Schedule and Room Assignments

Fall classes begin the week of September 3, 2024. 

You can see key dates in our Google calendar or view our Academic Calendar. You can also view the schedule as a grid (below) or as a list.

Quarter beginning September 3, 2024

View by Grade(s)

Monday

9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00
D-1

Criminology: Fundamentals of Forensic Science

Criminology: Fundamentals of Forensic ScienceClosed

Quarter(s): 1,2

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 0

Students will delve into the world of crime scene investigators (CSIs) as seen each week on Law and Order, NCIS, and the CSI television series! Students will be introduced to the field of forensic science which is the application of science, such as biology, chemistry, pharmacology, and physics, to the criminal justice system.


First semester, students will learn the scientific methodologies used in forensic investigation and how to process a crime scene. They will practice measuring, sketching, photographing, documenting, collecting, preserving, and cataloging crime scene evidence. Students will also apply observation skills, interpret evidence, and use logic and deductive reasoning to the investigative process.


Each week, students will perform in-class labs and activities to understand common, investigative forensics such as fingerprinting, including identifying fingerprint patterns, and learning how to find and lift latent fingerprints. The class will practice techniques for collecting and analyzing blood and saliva samples, blood typing, and evaluating blood spatter. The class will expand their forensic toolbox with impression evidence, such as footprints and tire tracks, and making molds thereof. They will learn how fibers, fabrics, hair, poison, drugs, pollen, insects, and other trace evidence can be used to unravel a crime. Students will also consider arson evidence, toxicology, and toolmarks in criminal investigative analysis as well as how ballistics, such as firearms evidence and bullet trajectories, are used in investigations.


The class will use case studies and forensic data from actual crimes- both solved and unsolved- to see how forensic science is used in investigating and prosecuting cases in the criminal justice system. The class will have occasional guest speakers from the criminal justice system and at least one field trip to a police crime lab.


This course is taught by a PhD candidate and professor of Criminology, Tayler Shreve. It is an introduction to criminology for teens who are interested in becoming practitioners or professionals in the vast criminal justice system or those who enjoy true crime books, blogs, or movies.


Rating/Advisory: For sensitive students, please note that in the examination of actual crimes, violence such as assault and murder will be discussed. References may be made to illicit substances and weapons used in the commission of crimes. Course content will be filtered to be age-appropriate for high school students in the instructor's judgement. For example, real crime scene photos may be shown with evidentiary details, but not victims or body parts. Students may read autopsy reports, but they will not be shown autopsy photos, and cases of rape will be referred to as sexual assault with no intimate details.


Topics in this Series: Fundamentals of Forensic Science (Semester 1) and Cold Case Files (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester will receive priority pre-registration for second semester.


Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.


Assignments:

There are assignments both in and out of the classroom. Students have the ability to submit assignments based on their learning style(s): written assignments, presentations, spoken recordings (podcast, TedTalk, etc.).

Assessments: Students will receive feedback on all assignments. There are no exams in this course, however points will be assigned for completed assignments, participation, and attendance.


Textbook/Materials: Articles and case studies will be posted by the instructor as downloadable pdfs.


Lab/Supply Fee: A lab fee of $100 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.


Non-Meeting Days: In addition to the scheduled days-off on the published Compass schedule, this class does not meet on 9/23/24.


Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in humanities or career exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

10:00 am-11:55 am

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

Information Masters: Inquiry & Investigation (On-Level and Honors)

Information Masters: Inquiry & Investigation (On-Level and Honors) Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 1,2

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 3

Information Masters transforms students into savvy consumers and producers of information capable of navigating today's intimidating infosphere. This class introduces high school students to the latest in academic and electronic resources and methodologies for conducting meaningful inquiry and research. Each week, students will develop new media literacy skills necessary for high school and college research writing.

First semester, students will learn strategies to navigate the traditional and digital resources of a library, tips on working with a librarian, and techniques to access library resources. Each student will be asked to obtain a library card during a field trip to the local library. They will learn how to conduct a search of the library, Google Scholar, and academic search engines and practice ways to locate and skim primary sources, secondary sources, and scholarly publications.

Students will become educated consumers of information and learn how to select the best resources for their informational needs and not merely the first ones that "pop up" in a browser search. They will practice fact-checking a source and distinguishing a verified and credible source (such as a .gov or .edu website) versus less reliable sources like Wikipedia, blogs, and tabloid articles.

The class will learn to review reliable sources as the inspiration for a narrower, more focused research topic. They will create mini-maps, circle or identify key words, and draw Venn diagrams comparing similarities and differences on a topic in order to formulate a specific research question. Students will apply ChatGPT to their research topic to gain experience with AI tools and evaluate the accuracy and credibility of the results.

Once students have used research to identify an area of interest, they will be guided through identifying and refining a research question. Topics can come from scientific or social science research, quantitative and/or qualitative research, or any favorite topic from favorite books and authors, video games, or music artists. Students will learn to skim read and scan sources and extract information from article abstracts. Students taking this course on-level will be expected to locate published literature on their topic, while those taking the course at the honors level will be expected to locate, interpret, and evaluate published literature. All students will be asked to write a brief summary explaining their research question, and honors students will be asked to write a one-paragraph critique of at least five resources.

Topics in this Series: Inquiry & Investigation (Semester 1) and Research & Reflection (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Prerequisites: Reading and writing at grade-level.

Workload: On-level students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class. Honors students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class.

Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes, track grades, and message instructor and classmates.

Assessments: The instructor will assign points for the completion of various assignments, and parents can use the total point earned versus possible for determining a grade in the class.

Textbook/Materials: All articles and reference materials will be available online or posted as pdfs on the class Canvas site.

What to Bring: Students should bring a laptop or tablet to class, paper or notebook, and pen or pencil.

Non-Meeting Days: In addition to the scheduled days-off on the published Compass schedule, this class does not meet on Monday, September 23.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English or Language Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

Mastering Microsoft Office: Word & Excel (Certificate Program)

Mastering Microsoft Office: Word & Excel (Certificate Program) Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 1,2

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 4

You might have gone through high school using beginner-level Google tools like Docs, Sheets, and Slides, but to prepare for college and career, it might be time to learn Microsoft Office 365. While Google Workspace applications are generally liked for their ease of collaboration and cloud-based accessibility, Microsoft Office 365 tools are preferred in many majors and industries for their advanced features, refinement, and computing power. Any high school student who plans to pursue a college major in business, science, engineering, or other data-driven field should learn Microsoft Office, and anyone wishing to enter the job market or enhance their resume with recognized credentials as a Certified Microsoft Office Specialist should take this class. Furthermore, any student bound for college or the work world who is not proficient in these computer applications can take this class to catch up on 21st century skills.

First semester, students will work through official Microsoft study materials to become certified as a Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) in Word and Excel. Working in Word will help a student create attractive and professional-looking reports, multicolumn newsletters, resumes, business correspondence. Specific skills covered in the Word Associate curriculum include: managing documents; inserting and formatting text, paragraphs, and sections; managing tables and lists; creating and managing references; inserting and formatting graphic elements; and managing document collaboration. Working in Excel will help as student create and manage worksheets and workbooks that can become professional-looking budgets, financial statements, sales invoices, data logs, and performance charts. Specific skills covered in the Excel Associate curriculum include: creating cells and ranges; creating tables; applying formulas and functions; creating charts and objects; creating and editing a workbook with multiple sheets; and using a graphic element to represent data visually.

An additional benefit of this course may be earned college credit. The American Council on Education (ACE) has recommended that MOS certifications in Word, Excel, and PowerPoint be considered as computer application in higher education institutions. 1800 accredited ACE-member, degree-granting colleges, universities, and other education-related organizations may award college credit to students who earned these certifications.

Prerequisite: Basic keyboarding skills.

Levels: Students who take this course on-level can earn two MOS certifications per semester. Students who take both semesters of this course will additionally qualify as a Microsoft Office Specialist: Associate level for earning at least three certifications. Students who wish to pursue a more rigorous curriculum and designate this as an "honors" level course on their transcript can self-study for the Microsoft Office Specialist: Expert level which requires two additional exams passed at the Expert level (and additional testing fees of $200.)

Equipment: Students should bring a laptop to class which has a local copy of Microsoft Office 2019 installed or a current subscription and access to Microsoft Office 365.

Course Materials: Students will work from the official Microsoft Office Specialist study guides that will be provided in class and is included in the course tuition

Assessment: Students will take computer-based exams for each application: The MO-110: Microsoft Word (Microsoft 365 Apps) and MO-210: Microsoft Excel (Microsoft 365 Apps) during first semester and the MO-310: Microsoft PowerPoint (Microsoft 365 Apps) second semester. If the MO-410 for Microsoft Outlook is released by spring 2025, students will take it, otherwise, they will take the corresponding and near-identical exams for Microsoft Outlook 2019.

Testing Fees: A fee of $100 per exam ($200 per semester) is required to take the Microsoft Office Specialist exams.

Non-Meeting Days: In addition to the scheduled days-off on the published Compass schedule, this class does not meet on September 23.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Career Exploration or Technology for purposes of a high school transcript.

1:00 pm-2:55 pm

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

D-2

Reading Rally: Complete Language Arts- Red Level 1 (Sem 1)

Reading Rally: Complete Language Arts- Red Level 1 (Sem 1) Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 1,2

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 5

Reading and writing affect a student's achievement in all aspects of schoolwork, so strong language arts skills are fundamental to success in homeschooling. This weekly class is a small group of 3-6 students who read and write at a similar level. Students follow a comprehensive language arts curriculum under the guidance of an experienced reading specialist. Each Monday class meeting will include a short story with select vocabulary words, a graphic organizer, main themes, and embedded learning objectives. Students will continue to practice language arts skills at home with easy-to-implement "page a day" workbook activities assigned by the instructor and implemented by the parents. For most early elementary learners, enrollment in Reading Rally can serve as a complete, self-contained language arts curriculum where families will not need additional resources in reading, comprehension, composition, spelling, and grammar. Weekly readings are organized around thematic units. The instructor will teach students how to approach a new story as a fun reading puzzle. For example, before reading aloud in class, students will conduct a "picture walk" to overview and predict elements of the story from the illustrations, review a graphic organizer to assist in writing sentences, define vocabulary words, and preview summary questions. Then, the instructor will read the story aloud, model good reading practices, and encourage students to read. Students will only be asked to read aloud when they feel comfortable and have built trust in their group. All follow-up activities are designed around learning objectives such as decoding, comprehension, prediction, visualization, and verbalization. READINESS: As a comprehensive language arts curriculum, a student must be at a similar grade level ability in reading, comprehension, and writing. Early readers who have not learned to write, for example, or emerging readers who struggle with comprehenion, may not be a good fit for this class. In addition, students must have the hand-eye coordination and basic handwriting skills to be able to copy the instructor's many notes, examples, and definitions from the classroom white board into their own notebook. Grade level references in Reading Rally are based on scope, sequence and pacing that correlate to the Grade Level Equivalent (GLE) standards of learning. Students who are more than one year behind in GLE in language arts or who have a difference in skill level between their reading and writing may be recommended for a second, weekly class meeting on Fridays or 1-on-1 private instruction to make up ground in reading or writing skills. Additional class meetings or private instruction will be an additional cost. ATTENTION! Parents should not register for a Reading Rally class until they have had a Language Arts Skills Inventory (i.e. brief assessment) and placement determination by the reading specialist. This must be scheduled separately through Compass at a cost of $125.00. The fee is due prior to the assessment and is not refundable in the event the child is not recommended for a reading group. The instructor has experience working with reluctant and fearful readers, those who are late bloomers, neurodivergent, dyslexic, and ESOL students. However, she might recommend a more complete evaluation by another professional if she suspects other learning differences are impacting the student's langauge arts learning. Students will work from a spiral bound copy of reading textbook and workbook by Pearson. A class fee of $72.00 is due payable to Compass for the required books. Students continuing from one semester to the next will receive priority registration to remain with their reading group.

10:00 am-10:55 am

1st-2nd

(Semester Long)

Reading Rally: Complete Language Arts- Green Level 1 (Sem 1)

Reading Rally: Complete Language Arts- Green Level 1 (Sem 1) Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 1,2

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 6

Reading and writing affect a student's achievement in all aspects of schoolwork, so strong language arts skills are fundamental to success in homeschooling. This weekly class is a small group of 3-6 students who read and write at a similar level. Students follow a comprehensive language arts curriculum under the guidance of an experienced reading specialist. Each Monday class meeting will include a short story with select vocabulary words, a graphic organizer, main themes, and embedded learning objectives. Students will continue to practice language arts skills at home with easy-to-implement "page a day" workbook activities assigned by the instructor and implemented by the parents. For most early elementary learners, enrollment in Reading Rally can serve as a complete, self-contained language arts curriculum where families will not need additional resources in reading, comprehension, composition, spelling, and grammar. Weekly readings are organized around thematic units. The instructor will teach students how to approach a new story as a fun reading puzzle. For example, before reading aloud in class, students will conduct a "picture walk" to overview and predict elements of the story from the illustrations, review a graphic organizer to assist in writing sentences, define vocabulary words, and preview summary questions. Then, the instructor will read the story aloud, model good reading practices, and encourage students to read. Students will only be asked to read aloud when they feel comfortable and have built trust in their group. All follow-up activities are designed around learning objectives such as decoding, comprehension, prediction, visualization, and verbalization. READINESS: As a comprehensive language arts curriculum, a student must be at a similar grade level ability in reading, comprehension, and writing. Early readers who have not learned to write, for example, or emerging readers who struggle with comprehenion, may not be a good fit for this class. In addition, students must have the hand-eye coordination and basic handwriting skills to be able to copy the instructor's many notes, examples, and definitions from the classroom white board into their own notebook. Grade level references in Reading Rally are based on scope, sequence and pacing that correlate to the Grade Level Equivalent (GLE) standards of learning. Students who are more than one year behind in GLE in language arts or who have a difference in skill level between their reading and writing may be recommended for a second, weekly class meeting on Fridays or 1-on-1 private instruction to make up ground in reading or writing skills. Additional class meetings or private instruction will be an additional cost. ATTENTION! Parents should not register for a Reading Rally class until they have had a Language Arts Skills Inventory (i.e. brief assessment) and placement determination by the reading specialist. This must be scheduled separately through Compass at a cost of $125.00. The fee is due prior to the assessment and is not refundable in the event the child is not recommended for a reading group. The instructor has experience working with reluctant and fearful readers, those who are late bloomers, neurodivergent, dyslexic, and ESOL students. However, she might recommend a more complete evaluation by another professional if she suspects other learning differences are impacting the student's langauge arts learning. Students will work from a spiral bound copy of reading textbook and workbook by Pearson. A class fee of $98.00 is due payable to Compass for the required books. Students continuing from one semester to the next will receive priority registration to remain with their reading group.

11:00 am-11:55 am

2nd-3rd

(Semester Long)

Reading Rally: Complete Language Arts- Blue Level 1 (Sem 1)

Reading Rally: Complete Language Arts- Blue Level 1 (Sem 1) Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 1,2

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 4

Reading and writing affect a student's achievement in all aspects of schoolwork, so strong language arts skills are fundamental to success in homeschooling. This weekly class is a small group of 3-6 students who read and write at a similar level. Students follow a comprehensive language arts curriculum under the guidance of an experienced reading specialist. Each Monday class meeting will include a short story with select vocabulary words, a graphic organizer, main themes, and embedded learning objectives. Students will continue to practice language arts skills at home with easy-to-implement "page a day" workbook activities assigned by the instructor and implemented by the parents. For most early elementary learners, enrollment in Reading Rally can serve as a complete, self-contained language arts curriculum where families will not need additional resources in reading, comprehension, composition, spelling, and grammar. Weekly readings are organized around thematic units. The instructor will teach students how to approach a new story as a fun reading puzzle. For example, before reading aloud in class, students will conduct a "picture walk" to overview and predict elements of the story from the illustrations, review a graphic organizer to assist in writing sentences, define vocabulary words, and preview summary questions. Then, the instructor will read the story aloud, model good reading practices, and encourage students to read. Students will only be asked to read aloud when they feel comfortable and have built trust in their group. All follow-up activities are designed around learning objectives such as decoding, comprehension, prediction, visualization, and verbalization. READINESS: As a comprehensive language arts curriculum, a student must be at a similar grade level ability in reading, comprehension, and writing. Early readers who have not learned to write, for example, or emerging readers who struggle with comprehenion, may not be a good fit for this class. In addition, students must have the hand-eye coordination and basic handwriting skills to be able to copy the instructor's many notes, examples, and definitions from the classroom white board into their own notebook. Grade level references in Reading Rally are based on scope, sequence and pacing that correlate to the Grade Level Equivalent (GLE) standards of learning. Students who are more than one year behind in GLE in language arts or who have a difference in skill level between their reading and writing may be recommended for a second, weekly class meeting on Fridays or 1-on-1 private instruction to make up ground in reading or writing skills. Additional class meetings or private instruction will be an additional cost. ATTENTION! Parents should not register for a Reading Rally class until they have had a Language Arts Skills Inventory (i.e. brief assessment) and placement determination by the reading specialist. This must be scheduled separately through Compass at a cost of $125.00. The fee is due prior to the assessment and is not refundable in the event the child is not recommended for a reading group. The instructor has experience working with reluctant and fearful readers, those who are late bloomers, neurodivergent, dyslexic, and ESOL students. However, she might recommend a more complete evaluation by another professional if she suspects other learning differences are impacting the student's langauge arts learning. Students will work from a spiral bound copy of reading textbook and workbook by Pearson. A class fee of $101.00 is due payable to Compass for the required books. Students continuing from one semester to the next will receive priority registration to remain with their reading group.

12:30 pm-1:25 pm

3rd-4th

(Semester Long)

Reading Rally: Complete Language Arts- Silver, Part 1 (Sem 1)

Reading Rally: Complete Language Arts- Silver, Part 1 (Sem 1) Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 1,2

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 4

Reading and writing affect a student's achievement in all aspects of schoolwork, so strong language arts skills are fundamental to success in homeschooling. This weekly class is a small group of 3-6 students who read and write at a similar level. Students follow a comprehensive language arts curriculum under the guidance of an experienced reading specialist. Each Monday class meeting will include a short story with select vocabulary words, a graphic organizer, main themes, and embedded learning objectives. Students will continue to practice language arts skills at home with easy-to-implement "page a day" workbook activities assigned by the instructor and implemented by the parents. For most early elementary learners, enrollment in Reading Rally can serve as a complete, self-contained language arts curriculum where families will not need additional resources in reading, comprehension, composition, spelling, and grammar. Weekly readings are organized around thematic units. The instructor will teach students how to approach a new story as a fun reading puzzle. For example, before reading aloud in class, students will conduct a "picture walk" to overview and predict elements of the story from the illustrations, review a graphic organizer to assist in writing sentences, define vocabulary words, and preview summary questions. Then, the instructor will read the story aloud, model good reading practices, and encourage students to read. Students will only be asked to read aloud when they feel comfortable and have built trust in their group. All follow-up activities are designed around learning objectives such as decoding, comprehension, prediction, visualization, and verbalization. READINESS: As a comprehensive language arts curriculum, a student must be at a similar grade level ability in reading, comprehension, and writing. Early readers who have not learned to write, for example, or emerging readers who struggle with comprehenion, may not be a good fit for this class. In addition, students must have the hand-eye coordination and basic handwriting skills to be able to copy the instructor's many notes, examples, and definitions from the classroom white board into their own notebook. Grade level references in Reading Rally are based on scope, sequence and pacing that correlate to the Grade Level Equivalent (GLE) standards of learning. Students who are more than one year behind in GLE in language arts or who have a difference in skill level between their reading and writing may be recommended for a second, weekly class meeting on Fridays or 1-on-1 private instruction to make up ground in reading or writing skills. Additional class meetings or private instruction will be an additional cost. ATTENTION! Parents should not register for a Reading Rally class until they have had a Language Arts Skills Inventory (i.e. brief assessment) and placement determination by the reading specialist. This must be scheduled separately through Compass at a cost of $125.00. The fee is due prior to the assessment and is not refundable in the event the child is not recommended for a reading group. The instructor has experience working with reluctant and fearful readers, those who are late bloomers, neurodivergent, dyslexic, and ESOL students. However, she might recommend a more complete evaluation by another professional if she suspects other learning differences are impacting the student's langauge arts learning. Students will work from a spiral bound copy of reading textbook and workbook by Pearson. A class fee of $142.00 is due payable to Compass for the required books. Students continuing from one semester to the next will receive priority registration to remain with their reading group.

1:30 pm-2:25 pm

4th-5th

(Semester Long)

Reading Rally: Complete Language Arts- Lt Green, Part 1 (Sem 1)

Reading Rally: Complete Language Arts- Lt Green, Part 1 (Sem 1) Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 1,2

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 5

Reading and writing affect a student's achievement in all aspects of schoolwork, so strong language arts skills are fundamental to success in homeschooling. This weekly class is a small group of 3-6 students who read and write at a similar level. Students follow a comprehensive language arts curriculum under the guidance of an experienced reading specialist. Each Monday class meeting will include a short story with select vocabulary words, a graphic organizer, main themes, and embedded learning objectives. Students will continue to practice language arts skills at home with easy-to-implement "page a day" workbook activities assigned by the instructor and implemented by the parents. For most early elementary learners, enrollment in Reading Rally can serve as a complete, self-contained language arts curriculum where families will not need additional resources in reading, comprehension, composition, spelling, and grammar. Weekly readings are organized around thematic units. The instructor will teach students how to approach a new story as a fun reading puzzle. For example, before reading aloud in class, students will conduct a "picture walk" to overview and predict elements of the story from the illustrations, review a graphic organizer to assist in writing sentences, define vocabulary words, and preview summary questions. Then, the instructor will read the story aloud, model good reading practices, and encourage students to read. Students will only be asked to read aloud when they feel comfortable and have built trust in their group. All follow-up activities are designed around learning objectives such as decoding, comprehension, prediction, visualization, and verbalization. READINESS: As a comprehensive language arts curriculum, a student must be at a similar grade level ability in reading, comprehension, and writing. Early readers who have not learned to write, for example, or emerging readers who struggle with comprehenion, may not be a good fit for this class. In addition, students must have the hand-eye coordination and basic handwriting skills to be able to copy the instructor's many notes, examples, and definitions from the classroom white board into their own notebook. Grade level references in Reading Rally are based on scope, sequence and pacing that correlate to the Grade Level Equivalent (GLE) standards of learning. Students who are more than one year behind in GLE in language arts or who have a difference in skill level between their reading and writing may be recommended for a second, weekly class meeting on Fridays or 1-on-1 private instruction to make up ground in reading or writing skills. Additional class meetings or private instruction will be an additional cost. ATTENTION! Parents should not register for a Reading Rally class until they have had a Language Arts Skills Inventory (i.e. brief assessment) and placement determination by the reading specialist. This must be scheduled separately through Compass at a cost of $125.00. The fee is due prior to the assessment and is not refundable in the event the child is not recommended for a reading group. The instructor has experience working with reluctant and fearful readers, those who are late bloomers, neurodivergent, dyslexic, and ESOL students. However, she might recommend a more complete evaluation by another professional if she suspects other learning differences are impacting the student's langauge arts learning. Students will work from a spiral bound copy of reading textbook and workbook by Pearson. A class fee of $140.00 is due payable to Compass for the required books. Students continuing from one semester to the next will receive priority registration to remain with their reading group.

2:30 pm-3:25 pm

5th-6th

(Semester Long)

D-3

War Room: Military Intelligence- The World at War

War Room: Military Intelligence- The World at War Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 1,2

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 3

Perhaps you have heard that "knowing is half the battle." This class will realize that as we examine the roles of military intelligence and espionage in conflicts. A fundamental goal of military intelligence is to fight smarter, not harder, on the battlefield. For context and inspiration, the class will examine the history of the real spies of WWI, their methods, failures, and successes.

This semester will start at the outbreak of the First World War and the grueling trench warfare that saw a years-long stalemate in Europe. Both sides sought every advantage they could get to break the stalemate, setting their spies to the task! Espionage was employed to hide one side's battle plans and steal the enemy's. Sabotage was staged to cripple the enemy's ability to fight before a battle had even started. All around the world, agents sought advantages for their country and exploited weaknesses in their opponents.

The continuing mission, should students choose to accept it, is to use secret codes and a modified tabletop RPG (role playing game) system to simulate missions, discover the enemy's secret plans, and give an edge to the forces on the battlefield.

While Compass's 3D History classes will simulate the battles in the field, this class will assume the supporting role by attempting to infiltrate enemy lines with field agents. War Room students in the "headquarters" will direct both their field agents and the missions of the frontline troops in 3D History. The decisions of War Room students on Monday will affect the play of 3D History students on Friday, and outcomes of the 3D History role play on Friday will dictate the work of the War Room the following Monday. While co-registration in both classes is not required, some students may want to dual register in order to see both the tactical and strategic aspects of a major engagement and how military intelligence affects the outcomes. This course is recommended for teens who have a passion for military history or an interest in a future career in intelligence.

Topics in this Series: World at War (Semester 1) and Winning the War (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hour per week outside of class.

Assignments: Course documents including period maps, photographs and recreations will be made available through a class Google Drive link emailed to parents and students, as well as a class YouTube playlist for any videos watched in class or assigned as homework.

Assessments: Will not be given.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in World History, US History, Military History, or Career Exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

10:00 am-10:55 am

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

Ancient Justice: Crime & Punishment in Medieval Times

Ancient Justice: Crime & Punishment in Medieval Times Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 1,2

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 5

This class will explore the judicial processes of Europe following the collapse of Rome. From witch trials and Viking blood feuds, then back again to the real barbarians- lawyers! Like a traditional mock trial program, the class will hear cases, and students will defend themselves. Real historical cases will be studied, and trial parts assigned to the class, which will be debated from the perspective of Royal Courts, Church Ordeals, or a Viking assembly they creatively called "a Thing." The class will serve as the jury and, if necessary, select period-appropriate verdicts and explain how they arrived at their decisions, while striving for period accuracy. Second semester will move to codified Renaissance legal systems, leading up to the direct Ancestor to American legal traditions, Common Law.

Topics in this Series: Crime & Punishment in Medieval Times (Semester 1), Crime & Punishment in the Early Modern Era (Semester 2).

Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.

Assignments: Period maps, photographs, and re-creations will be posted on a class Google Drive, and video links from YouTube will be e-mailed to parents and students for homework or supplemental investigation.

Assessments: A mid-term and final exam may be given.

Textbooks: None. Case documents are provided in class.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History or Civics for purposes of a high school transcript.

11:00 am-11:55 am

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

Economic Empires: Tycoons, Titans & Tyrants- a Market Simul...

Economic Empires: Tycoons, Titans & Tyrants- a Market Simulation Game (Late 19th Century) Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 1,2

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 3

This class begins with the transition from farm to factory. Students will begin the semester as "independently wealthy" barons and tycoons of various mid-century industries. The class will use a custom Role-Playing Game to simulate a fully industrialized economy. From day one, students will be assigned to key roles in industry, from railroads and shipping, to a variety of factories or resource extraction. They must manage their initial investments wisely or risk being overrun by their classmates. They will endeavor to dominate their market and rule the supply and demand, or risk ending up penniless. In true role-playing fashion, they will create characters and build their "backstories" to fit into this economy. Will they be Carnegies and Rockefellers, or will they run out of steam?

Using the lessons taught in class, students will navigate their interconnected business world, learning to either cooperate with or destroy their rivals. Using their carefully documented ledgers, the class will learn to manage key business elements, from keeping their labor force happy enough not to strike, forging deals and making partnerships, and of course, influencing government policy to their benefit.

The end of the semester should make clear how each business is interdependent on another, the benefits of cooperation or forceful acquisition. What role does a good (or bad) government play in encouraging and safeguarding investment and for whose benefit? Above all, it should stress the importance of keeping orderly records, making safe vs highly rewarding investments, and how to successfully manage working relationships. By recreating the circumstances of the industrial revolution, and navigating them in the role playing game, students should understand the why and how, to the history they've played through.

Topics in this Series: Tycoons, Titans & Tyrants- Late 19th century (Semester 1), Corporations, Capitalists & Consumers- Early 20th century (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Prerequisites: None

Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.

Assignments: Course documents including period plans, photographs and recreations will be made available through a class Google Drive link emailed to parents (and students who provide their email address), as well as a class reading list of articles/excerpts and YouTube playlist for any videos watched in class or assigned as homework.

Assessments: Informal assessments will be given at the instructor's discretion, but assignments will not be scored or graded. Each student's financial success in the game will be an indicator of their learning and participation for purposes of assigning a grade. Parents will also be given shared access to their student's business plan with instructor and ledger, with instructor comments at the conclusion of class.

Textbook/Materials: None

What to Bring: Paper or notebook, pen or pencil

Credit: Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History, Economics, or Business for purposes of a high school transcript.

12:00 pm-1:55 pm

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

Close, Confusing and Controversial Presidential Elections i...

Close, Confusing and Controversial Presidential Elections in American History Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 1,2

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 3

  • The fate of an election went to the House of Representatives when two candidates earned equal numbers of electoral votes, and one of them was not even running for president. (1800)
  • The successful presidential candidate won only 40% of the popular vote in a heated, 4-way race that divided the nation and led to war. (1824)
  • The candidate who won the popular vote yet lost the election after a number of disputed electoral votes were awarded to the other candidate by a bipartisan commission (1876).
  • A president who lost his bid for re-election despite winning the popular vote came back four years later to retake the White House. (1892)
  • Close, confusing, and sometimes controversial presidential elections are not unique in American History, and 2024 is shaping up to be yet another contentious and convoluted race to the White House. This is a discussion and current events-based class that will split each class meeting to look at both a historic election and the week's developments and drama in the 2024 election. The class will examine ten of these contests with the first occurring in 1800 and the most recent in 2008 and 2020. Discussions will track drama on the campaign trail, after the 2024 summer conventions and throughout the fall campaign season, in what is a political rarity: a presidential re-match.

    Join former college professor Dr. John Kornacki for this discussion-based class, where students will look more closely on why these contests were so close, and in some cases, disputed. Students will take a deep dive into the political, economic, and cultural context of these elections and study their lingering impacts on the current and future elections.

    Prerequisites: Reading at a high school level.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Students will be asked a write a 1-page reflection paper every other week (6 in the semester). Assignments and supplemental reading will be posted in a Google classroom.

    Assessments: Feedback will given on the reflection paper and class participation.

    Textbook/Materials: Supplemental readings will be posted in a Google classroom as downloaded pdfs or links to online articles.

    Non-Meeting Days: In addition to the scheduled days-off on the published Compass schedule, this class does not meet on 9/9/24

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in American Government, Civics, or Current Events for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2:00 pm-2:55 pm

    9th-12th

    (Semester Long)

    D-4

    AP 2D Art & Design

    AP 2D Art & Design Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 3

    Earn college credit and artistic "cred"-ibility in this studio art class! Over the course of the school year, student artists will experiment with artistic techniques, create original works in a variety of mediums and styles, and build a portfolio for submission. Students will be guided by a Compass art instructor, Pete Van Riper, who is also an adjunct art professor at Northern Virginia Community College and a reviewer for AP art portfolios.

    The three goals of AP 2D Art and Design are to (1) investigate a variety of artistic materials, methods, and ideas; (2) produce 2-dimensional art and designs; and (3) be able to describe and present art and design to others. AP Art and Design students "develop and apply skills of inquiry and investigation, practice, experimentation, revision, communication, and reflection."

    Student artists will create a portfolio with works that feature the elements of art and principles of design such as "point, line, shape, plane, layer, form, space, texture, color, value, opacity, transparency, time; unity, variety, rhythm, movement, proportion, scale, balance, emphasis, contrast, repetition, figure/ground relationship, connection, juxtaposition, hierarchy." Students will be asked to document their medium choices and keep a sketch book and art journal describing their inspiration and artistic process.

    In class, works will be done in charcoal, pencil, conte crayon, watercolor crayons, watercolor paints, acrylic paint, and collage. Like other college level classes, outside work will be expected, and art completed outside of the weekly class meetings can include graphic design, digital imaging, photography, collage, fabric design, weaving, fashion design, fashion illustration, painting, and printmaking, and other 2D formats. Students should consider how to express their ideas with selected materials and processes on a flat surface.

    The College Board has no preferred or unacceptable content or style, but all work must be entirely the student's original creation. Submissions may incorporate pre-existing photographs or others' images provided proper attribution and citations are given and the use reflects an extension of the student's vision and not just duplication or copy work. AI generated designs are strictly prohibited from portfolio submissions, but original, digitally created art is welcome.

    Students' portfolio submissions for the AP program must include two sections (1) "Sustained Investigation" which includes 15 images of the purposeful evolution of a work or works through concept sketches, practice, experimentation, and revisions, and (2) "Selected Works" which includes images of 5 completed pieces. All portfolio works will be submitted as digital images (scans or photographs) of the student's original pieces, and all images must be accompanied by a written discussion of the materials and processes used.

    Earn college credit and artistic "cred"-ibility in this studio art class! Over the course of the school year, student artists will experiment with artistic techniques, create original works in a variety of mediums and styles, and build a portfolio for submission. Students will be guided by a Compass art instructor, Pete Van Riper, who is also an adjunct art professor at Northern Virginia Community College and a reviewer for AP art portfolios.

    The three goals of AP 2D Art and Design are to (1) investigate a variety of artistic materials, methods, and ideas; (2) produce 2-dimensional art and designs; and (3) be able to describe and present art and design to others. AP Art and Design students "develop and apply skills of inquiry and investigation, practice, experimentation, revision, communication, and reflection."

    Student artists will create a portfolio with works that feature the elements of art and principles of design such as "point, line, shape, plane, layer, form, space, texture, color, value, opacity, transparency, time; unity, variety, rhythm, movement, proportion, scale, balance, emphasis, contrast, repetition, figure/ground relationship, connection, juxtaposition, hierarchy." Students will be asked to document their medium choices and keep a sketch book and art journal describing their inspiration and artistic process.

    In class, works will be done in charcoal, pencil, conte crayon, watercolor crayons, watercolor paints, acrylic paint, and collage. Like other college level classes, outside work will be expected, and art completed outside of the weekly class meetings can include graphic design, digital imaging, photography, collage, fabric design, weaving, fashion design, fashion illustration, painting, and printmaking, and other 2D formats. Students should consider how to express their ideas with selected materials and processes on a flat surface.

    The College Board has no preferred or unacceptable content or style, but all work must be entirely the student's original creation. Submissions may incorporate pre-existing photographs or others' images provided proper attribution and citations are given and the use reflects an extension of the student's vision and not just duplication or copy work. AI generated designs are strictly prohibited from portfolio submissions, but original, digitally created art is welcome.

    Students' portfolio submissions for the AP program must include two sections (1) "Sustained Investigation" which includes 15 images of the purposeful evolution of a work or works through concept sketches, practice, experimentation, and revisions, and (2) "Selected Works" which includes images of 5 completed pieces. All portfolio works will be submitted as digital images (scans or photographs) of the student's original pieces, and all images must be accompanied by a written discussion of the materials and processes used.

    The class will examine images of others' art, and students will be asked to visit at least two art museums or art exhibits. They will practice giving and receiving construction formal and informal critiques through the observation, analysis, discussion, and evaluation of their own work and that of other artists to hone the AP-required skill of communication about 2D art.

    Levels This course is only offered at the AP level, but enrollment does not obligate a student to submit a portfolio for AP review.

    Workload: Student artists should plan 2-4 hours per week outside of class on their pieces, concept drawings, practice sketches, etc.

    Assignments: All assignments will be communicated to students via email.

    Assessments: Qualitative feedback will be given weekly in class. The principal assessment in this course is the AP score earned.

    Textbooks: The instructor will furnish art and design books for students to browse in class and borrow.

    Supply Fee: A supply fee of $60.00 is due payable to the instructor for shared, in-class basics consisting of: pencils, charcoal, conte a Paris, acrylic paints, brushes, sketch journal, and canvas boards. The instructor will furnish a list of recommended supplies for alternative or premium materials that students may want to incorporate use such as watercolor or colored markers.

    About AP: "AP" is a trademark of the College Board, which owns and designs the course outline and "audits" (i.e. approves) high school instructors who employ their expertise and creativity to deliver the college freshman-level content. The College Board's summary of the AP 2D Art & Design program can be read HERE, and the instructor AP Course Audit Approval form can be viewed HERE.

    AP Fees: The fee for the College Board's AP 2D Art & Design portfolio in May 2025 is not included. Each family is responsible for scheduling and paying for their student's AP registration.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    11:00 am-12:55 pm

    9th-12th

    (Year Long)

    Head to Toe Health for Teens

    Head to Toe Health for Teens Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1,2

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 4

    What is a lower calorie lunch: McDonald's Big Mac or Panera's Mac & Cheese (it's not what you think!) How much sleep does a teen really need? Is vaping a safe alternative to smoking? Teens fall in the awkward gap between childhood and adult years and face many personal and physical changes. This class will cover the health topics teens should be prepared for such as healthy habits and developing bodies.

    The class will examine nutrition including specific recommendations for this age group and a look at the effects of favorites like sugar, caffeine, and fast food. Students will brainstorm safety topics such as internet safety, situational safety, risk-taking, and personal boundaries. Students will also learn about sleep recommendations and healthy sleep habits, exercise, and the effects of screen time, and students will be encouraged to keep a personal log to see how they fare on these measures.

    When it comes to feelings such a depression, anxiety, and fear, the class will discuss what is normal, and when you should start to worry. Teens will learn about eating disorders and self-harm, and when it is time to speak up and get adult help for themselves or a friend. The group will also examine brain development in the tween years and how it is different than that of a toddler and adult, and what this means for thought processes such as impulsivity.

    The class will cover the usage of alcohol, illicit drugs, prescription drugs, smoking, and vaping including the effects they can have on a teen; common names, and new threats "on the street" such as drugs that look like candy, bath salts, or edibles. Students will learn how to identify addiction in themselves or someone else and how to get help.

    Puberty and human reproduction will be taught from a purely biological perspective including male and female anatomy, pregnancy and fetal development, and sexually transmitted diseases. These topics will be covered in a mixed classroom of boys and girls. This class will not cover birth control, abortion, or gender identity issues, and parents will have the opportunity to preview the material covered before it is taught to ensure it is right for their teen.

    This class will be structured as a facilitated discussion with ample opportunities for students to get their questions answered by an "outside" authority, a Compass science teacher. The class will incorporate some video clips, in-class activities, demonstrations, work with partners, and personal assessments/surveys. Some homework will be given in the form of logs to track sleep, screen time, etc. Class materials will include pamphlets and fliers put out by public health agencies and associations. A textbook will also be selected for the class, and families will be sent the ISBN of the book to purchase or rent for class. There is a supply fee of $20.00 due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    1:00 pm-1:55 pm

    7th-12th

    (Semester Long)

    D-5

    Exercise Science: Fitness & Physiology

    Exercise Science: Fitness & Physiology Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1,2

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 3

    What are the effects of strength training versus endurance training on performance? What is the difference between aerobic and anaerobic exercise? How do you prevent- or recover from- sports related injuries?

    Questions like these can be answered by a kinesiologist! Kinesiology is the study of human movement which includes aspects of anatomy, physiology, pathology, psychology, sociology, and biomechanics. Kinesiologists look at the effects of exercise to help prevent injury or speed recovery, improve movement and function throughout life, and enhance the quality of life for their patients, clients, or athletes.

    The study of kinesiology can prepare a student for a career in preventive and rehabilitative exercise and wellness programs, such as physical therapy, occupational therapy, athletic training, or sports medicine. Some use kinesiology as the foundation for careers as physicians, nurses, first responders, nutritionists, chiropractors, osteopaths, orthopedists, personal trainers, coaches, and athletic trainers.

    First semester is an introduction to the field of kinesiology including a survey of human anatomy and overview of careers and credentialing in the field. Students will learn about the metrics used to measure progress for fitness, strength, or the rehabilitation of injury. They will learn how to check vital signs and perform the basics of a physical exam for an athlete. Students will perform in-class activities and labs such as a bone lab, strength tests, muscular endurance tests, rehabilitation lab, and practice the emergency care for injuries. Students will make at least one visit to the nearby YCMA gym to practice common exercises, including how to instruct others to do them.

    Note: This course is not a PE class, a health course, or a lab science, but contains elements of each as a career exploration course taught by an adjunct professor of kinesiology and certified athletic trainer.

    10:30 am-11:55 am

    9th-12th

    (Semester Long)

    Introduction to Computer Science: Python Programming

    Introduction to Computer Science: Python Programming Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1,2

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 6

    Do you want to learn the world's fastest growing programming language that is used by Google, NASA, YouTube and the CIA? Python is a versatile, easy-to-learn beginner-level programming language and gateway to foundational concepts in computer science.

    Students will learn how to code apps and games as they practice the computer science design cycle of writing code, executing the code, interpreting the results, revising the code syntax based on the output. The class will cover the fundamental building blocks of programming including: variables, mathematical operators, logical operators, and boolean arithmetic. They will also learn about data types, built-in functions, conditional statements, for- loops, defining functions, function stacks, interpreting error messages, exception handling, and add-on libraries. At each step, the class will create basic programs and fun, interactive content.

    Topics in this Series: Python Programming (Semester 1), JavaScript Programming (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: Algebra I, recommended

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Will be given in class.

    Assessments: Will not be given.

    Lab/Supply Fee: The class tuition includes a student technology fee that covers the rental of classroom laptops and all software and licenses installed on the laptops.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Technology or Career Elective for purposes of a high school transcript.

    1:00 pm-2:55 pm

    9th-12th

    (Semester Long)

    D-6

    Semi Private: Algebra/Geometry

    Semi Private: Algebra/Geometry Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1,2

    Day(s): Mon, Thu

    Open Spots: 1

    This is a semi-private section for students with permission of Compass and the Instructor.

    This is continuing course in high school Algebra I and introduction to Geometry covering concepts in mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. This course is designed to continue the study of algebraic problem-solving with the incorporation of real-world applications. Part 1 topics in Algebra I will be reviewed such as number systems, linear systems, rational numbers, complex numbers, exponents, roots, and radicals. Algebra I, Part 2 topics including quadratic equations, polynomials, factoring, absolute values, ratios, and proportions will be covered first semester. The course will review and expand on solving and graphing systems of functions, linear equations, and inequalities.

    Second semester, students will begin an introduction to Geometry covering lines, angles, congruence, concurrence, inequalities, parallel lines, quadrilaterals, transformations, area, similarity, right triangles, circles, regular polygons, and geometric solids. Geometric proofs will not be included. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem-solving.

    Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation in pre-algebra and Algebra I, part 1 in order to take this class.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-1.5 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 7-day cycle, with assignments posted on Thursdays and due the following Thursday. Students are advised to start homework once it is assigned (i.e., not wait until the night before it is due). Weekly homework assignments will be of a length that a student should be able to complete them in two or three at-home work sessions. Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of their work.

    Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.

    Assessments: Student progress will be assessed by: (1) The instructor checking that weekly homework sets are attempted and complete and (2) detailed grading of periodic take-home tests. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. See the instructor's webpage for detailed homework and test policy, including late work and re-work.

    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Algebra I: Expressions, Equations, and Applications by Paul A. Foerster. It is available in a few different editions, each of which is virtually identical: 2nd edition (ISBN-10 020125073X, ISBN-13 978-0201250732), 3rd edition (ISBN-10 0201860945, ISBN-13 978-0201860948), and Classic edition (ISBN-10 020132458X, ISBN-13 978-0201324587). It is also available under the title Foerster Algebra I, Classics edition (ISBN-10 0131657089, ISBN-13 978-0131657083). A calculator is not needed for this course.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Algebra I for purposes of a high school transcript.

    9:00 am-9:55 am

    5th-6th

    (Semester Long)

    Algebra I (Mon, Thu)

    Algebra I (Mon, Thu) Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

    Day(s): Mon, Thu

    Open Spots: 3

    This is a complete course in high school Algebra I which will cover fundamental concepts in algebra and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. This course is designed to emphasize the study of algebraic problem-solving with the incorporation of real-world applications. Topics in Algebra I include number systems, linear systems, rational numbers, complex numbers, exponents, roots, radicals, quadratic equations, polynomials, factoring, absolute values, ratios, and proportions. In addition, the course will cover solving and graphing systems of functions, linear equations, and inequalities. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem-solving.

    Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation in pre-algebra topics in order to take this class. In addition, students should be capable of copying the sample problems and solutions worked in class on the white board to his/her own notes as examples for completing homework.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-1.5 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 7-day cycle, with assignments posted on Thursdays and due the following Thursday. Students are advised to start homework once it is assigned (i.e., not wait until the night before it is due). Weekly homework assignments will be of a length that a student should be able to complete them in two or three at-home work sessions. Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of their work.

    Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.

    Assessments: Student progress will be assessed by: (1) The instructor checking that weekly homework sets are attempted and complete and (2) detailed grading of periodic take-home tests. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. See the instructor's webpage for detailed homework and test policy, including late work and re-work.

    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Algebra I: Expressions, Equations, and Applications by Paul A. Foerster. It is available in a few different editions, each of which is virtually identical: 2nd edition (ISBN-10 020125073X, ISBN-13 978-0201250732), 3rd edition (ISBN-10 0201860945, ISBN-13 978-0201860948), and Classic edition (ISBN-10 020132458X, ISBN-13 978-0201324587). It is also available under the title Foerster Algebra I, Classics edition (ISBN-10 0131657089, ISBN-13 978-0131657083). A calculator is not needed for this course.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Algebra I for purposes of a high school transcript.

    11:00 am-11:55 am

    7th-10th

    (Year Long)

    Geometry

    Geometry Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

    Day(s): Mon, Thu

    Open Spots: 2

    This is a complete course in high school Geometry which will cover fundamental concepts and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. Students will learn deductive reasoning, and logic by completing geometric proofs. Topics in geometry include: lines, angles, congruence, concurrence, inequalities, parallel lines, quadrilaterals, transformations, area, similarity, right triangles, circles, regular polygons, and geometric solids. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem solving. Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation in Algebra I in order to take this class. Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-1.5 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 7-day cycle, with assignments posted on Thursdays and due the following Thursday. Students are advised to start homework once it is assigned (i.e., not wait until the night before it is due). Weekly homework assignments will be of a length that a student should be able to complete them in two or three at-home work sessions. Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of their work. Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload. Assessments: Student progress will be assessed by: (1) The instructor checking that weekly homework sets are attempted and complete and (2) detailed grading of periodic take-home tests. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. See the instructor's webpage for detailed homework and test policy, including late work and re-work. Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Geometry: Seeing, Doing, Understanding, 3rd edition (ISBN-10 0716743612, ISBN-13 978-0716743613) A calculator is not needed for this course. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Geometry for purposes of a high school transcript.

    1:00 pm-1:55 pm

    8th-11th

    (Year Long)

    Algebra II

    Algebra II Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

    Day(s): Mon, Thu

    Open Spots: 3

    This is a complete course in high school Algebra II which will cover fundamental concepts and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. Topics in Algebra II include linear functions, systems of equations and inequalities, quadratic functions and complex numbers, exponential and logarithmic functions, rational and irrational algebraic functions, and quadratic relations and systems. In addition, this course will cover higher degree functions with complex numbers, sequences and series, probability, data analysis, and trigonometric and circular functions. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem solving.

    Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation Algebra I in order to take this class.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-1.5 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 7-day cycle, with assignments posted on Thursdays and due the following Thursday. Students are advised to start homework once it is assigned (i.e., not wait until the night before it is due). Weekly homework assignments will be of a length that a student should be able to complete them in two or three at-home work sessions. Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of their work.

    Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.

    Assessments: Student progress will be assessed by: (1) The instructor checking that weekly homework sets are attempted and complete and (2) detailed grading of periodic take-home tests. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. See the instructor's webpage for detailed homework and test policy, including late work and re-work.

    Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Algebra and Trigonometry: Functions and Applications- Prentice Hall Classics (ISBN-10 0131657100, ISBN-13 978-0131657106). A scientific calculator similar to the Casio fx-115ES PLUS is required for this class.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Algebra II for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2:00 pm-2:55 pm

    10th-12th

    (Year Long)

    H-7

    3D Design & Printing Studio- High School (Fall)

    3D Design & Printing Studio- High School (Fall) Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1,2

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 5

    Students will learn to think like inventors and designers when creating 3D! 3D design is used not only for modeling and fabricating objects but is also at the heart of many cutting-edge technologies such as AR and VR, video game design, interactive exhibits, and more. 3D printing is used in nearly all industries and design fields today from art to animation, manufacturing to medicine, and engineering to entertainment.

    In this class, students will first learn to use Tinkercard, a 3D modeling software that works in solid forms (like LEGO bricks). Then, students will transition to MeshMixer, a software that creates smooth, curved, organic shapes (like clay). They will learn to think about their design from all angles and how to subtract forms to create holes, voids, and concave features, and add forms to create projections, contours, appendages, and convex details. They will discover the limitations of 3D printing and how to handle overhanging elements or delicate details.

    Students will practice the artistic design process with simple sketches before diving into the software. They will be encouraged to use reference material, whether photos, a model, or even by modifying existing, public domain 3D files. Students will use an iterative printing process in which they print their project, check it for design intent, functionality, or fit, make modifications, and print again. The class will learn how to save and convert between 3D solid object files (.stl) and object files (.obj) and work with metadata fields to protect the intellectual property of their designs.

    To demonstrate the range and capability of 3D-printed designs, favorite student projects include D & D miniatures, cosplay props, Minecraft-designed creations, and beloved characters such as anime, baby Yoda, and Pokemon creatures.

    Second semester, continuing students will progress to more complex assemblies including multiple parts and parts with hinges. Second semester, some students may wish to work with alternative filaments such as TPU (rubber), metal, or magnetized filament. Because of the studio format, new students can enroll second semester.

    The class instructor is a design engineer with 3D Herndon and expert in 3D technologies and other areas of design and invention. A typical class will be structured with 5-10 minutes of lecture or demonstration of a new design skill, followed by 40 minutes of design "studio" time where students can receive trouble-shooting support and design tips from the instructor and have dedicated work time, and 5-10 minutes of sharing time at the end of class. As a studio class, students will work on individual projects at their own pace.

    Topics in this Series: As an open studio for individual projects, students may continue from one semester to the next or enroll mid-year. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: None

    What to Bring:Students will need to bring a laptop to class for design work.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1+ hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Project criteria will be explained in class to students.

    Assessments: Informal, qualitative feedback will be given in class throughout the semester as the student works.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $25.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for 3D printing and filament. This provides the student with 800 g of printed product per semester. Students who are prolific designers and print often will be asked to pay an additional $5.00 per 100 g or fraction thereof.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Visual Arts, Technology, or Career Exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

    10:00 am-10:55 am

    9th-12th

    (Semester Long)

    3D Design & Printing Studio- Middle School (Fall)

    3D Design & Printing Studio- Middle School (Fall) Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1,2

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 2

    Students will learn to think like inventors and designers when creating 3D! 3D design is used not only for modeling and fabricating objects but is also at the heart of many cutting-edge technologies such as AR and VR, video game design, interactive exhibits, and more. 3D printing is used in nearly all industries and design fields today from art to animation, manufacturing to medicine, and engineering to entertainment. In this class, students will first learn to use Tinkercard, a 3D modeling software that works in solid forms (like LEGO bricks). Then, students will transition to MeshMixer, a software that creates smooth, curved, organic shapes (like clay). They will learn to think about their design from all angles and how to subtract forms to create holes, voids, and concave features, and add forms to create projections, contours, appendages, and convex details. They will discover the limitations of 3D printing and how to handle overhanging elements or delicate details. Students will practice the artistic design process with simple sketches before diving into the software. They will be encouraged to use reference material, whether photos, a model, or even by modifying existing, public domain 3D files. Students will use an iterative printing process in which they print their project, check it for design intent, functionality, or fit, make modifications, and print again. The class will learn how to save and convert between 3D solid object files (.stl) and object files (.obj) and work with metadata fields to protect the intellectual property of their designs. To demonstrate the range and capability of 3D-printed designs, favorite student projects include D & D miniatures, cosplay props, Minecraft-designed creations, and beloved characters such as anime, baby Yoda, and Pokemon creatures. Second semester, continuing students will progress to more complex assemblies including multiple parts and parts with hinges. Second semester, some students may wish to work with alternative filaments such as TPU (rubber), metal, or magnetized filament. Because of the studio format, new students can enroll second semester. The class instructor is a design engineer with 3D Herndon and expert in 3D technologies and other areas of design and invention. A typical class will be structured with 5-10 minutes of lecture or demonstration of a new design skill, followed by 40 minutes of design "studio" time where students can receive trouble-shooting support and design tips from the instructor and have dedicated work time, and 5-10 minutes of sharing time at the end of class. As a studio class, students will work on individual projects at their own pace. Topics in this Series: As an open studio for individual projects, students may continue from one semester to the next or enroll mid-year. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. Prerequisites: None What to Bring:Students will need to bring a laptop to class for design work. Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1+ hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Project criteria will be explained in class to students. Assessments: Informal, qualitative feedback will be given in class throughout the semester as the student works. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $25.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for 3D printing and filament. This provides the student with 800 g of printed product per semester. Students who are prolific designers and print often will be asked to pay an additional $5.00 per 100 g or fraction thereof. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Visual Arts, Technology, or Career Exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

    11:00 am-11:55 am

    6th-8th

    (Semester Long)

    Juntos Apprendemos: Ciencia Para Niños: Quimica (12PM)

    Juntos Apprendemos: Ciencia Para Niños: Quimica (12PM) Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 6

    Ciencia para niños es un programa de ciencia basado en teoría y técnicas de laboratorio donde nuestros científicos más jóvenes estarán expuestos a conceptos y vocabulario de ciencia, mientras aprenden las habilidades prácticas necesarias para sentirse cómodos con clases de ciencias más avanzadas a medida que crecen. Los estudiantes obtendrán distintos conocimientos acerca de las fases de la materia, moléculas, la vida microscópica, gravedad, los tipos de energía, catapultas, geología, los patrones climáticos y la vida como astronauta. Lo más importante es que ganarán confianza al discutir conceptos científicos y trabajar con equipos y material de laboratorio. Los laboratorios enseñarán a los estudiantes cómo tomar medidas, usar un microscopio, hacer bocetos científicos y pensar críticamente.

    Cada quater reforzará los principios y las habilidades de laboratorio en torno a un tema central. En ciencia para ninos: Quimica, los estudiantes aprenderán sobre ácidos y bases, fases de la materia, densidad, flotabilidad, ósmosis y reacciones químicas simples que desprenden gas o calor. Esta clase tiene una tarifa de laboratorio de $20.00 que se debe pagar al instructor el primer día. Temas: Química (quater 1), Diversión física (quarter 2), Un Mundo vivo (quarter 3) y Tierra y espacio (quarter 4).

    12:00 pm-12:55 pm

    4th-6th

    Submersible Robotics: Remote Operated Vehicle (ROV)

    Submersible Robotics: Remote Operated Vehicle (ROV)Closed

    Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 0

    How do you explore the 139 million square miles of the earth's surface that is ocean when only 25% of the seafloor has been fully mapped? From finding shipwrecks to observing marine life, exploring hydrothermal vents to performing underwater inspections, and carrying out critical search, rescue, and recovery missions, submersible robots known as ROVs, or remotely operated vehicles, are up to the task.

    In this class, students will work in pairs to build, test, redesign, and deploy a small ROV called a SeaPerch. SeaPerch is an "innovative underwater robotics" program sponsored by the Office of Naval Research, NOAA Ocean Education Cooperative Institute, and RoboNation. Working from a kit of stock components, students will first build and test-drive the base model SeaPerch while learning about topics like buoyancy, hydrodynamics, propulsion, and displacement. Teams will learn basic circuitry and how to solder electronic components, first with a light-up practice circuit board, then by assembling, soldering, and wiring the control board for their ROV.

    Once teams have assembled their SeaPerches, the class will meet at a nearby community pool for their first in-water trial. Students will test their assemblies and practice their skills of driving and maneuvering their ROV underwater. Next, it will be back to the classroom workshop to make modifications to their designs, and back to the pool for the iterative design-build-test-modify engineering process. Once teams have fully functional "stock" SeaPerches and understand how decisions such as the placement of propellers and floats affect performance, they will modify and customize their designs while adding features such as hooks or arms to perform underwater tasks. Ultimately, the SeaPerch ROVs will go through an underwater hoop obstacle course and complete challenges like gathering rings from the pool floor.

    Students will gain an understanding of challenges faced by scientists and engineers in underwater applications and will be exposed to careers in mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, marine/nautical engineering, marine sciences, oceanography, and more. In class, they will learn to use hand tools such as a ratcheting PVC cutter, wire cutter, wire stripper, soldering iron/solder, solder removal tool, clamps, screwdrivers, and more. They will also work with waterproofing, adhesives, and fasteners. Teams will be encouraged to keep an engineering design notebook with sketches, performance data, observations, and modifications. Each team will be required to prepare and submit a Technical Design Report using a template and rubric, and the teams will against other Compass teams.

    Students who wish to add enhancements to their final build such as enamel paint, more powerful motors, lights, sensors, depth gauge, or underwater camera, may purchase their own accessories at a hobby or electronics store to install in class. (Enhancements cannot exceed $25.00 to remain eligible for the SeaPerch regional competition.)

    Schedule: This is a 24-week program that will conclude on March 31, 2025 with a small competition and parent showcase.

    Note: Parents should anticipate 3-4 class sessions to be held at the nearby Reston YMCA pool and plan for transportation there (0.9 miles).

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Assignments, if any, will be communicated in class and limited to individual investigation.

    Assessments: Will not be given

    Textbook/Materials: None

    Lab/Supply Fee:

    There is a $155.00 supply fee due payable to Compass for students who are willing to work with a partner (and flip a coin who keeps the ROV). Alternatively, a student could opt to pay $235.00 for their own SeaPerch which they would build individually and keep at the end of the program.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a partial credit in technology or career exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

    12:00 pm-12:55 pm

    7th-10th

    (Year Long)

    Medical Mission: Emergency Essentials (On-Level EMR, Honors EMT)

    Medical Mission: Emergency Essentials (On-Level EMR, Honors EMT) Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1,2

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 4

    Physician. Physical Therapist. Phlebotomist. Paramedic. Did you know that the Healthcare Industry makes up more than 18% of the US economy and employs 20 million workers in the US? Chances are that several Compass teens will work in this field. This course is designed to give students an overview of the healthcare field and a foot in the door to begin work as an Emergency Medical Responder (EMR) or Emergency Medical Technician (EMT).

    First semester will cover the Emergency Essentials that every EMR/EMT must know: stopping bleeding, starting care, and stabilizing a patient. Students will learn what to do in trauma, mass casualty, or hazardous materials incidents where the victims are bleeding or have broken bones, wounds, or head injuries. Every class will include practical, hands-on skills training and labs such as using a tourniquet, applying dressings, and splinting. Throughout the course, the class will learn medical terminology and aspects of human anatomy related to Emergency Essentials. They will use critical thinking skills to reason through problems they might encounter during emergencies. Finally, they will discover how HIPPA, privacy, consent, and legal issues play in the EMR/EMT's role and how these emergency responders interface with law enforcement, hospitals, and other specialties in the community.

    EMRs/EMTs are first-on-the-scene, frontline healthcare workers. In Virginia, individuals age 16 or older who earned their license can volunteer or be hired to work on an ambulance, a private medical transport service, or as an assistant or technician in clinical settings. Work as an EMR/EMT can be a young adult's full time job, side gig through college, or help them earn clinical hours that advanced medical programs want to see.

    Topics in this Series: Emergency Essentials (Semester 1), Crisis Care (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisite: Students must have completed a workshop in CPR prior to taking this course and will be asked to provide a copy of their certification. An option is the Compass 2-day. 6-hour First Aid/CPR training on June 10 and 11. Alternatively, this Instructor can conduct an outside CPR workshop for $80.00 per student.

    Levels/Certification: Students under age 16 may enroll in this class, but they must be age 16 by October 1 in order to sit for the EMR or EMT exam in the spring of 2025. Students must take both semesters to prepare for an exam. This class will be taught at two levels concurrently: On-Level which prepares students for the EMR exam and Honors which prepares students for the EMT exam. Both levels meet together for all classes and perform the same in-class activities and labs. Those on the Honors track will have additional readings for EMT preparation.

    Students may also enroll in this class for one semester as an elective (i.e. non-exam track). They may also take the class for knowledge and experience with no obligation to take the exam.

    Students who wish to take this at the Honors level and continue the EMT track must have a class average of 80% at the end of the first semester to be approved for Honors level second semester. Students who have less than an 80% average may continue the second semester course at the on-level, or EMR, track. Students on the Honors EMT track may need additional review or test prep sessions with the instructor prior to the exam.

    Workload: On-level (EMR) students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class on reading assignments and chapter questions. Honors (EMT) students should expect to spend 5-6 hours each week outside of class on reading assignments, chapter questions, and review.

    Assignments: Students will be assigned 1-2 chapters each week to read at home each week so class time can be dedicated to the practice of hands-on skills.

    Assessments: The instructor will give short quizzes to ensure that students are keeping up with their reading, which is necessary to prepare for the exam. In addition, students will be "signed off" and approved on hands-on skills throughout the course. The National Registry Exam will be administered in May 2025.

    Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase or rent Emergency Care and Transportation of the Sick and Injured Essentials Package 12th Edition by AAOS (ISBN # 978-1284227222)

    Supplies: Students should purchase the following items and bring to class each week:

  • Lightning X Small First Responder Stocked EMT Trauma Bag (student's choice of 7 colors) on Amazon.
  • https://www.amazon.com/dp/B010G2I3PU/?coliid=I18ZZZ79D6Z0EF&colid=1BQJV62J905ZD&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it&th=1

    Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $30.00 is due payable to the instructor for consumable and in-class supplies and equipment.

    What to Bring: Students should bring their textbook, notebook/paper, pen or pencil, and medical kit to class each week.

    What to Wear: Students should wear comfortable clothing that would allow them to participate in occasional demonstrations on the floor.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Science, Health, Elective, or Career Exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

    1:00 pm-2:55 pm

    9th-12th

    (Semester Long)

    H-13

    Juntos Apprendemos: Ciencia Para Niños: Quimica (11AM)

    Juntos Apprendemos: Ciencia Para Niños: Quimica (11AM) Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 5

    Ciencia para niños es un programa de ciencia basado en teoría y técnicas de laboratorio donde nuestros científicos más jóvenes estarán expuestos a conceptos y vocabulario de ciencia, mientras aprenden las habilidades prácticas necesarias para sentirse cómodos con clases de ciencias más avanzadas a medida que crecen. Los estudiantes obtendrán distintos conocimientos acerca de las fases de la materia, moléculas, la vida microscópica, gravedad, los tipos de energía, catapultas, geología, los patrones climáticos y la vida como astronauta. Lo más importante es que ganarán confianza al discutir conceptos científicos y trabajar con equipos y material de laboratorio. Los laboratorios enseñarán a los estudiantes cómo tomar medidas, usar un microscopio, hacer bocetos científicos y pensar críticamente.

    Cada quater reforzará los principios y las habilidades de laboratorio en torno a un tema central. En ciencia para ninos: Quimica, los estudiantes aprenderán sobre ácidos y bases, fases de la materia, densidad, flotabilidad, ósmosis y reacciones químicas simples que desprenden gas o calor. Esta clase tiene una tarifa de laboratorio de $20.00 que se debe pagar al instructor el primer día. Temas: Química (quater 1), Diversión física (quarter 2), Un Mundo vivo (quarter 3) y Tierra y espacio (quarter 4).

    11:00 am-11:55 am

    1st-3rd

    4th Grade Math Mammoth- Complete Math Curriculum

    4th Grade Math Mammoth- Complete Math Curriculum Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

    Day(s): Mon, Wed

    Open Spots: 6

    4th grade math is a full-year, complete math curriculum for students who have covered the 3rd grade equivalent math skills (see prerequisites). This course uses the Grade 4 Math Mammoth curriculum which homeschool guru Cathy Duffy (cathyduffyreviews.com) calls "an amazingly well-developed program." She praises the program saying, "Math Mammoth has created a very high-quality product... the content is also top-notch. Some people have compared Math Mammoth with Singapore Math since both programs teach for mastery and understanding." Read more about Math Mammoth here: https://www.mathmammoth.com/complete-curriculum

    This class meets twice a week and is designed to be a complete program in which students receive instruction in person at Compass and complete homework on off-days at home. Parents do not have to select a curriculum or deliver the instruction, but rather are expected to ensure that assignments are being completed on time and assisting the student in checking attempted homework.

    Topics covered in Grade 4 Math Mammoth include:

    • Chapter 1: Addition, Subtraction, Patterns, and Graphs
    • Chapter 2: Large Numbers and Place Value
    • Chapter 3: Multi-Digit Multiplication
    • Chapter 4: Time and Measuring
    • Chapter 5: Division
    • Chapter 6: Geometry
    • Chapter 7: Fractions
    • Chapter 8: Decimals

    4th Grade Math is being offered at Compass as a full year class with 59 in-person class meetings. Attendance is very important. In the event of a missed class due to illness or travel, students may cover the missed lesson through online recorded lectures by the author available on YouTube.

    Prerequisites: Grade 3 Math or equivalent, with experience/familiarity in following:

    • Multiplication tables and basic division facts
    • Mental addition and subtraction
    • Regrouping in addition and subtraction (carrying and borrowing)
    • Basic word problems
    • Multiplication and related concepts
    • Clock to the minute and elapsed time calculations
    • Basic money calculations (finding totals and change)
    • Place value and rounding with four-digit numbers
    • Quadrilaterals, perimeter, and area
    • Division and related concepts (remainder, word problems)
    • Measuring lines in inches and centimeters
    • Basic usage of measuring units
    • The concept of a fraction and mixed number, equivalent fractions, and comparing fractions

    For guidance if a child is ready for Grade 4 math, parents can administer the Math Mammoth end-of-3rd-grade placement test. A score of 80% is recommended to place into Grade 4.

    Assignments: Assignments will be made in class as a range of pages to complete on the topics that were taught in class. The instructor will follow up with an email repeating the assigned pages.

    Assessments: Each class, the instructor will check that students have completed the assigned homework. Homework will be recorded as attempted or not attempted. Parents will be provided with an answer key for homework. Students will have take-home unit tests that will be graded by the instructor. Parents may track unit test scores in order to assign their own grades and complete homeschool record-keeping.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $50.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for Grade 4, color edition worktext book. Students will be issued the 4A book first semester, and the 4B book second semester.

    What to Bring: Students should bring a spiral notebook, pencil, and their worktext to class each week.

    1:00 pm-1:55 pm

    4th

    (Year Long)

    H-14

    Compass Kindergarten: Language Arts (Sem 1)

    Compass Kindergarten: Language Arts (Sem 1)Closed

    Quarter(s): 1,2

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 0

    Can your child sit in a circle for story time? Line up for lunch? Take turns talking? This one-day, 3-hour (half-day) program is a "taste" of kindergarten for 5- year-olds. Start your child's week off right with "Mornings with Miss M" at Compass Kindergarten. Children will work in a small group with an experienced early elementary educator for this dynamic, play-based program that offers regular interaction and socialization.

    This fun, activity-based program will create rhythm and routine in a homeschooled kindergartner's week and give them a sense of community and a peer group. Children will practice routines and transitions as they move through the morning. Each session will include some simple structure such as a daily arrival song/greeting, circle time, story, snack time, activity, lunch, active game, and closing/goodbyes. Through games and activities, they will also practice key childhood social skills such as sharing, taking turns, and entering play with others. Academic basics such as the ABCs, days of the week, colors, shapes, and number sense will be integrated into activities involving fairy tales, nature and art. The teacher will provide ideas for parents to work on at home with their child during the week.

    Compass Kindergarten is offered in three weekly sessions: Monday, Wednesday, or Friday. Registration is stand-alone for each day so parents can register for one, two, or all three. While each kindergarten class will give children the opportunities for learning and playing in a social environment along with classroom routines, each of the three days will focus on a particular area of study and discovery of how each is connected.

    On Mondays, the focus will be on Language Arts where students will be exposed to folktales, seasonal stories, and classic favorites while also practicing basic reading and writing skills such as sound blends, digraphs and long vowel sounds.

    Readiness Students must be age five (5) by the start of the program or have the teacher's approval for younger. To be successful in this program, entering kindergartners must be able to do the following preschool-level skills: (1) be able to separate from parents with little discomfort; (2) be able to sit and listen to a story or stay on a task for 10 minutes; (3) be able to follow simple, age-appropriate directions from the teacher or another adult; (4) be able to write and recognize his/her first name; (5) be able to hold and use crayons and scissors correctly; (6) be completely self sufficient in a public restroom (wiping, flushing, washing hands, etc.)

    Other Notes:

    • Children should bring a bagged lunch and water bottle to each session.
    • There is a $50.00 material fee for class consumables due payable to the teacher on the first day of class.
    • Parents can choose to drop children off for this program (different than Compass's school-year policies for 55 minute classes.)
    • Registration for this program is by 13-week semester.
    • Parents who are shopping around or applying to alternate kindergarten programs should review the Compass withdrawal policy.

    10:00 am-12:55 pm

    K

    (Semester Long)

    H-16

    Concert Band Sectional: Percussion Beginner 1

    Concert Band Sectional: Percussion Beginner 1 Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1,2

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 5

    This program has two in-person meetings each Monday: a 45-minute instrument family sectional at 10:00 am and a 55-minute all-instrument group practice session from 1:00 pm- 1:55 pm. Band students must take both sectional and group together. Registration for a sectional will automatically enroll the student in the group session.

    Enjoy the camaraderie and cooperation of making music with others in a school band! Join the first homeschool concert band in the region at Compass. This band is for beginner and advanced beginner musicians of brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments.

    Students in beginner percussion will learn to play the snare drum and mallet instruments (such as glockenspiel and xylophone). They will learn proper stick and mallet grip, posture, and playing position for concert percussion instrumentals. Students will learn the fundamentals of music reading. The group will practice short songs in Concert B-flat and Concert E-flat major (and their relative minors) on mallet instruments and basic rudiments on snare drum. Students will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing percussion instruments and will play both cooperatively in small ensembles and independently.

    Students in beginner woodwinds will learn to play the flute or clarinet (4th-8th grade) or alto saxophone (7th-8th grade only). They will learn how to hold their instruments with proper posture and hand position and correct embouchure (mouth position and blowing technique) for the instrument. Students will receive instruction on the parts of their instruments and how to safely, correctly, and independently assemble and clean them. Students will learn the fundamentals of music reading, and the group will practice short songs in Concert B-flat and Concert E-flat major (and their relative minors). Students will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing woodwind instruments and will play both cooperatively in small ensembles and independently.

    Students in beginner brass will learn to play the trumpet, trombone, or euphonium (4th-8th grade) and French horn or tuba (7th-8th grade students only). They will learn how to hold their instruments with proper posture and hand position and correct embouchure (mouth position and blowing technique) for the instrument. Students will receive instruction on the parts of their instruments and how to safely, correctly, and independently assemble and clean them. Students will learn the fundamentals of music reading, and the group will practice short songs in Concert B-flat and Concert E-flat major (and their relative minors). Students will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing woodwind instruments and will play both cooperatively in small ensembles and independently.

    Students will need to rent or purchase an instrument and accessories for the band. See the linked list by instrument.

    There is a $33.00 supply fee due payable to Compass on/before the start of class for the "Do It! Play (a Band Instrument)" book and workbook and the sheet music songs used for the group band performance.>

    10:00 am-10:45 am

    4th-8th

    (Semester Long)

    Concert Band Sectional: Woodwind Beginner 1

    Concert Band Sectional: Woodwind Beginner 1 Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1,2

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 3

    This program has two in-person meetings each Monday: a 45-minute instrument family sectional at 10:50 am and a 55-minute all-instrument group practice session from 1:00 pm- 1:55 pm. Band students must take both sectional and group together. Registration for a sectional will automatically enroll the student in the group session.

    Enjoy the camaraderie and cooperation of making music with others in a school band! Join the first homeschool concert band in the region at Compass. This band is for beginner and advanced beginner musicians of brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments.

    Students in beginner percussion will learn to play the snare drum and mallet instruments (such as glockenspiel and xylophone). They will learn proper stick and mallet grip, posture, and playing position for concert percussion instrumentals. Students will learn the fundamentals of music reading. The group will practice short songs in Concert B-flat and Concert E-flat major (and their relative minors) on mallet instruments and basic rudiments on snare drum. Students will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing percussion instruments and will play both cooperatively in small ensembles and independently.

    Students in beginner woodwinds will learn to play the flute or clarinet (4th-8th grade) or alto saxophone (7th-8th grade only). They will learn how to hold their instruments with proper posture and hand position and correct embouchure (mouth position and blowing technique) for the instrument. Students will receive instruction on the parts of their instruments and how to safely, correctly, and independently assemble and clean them. Students will learn the fundamentals of music reading, and the group will practice short songs in Concert B-flat and Concert E-flat major (and their relative minors). Students will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing woodwind instruments and will play both cooperatively in small ensembles and independently.

    Students in beginner brass will learn to play the trumpet, trombone, or euphonium (4th-8th grade) and French horn or tuba (7th-8th grade students only). They will learn how to hold their instruments with proper posture and hand position and correct embouchure (mouth position and blowing technique) for the instrument. Students will receive instruction on the parts of their instruments and how to safely, correctly, and independently assemble and clean them. Students will learn the fundamentals of music reading, and the group will practice short songs in Concert B-flat and Concert E-flat major (and their relative minors). Students will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing woodwind instruments and will play both cooperatively in small ensembles and independently.

    Students will need to rent or purchase an instrument and accessories for the band. See the linked list by instrument.

    There is a $33.00 supply fee due payable to Compass on/before the start of class for the "Do It! Play (a Band Instrument)" book and workbook and the sheet music songs used for the group band performance.>

    10:50 am-11:35 am

    4th-8th

    (Semester Long)

    Concert Band Sectional: Brass Beginner 1

    Concert Band Sectional: Brass Beginner 1 Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1,2

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 2

    This program has two in-person meetings each Monday: a 45-minute instrument family sectional at 11:40 am and a 55-minute all-instrument group practice session from 1:00 pm- 1:55 pm. Band students must take both sectional and group together. Registration for a sectional will automatically enroll the student in the group session.

    Enjoy the camaraderie and cooperation of making music with others in a school band! Join the first homeschool concert band in the region at Compass. This band is for beginner and advanced beginner musicians of brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments.

    Students in beginner percussion will learn to play the snare drum and mallet instruments (such as glockenspiel and xylophone). They will learn proper stick and mallet grip, posture, and playing position for concert percussion instrumentals. Students will learn the fundamentals of music reading. The group will practice short songs in Concert B-flat and Concert E-flat major (and their relative minors) on mallet instruments and basic rudiments on snare drum. Students will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing percussion instruments and will play both cooperatively in small ensembles and independently.

    Students in beginner woodwinds will learn to play the flute or clarinet (4th-8th grade) or alto saxophone (7th-8th grade only). They will learn how to hold their instruments with proper posture and hand position and correct embouchure (mouth position and blowing technique) for the instrument. Students will receive instruction on the parts of their instruments and how to safely, correctly, and independently assemble and clean them. Students will learn the fundamentals of music reading, and the group will practice short songs in Concert B-flat and Concert E-flat major (and their relative minors). Students will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing woodwind instruments and will play both cooperatively in small ensembles and independently.

    Students in beginner brass will learn to play the trumpet, trombone, or euphonium (4th-8th grade) and French horn or tuba (7th-8th grade students only). They will learn how to hold their instruments with proper posture and hand position and correct embouchure (mouth position and blowing technique) for the instrument. Students will receive instruction on the parts of their instruments and how to safely, correctly, and independently assemble and clean them. Students will learn the fundamentals of music reading, and the group will practice short songs in Concert B-flat and Concert E-flat major (and their relative minors). Students will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing woodwind instruments and will play both cooperatively in small ensembles and independently.

    Students will need to rent or purchase an instrument and accessories for the band. See the linked list by instrument.

    There is a $33.00 supply fee due payable to Compass on/before the start of class for the "Do It! Play (a Band Instrument)" book and workbook t and the sheet music songs used for the group band performance.>

    11:40 am-12:25 pm

    4th-8th

    (Semester Long)

    Juntos Aprendemos: Español Para Pequeños

    Juntos Aprendemos: Español Para Pequeños Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 4

    ¡Hola! Español para pequeños es una clase divertida de inmersión en español basada en juegos para niños pequeños. Siguiendo el proceso de aprendizaje del idioma materno, los niños estarán expuestos a los sonidos, las letras y las palabras de alta frecuencia en español a través de canciones, juegos, cuentos, títulos y otras actividades interactivas. La maestra proporcionará todos los juguetes y objetos necesarios para brindarles a los niños formas tangibles y activas de aplicar nuevos conceptos en situaciones prácticas de la vida diaria. El instructor utiliza algunas actividades del estilo Montessori que crean un entorno lúdico y lleno de energía, que atrae a los alumnos tanto táctiles como cenestesicos y al mismo tiempo apela a las curiosidades naturales de los niños. El vocabulario y las estructuras del lenguaje presentadas en cada sesión introducen una nueva letra del alfabeto cada semana que incluye saludos, frases sencillas, comidas, colores, números, animales, ropa, verbos activos, frases del calendario y temas de temporada. El vocabulario será repetido y revisado con frecuencia para ayudar a retener el idioma y, principalmente, desarrollara habilidades para escuchar y hablar. El objetivo de este curso introductorio es crear las bases para la fonetica y las palabras de vocabulario esencial mientras se divierte y desarrolla confianza en un idioma extranjero. Quien sabe, ¡tal vez su hijo regresa a casa cantando su nueva canción infantil favorita en español! Una nota: Esta clase es para estudiantes cuyas familias hablan español en el hogar. Los estudiantes deben tener una edad mínima de 5 años para inscribirse en esta clase. Toda la instrucción será verbal en esta clase. No se espera lectura, escritura o ortografía. Esta clase servirá para apoyar a los padres que buscan mantener o aumentar la fluidez en español de sus hijos.

    1:00 pm-1:55 pm

    K-2nd

    H-20

    Design & Construction: Building Basics

    Design & Construction: Building Basics Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1,2

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 5

    From stunning stadiums and ostentatious offices to soaring skyscrapers and massive malls, public projects and humble homes, not a day goes by that you do not interact with the work of architects and builders! You may think of hardhats and shovels when you envision construction, but did you know that behind the scenes, there is a vast team of professionals who design, engineer, finance, manage, staff, schedule, estimate, insure, inspect, furnish, and build these structures in a thriving $1.1 trillion industry? Design and construction of buildings represents a dynamic, fast-paced field to consider a career in. First semester, students will learn about the comprehensive process from concept design to completion of construction for buildings. Students will try their hand at basic drafting and will examine simple blueprints to understand the 2D representation of building elements. Teams will build structures out of simple materials to test the strength of different shapes. Materials matter. The class will explore and experiment with the literal building blocks that define structures. From concrete and steel to aluminum and glass, each material has its unique properties and potentialities. Students will examine how material choices impact durability, aesthetics, cost, and environmental sustainability. The class will be challenged to think about all the components that go into buildings and will complete in-class labs and activities to test and evaluate construction materials. As examples, they will mix and test a small batch of concrete and consider the effect on strength of embedding reinforcing steel. Students will complete a lumber lab to understand dimensions and strength, and they will experiment with soil types such as stone, sand, and clay to demonstrate how these conditions dictate the design of foundations. The class will look at elements of the building envelope, finishes, and MEP (mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems) to understand these fundamental building systems. This course is designed to inspire tomorrow's designers and builders and create an awareness and interest in the design and construction industry. Students will gain insights into the project management, collaboration, and problem-solving critical in these fields. This class will overview trends, innovations, and sustainability practices and will meet the team of stakeholders including owners, municipalities, architects, engineers, construction managers, trade contractors, and many others. Topics in this Series: Building Basics (Semester 1) and Foundations to Finish (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class on assignments. Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, download articles, upload homework, track points earned, and message instructor and classmates. Assessments: Will not be given. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: Notebook or paper, pen or pencil. Non-Meeting Days: This is a 10-week course that begins on September 30. There is no class meeting on 9/9/24, 9/16/24, or 9/23/24. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Career Exploration or an Elective for purposes of a high school transcript.

    10:00 am-11:55 am

    9th-12th

    (Semester Long)

    5th Grade Math Mammoth- Complete Math Curriculum

    5th Grade Math Mammoth- Complete Math Curriculum Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

    Day(s): Mon, Wed

    Open Spots: 5

    5th grade math is a full-year, complete math curriculum for students who have covered the 4th grade equivalent math skills (see prerequisites). This course uses the Grade 5 Math Mammoth curriculum which homeschool guru Cathy Duffy (cathyduffyreviews.com) calls "an amazingly well-developed program." She praises the program saying, "Math Mammoth has created a very high-quality product... the content is also top-notch. Some people have compared Math Mammoth with Singapore Math since both programs teach for mastery and understanding." Read more about Math Mammoth here: https://www.mathmammoth.com/complete-curriculum

    This class meets twice a week and is designed to be a complete program in which students receive instruction in person at Compass and complete homework on off-days at home. Parents do not have to select a curriculum or deliver the instruction, but rather are expected to ensure that assignments are being completed on time and assisting the student in checking attempted homework.

    Topics covered in Grade 5 Math Mammoth include:

    • Chapter 1: The Four Operations
    • Chapter 2: Large Numbers and the Calculator
    • Chapter 3: Problem Solving
    • Chapter 4: Decimals, Part 1
    • Chapter 5: Graphing
    • Chapter 6: Decimals, Part 2
    • Chapter 7: Fractions: Add and Subtract
    • Chapter 8: Fractions: Multiply and Divide
    • Chapter 9: Geometry

    4th Grade Math is being offered at Compass as a full year class with 59 in-person class meetings. Attendance is very important. In the event of a missed class due to illness or travel, students may cover the missed lesson through online recorded lectures by the author available on YouTube.

    Prerequisites: Grade 4 Math or equivalent, with experience/familiarity in following:

    • Addition and subtraction
    • Early algebraic thinking
    • The order of operations
    • Graphs
    • Large numbers and place value
    • Rounding and estimating
    • Multi-digit multiplication
    • Word problems
    • Some basic conversions between measuring units
    • Measuring length
    • Time calculations
    • Long division
    • The concept of remainder
    • Factors
    • Area and perimeter
    • Measuring and drawing angles
    • Classifying triangles according to their angles
    • Adding and subtracting fractions and mixed numbers (like fractional parts)
    • Equivalent fractions
    • Comparing fractions
    • Multiplying fractions by whole numbers
    • The concept of a decimal (tenths/hundredths)
    • Comparing decimals

    For guidance if a child is ready for Grade 5 math, parents can administer the Math Mammoth end-of-4th-grade placement test. A score of 80% is recommended to place into Grade 5.

    Assignments: Assignments will be made in class as a range of pages to complete on the topics that were taught in class. The instructor will follow up with an email repeating the assigned pages.

    Assessments: Each class, the instructor will check that students have completed the assigned homework. Homework will be recorded as attempted or not attempted. Parents will be provided with an answer key for homework. Students will have take-home unit tests that will be graded by the instructor. Parents may track unit test scores in order to assign their own grades and complete homeschool record-keeping.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $52.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for Grade 5, color edition worktext books. Students will be issued the 5A book first semester, and the 5B book second semester.

    What to Bring: Students should bring a spiral notebook, pencil, and their worktext to class each week.

    12:00 pm-12:55 pm

    5th

    (Year Long)

    Intro to Interior Design: Fundamentals

    Intro to Interior Design: Fundamentals Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1,2

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 6

    Discover the captivating world of Interior Design, where creativity meets functionality in the art of shaping spaces! This class will delve into the realms of color, texture, and form to transform ordinary rooms into extraordinary expressions of style and comfort. The class will discover how Interior Designers (also known as Interior Architects) are responsible for embracing the power of design to evoke emotions and enhance everyday living while blending personality, purpose, and practicality to create inviting and inspired spaces where people want to work, rest, dine, play, learn, vacation, and live!

    First semester, students will explore the fundamentals of interior design to understand how the field is so much more than interior decorating! They will consider how interior design affects their world through an investigation of theory and hands-on practice leading to a semester project of designing a dream room! The class will review the principles and elements of design such as form, shape, and balance with respect to configuring a room. Students will learn about scale and proportion, i.e. the relative size of forms, such as rooms and furniture, in relation to each other. The group will explore the basics of color theory and various finishes.

    Students will also be introduced to digital tools used in interior design. They will take a field trip to the Marymount University interior architecture resource library. Throughout the semester, they will be exposed to career paths in interior design and will meet some industry guest speakers. They will also look at case studies and sample design projects and challenges from the instructor’s long career in interior design and project management.

    Each week, students will be working in sketchbooks and learning how to do basic hand sketches, colored renderings, and simple drafting of floor plans, furniture plans, and elevations. Student designers will collect inspiration photos, colored drawings, product information, and finish and fabric samples that will be presented on a design board of their dream room. A student’s sketchbook and/or design boards could be used as elements of a design portfolio that would be submitted for a college program in art, design, or architecture.

    Topics in this Series: Fundamentals (Semester 1) and Essentials (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Will be communicated weekly to students in class and on a class communication platform.

    Assessments: The instructor will track points for the student’s semester effort, and parents can use points earned to assign a grade: Participation (20 points), Sketchbook (30 points), Semester Project (40 points), Presentation of Project (10 points).

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $75.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for a class kit consisting of: sketchbook, graph paper, tracing paper, drafting kit, pencils, colored pencils, 30- and 45- degree triangles.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component partial credit in fine arts/ career exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

    1:00 pm-2:55 pm

    9th-12th

    (Semester Long)

    H-22

    Juntos Aprendemos: Arte Para Pequeños (Q1)

    Juntos Aprendemos: Arte Para Pequeños (Q1) Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 6

    Los artistas principiantes pueden participar en la acción mientras aprenden sobre un artista o estilo artístico diferente cada semana y crean una pieza representativa utilizando una amplia gama de materiales artísticos como lápices de colores, pintura acrilica, crayones pastel y papeles especiales.

    En esta clase de expresión artística, los estudiantes desarrollaran los estilos de dos artistas de renombre Latinoaméricano. Por ejemplo, estudiaremos las pinturas y técnicas de Xul Solar - Argentina y Fernando Botero - Colombia. También estudiaremos las carreras artísticas de Xul y Botero incluyendo sus comienzos, estilos y sus obras mas famosas.

    De esta manera, los estudiantes aplicaran distintas técnicas y procedimientos en la pintura. Como también despertaran, impulsaran y dinamizaran la imaginación y la creatividad.

    Hay una tarifa de $15.00 por cada estudiante. Páguele esto al maestro por los materiales de arte.

    10:00 am-10:55 am

    1st-3rd

    Juntos Aprendemos: Arte Para Niños (Q1)

    Juntos Aprendemos: Arte Para Niños (Q1) Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 6

    Los artistas principiantes pueden participar en la acción mientras aprenden sobre un artista o estilo artístico diferente cada semana y crean una pieza representativa utilizando una amplia gama de materiales artísticos como lápices de colores, pintura acrilica, crayones pastel y papeles especiales.

    En esta clase de expresión artística, los estudiantes desarrollaran los estilos de dos artistas de renombre Latinoaméricano. Por ejemplo, estudiaremos las pinturas y técnicas de Xul Solar - Argentina y Fernando Botero - Colombia. También estudiaremos las carreras artísticas de Xul y Botero incluyendo sus comienzos, estilos y sus obras mas famosas.

    De esta manera, los estudiantes aplicaran distintas técnicas y procedimientos en la pintura. Como también despertaran, impulsaran y dinamizaran la imaginación y la creatividad.

    Hay una tarifa de $15.00 por cada estudiante. Páguele esto al maestro por los materiales de arte.

    11:00 am-11:55 am

    4th-6th

    Juntos Aprendemos: Escritura y Lectura Para Pequeños (Q1)

    Juntos Aprendemos: Escritura y Lectura Para Pequeños (Q1) Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 6

    Escribir es una habilidad fundamental para la escuela y para la vida en general. Escribir les da voz a los niños!. En esta clase los estudiantes explorarán la escritura de diferentes maneras. Aprenderán los conceptos básicos de una buena redacción y el arte de la revisión. Las clases consistirán en lecciones sencillas sobre escritura y lectura, así como también la práctica de las mismas en clase. Siempre se alentará a los estudiantes a escribir sobre lo que mas les interesa. También se les darán pautas de escritura creativas y divertidas. Trabajaremos de manera que nadie sienta el pánico o la presión de "qué escribir".

    En la primera sesión, los estudiantes escribirán sobre experiencias y recuerdos personales. Este es uno de los temas más fáciles para que los niños empiecen a escribir, ya que normalmente tienen muchas historias que contar. Aprenderán a organizar sus recuerdos de una manera lógica de lo que pasó primero, segundo, último, etc.

    El objetivo de este curso es ayudar a los jóvenes estudiantes a tener mas confianza en la escritura del idioma, aumentar la fluidez de la escritura e incorporar la misma en el trabajo y los juegos cotidianos. Cada semana, el instructor enseñara lecciones breves sobre gramática, ejemplos: tiempos verbales, partes de la oración, uso de adjetivos/ y adverbios, etc. Los estudiantes también aprenderán el proceso de escribir, como ser: preescritura, redacción y revisión.

    12:00 pm-12:55 pm

    1st-3rd

    Juntos Aprendemos: Escritura y Lectura Para Niños (Q1)

    Juntos Aprendemos: Escritura y Lectura Para Niños (Q1) Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 5

    Escribir es una habilidad fundamental para la escuela y para la vida en general. Escribir les da voz a los niños!. En esta clase los estudiantes explorarán la escritura de diferentes maneras. Aprenderán los conceptos básicos de una buena redacción y el arte de la revisión. Las clases consistirán en lecciones sencillas sobre escritura y lectura, así como también la práctica de las mismas en clase. Siempre se alentará a los estudiantes a escribir sobre lo que mas les interesa. También se les darán pautas de escritura creativas y divertidas. Trabajaremos de manera que nadie sienta el pánico o la presión de "qué escribir".

    En la primera sesión, los estudiantes escribirán sobre experiencias y recuerdos personales. Este es uno de los temas más fáciles para que los niños empiecen a escribir, ya que normalmente tienen muchas historias que contar. Aprenderán a organizar sus recuerdos de una manera lógica de lo que pasó primero, segundo, último, etc.

    El objetivo de este curso es ayudar a los jóvenes estudiantes a tener mas confianza en la escritura del idioma, aumentar la fluidez de la escritura e incorporar la misma en el trabajo y los juegos cotidianos. Cada semana, el instructor enseñara lecciones breves sobre gramática, ejemplos: tiempos verbales, partes de la oración, uso de adjetivos/ y adverbios, etc. Los estudiantes también aprenderán el proceso de escribir, como ser: preescritura, redacción y revisión.

    1:00 pm-1:55 pm

    4th-6th

    AP Literature and Composition (World Literature)

    AP Literature and Composition (World Literature) Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

    Day(s): Mon,Wed

    Open Spots: 3

    This is a full-credit high school English course taught at the AP level to prepare students for college level reading, analysis, and academic writing. The course features selections from World Literature and will prepare students for the AP Literature and Composition examination. The course will broaden a student's critical reading and textual analysis skills by challenging them to think and write more comprehensively about World Literature.

    In this course, students will read and respond in writing to fiction works, non-fiction texts, and poetry. The analytical method will focus on both rhetorical context (subject, purpose and audience) and the six "Big Ideas" of the AP course include: Character, Setting, Structure, Narration, Figurative, Language, and Literary Argumentation. Other objectives from the AP curriculum include reading a text closely and drawing conclusions from details; identifying the techniques used by an author and their effects; developing an interpretation of a text; making an argument for it in writing; and supporting that argument with compelling textural evidence.

    Literature: Featured literature will include: Antigone by Sophocles (441- Greece); Othello by William Shakespeare (1603- England); Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte (1847- England); The Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad (1899-Poland); The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka (1915-Germany); Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe (1958- Nigeria); and The Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro (1989- Japan). Remains of the Day is summer reading.

    Composition: An essential component of this course will analytical writing. Students in this class should have mastered the basics of academic writing, such as constructing a thesis statement that makes an argument and organizing their thoughts through effective topic sentences and transition statements. This class will deepen students' textual analysis skills with a focus on developing rhetorical analysis, the study of how a text makes meaning. Over the course of the year, students will develop familiarity with a variety of writing styles and forms including rhetorical analysis, literary analysis, critical response, and close reading.

    Prerequisites: Students taking this class should have taken American Literature at Compass or received permission of the Instructor to enroll at the AP level. Students are expected to take an active role in discussion and complete all writing assignments.

    Schedule/Format: There are two weekly meetings: (1) Mondays from 2:00 pm-2:55 pm online in a synchronous virtual classroom and (2) Wednesdays from 2:00 pm- 2:55 pm in person. A physical meeting room will be designated for on-campus students who have classes immediately before or after the virtual session.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 4-6 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: All assignments will be posted in a Google Classroom management site. Students will need their own gmail accounts to access Google Classroom.

    Assessments: Students' written assignments will be evaluated using a rubric and assigned points that the homeschool parent can use when assigning an overall class grade.

    About AP: "AP" is a trademark of the College Board, which owns and designs the course outline and "audits" (i.e. approves) high school instructors who employ their expertise and creativity to deliver the college freshman-level content. The College Board's complete AP Literature and Composition program can be read HERE, and the instructor AP Course Audit Approval form can be viewed HERE.

    https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/media/pdf/ap-english-literature-and-composition-course-and-exam-description.pdf

    AP Fees: The fee for the College Board's AP Literature and Composition exam in May 2025 is not included. Each family is responsible for scheduling and paying for their student's AP exam.

    Textbook/Materials: Because students will need clean, inexpensive copies of each novel to mark in, and they must be able to refer to the passages on the same page numbers, copies of mass market paperbacks will be pre-purchased and bundled for students. (See Supply Fee below).

    Supply Fee: A class fee of $64.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for the class bundle of novels.

    What to Bring: Students should bring the current literature, paper, pen or pencil and highlighter to class each week. Some students may wish to bring paper clips, adhesive flags or post-it notes for marking passages/pages.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2:00 pm-2:55 pm

    11th-12th

    (Year Long)

    C-23

    Private Music Lesson (J Hall)- 25 min (10:00 AM MON Q1)

    Private Music Lesson (J Hall)- 25 min (10:00 AM MON Q1) Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 1

    6 weeks X 25-minute Private Music Lesson weeks for new or returning, beginner or advanced students with Jessica Hall in:


  • Piano;
  • Voice;
  • Ukuele
  • Song/Theory Books/Sheet Music: Instructor will provide an Amazon link for parent to order the recommended music book(s).


    Cancellation/Rescheduling: In the event of a change in your schedule, Compass requires 24 hours notice to reschedule the private lessons. Every effort will be made to reschedule the session at a time that is mutually agreeable to the teacher, the student/client, and Compass. In the event of a no-show or change/cancellation occurring less than 24 hours before the scheduled instruction session, pre-paid fees will be forfeited and no refund will be offered.

    10:00 am-10:25 am

    K-12th

    Private Music Lesson (J Hall)- 25 min (10:30 AM MON Q1)

    Private Music Lesson (J Hall)- 25 min (10:30 AM MON Q1) Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 1

    6 weeks X 25-minute Private Music Lesson weeks for new or returning, beginner or advanced students with Jessica Hall in:


  • Piano;
  • Voice;
  • Ukuele
  • Song/Theory Books/Sheet Music: Instructor will provide an Amazon link for parent to order the recommended music book(s).


    Cancellation/Rescheduling: In the event of a change in your schedule, Compass requires 24 hours notice to reschedule the private lessons. Every effort will be made to reschedule the session at a time that is mutually agreeable to the teacher, the student/client, and Compass. In the event of a no-show or change/cancellation occurring less than 24 hours before the scheduled instruction session, pre-paid fees will be forfeited and no refund will be offered.

    10:30 am-10:55 am

    K-12th

    Private Music Lesson (J Hall)- 25 min (11:00 AM MON Q1)

    Private Music Lesson (J Hall)- 25 min (11:00 AM MON Q1) Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 1

    6 weeks X 25-minute Private Music Lesson weeks for new or returning, beginner or advanced students with Jessica Hall in:


  • Piano;
  • Voice;
  • Ukuele
  • Song/Theory Books/Sheet Music: Instructor will provide an Amazon link for parent to order the recommended music book(s).


    Cancellation/Rescheduling: In the event of a change in your schedule, Compass requires 24 hours notice to reschedule the private lessons. Every effort will be made to reschedule the session at a time that is mutually agreeable to the teacher, the student/client, and Compass. In the event of a no-show or change/cancellation occurring less than 24 hours before the scheduled instruction session, pre-paid fees will be forfeited and no refund will be offered.

    11:00 am-11:25 am

    K-12th

    Private Music Lesson (J Hall)- 25 min (11:30 AM MON Q1)

    Private Music Lesson (J Hall)- 25 min (11:30 AM MON Q1) Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 1

    6 weeks X 25-minute Private Music Lesson weeks for new or returning, beginner or advanced students with Jessica Hall in:


  • Piano;
  • Voice;
  • Ukuele
  • Song/Theory Books/Sheet Music: Instructor will provide an Amazon link for parent to order the recommended music book(s).


    Cancellation/Rescheduling: In the event of a change in your schedule, Compass requires 24 hours notice to reschedule the private lessons. Every effort will be made to reschedule the session at a time that is mutually agreeable to the teacher, the student/client, and Compass. In the event of a no-show or change/cancellation occurring less than 24 hours before the scheduled instruction session, pre-paid fees will be forfeited and no refund will be offered.

    11:30 am-11:55 am

    K-12th

    Private Music Lesson (J Hall)- 25 min (12:00 PM MON Q1)

    Private Music Lesson (J Hall)- 25 min (12:00 PM MON Q1) Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 1

    6 weeks X 25-minute Private Music Lesson weeks for new or returning, beginner or advanced students with Jessica Hall in:


  • Piano;
  • Voice;
  • Ukuele
  • Song/Theory Books/Sheet Music: Instructor will provide an Amazon link for parent to order the recommended music book(s).


    Cancellation/Rescheduling: In the event of a change in your schedule, Compass requires 24 hours notice to reschedule the private lessons. Every effort will be made to reschedule the session at a time that is mutually agreeable to the teacher, the student/client, and Compass. In the event of a no-show or change/cancellation occurring less than 24 hours before the scheduled instruction session, pre-paid fees will be forfeited and no refund will be offered.

    12:00 pm-12:25 pm

    K-12th

    Private Music Lesson (J Hall)- 25 min (12:30 PM MON Q1)

    Private Music Lesson (J Hall)- 25 min (12:30 PM MON Q1) Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 1

    6 weeks X 25-minute Private Music Lesson weeks for new or returning, beginner or advanced students with Jessica Hall in:


  • Piano;
  • Voice;
  • Ukuele
  • Song/Theory Books/Sheet Music: Instructor will provide an Amazon link for parent to order the recommended music book(s).


    Cancellation/Rescheduling: In the event of a change in your schedule, Compass requires 24 hours notice to reschedule the private lessons. Every effort will be made to reschedule the session at a time that is mutually agreeable to the teacher, the student/client, and Compass. In the event of a no-show or change/cancellation occurring less than 24 hours before the scheduled instruction session, pre-paid fees will be forfeited and no refund will be offered.

    12:30 pm-12:55 pm

    K-12th

    C-24

    LEGO Robotics Training Team (S1)

    LEGO Robotics Training Team (S1) Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1,2

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 3

    LEGO Robotics Training Team is a semester-long "boot camp" and training ground for future FIRST LEGO League (FLL) competitors. The Training Team allows Compass students to work through a complete FLL challenge to ensure that they understand the project and enjoy the process before joining a competition team. Training Team students are sub-divided into smaller teams that compete against each other in building and coding challenges at a more relaxed pace than FLL competition teams which may require 6-10+ hours per week.



    Compass Training Team members will complete a full FLL challenge from a previous year. They will learn 21st century skills in robotics and programming while enjoying the camaraderie of working as a team to solve challenges. Kids will gain confidence and build skills in leadership and communication. The Training Team members will compete in-house against each other, but will not participate in a regional competition in 2024-25.



    FIRST LEGO League (FLL) is an accessible, guided, beginners' robotics program that encourages teamwork, discovery, innovation, and problem-solving. The FLL competition is comprised of three components: the Robot Game, an Innovation Project, and Core Values. The Robot Game is an annual theme-based challenge that encourages kids to think of technology solutions to real-world problems. Teams design and program an autonomous robot that scores points on a themed table-top playing field. Past challenges have been inspired by environment, transportation, accessibility, and exploration. FLL team members engage in brainstorming, research, design, and coding while practicing the engineering design process of building, testing, re-building, re-testing, etc. Students will work with LEGO Mindstorms EV3 robotics components and use drag-and-drop coding blocks to program their robots on laptop computers. No robotics or programming experience is necessary to join the Training Team, but it is beneficial if students have experience building with LEGO Technics components (beams, gears, and axel pins rather than bricks with studs).



    FLL members have fun with friends, encourage and support each other, and learn the art of gracious competition. In addition to the robot challenge, FLL team members compete in short, on-the-spot challenge problems in the Innovation Project phase of the competitions. FLL is also known for its philosophies of "professionalism" and "cooperation" which are expressed in the organization's Core Values of discovery, innovation, impact, inclusion, teamwork, and fun. Teams are also judged on how well they promote and exhibit these core values.


    10:00 am-11:55 am

    4th-6th

    (Semester Long)

    Robotics Challenge Lab (Sem1)

    Robotics Challenge Lab (Sem1) Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1,2

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 4

    Students will explore the science and technology of robotics in an open workshop environment. They will work in pairs by experience level and interests to plan, conceptualize, build, program, and test a robot of their own design. Student partners will set their own design and performance criteria for their robot. Will it be one that plays a game, gathers data, or completes a mission using custom code that the team has written and tested? This laboratory is open to beginners as well as returning students with prior experience.

    The class will focus on construction and programming, with the goal of having functional robots by the end of the semester. There will be an emphasis on the engineering-design process with repeated build-test-redesign iterations until the robot performs as expected. Student pairs will be encouraged to think creatively and apply problem-solving skills to find unique solutions to their scenario. Groups will move at their own pace, and completed robots may have different levels of complexity depending on the experience of the team.

    An experienced electrical engineer who was a robotics competitor and coach will serve as a mentor and facilitator during the lab. He will not teach formal lessons but will instead circulate among the partner teams to trouble-shoot and offer advice on hardware and software issues, spending more time with newer builders and programmers. Students will enjoy the collaboration and camaraderie that comes from watching the successes, missteps, and eventual solutions of other teams. They will build with Tetrix Prime metal robotics components, incorporate sensors [such as, ultrasonic distance, infrared (IR) proximity, mini-LIDAR (laser radar), touch, line-following, color- sensing, or sound sensors], electronics, and motors from Tetrix Prizm, and code using the Arduino IDE. Students do not get to keep finished projects.

    Note: Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisite:Prior experience with robotics and coding are not required.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Assignments, if any, will be communicated in class and limited to individual investigation.

    Assessments: Will not be given

    Textbook/Materials: None

    Lab/Supply Fee:

    None.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a partial credit in technology or career exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

    1:00 pm-2:55 pm

    8th-12th

    (Semester Long)

    C-25

    Juntos Aprendemos: Educacion Fisica (Rojo)

    Juntos Aprendemos: Educacion Fisica (Rojo) Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 6

    FUNctional Fitness es un programa dinámico de educación física para
    niños que incorpora ejercicios completos para que los niños se levanten y se muevan al mediodía. No hay dos entrenamientos iguales, pero las actividades de cada día incorporan ejercicios dirigidos a 10 áreas: resistencia cardiovascular, resistencia, fuerza, flexibilidad, potencia, velocidad, coordinación, agilidad, equilibrio y precisión. FUNctional Fitness se centra en movimientos funcionales que son fundamentales para todos los aspectos del juego y el ejercicio: tirar, empujar, correr, lanzar, trepar, levantar y saltar. Los entrenamientos son escalables y adaptables al nivel de cada individuo, y el énfasis está en la diversión, la seguridad y la realización personal en lugar de la competencia entre compañeros de clase. Cuando el tiempo lo permita, se podrán realizar algunos ejercicios al aire libre. Los desafíos físicos de FUNctional Fitness fomentarán la confianza en uno mismo, la concentración y ayudarán a sentar las bases para una vida de fitness.

    El nombre del color en el título de la clase se refiere a la ficha coleccionable que los estudiantes ganarán cada trimestre que tomen la clase. ¡Colecciona los 8! Los estudiantes pueden inscribirse en FUNctional Fitness en cualquier momento, independientemente del nombre del color. Ningún color es un requisito previo para ningún otro color y las fichas se pueden ganar en cualquier orden.

    Todo el equipamiento está amueblado. Se pide a los estudiantes que usen ropa holgada y cómoda, como pantalones para correr o pantalones deportivos, y calzado deportivo cómodo y con apoyo.

    10:00 am-10:55 am

    2nd-6th

    American History Alive! 17th-18th Century

    American History Alive! 17th-18th Century Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 8

    Step back in time each week for a one-of-a-kind rendez vous with key personalities in American history. First quarter appearances will focus on the 1600s and 1700s. Meet famous and everyday Americans such as a Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Martha Washington, John Adamas, a Powhattan Indian, and English colonist William Tharp. Each week a professional, costumed living history interpreter will deliver a compelling first-person performance portraying his or her role in American history. Living history actors are the professionals employed by museums, historical sites, and conferences. They have typically studied their historical character for years and tell their story in first person. Presentations are conversational in style, occasionally involve the audience, and conclude with spontaneous audience Q & A. Watch the historical actors answer 21st century questions in character with period replies! Students will receive a packet each quarter with biographies, puzzles, and activities about each famous personality that we will meet. Note: Students younger than age 8 must be accompanied by a paid parent or adult. Parents and siblings interested in the program must register and pay separately. Topics in this series include: The 17th-18th Century (Quarter 1); The 1800s (Quarter 2); The Civil War (Quarter 3); and the 20th Century (Quarter 4).

    11:30 am-12:25 pm

    3rd-Adult

    Concert Band: All Instrument Group Rehearsal (Fall)

    Concert Band: All Instrument Group Rehearsal (Fall) Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1,2

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 8

    This is a place-holder for the weekly Concert Band All-Instrument group session. Students should register for their selected instrument sectional sessions which will automatically enroll them in the group session.

    1:00 pm-1:55 pm

    4th-8th

    (Semester Long)

    Concert Band: All Instruments, Advanced Beginner 1

    Concert Band: All Instruments, Advanced Beginner 1 Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1,2

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 3

    This program has two in-person meetings each Monday: a 55-minute advanced beginner group session at 2:00 pm and a 55-minute all-instrument group practice from 1:00 pm- 1:55 pm. Band students must take both sectional and group together. Registration for the advanced beginner group will automatically enroll the student in the group session. Enjoy the camaraderie and cooperation of making music with others in a school band! Join the first homeschool concert band in the region at Compass. This band is for beginner and advanced beginner musicians of brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments. Students in Advanced Beginner band will meet together to continue to develop their skills on their selected instruments. To be considered an advanced beginner, students must have the following competencies on their chosen percussion, woodwind, or brass instrument:

    • Minimum of 2 months of playing experience;
    • A firm understanding of how to assemble and disassemble the instrument correctly;
    • Demonstrate proper instrument care;
    • Demonstrate correct posture, hand position, and embouchure (woodwinds);
    • Be able to play Hot Cross Buns in B-flat Major;
    • Be able to play at least one additional song in any key
    Advanced beginner percussion students will continue their skills on the snare drum and mallet instruments (such as glockenspiel and xylophone). Advanced beginner woodwinds students will continue to play the flute or clarinet (4th-8th grade) or alto saxophone (7th-8th grade only). Advanced beginner brass students will learn to play the trumpet, trombone, or euphonium (4th-8th grade) and French horn or tuba (7th-8th grade students only). All band students will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing percussion instruments and will play both cooperatively in small ensembles and independently. Students will need to rent or purchase an instrument and accessories for the band. See the linked list by instrument. There is a $33.00 supply fee due payable to Compass on/before the start of class for the "Do It! Play (a Band Instrument)" book and workbook and the sheet music songs used for the group band performance.>

    2:00 pm-2:55 pm

    4th-8th

    (Semester Long)

    C-26

    Culinary Foundations: Mixed Up! (Stir-Fries & Casseroles)

    Culinary Foundations: Mixed Up! (Stir-Fries & Casseroles)Closed

    Quarter(s): 1

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 0

    Students with a curiosity for culinary careers will explore many aspects of cooking for the hospitality industry and for themselves. In this advanced cooking class, students will make delicious, advanced recipes and learn skills that are the foundation for a future career in culinary arts. This class will get students excited about new foods, flavors, and techniques as they gain a working knowledge of food planning and preparation.


    Each quarter, new technical, kitchen skills are introduced, and each week, a new recipe is made in class that demonstrates the featured food group or cooking style.


    First quarter covers chapter Chapter 8 in the Level 1 textbook and features recipes the following recipes:


  • Chicken Pineapple Stir Fry
  • Beef and Broccoli Stir Fry
  • Chicken Roman Casserole
  • Turkey and Cauliflower Tetrazzini
  • Sheet Pan Eggplant Parmesan
  • Sheet Pan Shrimp Biryani
  • Sheet Pan Baked Feta and Vegetables
  • Culinary vocabulary will also be introduced each week. Students will leave this class with an introduction to culinary careers in the hospitality industry and a beginning foundation in culinary arts. Additionally, students will be able to take charge of a home kitchen, prepare advanced dishes, and adhere to safety and hygiene standards. They will have nutrition-planning and cooking skills that will enrich the lives of their friends and families.


    Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics.


    Topics in this Series: Mixed Up! (Stir-Fries & Casseroles)- Quarter 1; Roasted! (Grilled, Baked & Broiled Dishes)- Quarter 2; Stuffed! (Filled Meats & Vegetables)- Quarter 3; Skewered! (Kabobs & Grilled Skewers)- Quarter 4. Students continuing from the prior quarter will receive priority pre-registration for next quarter.


    Prerequisites: Students must be in 9th grade (minimum age 14) to take this class. 7th-8th graders must have Instructor's permission to enroll. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group.


    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.


    Assignments: Cooking assignments, practicing skills at home, and related homework will be given in class and e-mailed to students and parents. Brief written assignments may be given, such as recipe modification or development.


    Assessments: Individual feedback will be given in class. Formal assessments will not be given. At the end of the second quarter, enrolled students will be required to complete an online Virginia Food Handler Course for food safety certification through the county health department, which will cost $25.00


    https://courseforfoodsafety.com/states/VA?gclid=CjwKCAjw7LX0BRBiEiwA__gNw4AfZHgp_eOVTeiEXudxZhhF11E2UMggiIeYo6qL33xlUaDXbUeB5RoCG1cQAvD_BwE

    Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase or rent the selected textbooks and workbooks. Used copies are acceptable.


  • Foundations of Restaurant Management & Culinary Arts: Level 1, published by National Restaurant Association (ISBN# 978-0138019389)
  • Foundations of Restaurant Management & Culinary Arts: Level 2, published by National Restaurant Association (ISBN# 978-0131380226)
  • Activity Guide for Foundations of Restaurant Management and Culinary Arts Level 1, published by National Restaurant Association (ISBN# 978-0137070503)
  • Activity Guide for Foundations of Restaurant Management and Culinary Arts Level 2, published by National Restaurant Association (ISBN# 978-0131380714)
  • Required Tools/Materials: Culinary students will be expected to begin to acquire their own tools. Students should purchase and bring with them each week the following basic, minimum tools and supplies:


  • Chef's Knife Set, Professional Quality- (purchased individually or as a starter set) Recommended model (Amazon): J.A Henckels International 31425-000 Classic Starter Knife Set, 3-Piece, Black/Stainless Steel
  • Knife Guards- Recommended model (Amazon): 3- Piece Universal Knife Edge Guards Set
  • Carrying Case- Recommended model (Amazon): Tosnail Chef Knife Case Roll Bag with 15 Slots
  • Chef's Jacket- (long sleeve, white. Brought to class clean each week) Recommended model- women's (Amazon): Chef Works Women's Le Mans Chef Coat Recommended model-men's (Amazon): Chef Works Men's Bordeaux Chef Coat
  • Chef's Cap - (student's choice of color) Recommended model (Amazon): Nanxson 3pcs Chef Hat
  • Office Supplies: Ring binder, pen or pencil, note cards and loose-leaf paper
  • Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $75.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for perishable food items, ingredients, and supplies that are used in this class. For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts or Career Education for purposes of a high school transcript.

    10:00 am-11:55 am

    9th-12th

    Sweet Shop: Decadent Desserts (Mon)

    Sweet Shop: Decadent Desserts (Mon) Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 5

    The tantalizing aroma of cookies in the oven. A mouth-watering burst of mint. The silky feel of melted chocolate. The sticky sweet of fresh-made caramel. A subtle hint of lemon. Student bakers will enjoy these delicious sensations- and more- as they explore the world of baking homemade desserts.


    Sweet Shop treats are scrumptious, fun, and simple to make. Each week they will prepare a fresh, handmade dessert or sweet such as: pies, cakes, cookies, tarts, trifles, mousses, puddings, candies, fudge, brittle, or chocolate. The class will include some icing, decorating, and garnishing techniques for completed desserts. This quarter, the Compass bakers' culinary adventures will include:


  • Mini Apple Crumble
  • Apple Pecan Bread (contains nuts)
  • Caramel-Apple Monkey Bread Mini Loaves
  • Blue Pear Puff Tarts
  • Fall Spiced Pear and Date Upside Down Cake
  • Nantucket Cranberry Tart
  • Caramel Pecan Cheesecake Pie (contains nuts)
  • Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. This engaging sweets class will get students excited about helping in the kitchen and entertaining. They will learn important baking skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary is introduced each week.


    Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics.


    Topics in this Series: Decadent Delights (Quarter 1); Gooey Goodies (Quarter 2), Best Bon Bons (Quarter 3), and Tasty Treats (Quarter 4).


    Assessments: Qualitative Feedback will be given in class. Formal grades/assessment will not be given.


    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on or before the first day of class.


    What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided.


    What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).


    Cooking Class Requirements: For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    12:00 pm-12:55 pm

    9th-12th

    Advanced Baking Academy: Delightful Desserts

    Advanced Baking Academy: Delightful Desserts Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 4

    The warm, welcoming smell of baking bread, flavorful fondant, carefully crackled creme brulee, mile-high mille-feuille, and proper puffed pastry. These are just some of the specialized baking techniques that Compass bakers will learn in Advanced Baking Academy. From pate a choux to piecrust, students chefs will create more complex baked items in this course. This quarter, the Compass bakers' culinary adventures will include:


  • Apple Meringue Cupcakes
  • Layered Pumpkin Pastry
  • Pumpkin Spice Swiss Roll Cake
  • Iced Raspberry Danish Braid
  • Chocolate Pistachio Tartufo (contains nuts)
  • Chocolate Mint Cream Cookies
  • Gluten-Free Sugar Plums (contains nuts)
  • This engaging advanced baked goods class will get students excited about pastries for a career, side gig, hobby, or special occasions. Some recipes will be completed over two class periods, and several, due to the complexity of the dough or crust, will be sent home with instructions on how to fill or finish baking. Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. They will learn important baking skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, garnishes, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary is introduced each week.


    Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics.


    Topics in this Series: Delightful Desserts (Quarter 1); Seasonal Sweets (Quarter 2); Perfect Pastries (Quarter 3); Creative Confections (Quarter 4).


    Assessments: Qualitative Feedback will be given in class. Formal grades/assessment will not be given.


    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.


    What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided.


    What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).


    Cooking Class Requirements. For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.


    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in career exploration, fine arts, or electives for purposes of a high school transcript.


    1:00 pm-2:55 pm

    9th-12th

    Virtual

    Biology: Lecture (On-Level or Honors) **Online**

    Biology: Lecture (On-Level or Honors) **Online** Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 2

    This is a place-holder for the Principles of Biology lecture. Students should register for the Principles of Biology Lab, which will automatically enroll them in both class sections. A physical meeting room will be designated for on-campus students who have classes immediately before or after this virtual session.

    9:00 am-9:55 am

    10th-12th

    (Year Long)

    AP Modern World History- Lecture **Online**

    AP Modern World History- Lecture **Online** Add to Cart

    Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 5

    AP students are required to enroll in this additional lecture section. The lecture is recorded and open to all Modern World History Students. It is tentatively scheduled for 12:00 pm- 12:55 pm online (subject to an alternate time by consensus of AP-enrolled students). A physical meeting room will be designated for on-campus students who have classes immediately before or after this virtual session.

    12:00 pm-12:55 pm

    10th-12th

    (Year Long)



    Art / Music Science / Technology Humanities / Social Sciences Language Arts
    Extracurricular Math Foreign Language (Full Classes)
    Private Lessons Cooking Lunch N Learn