates. The class will include some icing, decorating, and garnishing techniques for completed desserts. This quarter, the Compass bakers' culinary adventures will include:

  • Eclair Squares
  • Fruit and Cheese Danish
  • Blueberry Zucchini Bread
  • Sweet Fruit Pizza
  • Berry Galette
  • French Crepes with Lemon Sauce
  • Baked Apples
  • Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. This engaging sweets class will get students excited about helping in the kitchen and entertaining. They will learn important baking skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary is introduced each week.

    Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a small group.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
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    Learn to sew to create one-of-a kind articles of clothing, home decor, crafts, or handmade items for your side business like Etsy or Ebay. Sewing can be a relaxing hobby, a profitable side gig, and a practical money-saving life skill. Don't settle for store-bought when you can learn to sew the custom creations you envision!

    First semester, students will learn the basics of hand sewing. Skills that will be introduced this semester include: quilter's knot, stitches (basting, running, backstitch, whip, ladder), tying a knot, and anchoring a knot. Students will learn to identify and use sewing tools such as fabric scissors, straight pins, thimbles, seam ripper, and various needles.

    Students will also begin with getting-to-know their sewing machines including different components, attachments, and functions, along with care, use, and maintenance of their machines. They will learn Identify parts of sewing machine; how to fill a bobbin and thread the machine; types of machine needles and how to change a needle, and how to control speeds. Students will practice machine stitches (straight, zig-zag, backstitch) and adjusting the length and width, learn about seam allowance, and sewing corners and curves. Students will begin with simple stitching exercises, and their first project will be sewing a pin cushion that they will use throughout the year.

    As part of learning to sew, students will learn about different types of fabrics, what each is best used for, and how to identify grain lines, bias, and selvedge. The class will discover how garments are assembled by deconstructing an article of clothing from its seams. Students will learn how to read a sewing pattern and take measurements The group will learn about hems and elastic along with closures and how/where to use them. First semester's project will be sewing a custom pair of pajama pants.

    Topics in this Series: Learn to Sew: Beginner (Semester 1), Learn to Sew: Beginner and Intermediate (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: First semester- None. Second semester- No prerequisites for someone to enroll as a beginner. Intermediate students should have taken first semester or have equivalent skills.

    Workload: Students who practice at home will find that their sewing skills are refined and perfected more quickly. Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class practicing the sewing skill/step covered in class.

    Assignments: Projects will be given out in class and will also be communicated via Google Classroom.

    Assessments: Informal qualitative feedback will be given in class throughout the semester. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided.

    Textbook: None

    Equipment/Fabric: Students must bring to class each week:

    • A portable sewing machine with bobbins. If you are purchasing a new sewing machine for the class, a Singer Heavy Duty Sewing Machine, 4400 series, model is recommended. These can be purchased from Amazon or Joann Fabrics for $160-$180. Students who are bringing a pre-owed or loaned sewing machine are expected to have the machine professionally serviced before the start of class.
    • The sewing machine owner's manual
    • An extension cord
    • Fabric for class assignments. A list of needed fabric and sewing patterns will be sent out the first day of class, with the recommended quantity, type, and deadlines.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $50.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a project box, including a sewing kit (with 1 pack of sewing machine needles, thread, and hand sewing essentials), and other materials used in class.

    What to Bring: Instructor-furnished sewing kit, sewing machine, bobbins, owner's manual, extension cord, fabric, and images/sample photos, swatches, and other assigned materials.

    Non-Meeting Days: In addition to the scheduled days-off on the published Compass schedule, this class does not meet on 10/31/2022.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts or Career Education for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Ruth Wood
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    Ni hao! Mandarin Chinese is the most commonly spoken language in the world! In this beginning class, the Chinese language will be introduced in a natural learning sequence beginning with nouns (such as colors, numbers, clothing, foods, animals, days/dates, etc), and simple greetings. The class will enjoy songs, games, and stories to reinforce learning. Aspects of Chinese culture such as holidays, foods, and traditions will be introduced in the classes. The class will be run as partial immersion, with the instructor prompting and modelling vocabulary and phrases in Chinese but providing limited cues in English to prevent roadblocks. For elementary-aged students, emphasis will be on spoken Chinese with sounds, tones, and inflection and not on written representation of the language. Students in this level will not be expected to take notes or make written responses. Since the class is taught in "themes", or units, students may join during any quarter. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, and simple phrases while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Fluency should not be expected at this level.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Taliesin Knol
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    Centuries after barbarians had settled into the ruined cities of Roman Europe, converted to Christianity, and taken up farming, a new medieval menace, known as The Great Heathen Army, crossed the freezing North Atlantic. The pagan Danes, Swedes, and other Norsemen come as Vikings seeking fortune and battle. For decades they burned down or stole the last vestiges of civilization, taking relics and slaves from coastal abbeys and monasteries. The Great Heathen Army burned a path across the scattered Anglo Saxon Kingdoms for nearly 15 years, and would be stopped only by King Alfred the Great of Wessex. This would make Alfred the first true king of all England, and only English King to be known as The Great. Our class will focus on Alfred the Great s campaigns against the Vikings and specifically his victory at the Battle of Edington in 878.

    Students will choose from among several options for their diorama: a battlefield, and English monastery, or a medieval town. Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will create a 10" X 14" diorama board and populate it with 1:72 scale Viking raiders and Saxon soldiers. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate a larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how battles progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices. Students will also receive dozens of miniatures to re-enact the historical battles! Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. Future topics in this series include: Viking Invasions (Quarter 1), Charlemagne, Rebuilding an Empire (Quarter 2), William the Conqueror 1066 (Quarter 3), Suleiman the Magnificent (Quarter 4). There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mimi Nyman
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    Mosaics is run as a studio art class where students create unique compositions and work at their own pace under the guidance of an experienced mosaic artist. Each quarter, students are taught new design, cutting, layout, and finishing techniques and are introduced to new mosaic materials which they can incorporate into inspired, original pieces. Throughout the quarter, the instructor will suggest possible themes for projects based on the featured materials, but students are always welcome to pursue a different direction.

    Students who are new to mosaics will complete a quick checkerboard project (complete with wooden checkers) to teach pattern, layout, and lines before starting an individual projects. For each project, students will be able to choose from a variety of substrates- rectangular, square, shaped, or circular backboards (typically first-year students), or special forms or 3D objects (experienced students). Each project will expand a student's understanding of color, pattern, rhythm, texture, and spacing as they complete rich, dimensioned compositions. Students will be able to incorporate other glass, ceramic, and porcelain tiles into their projects and may select feature elements such as beautiful glass gems, millefiori, sliced stone, metallic ornaments, mirrored bits, or shells, to serve as focal points in their mosaic piece. The mosaic can be monochromatic, complimentary, or contrasting colors. A broad pallet of colors is always available, and new colors are added each quarter to reflect the season.

    Students will develop a skillset for mosaic artistry over multiple quarters or years. As each student demonstrates mastery of basic skills, safety, and artistic expression, that student will be taught advanced techniques, materials, tools, composition, and color theory. A typical progression in mosaics is:

    -Flat, rectangular substrate, whole tiles, symmetric design, proper spacing and adhesion

    -Flat, circular substrate, tile cutting with nippers, themed design and color choice

    -Flat or curved substrate, cutting sheet glass with pistol grip, breaking pliers, and running pliers, composition and color design

    -3D substrate, adhesion substances, and techniques

    -Porcelain and ceramic cutting, special application, advanced design

    There is no prerequisite for this class. The number of projects completed each quarter depends on the student's work speed and attendance in class. Compass parents are welcome to register for the class to work alongside their teens, or to work on their own, while their teen is in another Compass class.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.

    Assessments: will not be given.

    Materials Fee: Materials used vary depending on a student's experience with mosaic. Beginner Material Fee: $40.00 for a selection of Beginner Materials, including: vitreous glass, ceramic, mini, eco recycled glass, beach glass, glitter glass, glass gems, ceramic pebble, shells, metallic crystal, subway glass; Adhesive: weld bond; Grout: bone or charcoal color; Cutters: wheeled tile nippers; Substrate: 2D/Flat 12" x 12",10" x 10", 8" X 8", 4" X 4", framed mirrors, ornament shapes. Advanced Material Fee: $50.00 for a selection of Advanced Materials including: All Beginner Materials plus, iridized glass, cathedral sheet glass, opaque sheet glass, color fusion, millefiori, Van Gogh glass, natural stone and minerals, special effects glass, water glass, colored mirror, illumination glass, china plates, rhinestone, ball chain; Adhesives: weld bond, thin-set mortar, silicone; Grout: Custom colors (purple, rose, green, blue, earth, orange); Cutters: wheeled tile nippers, porcelain hand tool, hand file, pistol grip, beetle bits cutting system; Substrates: All flat shapes plus, 3D forms (egg, sphere, cone, pyramid etc),cut out sentiments, trays, glass bottle, mini sleds, flower pot, picture frame, sun catcher. Additional Fee: Tesserae by request and consultation with instructor: mother of pearl, 24 kt gold tiles (market rate), specially cut substrate. All material fees are due payable to the instructor on the first day of class by cash, check or electronic payment.

    What to Bring: In-progress project must be brought back to studio each week.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mimi Nyman
    Add

    Mosaics is run as a studio art class where students create unique compositions and work at their own pace under the guidance of an experienced mosaic artist. Each quarter, students are taught new design, cutting, layout, and finishing techniques and are introduced to new mosaic materials which they can incorporate into inspired, original pieces. Throughout the quarter, the instructor will suggest possible themes for projects based on the featured materials, but students are always welcome to pursue a different direction.

    Students who are new to mosaics will complete a quick checkerboard project (complete with wooden checkers) to teach pattern, layout, and lines before starting an individual projects. For each project, students will be able to choose from a variety of substrates- rectangular, square, shaped, or circular backboards (typically first-year students), or special forms or 3D objects (experienced students). Each project will expand a student's understanding of color, pattern, rhythm, texture, and spacing as they complete rich, dimensioned compositions. Students will be able to incorporate other glass, ceramic, and porcelain tiles into their projects and may select feature elements such as beautiful glass gems, millefiori, sliced stone, metallic ornaments, mirrored bits, or shells, to serve as focal points in their mosaic piece. The mosaic can be monochromatic, complimentary, or contrasting colors. A broad pallet of colors is always available, and new colors are added each quarter to reflect the season.

    Students will develop a skillset for mosaic artistry over multiple quarters or years. As each student demonstrates mastery of basic skills, safety, and artistic expression, that student will be taught advanced techniques, materials, tools, composition, and color theory. A typical progression in mosaics is:

    -Flat, rectangular substrate, whole tiles, symmetric design, proper spacing and adhesion

    -Flat, circular substrate, tile cutting with nippers, themed design and color choice

    -Flat or curved substrate, cutting sheet glass with pistol grip, breaking pliers, and running pliers, composition and color design

    -3D substrate, adhesion substances, and techniques

    -Porcelain and ceramic cutting, special application, advanced design

    There is no prerequisite for this class. The number of projects completed each quarter depends on the student's work speed and attendance in class. Compass parents are welcome to register for the class to work alongside their teens, or to work on their own, while their teen is in another Compass class.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.

    Assessments: will not be given.

    Materials Fee: Materials used vary depending on a student's experience with mosaic. Beginner Material Fee: $40.00 for a selection of Beginner Materials, including: vitreous glass, ceramic, mini, eco recycled glass, beach glass, glitter glass, glass gems, ceramic pebble, shells, metallic crystal, subway glass; Adhesive: weld bond; Grout: bone or charcoal color; Cutters: wheeled tile nippers; Substrate: 2D/Flat 12" x 12",10" x 10", 8" X 8", 4" X 4", framed mirrors, ornament shapes. Advanced Material Fee: $50.00 for a selection of Advanced Materials including: All Beginner Materials plus, iridized glass, cathedral sheet glass, opaque sheet glass, color fusion, millefiori, Van Gogh glass, natural stone and minerals, special effects glass, water glass, colored mirror, illumination glass, china plates, rhinestone, ball chain; Adhesives: weld bond, thin-set mortar, silicone; Grout: Custom colors (purple, rose, green, blue, earth, orange); Cutters: wheeled tile nippers, porcelain hand tool, hand file, pistol grip, beetle bits cutting system; Substrates: All flat shapes plus, 3D forms (egg, sphere, cone, pyramid etc),cut out sentiments, trays, glass bottle, mini sleds, flower pot, picture frame, sun catcher. Additional Fee: Tesserae by request and consultation with instructor: mother of pearl, 24 kt gold tiles (market rate), specially cut substrate. All material fees are due payable to the instructor on the first day of class by cash, check or electronic payment.

    What to Bring: In-progress project must be brought back to studio each week.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sevim Kalyoncu
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    Have fun the final weeks of summer! Look forward to early fall! Animals are active and sunning themselves. Plants are mature, and flowers have gone to seed. The stream may have slowed down from summer drought, but discoveries at the water's edge abound.

    Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

    A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

    Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 6 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sevim Kalyoncu

    Venture outdoors each week to explore the woods with a senior naturalist and mentor while learning valuable survival skills. Students will learn how to construct a temporary debris shelter, make cordage, identify edibles, track animals, purify water, perform basic first aid, and use maps and compass (orienteering). Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things you encounter outdoors, safe exploration of the woods, how to be a good steward of nature, and what to do if you ever became lost or injured in the woods. Skills will be repeated and reinforced each quarter, because the available plants, animals, materials, and water sources change with each season. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong connection to nature and to the real world! Explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. For information on where the class meets, what to wear, and inclement weather, see the webpage for Compass's Nature Quest program.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Daniel Greenberg
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    Students of all ages will love the energy and exhilaration of drumming! Students will learn rhythms and drumming patterns from West Africa and other cultures. In this "hands-on" class, students will learn hand-drumming on djembe drums and accompanying percussion accessories such as tambourines, triangles, rhythm sticks, maracas, and bongos.

    Students will learn the difference between steady beat, rhythms, and polyrhythms, which involve patterning, call and response, and different tonal levels. Drummers will be "in the groove" as they learn single stroke rolls, single and double paradiddle, frills, and patterns. They will be encouraged to experiment with different percussion instruments and to improvise.

    New drummers are welcome to enroll any quarter, and returning drummers are encouraged to return and continue to learn more complex drumming techniques. Drummers may be divided by age and/or drumming experience in class with each group taught the same rhythm with varying degrees of difficulty. All instruments are provided by the instructor.

    2
    Becca Sticha
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    Student engineers will be challenged to design, build, and program a robot to complete several unique mazes in the fastest possible time. Students will learn to program their robots to make "decisions" when exploring an unfamiliar maze such as "go straight until you encounter a wall" and "turn to the right if you run into an obstacle."

    Students will use the LEGO MINDSTORMS Education EV3 robotics sets. They will build with motors, wheels/axles, gears, levers, and special components. Students will have to install touch, sound, color, gyro, ultrasonic, and/or infrared sensors while also learning to program sequences and commands that use input/output devices for controlled movements and precise turns. Using the drag-and-drop EV3 programming menu, students will learn to program their robots while experimenting with key concepts such as fixed values, variables, loops, and logic constructs.

    This course integrates science, engineering and computational thinking while introducing physical constraints, units of measurement, and coordinate systems. But, don't worry, this is a beginning robotics class. Prior experience is not expected, but returning students are welcome. Each student will build his/her own robotic project, so students can progress and customize at their own pace. In general, in this class, students will spend two weeks assembling, three weeks programming, and two weeks testing and re-designing. Topics in this Series: Maze Runner (Quarter 1), Sumo Bots (Quarter 2), Mars Rover (Quarter 3), and Explore Atlantis (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
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    Little kids will learn the basics of hand sewing and discover it is "sew simple" to create fun things they can play with and use every day. First quarter, little kids will sew ten backyard buddies as they follow along with a storybook about Wanda's World. Stuffies include: an owl family (3), dogs (2), a cat, mouse, bird, turtle, and duck.

    Kids will learn practical sewing skills such as pinning and placement, a running stitch, attaching a button, scissor skills, and stuffing. The group will be working with pre-cut felt components from kits that will be enhanced with buttons and accessories. Since students may work at different rates, some projects may not be completed in class and will be sent home to finish sewing with the newly learned skills. Students should be at age/grade level for fine motor skills for this class and should be a minimum of age 6. A material fee of $35.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this series include: Sewing with a Storybook (Quarter 1), Shareables (Quarter 2), Silly Sea Stuffies (Quarter 3), and Just for Me (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sirdley Taborga
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    Buenas tardes! Spanish Exploradores (Explorers) is a fun, immersive introductory Spanish class for elementary students. Much like learning their native language, students will be exposed to the sounds, vocabulary, and phrases in Spanish through songs, games, stories, and hands-on activities. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students in the first few weeks. The teacher will bring objects each week to give students tangible, hands-on examples of the vocabulary being introduced.

    First quarter, children will learn Todo Sobre Mi (All About Me) and will practice expanded vocabulary and beginning phrases such as saying their name and age, parts of the body, birthdays, and personal descriptors (hungry, sleepy, funny, etc.) Every quarter, basics such as numbers, colors, the alphabet, and greetings will be incorporated. In this level, students will be encouraged to begin to combine adjectives with nouns and nouns with verbs.

    Each quarter introduces new themes and new vocabulary in Spanish, so children can continue to build their language basics. However, themes and units are non-sequential, so students may enroll in this level in any quarter. While the theme might be the same as that of a younger level of instruction, more vocabulary will be introduced at the older level. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, and simple phrases while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Instruction will be predominantly verbal, but key vocabulary words may be written down for students to begin a sense of spelling. Students will be encouraged to write down new words each week, but reading, writing, and spelling will not be expected. Fluency should not be expected at this level.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sirdley Taborga
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    Get ready for a full year of intermediate level high school Spanish! This is a conversation-focused program in which students will build their vocabulary describing homes and chores; planning a party; health, body parts and sports; vacations, leisure time activities, fun events and places of interest; communicating via phone and computer; and daily routines. There will be a strong emphasis on conversation with common grammar concepts such as regular and irregular past tense verbs and common grammar concepts such as commands, direct and indiect object pronouns, reflexive verbs, learned and practiced in the context of conversation (rather than stand-along grammar exercises).

    Class will be conducted primarily in Spanish and will focus on listening and speaking skills, asking and answering questions. At home, students will be responsible for practicing vocabulary and grammar and completing written assignments, and watching language immersion video clips.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 30-45 per day approximately 4 days per week on homework outside of class.

    Assignments: Are sent by e-mail to parents and students. Students must have access to a computer for videos that are assigned.

    Assessments: Quizzes and tests will be scored with a points system that parents can use in calculating a grade .

    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent Avancemos!: Student Edition Level 2, 2018 edition (ISBN # 978-0544841956)

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Foreign Language for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: Spanish I

    2
    Joe Romano
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    Curious coins, baffling balls, confounding cards, and puzzling papers! Students will learn tricks of the trade from a professional magician using the Discover Magic curriculum! This class will present tricks from the Discover Magic curriculum.

    Each week, kids will learn how to perform a unique magic trick, and students will practice and perfect the illusion in class so they can come home and mystify their friends and family. Students will unlock the secrets to eight special magic tricks to earn the top honor of a black wand. For each trick, students will receive a custom magic prop and full color instructions, and at the end of each class, every magician will take home a Top Secret file folder with additional tricks they can practice. Student magicians will be given a secret password each week to gain access to an additional magic trick on the Discover Magic website (parents will need to work the magic to set up the child's online account.) Along with the actual magic, students will discuss a life skill each week that is essential to a good magician (and student) such as public speaking, presentation skills, practicing, being prepared, and reading your audience. Magicians who complete the class will receive a certificate and magic wand.

    Topics in this Series:Bewildering Black Wand (Quarter 1); Groovy Green Wand (Quarter 2); Baffling Blue Wand (Quarter 3); Orange Wand Wonders (Quarter 4) Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Karen Shumway
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    A chihuahua needs a check-up. A beagle with a bellyache. Vaccinations for Vizsla pups. Sometimes even our canine friends need medical care! Lots of kids love animals, and some even think about becoming veterinarians and animal specialists. There is a lot of science in the care and keeping of animals.

    In this class, future dog veterinarians will learn all about dog care (nutrition, exercise, grooming), dog anatomy, and dog behavior. Kids will learn to recognize signs that a dog is unfriendly, afraid, aggressive or unwell. They will learn to perform steps of a well-pet check-up and identify some common medical care and preventatives recommended for dogs. The class will also learn about dog behavior and training. Kids will discover some of fun and fascinating facts, similarities, and differences in dog groups and specific breeds. Students will learn about dog's relationship with humans and the many jobs and duties that dogs perform for humans. Finally, students will take one class session to journey to other corners of the continents to meet some wild members of the dog (Canidae) family such as the dingo, jackal, wild dog, fox, and wolf species (and, hey, why aren't hyenas on the list?)

    Each class meeting will include hands-on and interactive demonstrations, simulations, role-playing, activities, games, stories, or short video clips to convey the information. During the first week, students will receive a lab coat and clinic name tag, a plush dog for demonstrations, and a class workbook. They will "adopt" and name their dog, and during the final week, they will receive a diploma. (Pets, lab coats, name tags, and workbooks will remain at Compass between classes so they are not forgotten at home). Students must be minimum age 6 to enroll in this class (no age 5s). There is a $31.00 supply fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Topics in this series include: Discover Dogs (Quarter 1), Pocket Pets (Quarter 2), Reptile Roundup (Quarter 3) and Wildlife Rescue (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Shannon McClain

    Writers @ Work is a fundamental writing class that will prepare seventh and eighth grade students for high school level composition. The class will progress from getting started on learning how to effectively structure purposeful paragraphs) (first semester) to multiple paragraphs linked into articulate and organized essays (second semester).

    First semester will be all about paragraphs! Early in the term, the goal will be writing fluency- encouraging students to get ideas onto paper. The class will introduce not only sentence structure, paragraph structure, and effective language, but will also help students define the objective of their paragraph. Students will be given broad prompts and a variety of writing options to encourage them to write about things they care about. Over the course of the semester, writers will compose descriptive and informative paragraphs encompassing fiction and non-fiction themes.

    Grammar concepts will be introduced throughout the year, and students will be encouraged to incorporate the technique in their next writing or revision. Grammar concepts will include a "toolbox" of writing techniques and rules such as sentence structure, complex and compound sentences, independent and dependent clauses, parts of speech, agreement, tense, use of dialogue and quotation marks, and correct use of punctuation. Students will also be taught techniques for brainstorming and outlining before beginning to write and will be given tips on choosing creative, interesting, and powerful words over mundane, vague, and over-used words.

    In both semesters, there will be an emphasis on revision. Writing is seldom just the way the author hopes in the first draft. At times, students will be encouraged to use the same paragraph for several weeks to build-upon their first draft, incorporate feedback, apply writing and grammar techniques, in order for them to see the benefits of revision. They will learn to read their own writing from a reader's perspective and develop strategies for improving it. Students will give and receive feedback from class peers and receive regular feedback from the instructor. Time will be set aside in most classes for dedicated, in-class writing (8-10 minutes.)

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Shannon McClain

    Writing is one of the most essential communication skills, and it gives kids a voice! In this class, upper elementary-aged students will learn the FUN-damentals of Writing Well! Kids will learn the foundations of good writing, step-by-step, in manageable, weekly pieces. Students will start the year with learning to formulate strong sentences and eventually move to organized, cohesive paragraphs in this class series. Classes will consist of lessons on writing basics, reading great examples (and weak ones) from literature and publications, and in-class writing practice. The emphasis will be on varying sentence structures, word choice, and correct structure- all with fun, creative topics that will keep kids interested in writing!

    Quarter one, students will learn all about sentences. The class will learn how to choose descriptive words from word lists and avoid dull, overused words (like good, bad, said) in their writing. They will learn about different sentence structures (simple, complex, and compound) and which one works best for different meanings. Each week, students will practice writing descriptive, informative, argumentative sentences in response to a variety of creative and non-fiction prompts in class. By the end of the quarter, students will feel confident writing three to four sentences cohesively and be prepared for constructing full paragraphs in Quarter two.

    The goal for this course is for students to increase their writing fluency, gain confidence, and strengthen their abilities to write clear, cohesive, and grammatically correct sentences and paragraphs. The group will learn the stages of writing--prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing--and various approaches to each stage. Throughout the quarter, mini-lessons on vocabulary and grammar will be presented on topics such as correct capitalization, agreement, tenses, parts of speech, synonyms, etc. Each week, students will have brief homework assignments based on what was covered in class using creative and non-fiction free response prompts to practice techniques at home. Regular writing practice improves fluency and comfort level. Students should expect 45-60 minutes of writing at home throughout the week (3-4 days at 15 minutes per sitting.)

    Topics in this series include Sentences that Speak (Quarter 1), Planning Paragraphs (Quarter 2), Fascinating Fiction Paragraphs (Quarter 3), and Fun Factual Paragraphs (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Fatimah Aziz
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    Students of ASL IV will develop intermediate level proficiency ASL conversational skills and vocabulary to effectively communicate with members of the Deaf community in the United States. Level 4 students will demonstrate language skills for expressing ideas and concepts and for illustrating reasons and functions. Specific lessons will cover narration of unforgettable moments, accidents, everyday rules, and driving. The class will analyze the use of grammar and syntax of ASL and English. Students will increase their cultural competency relative to the Deaf community and demonstrate awareness of language and social issues found in the Deaf community today.

    ASL students will have a Deaf instructor. She regularly teaches all-hearing classes and is an excellent role model for students to meet and interact with a native speaker of ASL and to lean natural facial expressions, gestures, and body language used in Deaf communications. ASL students will have more confidence when they encounter Deaf instructors in college or greet speakers of ASL in social settings. Because the instructor is Deaf, students are not permitted to speak aloud in class. This approach improves visual attention and encourages immersion in the language. Students will be able to ask questions of the instructor by writing on individual white boards, but they will be encouraged to sign in order to communicate with the instructor. Lessons are facilitated with Power Point presentations, and a professional ASL interpreter will assist the class on the first day of class.

    Hundreds of colleges and universities, including all public institutions of higher learning in Virginia, accept ASL as a distinct foreign language. This allows hearing and Deaf students to fulfill foreign language requirements for admission to college. Teens who have difficulty writing, spelling, or have challenging pronunciation in English, can be successful with ASL as a second or foreign language choice. Penn State University research demonstrated that the visual and kinesthetic elements of ASL helped to enhance the vocabulary, spelling, and reading skills in hearing students.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours each week outside of class on required vocabulary exercises, readings, and signing practice.

    Assignments: Homework assignments will be posted online in the Canvas digital classroom platform. Through Canvas, students will be asked to post short videos of themselves signing as homework. This class will review Unit 12 (reviewing classifiers), complete lessons 12.8-12.10, Unit 18 (Narrating Unforgettable Moments), Unit 19 (Sharing Interesting Facts), and Unit 20 (Explaining Rules).

    Assessments: The instructor will assign points using a class rubric for the parent's use in assigning a course grade. Course rubrics will evaluate students on their sign production, fingerspelling, ASL grammar, facial expressions including "above the nose" grammar (brows and body movement), and "below the nose" modifiers (lip expressions).

    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent "Signing Naturally Units 7-12 Student Workbook" (ISBN# 978-1581212211) and Signing Naturally Level 3 (ISBN# 978-1581211351)-

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in World Languages for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: ASL III

    2
    Judith Harmon
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    Crafty Kids Club is a weekly after-school meet-up for kids in grades 2-5. Kids gather and socialize while completing a craft around a monthly theme. An experienced Compass art instructor facilitates the crafting each week. Projects are selected to showcase a variety of materials and crafting techniques and to promote creativity and imagination. Each quarter, students will complete projects organized around two themes from among eight craft categories: wooden, wearables, simple sewing, painting, sculpting, paper, beading, and mixed media.

    Kids will enjoy the camaraderie of working alongside a group of friends in Crafty Kids Club, and parents will appreciate the break! Parent Notes:

  • All the supplies are provided: No need to search high and low for the needed materials.
  • Reduce waste and clutter: No need to buy large quantities of specialty supplies for a one-time project.
  • Reduce clean-up: Leave the glue, paint, and glitter mess at Compass.
  • Kids get to experiment with a variety of materials and techniques, even if you are not crafty.
  • Crafting improves dexterity and fine motor skills, and an afterschool club makes a great social outlet.
  • The first quarter project themes are:

  • Amazing Animals (sample projects: bird feeder and clothespin critters)
  • The Great Outdoors (sample projects: pony bead foxes and adventure bags)
  • Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
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    In the style of an old-fashioned quilting bee or a sewing circle of long ago, Sewing Workroom is a dedicated drop-in sewing work session each week. Participants will enjoy the camaraderie of working alongside other seamstresses and seamsters of all abilities. Chat with others about their sewing projects. Learn tips and tricks from others. Become inspired by the wide variety of sewn items others are working on, and most importantly, ensure that you have a time set-aside each week to pursue your sewing hobby.

    Sewing Workroom will be overseen by an experienced sewing instructor however, detailed individual or on-going instruction is not included. The instructor will walk around the room to provide guidance and assist participants with tips, troubleshooting, or trying a new technique. Those who need more sewing instruction than the instructor can provide in the Workroom are encouraged to take private one-on-one lessons or enroll in the Learn to Sew class. Participants are expected to bring their own fabric, patterns, thread, notions, embellishments, sewing implements, and machine each week. The instructor will have an iron, ironing board, extension cords, and common items on hand (such as machine needles). Learn to Sew students are welcome to enroll in this session to have more dedicated sewing time. Parents are welcome to enroll with their child(ren) or alone, and adult community members are invited.

    Prerequisites: None

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