Schedule and Room Assignments

Classes meet Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, or Fridays in Herndon, VA. Filter by subject or grade below. You can see key dates in our Google calendar or view our Academic Calendar.

Quarter beginning September 8, 2020

Art / MusicScience / TechnologyHumanities / Social SciencesLanguage Arts
ExtracurricularMathForeign Language(Full Classes)
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Monday Classes

9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00
Room 1

Creative Storytelling: Once Upon an...Awesome Adventure

Creative Storytelling: Once Upon an...Awesome Adventure - Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

Quarter(s): 1

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 8

Children are full of stories and bubbling over with big ideas! In this class, students will learn how to capture their creative vision into a simple story that they will write and illustrate. First quarter, they will spin the tale of their own, unique Awesome Adventure. Will they journey to the wild west, a haunted house, a stormy sea, a creepy cave... or somewhere else?

Students will learn how to build a Story Arc through guided, weekly activities. They will discover the key elements to composing a story such as crafting characters, posing a problem, advancing the action, constructing the climax, and writing the resolution- through brainstorming questions like, "Who is in your story?", "Where does this take place?", "What does that look like?" and "What happened after ____?"

Emerging writers or readers are welcome and will receive support, if needed, to get their own words written down. Psst- don't tell your child, but this class helps lay the foundation in language arts for more advanced creative writing and composition. Pair this class with So Cool, No Sew Costume Workshop, Playful Puppet Workshop, Acting: Kids Theater, or Writing Well: Sentences that Speak to further encourage communication and storytelling skills. The supply fee is included in the class tuition. Topics in this Series: Awesome Adventure (Quarter 1), Magic Kingdom (Quarter 2), Medieval Castle (Quarter 3), and Zany Zoo (Quarter 4).

10:00 am-10:55 am

1st-2nd

Creative Storytelling: Once Upon an...Awesome Adventure

Creative Storytelling: Once Upon an...Awesome Adventure - Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

Quarter(s): 1

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 8

Children are full of stories and bubbling over with big ideas! In this class, students will learn how to capture their creative vision into a simple story that they will write and illustrate. First quarter, they will spin the tale of their own, unique Awesome Adventure. Will they journey to the wild west, a haunted house, a stormy sea, a creepy cave... or somewhere else?

Students will learn how to build a Story Arc through guided, weekly activities. They will discover the key elements to composing a story such as crafting characters, posing a problem, advancing the action, constructing the climax, and writing the resolution- through brainstorming questions like, "Who is in your story?", "Where does this take place?", "What does that look like?" and "What happened after ____?"

Emerging writers or readers are welcome and will receive support, if needed, to get their own words written down. Psst- don't tell your child, but this class helps lay the foundation in language arts for more advanced creative writing and composition. Pair this class with So Cool, No Sew Costume Workshop, Playful Puppet Workshop, Acting: Kids Theater, or Writing Well: Sentences that Speak to further encourage communication and storytelling skills. The supply fee is included in the class tuition. Topics in this Series: Awesome Adventure (Quarter 1), Magic Kingdom (Quarter 2), Medieval Castle (Quarter 3), and Zany Zoo (Quarter 4).

11:00 am-11:55 am

3rd-5th

Style Studio: Fashion Design & Sewing I

Style Studio: Fashion Design & Sewing I - Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

Quarter(s): 1, 2

Day(s): Mon.

Open Spots: 3

What's on the runways in 2020? Wide disco collars, chic trench coats, and layered skirts in simmering neons, crochet knits, and faux leather. Do you study the pages of Glamour, Vogue, Marie Claire, and wish to be involved in the world of trendy fashion? Perhaps you follow fashion influencers on Instagram. Or, do you enjoy the satisfaction of making things yourself, your way? If so, this class is for you. Each week this course will cover three parallel tracks: the history of fashion, fashion design, and sewing, with the first hour of each class being lessons and design work and the second hour dedicated to application and sewing.

Fashion trends are often cyclical, and elements of style are reimagined every few decades. Students will seek inspiration for new designs and style remixes by learning about the history of fashion in eastern and western cultures for the last century. First semester, students will look at fashion trends by decade from 1900 through the 1960s. This semester will cover chapters 1 through 3 in the textbook.

With inspiration from historical design trends, students will learn how to create fashion renderings, from initial concepts through a chic, coordinated collection. First semester, the class will learn about color theory, color psychology, and composing color palettes. They will learn to draw their designs by sketching a croquis (a quick, rough sketch of a garments on a proportioned figure.) Students will practice vision boarding and developing a story board.

In this class, students will also learn to sew clothing as way of sharing- and wearing- fashions that they have designed. First semester, students will begin by getting-to-know their sewing machines including different components, attachments, and functions, along with care and use if their machines. Students will begin with simple stitching exercises, and their first project will be sewing a pin cushion that they will use throughout the year. The class will also learn the basics of hand sewing. The class will discover how garments are assembled by deconstructing an article of clothing from its seams. The group will learn how to read a sewing pattern and take measurements and will learn about different types of fabrics, their uses, and care. The group will learn about hems and elastic along with closures and how/where to use them. First semester's project will be sewing a custom pair of PJ pants.

Students who practice at home will find that their sewing skills are refined and perfected more quickly. However, due to the complexity of constructing wearable, functional pieces of clothing, students should understand that by the end of the year, their sewn items will be more basic than the complex designs they render in the fashion design portion of the class. It takes years of practice before designers can create the complete, detailed collection that they have designed!

Topics in this Series: Style Studio: Fashion Design and Sewing I (Semester 1), Style Studio: Fashion Design and Sewing I (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Prerequisites: First semester- none. A student who wishes to enroll in the second semester must know some of the beginning sewing and artistic skills (equivalent to first semester) and will require instructor approval to enroll.

Levels: There will be different levels of the sewing instruction: a basic pattern for those new to the craft and a more complex version of the same project for those with more advanced sewing knowledge. Interested students with advanced sewing skills may take the course and sew their own projects during the second hour. These students would be asked to review their projects with the instructor in advance.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class on reading assignments and completing or practicing the sewing skill/step covered in class.

Assignments: Projects and readings will be given out in class and will also be communicated via email.

Assessments: Individual feedback is given in class. Formal assessments will not be given.

Textbook: Students should purchase Fundamentals of Fashion Design, 3rd Edition, by Richard Sorger and Jenny Udale (ISBN# 978-1474270007) before the first class. Additional information will be distributed as handouts in class.

Equipment/Fabric: Students must bring to class each week:

  • A portable sewing machine with bobbins. If you are purchasing a new sewing machine for the class, a Singer Heavy Duty Sewing Machine, 4400 series, model is recommended. These can be purchased from Amazon or Joann Fabrics for $160-$180. Students who are bringing a pre-owed or loaned sewing machine are expected to have the machine professionally serviced before the start of class.
  • The sewing machine owner's manual
  • An extension cord
  • Fabric for class assignments. A list of needed fabric and sewing patterns will be sent out the first day of class, with the recommended quantity, type, and deadlines.
  • Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a project box, including a sewing kit (with 1 pack of sewing machine needles, thread, and hand sewing essentials), sketchpad, folder, tracing paper, colored pencils, eraser. The supply fee also includes the shared cost and use of a lightbox for tracing. The cost of photocopied class documents is included in the course fee.

    What to Bring: Instructor-furnished sewing kit, art supplies, sewing machine, bobbins, owner's manual, extension cord, fabric, and images/sample photos, swatches, and other assigned materials.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts or Career Education for purposes of a high school transcript.

    12:00 pm-1:55 pm

    9th-12th

    (Semester Long)

    So Cool, No Sew Costume Workshop: Superheroes

    So Cool, No Sew Costume Workshop: Superheroes - Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Quarter(s): 1

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 8

    Are you ready to become the superhero you were always meant to be? In this workshop, kids will imagine themselves as superheroes and craft the costume elements they need to complete their super-persona. Using a variety of crafting techniques and a range of materials, students will learn how to make capes, masks, and utility belts.

    Kids will learn how to transfer common materials and simple supplies into spectacular, wearable items without sewing. Discover how something as simple as a plain t-shirt, tablecloth, or headband can be transformed. Learn tricks for no-sew hems and applying embellishments. Students should be able to use scissors for this class.

    Pair this class with Creative Storytelling, Playful Puppet Workshop, or Acting- Kids Theater to encourage more creative expression and theatrical basics. There is a $12.00 material fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this Series: Superheroes (Quarter 1), Magic Creatures (Quarter 2), Royal Robes (Quarter 3), and It's a Zoo (Quarter 4).

    2:00 pm-2:55 pm

    3rd-5th

    Room 2

    Chess: Advanced Beginners 1 (Mon)

    Chess: Advanced Beginners 1 (Mon) - Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Quarter(s): 1

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 10

    In Advanced Beginner Chess 1, students will learn skills and strategies that build upon each other, including a review of: castling, pawn promotion, and en pass ant rules; a notation lesson; a review of basic mates; strategies for using the draw rules for drawing a game when too far behind to win; using batteries to cause checkmates; back-rank checkmates; proper development of bishops; proper development of rooks (in the middlegame); advanced beginning overextended pieces; and other topics based on observed need. Experts suggest that the game of chess teaches analytical and disciplined thinking skills, while raising self esteem, teaching motivation and determination, and sportsmanship (Kasparov Foundation). Each class will be spent half on technique and half in practice matches with classmates while the instructor coaches. Students should have 15-20 hours of chess instruction prior to enrolling in Advanced Beginner Chess, or a working knowledge of most skills taught in the Compass Beginner Chess level.

    10:00 am-10:55 am

    3rd-6th

    Chess: Beginners 1 (Mon)

    Chess: Beginners 1 (Mon) - Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Quarter(s): 1

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 10

    In Beginning Chess 1, students will learn beginner basics such as: how all pieces move and capture; castling, pawn promotion, en pass ant; checks and how to get out of them; checkmate and stalemate; notation lesson and chess etiquette behavior; scholars mate & fools mate. Experts suggest that the game of chess teaches analytical and disciplined thinking skills, while raising self esteem, teaching motivation and determination, and sportsmanship (Kasparov Foundation). Each class will be spent half on technique and half in practice matches with classmates while the instructor coaches.

    11:00 am-11:55 am

    2nd-5th

    Little Medical School: Doctor, Doctor!

    Little Medical School: Doctor, Doctor! - Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Quarter(s): 1

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 8

    Little Doctors will learn about what physicians do, what tools they use, and key parts of the body! Students will learn about the major organs in the body and how they work such as the heart, lungs, eyes, and digestive system through role-playing and hands-on activities. Young doctors will learn about surgery and learn how to suture and tie surgical knots. They will also learn all about bone breaks and practice casting and splinting.

    Topics in this Series: Doctor, Doctor (Quarter 1); Calling All Doctors (Quarter 2); Little Dental School (Quarter 3); and Wilderness Medicine (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $43.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a set of high quality, take-home class materials including: a disposable lab coat, gloves, surgical mask, a real stethoscope, an eye model, and doctor's office diagrams and forms such as a human body chart and stickers, a physical exam chart, a heart worksheet, a broken bone assessment chart, suture supplies, and a class diploma.

    12:00 pm-12:55 pm

    2nd-3rd

    Little Medical School: Doctor, Doctor!

    Little Medical School: Doctor, Doctor! - Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Quarter(s): 1

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 8

    Little Doctors will learn about what physicians do, what tools they use, and key parts of the body! Students will learn about the major organs in the body and how they work such as the heart, lungs, eyes, and digestive system through role-playing and hands-on activities. Young doctors will learn about surgery and learn how to suture and tie surgical knots. They will also learn all about bone breaks and practice casting and splinting.

    Topics in this Series: Doctor, Doctor (Quarter 1); Calling All Doctors (Quarter 2); Little Dental School (Quarter 3); and Wilderness Medicine (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $43.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a set of high quality, take-home class materials including: a disposable lab coat, gloves, surgical mask, a real stethoscope, an eye model, and doctor's office diagrams and forms such as a human body chart and stickers, a physical exam chart, a heart worksheet, a broken bone assessment chart, suture supplies, and a class diploma.

    1:00 pm-1:55 pm

    K-1st

    Room 3

    Energy Economics: Strategy & Sim. Role-Playing Game (RPG)- The Industrial Revolution

    Energy Economics: Strategy & Sim. Role-Playing Game (RPG)- The Industrial Revolution - Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Quarter(s): 1, 2

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 7

    This class will study and simulate the revolution that built the modern world, from coal to oil!

    For thousands of years, the most advanced feats of human engineering came about through brute labor of men and beasts. Armies, soldiers, and slaves built roads and temples, and cargo was transported on waterways or pulled on animal-drawn carts. Once humanity began the widespread use of mechanical engines, it kick-started a massive leap in technology and progress. The limits were no longer set by biology, but by technology. This took people out of fields and into factories, producing goods at superhuman rates and raising the standard of living for humanity to unimaginable levels. This class will study the early Energy Economy, how modern nations exploited new technology and energy sources in the Industrial Revolution.

    The class will use a custom Role-Playing Game to simulate a transitional industrial economy. Students will role play as either industry or energy tycoons and attempt to dominate the market and rule the supply and demand, while balancing the construction and maintenance of a class energy grid. Economic systems, infrastructure, labor organization, all must be precariously balanced to keep civilization out of literal darkness. Will they be Carnegies and Rockefellers, or will they run out of steam? To accomplish this, students will create a business plan and run balance sheets week-by-week to justify their strategies. These strategies will have to account for decisions like, how much fuel to acquire versus how much energy/goods to produce and sell in the in-class economy. We will track this in a class ledger, updated weekly and posted online. The students' bookkeeping will reveal profit or loss and guide their choices for the next week's game. Players will learn to change their strategies and tactics based on what everyone else is doing so their businesses remain profitable. Will they avoid bankruptcy or achieve a monopoly -– true to history?

    Each student's business plan and bookkeeping ledger will be updated on class Google Drive and will be developed with feedback from the instructor. At the end of the semester, students will add a reflection about what they learned and what they would have done differently in their business plan with their new knowledge and game experience.

    Students are encouraged, but not required, to take both semesters of this class. First semester will use a simple energy and business model, while second semester will be more technical including more energy options and considerations, resulting in more complex business plans and game strategies. During the second semester, students will learn about the different types of jobs found in the energy industry.

    Topics in this Series: The Industrial Revolution (Semester 1), The Oil Economy and Beyond (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: None

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: Course documents including period plans, photographs and recreations will be made available through a class Google Drive link emailed to parents (and students who provide their email address), as well as a class reading list of articles/excerpts and YouTube playlist for any videos watched in class or assigned as homework.

    Assessments: Informal assessments will be given at the instructor's discretion, but assignments will not be scored or graded. Each student's financial success in the game will be an indicator of their learning and participation for purposes of assigning a grade. Parents will also be given shared access to their student's business plan with instructor and ledger, with instructor comments at the conclusion of class.

    Textbook/Materials: None

    Lab/Supply Fee: None

    What to Bring: Paper or notebook, pen or pencil

    Credit: Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History, Economics, or Business for purposes of a high school transcript.

    10:00 am-11:55 am

    10th-12th

    (Semester Long)

    Battle Strategies & Dioramas: Modern Warfare- WWII from the...

    Battle Strategies & Dioramas: Modern Warfare- WWII from the Russian Perspective, Stalingrad/Berlin (Mon) - Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Quarter(s): 1

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 5

    Students will engage in a hands-on 3D battle strategy game using the military dioramas that they make!

    From Stalingrad to Berlin, the downfall of Nazi Germany. This quarter will cover the climactic urban battles of the Eastern Front in Europe, or as the Russians call it, The Great Patriotic War. The Eastern front is often sidelined in Western history, but it was quite possibly the most brutal theater of war in human history. The Germans invaded Eastern Europe to wage a war of extermination, and instead found themselves hunted like rats in the cities they destroyed. This is not the Blitzkrieg, where a modern German army used fancy new tactics to destroy larger armies. This is the rat warfare, brutal attrition more akin to the 1st World War, with the trenches swapped for bitter street fighting, where each side was literally fighting in their own homes, for everything they had.

    Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will each form a 10" X 16" shaped, foam diorama with landscape elements (hills, buildings, rivers, bridges, vegetation, fences, etc) to represent a scene of a famous historical engagement. Students will each receive 1:72 scale miniature soldiers to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate the larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices.

    The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical background and circumstances leading up to the specific battle. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include: WWII from the Russian Perspective, Stalingrad/Berlin (1st quarter), WWII The Battle of the Bulge, 1944 (2nd quarter), WWII The USMC at Guadalcanal, 1945 (3rd quarter), and Korean War, 1950-1953 (4th quarter).

    12:00 pm-12:55 pm

    6th-8th

    Dynamic Dioramas: Prehistoric Series- Ancient Seas Survival...

    Dynamic Dioramas: Prehistoric Series- Ancient Seas Survival (billions to 250 million years ago) (Mon) - Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Quarter(s): 1

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 8

    Dive deep, back to the time of some of the first life on Earth, into prehistoric seas filled with monstrous and mysterious creatures that were the ancient ancestors of all life as we know it. This class will cover the early ocean life on Earth, from the darkest depths, where life exists because of geothermal vents, to the shallow inland sea that was the American Mid-West in the Jurassic age through the ancient seas as the dinosaurs swam them.

    We will learn to play "Submarine Safari" to simulate cooperative oceanographic research, exploring and cataloging ocean life, and an aquatic version of Try-To-Survive-Asaurus, where students role play as a shark or prehistoric marine reptile in their very own food chain. Over the course of the class, students should be able to explain the differences in the types of marine life over time and depth, and how these differences are reflected in their very own marine habitat boards.

    Each student will create an individual diorama. Students will craft and hand-shape their scene on a 10 x 16 inch foam board using artistic, model-making techniques. They will customize their dioramas with landscape elements, reefs, geothermal vents, and paint different ocean depths. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with miniature figures and combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to create a larger terrain. Students will then compete in a pre-history-based survival strategy game. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them. Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $15.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include Prehistoric Seas Survival (1st quarter), A Jurassic Survival Challenge (2nd quarter), Ice Age Survival (3rd quarter), and Sumerian Settlement (4th quarter).

    1:00 pm-1:55 pm

    3rd-5th

    Literature in Miniature: The Lord of the Rings, The Third Age

    Literature in Miniature: The Lord of the Rings, The Third Age - Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Quarter(s): 1

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 8

    This class will examine the works of literature so good, they made history!

    It began with the forging of great rings… and it will end with the creation of great dioramas in this class. Lord of the Rings is the king of the fantasy genre of literature, but all the great authors were inspired by something. In JRR Tolkien’s case, it was Norse Mythology. In this class students will study the connection of Tolkien’s Middle Earth to our own history, how it influenced the source material, and how the series in turn influenced the real world. No background knowledge of the book is required before class starts, but it is suggested to read (or watch, if you prefer) the first two books/films of the trilogy while the class progresses, as we will focus on the first half of the story of The War of The Ring. As students student the book and discuss its influences, they will craft a faithful diorama recreation of the great struggle against the evil, Sauron, and his legions of orcs, goblins and trolls. LotR fans will model either small party adventures through familiar scenes in the book, like the Mines of Moria, or larger scale events, such as The Battle of Helm’s Deep.

    Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and descriptions from the source material, students will each form a 10" X 16" shaped, foam diorama with landscape elements (hills, buildings, rivers, bridges, vegetation, fences, etc) to represent a scene from the source book. Students will each receive 1:72 scale miniature characters to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate the larger scenes. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the historical influences of the book, while playing either a table-top strategy or Role-Playing-Game. Student strategists will use a simple gaming rule systems for moving characters and interacting. Along with their classmates, students will see how this story progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different game choices.

    The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical influences on and of a work. Course documents, such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include: LotR: The 3rd Age (Quarter 1); LotR: The War of the Ring (Quarter 2); The Hobbit: Laketown(Quarter 3); and The Hobbit: Erebor and Dale (Quarter 4).

    2:00 pm-2:55 pm

    6th-8th

    Siege Physics: The Catapult

    Siege Physics: The Catapult - Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Quarter(s): 1

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 8

    According to Isaac Newton, what goes up must come down, but if you can’t wait for gravity to bring something down, a catapult was arguably the next best thing in the middle ages. Students will examine the physics, engineering, and history of the catapult, through "practical" application. Perfect for the mad scientist in everyone, students will use the Engineering Design Process to design and build their own catapults and knock objects over with them. Students will conduct rigorous testing and redesign to improve their catapults using both historic and modern materials. The instructor will demonstrate the mathematics and physics concepts behind the operations of their engines. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a catapult kit and building materials.

    3:00 pm-3:55 pm

    6th-8th

    Room 4

    Paint Studio I: Botanicals- Line, Color, Shape, & Texture

    Paint Studio I: Botanicals- Line, Color, Shape, & Texture - Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Quarter(s): 1

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 8

    Students will be introduced to painting with acrylics in a relaxed, informal studio setting under the guidance of a professional paint instructor.

    Students will work on framed canvas and easels and will learn elements of art and principles of design in addition to methods in painting. Painters will learn basic techniques such as shading, blending, stippling, and broad stroke. Each quarter, the instructor will demonstrate techniques by developing a sample painting. Students may elect to follow the class sample or may apply the painting skills to an entirely unique composition. Students will complete one or two 16" X 20" canvases each quarter, depending on the level of detailing.

    First quarter, students will begin painting botanicals such as flowers, plants, or leaves. Through the botanical study, painters will learn to represent different textures and effects in natural subjects. Elements of art introduced in the first quarter projects include line, color, shape, and texture.

    This class is suitable for beginners who have never painted before, and for experienced art students who have worked in other mediums and are interested in exploring acrylic painting. Compass parents are welcome to register for this class to work alongside their teens, or to work on their own, while their teen is in another Compass class. Painting can provide a relaxing, needed break from rigorous academic classes and over-scheduled lives in a fun, supportive environment.

    Prerequisites: None

    Topics in this Series: Botanicals- Line, Color, Shape, & Texture (Quarter 1); Still Life- Values, Form, & Composition (Quarter 2); 3D Perspective- Space, Depth, & Distance (Quarter 3); and Landscapes- Unity & Harmony (Quarter 4).

    Workload: Work outside of class is optional, however students who want to continue to practice their painting techniques might want to purchase a tabletop easel (approx. $10.00) and set of basic acrylic paints ($30.00+) for home use.

    Assessments: Individual feedback is given in class. Formal assessments will not be given.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A new student class fee of $20.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for two canvases, a sketchbook, and use of shared class supplies (desktop easels, paints, brushes, paper products, etc.). Returning students who are continuing in this class from a prior quarter can continue using their sketchpad, but there is still a $14.00 fee for the other materials.

    What to Wear: Students may wish to wear an apron, smock, or paint shirt when working with acrylic paints.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    12:00 pm-12:55 pm

    6th-8th

    Fundamentals of Drawing: Marine Life- Line, Shape & Texture

    Fundamentals of Drawing: Marine Life- Line, Shape & Texture - Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Quarter(s): 1

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 8

    Students will be introduced to drawing in a relaxed, informal workroom setting, where they will learn the fundamentals of drawing along with the elements of art and principles of design.

    First quarter, teens will begin basic, freehand sketching of marine life such as fish, dolphins, coral, or seaweed to learn to represent the objects that they observe. Teen artists will learn techniques such as drawing a "good line", fading, shading, and blending using crosshatching and smudging. Through the objects study, artists will learn techniques with pencil to help them replicate different effects in light and surfaces. Elements of art that will be emphasized include line, shape, and texture. Over the course, students should progress to draw more carefully and more accurately and to represent more refined details in their drawings. Toward the end of the quarter, students may also choose to add color to their drawings.

    The instructor will demonstrate various techniques by developing a sample drawing. Students may elect to follow the class sample or may apply the drawing skills to an entirely unique drawing. This class is suitable for beginners who have never drawn before and for intermediate art students who have worked in other mediums and are interested in exploring drawing. Students who have two or more quarters of drawing with this instructor, may choose to draw with a digital stylus and iPad/laptop (owned and brought to class by the student), to create digital drawings. Drawing can provide a relaxing, needed break from rigorous academic classes and over-scheduled lives in a fun, supportive environment.

    Topics in this Series: Marine Life- Line, Shape & Texture (Quarter 1), Realistic Renderings- Value, Form & Composition (Quarter 2), The Built Environment- Space, Depth & Dimension (Quarter 3), and Fantasy Landscapes- Unity & Harmony (Quarter 4).

    Workload: Work outside of class is optional for those who wish to practice their drawing techniques.

    Assessments: Individual feedback is given in class. Formal assessments will not be given.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $15.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a sketchbook, a pencil box with pencils of varying hardness, and an eraser. Returning drawing students do not need to pay a supply fee and are expected to replace their drawing supplies as needed, with similar or better quality.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    1:00 pm-1:55 pm

    6th-8th

    Code for a Cause: Technovations Team for Girls

    Code for a Cause: Technovations Team for Girls - Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Quarter(s):

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 7

    Imagine a phone app that could quickly reunite lost pets, connect the poor with resources that they need, or report a problem in the community! Code for a Cause is the Compass-based Technovation hub where middle school girls will participate in the "world's largest technology entrepreneurship program for girls." Each year, Technovation teams solve real world problems through technology that they develop!

    Through Technovation, girls work with women mentors, identify a problem in their community, develop a mobile app, and launch a startup. Since 2010, 23,000 girls around the world have developed mobile apps and startups to solve problems around a diverse range of problems, including food waste, nutrition, women's safety, and much more. In this year-long program, girls will work in teams and learn the skills they need to change the world with technology.

    Girls will beging with get-to-know-you and team building activities before breaking into teams of 3-4. Each team will brainstorm to identify a problem in the community. They will propose a mobile app solution to their problem and conduct market research to see if their idea is the best possible solution. Next, the girls will learn to program their unique application using a web-based software called MIT App Inventor. In class, girls will be coached step-by-step on the process and logic of creating an interactive application. Finally, girls will learn how to brand their app, create a business plan, and look at what it would take to bring the app to market.

    Girls will work on laptops provided by the instructor to eliminate technology or connectivity problems in class. However, since the app inventor platform is web-based, girls may continue to code at home. The course tuition includes a technology use/access fee.

    Participation in Technovation gives girls the confidence to pursue more computer science courses (70%), and give many the foundation to eventually major in computer science (26%). Technovation teams are in 100 countries, and the program is sponsored by Oracle, Google, 3M, Adobe Foundation, and others. The Compass Technovation facilitator/instructor will be a coding coach from Coder Kids. This is a year-long program that follows the Compass Monday calendar.

    2:00 pm-3:25 pm

    6th-8th

    Room 6

    Robotics Tech Challenge: Medical Robots

    Robotics Tech Challenge: Medical Robots - Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Quarter(s): 1, 2

    Day(s): Mon.

    Open Spots: 0

    Working in small teams, students will design, build, and program a medical-assist robot capable of one of the following medical-related tasks: telepresence (to minimize in-person interactions), remote patient processing and vitals inspection, autonomous delivery of critical supplies, shut-in companionship (must be soft, cuddly, and cute), or autonomous sanitization of areas and surfaces.

    The class will focus on construction and programming, with heavy emphasis on design of functional robots. The medical robots will be programmed to sense and react to their environment, users, or patients through sensors. Sensors for medical robots may include: digital infrared (IR) temperature, IR proximity, mini-LIDAR (laser radar), gesture (for patient input/communication with the robot), heart-rate, galvanic skin response, muscle movement, and cameras.

    Teams will conduct research, apply the engineering design process, follow the general rules and conventions of the engineering profession, including maintaining an engineering notebook. Teams will be using the Tetrix Prime robotics system, Grove sensors, and other components to build the robot, and Arduino software to program it. Each robot will be put through a series of tests/challenges related to the specific robot design. Please note that students do not get to keep finished projects.

    Topics in this Series: Medical Robots (Semester 1) and Autonomous Delivery Vehicles (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: None

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class researching robot and automation design

    Assessments: Ongoing feedback is provided in class on construction and programming. Formal assessments are not provided.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Technology or Career Exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

    10:00 am-11:55 am

    7th-12th

    (Semester Long)

    Investigative Archaeology- Field Methods

    Investigative Archaeology- Field Methods - Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Quarter(s): 1, 2

    Day(s): Mon.

    Open Spots: 2

    Archaeology is the field of study that unlocks the clues to past civilizations. Forensic archaeology applies these methods to solve puzzles. In this class, students will use physical evidence to try to understand or re-create what happened to an individual through life, death, and burial or to an object though its creation, use, and after it was lost, buried, or discarded. Students will practice field archaeological techniques such as surveys, excavation, and mapping, as well as documentation, analysis, and illustration of human material culture. This archaeological lab will be guided by a scholar of art and antiquity. Dr. Erica Hughes has traveled and participated in archaeological explorations throughout the ancient world. Students will "dig" her personal photos and stories. Class discussions, group activities, and individual hands-on experiences are designed to help teens understand the creation, recovery, and conservation of artifacts and remains.

    First semester, students will learn the field component of investigative archaeology. The class will first learn to plan their trench on grid paper and then practice actual excavation techniques in a field square. Students will learn to use the baulk trimming method in addition to using a total station and plumb bob. The instructor will teach methods of recording stratigraphy, drawing sections and trenches, and documenting artifacts through site photography and sketching. The class will learn about lighting, angles, and scales for photographing their finds. Archaeological illustration of bones, figurines, and pottery, metal, and stone vessels will be taught with pencil, and students will ink their best work for a grade.

    Topics in this Series: Field Methods (Semester 1), Forensics (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: 8th grade students may only enroll in this course if they successfully completed one of Dr. Hughes' 2019-20 archaeology classes.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.

    Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates

    Assessments: Points will be assigned for class activities and demonstration of field techniques in addition to a semester project.

    Textbook/Materials: A pdf version of the required textbook will be posted on the class Canvas site for reading assignments.

    Supplies/Equipment: Students should purchase and bring with them each week the following tools and supplies:

  • - Archaeology Trowel- Recommended model (Digitup.com): Eco Archaeology Trowel- Soft Grip Handle. (Note: trowels from garden stores tend to have the wrong shape and are unsuitable.)
  • - Sketching Kit- Recommended model (Amazon): Drawing and Sketching Pencil Set in Zippered Carrying Case. (Includes: 6B, 5B, 4B,3B, 2B, B, HB, H, 2H, 3H, 4H, and 5H pencils as well as an eraser, pencil sharpener, and a sketch pad.)
  • Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Social Sciences for purposes of a high school transcript.

    12:00 pm-1:25 pm

    9th-12th

    (Semester Long)

    Cybersecurity Basics: Operating Systems/Hardware

    Cybersecurity Basics: Operating Systems/Hardware - Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Quarter(s): 1, 2

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 5

    More than 4.4 billion people saw their personal data stolen in just three of the top data breeches in the last decade! Key personal, financial, and business data is unintentionally released, or worse, hacked, when digital information is not properly secured in cyberspace. Cyber-viruses crippled and compromised major businesses long before Coronavirus was in the news. This is why the cybersecurity industry is in high demand, with a job growth projection of 38% per year and starting salaries in excess of $100,000!

    This course is an introduction to fundamentals of cybersecurity in an interactive, information technology (IT) class taught by a cybersecurity expert and college professor. The course is designed to give students an overview of cybersecurity as a potential career field and get them interested in pursuing cybersecurity learning at a higher level.

    First semester, students will learn the basics about computer operating systems (OS) and hardware and how to secure them. The class will cover operating system components, drivers, applications, networking, troubleshooting, data protection, and preventing and responding to threats. Students will also examine personal computers (PCs) to understand all of the functions and components, such as processors, memory, motherboards, drivers, storage, and peripheral devices.

    Topics in this Series: Operating Systems/Hardware (Semester 1) and Networks (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

    Prerequisites: None.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class completing reading and virtual labs.

    Assignments: Homework will be a combination of reading chapters, completing online quizzes, virtual labs, and a semester project. All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates.

    Assessments: Points will be awarded for the competition of assignments, quizzes, and projects, and parents can assign a grade based on the number of points earned as compared to the number of points available.

    Textbook/Materials: First semester, students should purchase or rent CompTIA A+ Core 2 Exam: Guide to Operating Systems and Security, 10th edition, by Jean Andrews, Joy Dark, Jill West. (ISBN 978-0357108502). This text is available as an e-book or a loose-leaf publication.

    Software Fee: Students will have to pay a fee of $119 (estimated) for a one-year subscription to the Cengage online learning platform which allows students to complete virtual lab exercises.

    What to Bring/Equipment: Students must bring a PC or Mac laptop to class each week. These should be no more than 3 years old. Chromebooks and tablets cannot be used. Students should also bring their laptop charger and a 6 foot extension cord to class each week.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Technology or Career Exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

    1:30 pm-3:25 pm

    9th-12th

    (Semester Long)

    Jr. Engineering with LEGO: Fantastic Fliers & Space Racers (Mon)

    Jr. Engineering with LEGO: Fantastic Fliers & Space Racers (Mon) - Opens Aug 10 6:00 am

    Quarter(s): 1

    Day(s): Mon

    Open Spots: 8

    Students will use LEGO to design and build simple engineering projects out of everyone's favorite building toy! In this 90 minute class, students will explore concepts and vocabulary in physics, mechanical engineering, structural engineering, aerospace engineering, and architecture while playing with their creations.

    First quarter, junior engineers will tackle Fantastic Fliers and Space Race with projects inspired by the Space Station, Shuttle, Mars Rover, Gondola Gliders, Helicopeters, and Airplanes.

    Each class begins with 10-minutes of free build from tubs of LEGO components followed by a short discussion and demonstration of the day's project and concepts. Students build individually or in groups. Instructors will provide individual assistance, facilitate challenges, performance testing, competitions, and modifications to projects. Some projects may have been introduced in prior year's sessions, but each new build is unique, and student's building skills and understanding will have grown.

    Notes:(1)Students must be minimum age 5 and able to separate from their parents for this class. (2) Projects are built from shared, Instructor-owned components, so students will not bring completed projects home. Parents, however, can step into class 15 minutes before the end of each session to photograph their child's construction.

    Topics in this Series: Fantastic Fliers & Space Racers (Quarter 1); Animal Architects (Quarter 2); Winter Workshop (Quarter 3); Amusement Park (Quarter 4)

    2:00 pm-3:30 pm

    K-2nd

    Virtual 1

    Principles of Biology (Honors or On-Level) *ONLINE/TRANSITION*

    Principles of Biology (Honors or On-Level) *ONLINE/TRANSITION* Add to Cart

    Quarter(s):

    Day(s): Mon, Fri

    Open Spots: 2

    This full-year lab science course introduces classic biology topics updated for the 21st century. Biology studies living things and their relationships from microscopic to massive, ancient to modern, arctic to tropic. Our survey includes: (1) cellular and molecular biology, (2) ecology, (3) genetics, (4) biology of organisms (with selected human health and anatomy topics), and (5) evolution and diversity.

    You will observe microscopic organisms and give monarch butterflies a health exam before tagging them for their 2,800 mile migration to Mexico. You will extract DNA, model its processes, and learn how scientists manipulate this magnificent molecule to make mice glow. You will observe animal behavior, test your heart rate, and practice identifying and debunking pseudo-science.

    By the end of the course, students will be able to explain the nature of science as a system of knowing; cite evidence for foundational theories of modern biology; explain basic biological processes and functions; describe structures and relationships in living systems; outline systems of information, energy, and resources; demonstrate valid experimental design; discern ethical standards; relate their values and scientific ideas to decision-making; and apply biology knowledge to their own health.

    In this flipped classroom, students are responsible for covering new material such as readings from the textbook and additional popular and scholarly sources, videos, and animations prior to class meetings. In-person sessions focus on active discussion, clarification, exploration of content, review, modeling, and hands-on activities.

    Labs address not only technical skills and sequential operations, but also forming testable predictions, collecting data, applying math, drawing conclusions, and presenting findings. Hands-on dissection, always optional, is taught with preserved crayfish and fetal pigs.

    Sensitive issues: human reproduction is not taught separately, but mentioned as students learn about other, related topics such as sperm, eggs, stem cells, genetic disease, hormones, fetal development, breast-feeding, adolescence, and HIV. While there may be some debate-style discussion of topics such as GMO, abortion will not be debated. Birth control and sexuality education are not covered, but distinctions between gender and biological sex are discussed in detail in the genetics unit. Dissections are optional. Evolution is embedded in every topic, from molecular to ecological, inseparably from other content. It is addressed in a scientific context, not from a faith standpoint.

    The course provides a substantive, full-credit experience on either an Honors or On-Level track. All class members share core material and participate in the same labs. Honors has longer or additional readings, more analytical work, and more thorough and difficult assessments; it is appropriate for students who seek more challenge or plan to take the SAT Subject Test in Biology. Brief, required summer assignments are due in August for those who elect to take Honors. Students register online for the same course, but must indicate which level they wish to study via e-mail by August 15. Students may move down a level (from Honors to On-Level) at any time.

    Schedule: Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous ONLINE instruction via videoconferencing for fall semester. At the instructors' option, the class may transition to HYBRID instruction for second semester as COVID-19 scenarios improve. Hybrid instruction would include online instruction on Mondays (8:00 am - 8:55 am) and in-person instruction on Fridays. Instruction is recommended to be synchronous, but recordings will be made for students with schedule conflicts.

    Prerequisites: Students should be very strong, independent readers and able to understand graphs, tables, percentages, decimals, ratios, and averages.

    Workload: Homework includes term cards, brief written responses, weekly online quizzes, unit tests, occasional lab reports, and some creative assignments including sketching. Students will sometimes prepare short, in-class presentations, participate in group projects, run simulations, or conduct simple experiments at home. All students should expect to spend 4-6 hours outside of class reading and preparing homework.

    Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments; upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests; track grades; message instructor and classmates; and virtual conferences.

    Assessments: Points will be assigned for completed homework, projects, quizzes, and tests. A letter grade will not be assigned, but parents can use total points earned versus total points offered to assign a grade for purposes of a homeschool transcript. Parents can view total points earned at any time through the Canvas site

    Textbook/Materials: Students must purchase or rent the textbook Biology (2010 edition with baby alligator cover) by Stephen Nowicki, published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt/Holt McDougal (ISBN# 9780547219479) An e-book version is also available (ISBN# 9780547221069). By second semester, those who elect to take the SAT Subject Test will also need the College Board's "Official SAT Subject Test in Biology Study Guide" (ISBN# 978-1457309205) and a prep book of their choice, such as the latest Princeton Review's Cracking the SAT Subject Test in Biology E/M or Barron's SAT Subject Test Biology E/M.

    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $130 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. The cost for the SAT Subject Test in Biology in spring or summer 2021 is not included. Each family is responsible for scheduling and paying for their student's exam through the College Board.

    Supplies/Equipment: Students will need access to a computer/internet, compound microscope with 400X magnification and cool lighting, splash goggles, water-resistant/acid-resistant lab apron, kitchen or postal scale, 3-ring binder, at least 400, 3"x5" index cards, and plain, lined, and graph paper. Some of these supplies are used at home. Students should watch class announcements on Canvas to know when to bring items to class.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Lab Science for purposes of a high school transcript.

    9:30 am-10:55 am

    9th-12th

    US Government and Politics (Honors or On Level) *ONLINE/TRANSITION*

    US Government and Politics (Honors or On Level) *ONLINE/TRANSITION*Closed

    Quarter(s):

    Day(s): Mon, Fri

    Open Spots: 0

    As Thomas Jefferson wrote to Richard Price in 1788, "wherever the people are well informed they can be trusted with their own government." That's what this course aims to do!

    US Government and Politics is a year-long political science and civics course for high school students to build their knowledge of essential political structures and processes. Key themes in the course include Congress, Presidency, Bureaucracy, American Legal System and the Courts (30%); Constitutional Underpinnings of American Democracy (15%); Political Parties and Interest Groups (15%); Political Beliefs and Behavior (20%); and Civil Liberties and Civil Rights (15%).

    Students will learn about the formal and informal machinery that "makes the system go" -– including the so-called "fourth branch of government," the bureaucracy we know so well here in the Washington, DC metropolitan area. By the end of the course, students will also be able to explain the development of civil rights and liberties from their constitutional roots and through several Supreme Court cases; how political parties and interest groups work; the structure of elections; and the means by which citizens learn about politics and form political beliefs. Students will understand enduring issues, including separation of powers, checks and balances, and then tension between majority rule and minority rights.

    LevelsThe course provides a substantive, full-credit experience in either an Honors or On-Level track. Honors and On-Level students meet together and share core preparation each week, but assignments and assessments are differentiated, with longer readings, more practice of synthesis and analysis, and additional writing at the Honors level. Both tiers offer a serious, full-credit experience. A student who wishes to move up or down a level during the year may consult with the instructor. Students register online for the same course, but must indicate which level they wish to study via e-mail by August 15.

    Schedule: Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous ONLINE instruction via videoconferencing for fall semester. At the instructors' option, the class may transition to HYBRID instruction for second semester as COVID-19 scenarios improve. Hybrid instruction would include online instruction on Mondays (9:00 am - 9:55 am) and in-person instruction on Fridays. Instruction is recommended to be synchronous, but recordings will be made for students with schedule conflicts.

    Prerequisites: Students must be highly-skilled readers at the high school level or above; or else have very robust assistance at home with weekly reading assignments.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-5 hours per week outside class meetings for reading and homework, a range which may vary based on reading speed. Note that the core textbook is written at a basic college level, while other materials are targeted at either a high school audience or the news-reading public.

    Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates. These are due by 10 AM on Thursdays before each Friday meeting to promote active, knowledgeable discussion in class. There will be a summer assignment that is due on September 10, before the first class meeting. The class Canvas site will open on August 3 with introductory information, a syllabus, and the initial assignment.

    Assessments: Points will be assigned for completed homework, projects, quizzes, and tests. A letter grade will not be assigned, but parents can use total points earned versus total points offered to assign a grade for purposes of a homeschool transcript. Parents can view total points earned at any time through the Canvas site.

    This course was structured to allow interested students to prepare for the College Boards' CLEP exam in American Government. Time spent on major course themes intentionally mirror the CLEP test's percentages. Students interested in taking the CLEP exam will have to register and pay for those exams individually. This course is not offered at an AP level, but the instructor is willing to advise experienced students who wish to independently prepare for the AP United States Government and Politics exam in May 2021. Additional preparation outside of class, particularly in essay-writing and analysis of Supreme Court cases, would be needed for AP.

    https://clep.collegeboard.org/history-and-social-sciences/american-government
    https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/courses/ap-united-states-government-and-politics/exam

    Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase or rent Keeping the Republic: Power and Citizenship in American Politics, Brief 8th Edition by Christine Barbour and Gerald Wright (ISBN-13: 978-1544316215). Electronic versions are available. Be sure to purchase the EIGHTH (8th) edition that is also labeled "BRIEF." Other readings will be provided by the instructor.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component full year, one-credit course in US Government, Civics, or Humanities for purposes of a high school transcript

    11:00 am-11:55 am

    10th-12th

    US Government and Politics (Honors or On Level) *ONLINE ONLY*

    US Government and Politics (Honors or On Level) *ONLINE ONLY* Add to Cart

    Quarter(s):

    Day(s): Mon, Thur

    Open Spots: 3

    As Thomas Jefferson wrote to Richard Price in 1788, "wherever the people are well informed they can be trusted with their own government." That's what this course aims to do!

    US Government and Politics is a year-long political science and civics course for high school students to build their knowledge of essential political structures and processes. Key themes in the course include Congress, Presidency, Bureaucracy, American Legal System and the Courts (30%); Constitutional Underpinnings of American Democracy (15%); Political Parties and Interest Groups (15%); Political Beliefs and Behavior (20%); and Civil Liberties and Civil Rights (15%).

    Students will learn about the formal and informal machinery that "makes the system go" -– including the so-called "fourth branch of government," the bureaucracy we know so well here in the Washington, DC metropolitan area. By the end of the course, students will also be able to explain the development of civil rights and liberties from their constitutional roots and through several Supreme Court cases; how political parties and interest groups work; the structure of elections; and the means by which citizens learn about politics and form political beliefs. Students will understand enduring issues, including separation of powers, checks and balances, and then tension between majority rule and minority rights.

    LevelsThe course provides a substantive, full-credit experience in either an Honors or On-Level track. Honors and On-Level students meet together and share core preparation each week, but assignments and assessments are differentiated, with longer readings, more practice of synthesis and analysis, and additional writing at the Honors level. Both tiers offer a serious, full-credit experience. A student who wishes to move up or down a level during the year may consult with the instructor. Students register online for the same course, but must indicate which level they wish to study via e-mail by August 15.

    Schedule: This section will be held entirely ONLINE as virtual conferences with a Monday morning meeting from 9:00 am - 9:55 am, and a Thursday afternoon meeting from 3:00 pm- 3:55 pm via Canvas Conference. Recordings will be made for students with schedule conflicts. Please note that this section is intended to be online for the full year for most. Openings in the live, in-person Friday morning section may be possible for a handful of students when COVID gathering limitations are lifted.

    Prerequisites: Students must be highly-skilled readers at the high school level or above; or else have very robust assistance at home with weekly reading assignments.

    Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-5 hours per week outside class meetings for reading and homework, a range which may vary based on reading speed. Note that the core textbook is written at a basic college level, while other materials are targeted at either a high school audience or the news-reading public.

    Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates. These are due by 10 AM on Thursdays before each Friday meeting to promote active, knowledgeable discussion in class. There will be a summer assignment that is due on September 10, before the first class meeting. The class Canvas site will open on August 3 with introductory information, a syllabus, and the initial assignment.

    Assessments: Points will be assigned for completed homework, projects, quizzes, and tests. A letter grade will not be assigned, but parents can use total points earned versus total points offered to assign a grade for purposes of a homeschool transcript. Parents can view total points earned at any time through the Canvas site.

    This course was structured to allow interested students to prepare for the College Boards' CLEP exam in American Government. Time spent on major course themes intentionally mirror the CLEP test's percentages. Students interested in taking the CLEP exam will have to register and pay for those exams individually. This course is not offered at an AP level, but the instructor is willing to advise experienced students who wish to independently prepare for the AP United States Government and Politics exam in May 2021. Additional preparation outside of class, particularly in essay-writing and analysis of Supreme Court cases, would be needed for AP.

    https://clep.collegeboard.org/history-and-social-sciences/american-government
    https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/courses/ap-united-states-government-and-politics/exam

    Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase or rent Keeping the Republic: Power and Citizenship in American Politics, Brief 8th Edition by Christine Barbour and Gerald Wright (ISBN-13: 978-1544316215). Electronic versions are available. Be sure to purchase the EIGHTH (8th) edition that is also labeled "BRIEF." Other readings will be provided by the instructor.

    Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component full year, one-credit course in US Government, Civics, or Humanities for purposes of a high school transcript

    3:00 pm-3:55 pm

    10th-12th