Schedule and Room Assignments

Classes meet Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, or Fridays in Herndon, VA. Filter by subject or grade below. You can see key dates in our Google calendar or view our Academic Calendar.

Quarter beginning January 16, 2023

Art / MusicScience / TechnologyHumanities / Social SciencesLanguage Arts
ExtracurricularMathForeign Language(Full Classes)
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Monday Classes

9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00
Room 1

Fashion: Fiction, Fantasy, and Future

Fashion: Fiction, Fantasy, and Future Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 3

Fashion designers have long borrowed design elements from characters and costumes of their favorite films when creating collections, some more directly than others. Fashion designers often look to various forms of fiction and  fantasy for inspiration. In this fashion masterclass, students will examine the fashion featured in film, television, live theater, and visual arts. What inspired these looks? Did they make it to the runway or mass markets?Fashion trends traced to the silver screen range from slouchy legwarmers from "Flash Dance" and bomber jackets from "Top Gun" to full black leather looks from the "Matrix". The movie "Grease" brought 50s fashion back decades later. "Clueless" made preppy cute, and "Frozen" encouraged girls to try side braids. Designers of wedding gowns have taken inspiration from Disney princesses for decades.Students will learn about fashion forecasting-- the art of selecting styles and colors several seasons in advance-- and will make their own predictions on the future of fashion of what might be coming to runways and retail based on what is trends the see originating in media.

10:00 am-10:55 am

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

Crafting for Cosplay: Leather Work (11:00am)

Crafting for Cosplay: Leather Work (11:00am) Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 4

Kratos wears a leather baldric. Captain America grasps a shield. Harley Quinn sports spiked wrist cuffs, and Lara Croft wouldn't go to war without her weaponry. Great accessories and carefully crafted garments make great cosplay. If you are interested in the world of cosplay and want to bring some of your favorite characters to life, this class will teach you the skills to craft costumes and accessories.Third quarter, students will learn leather-working techniques such as dyeing, cutting, embossing, punching, and hand sewing. Projects for the quarter include a leather wrist bracers and a leather travel journal.In this class, students will follow templates and patterns provided by and demonstrated by the instructor. Pieces will be individualized through paint and embellishments, but the goal is for cosplayers to learn specialized crafting techniques that they can use at home to make additional, unique pieces. There is a $75.00 supply fee for in-class materials, the shared use of classroom tools/supplies, and some take-home tools to continue crafting at home. Third quarter, students will take home leather embossing tools.Projects are all-new from the 2021-22, so students may take this course again to hone their proficiency with various crafting techniques and fabricate new accessories. Cosplayers who would like to create original fabric costume elements such as capes, vests, skirts, and more, may want to co-register for this instructor's Learn to Sew classes. Topics in this Series: Foam and Plastics (Quarter 1), Resins and Metal Work (Quarter 2), Leather Work (Quarter 3), Mending and Alterations (Quarter 4) etc. Students continuing from one quarter receive priority pre-registration for the next quarter.Prerequisites: NoneWorkload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: Will be communicated in weekly e-mails and posted in a Google classroom.Assessments: Informal, qualitative feedback will be given in class throughout the semester. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided.Textbook/Materials: All materials will be furnished.Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $75.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in fine arts/theater for purposes of a high school transcript.

11:00 am-12:30 pm

9th-12th

Crafting for Cosplay: Leather Work (12:30pm)

Crafting for Cosplay: Leather Work (12:30pm) Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 2

Kratos wears a leather baldric. Captain America grasps a shield. Harley Quinn sports spiked wrist cuffs, and Lara Croft wouldn't go to war without her weaponry. Great accessories and carefully crafted garments make great cosplay. If you are interested in the world of cosplay and want to bring some of your favorite characters to life, this class will teach you the skills to craft costumes and accessories.Third quarter, students will learn leather-working techniques such as dyeing, cutting, embossing, punching, and hand sewing. Projects for the quarter include a leather wrist bracers and a leather travel journal.In this class, students will follow templates and patterns provided by and demonstrated by the instructor. Pieces will be individualized through paint and embellishments, but the goal is for cosplayers to learn specialized crafting techniques that they can use at home to make additional, unique pieces. There is a $75.00 supply fee for in-class materials, the shared use of classroom tools/supplies, and some take-home tools to continue crafting at home. Third quarter, students will take home leather embossing tools.Projects are all-new from the 2021-22, so students may take this course again to hone their proficiency with various crafting techniques and fabricate new accessories. Cosplayers who would like to create original fabric costume elements such as capes, vests, skirts, and more, may want to co-register for this instructor's Learn to Sew classes. Topics in this Series: Foam and Plastics (Quarter 1), Resins and Metal Work (Quarter 2), Leather Work (Quarter 3), Mending and Alterations (Quarter 4) etc. Students continuing from one quarter receive priority pre-registration for the next quarter.Prerequisites: NoneWorkload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: Will be communicated in weekly e-mails and posted in a Google classroom.Assessments: Informal, qualitative feedback will be given in class throughout the semester. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided.Textbook/Materials: All materials will be furnished.Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $75.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in fine arts/theater for purposes of a high school transcript.

12:30 pm-1:55 pm

9th-12th

Learn to Sew: Beginner and Intermediate

Learn to Sew: Beginner and Intermediate Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 3

Learn to sew to create one-of-a kind articles of clothing, home decor, crafts, or handmade items for your side business like Etsy or Ebay. Sewing can be a relaxing hobby, a profitable side gig, and a practical money-saving life skill. Don't settle for store-bought when you can learn to sew the custom creations you envision!Second semester, Beginner students will learn the basics of hand sewing. Skills that will be introduced this semester include: quilter's knot, stitches (basting, running, backstitch, whip, ladder), tying a knot, and anchoring a knot. Students will learn to identify and use sewing tools such as fabric scissors, straight pins, thimbles, seam ripper, and various needles. Intermediate students (those continuing from first semester or those with prior experience), will learn how to read and cut our a sewing pattern, how to take body measurements and match to pattern measurements, and how to select the best fabric for a pattern. Intermediate students will learn how to finish pieces by selecting and attaching closures (buttons, button holes, grommets, zippers, & hook and eyes); gathering and pleating, using binding and bias tape, and attaching pockets and waistbands.Students will also begin with getting-to-know their sewing machines including different components, attachments, and functions, along with care, use, and maintenance of their machines. They will learn Identify parts of sewing machine; how to fill a bobbin and thread the machine; types of machine needles and how to change a needle, and how to control speeds. Students will practice machine stitches (straight, zig-zag, backstitch) and adjusting the length and width, learn about seam allowance, and sewing corners and curves. Students will begin with simple stitching exercises, and their first project will be sewing a pin cushion that they will use throughout the year.As part of learning to sew, students will learn about different types of fabrics, what each is best used for, and how to identify grain lines, bias, and selvedge. The class will discover how garments are assembled by deconstructing an article of clothing from its seams. Students will learn how to read a sewing pattern and take measurements The group will learn about hems and elastic along with closures and how/where to use them. Second semester's Beginner project will be sewing a custom pair of pajama pants, while the Intermediate project will be a small block quilt. Topics in this Series: Learn to Sew: Beginner (Semester 1), Learn to Sew: Beginner and Intermediate (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.Prerequisites: First semester- None. Second semester- No prerequisites for someone to enroll as a beginner. Intermediate students should have taken first semester or have equivalent skills.Workload: Students who practice at home will find that their sewing skills are refined and perfected more quickly. Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class practicing the sewing skill/step covered in class.Assignments: Projects will be given out in class and will also be communicated via Google Classroom.Assessments: Informal qualitative feedback will be given in class throughout the semester. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided.Textbook: NoneEquipment/Fabric: Students must bring to class each week:

  • A portable sewing machine with bobbins. If you are purchasing a new sewing machine for the class, a Singer Heavy Duty Sewing Machine, 4400 series, model is recommended. These can be purchased from Amazon or Joann Fabrics for $160-$180. Students who are bringing a pre-owed or loaned sewing machine are expected to have the machine professionally serviced before the start of class.
  • The sewing machine owner's manual
  • An extension cord
  • Fabric for class assignments. A list of needed fabric and sewing patterns will be sent out the first day of class, with the recommended quantity, type, and deadlines.
Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $50.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a project box, including a sewing kit (with 1 pack of sewing machine needles, thread, and hand sewing essentials), and other materials used in class.What to Bring: Instructor-furnished sewing kit, sewing machine, bobbins, owner's manual, extension cord, fabric, and images/sample photos, swatches, and other assigned materials.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts or Career Education for purposes of a high school transcript.

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

Sewing Workroom (Q3)

Sewing Workroom (Q3) Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 14

In the style of an old-fashioned quilting bee or a sewing circle of long ago, Sewing Workroom is a dedicated drop-in sewing work session each week. Participants will enjoy the camaraderie of working alongside other seamstresses and seamsters of all abilities. Chat with others about their sewing projects. Learn tips and tricks from others. Become inspired by the wide variety of sewn items others are working on, and most importantly, ensure that you have a time set-aside each week to pursue your sewing hobby.Sewing Workroom will be overseen by an experienced sewing instructor however, detailed individual or on-going instruction is not included. The instructor will walk around the room to provide guidance and assist participants with tips, troubleshooting, or trying a new technique. Those who need more sewing instruction than the instructor can provide in the Workroom are encouraged to take private one-on-one lessons or enroll in the Learn to Sew class. Participants are expected to bring their own fabric, patterns, thread, notions, embellishments, sewing implements, and machine each week. The instructor will have an iron, ironing board, extension cords, and common items on hand (such as machine needles). Learn to Sew students are welcome to enroll in this session to have more dedicated sewing time. Parents are welcome to enroll with their child(ren) or alone, and adult community members are invited.

3:00 pm-3:55 pm

6th-Adult

Room 2

Planetary Science (Honors or On-Level)- Lecture

Planetary Science (Honors or On-Level)- LectureClosed

Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 0

This is a place-holder for the Planetary Science lecture. Students should register for the Planetary Science Lab, which will automatically enroll them in both class sections.

10:00 am-10:55 am

9th-12th

(Year Long)

Ace the ACT & SAT: Strategies for College Entrance Exams

Ace the ACT & SAT: Strategies for College Entrance Exams Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3,5

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 6

Recently, in response to the pandemic, the majority of colleges have been "test optional" for applying students. However, more and more of those now say, "except for homeschoolers" and still expect achievement test scores in order to have a standardized benchmark for those who learn at home.Whether college admissions tests (SAT, PSAT, or ACT) are right around the corner or down the road, this class will teach you how to tackle the tests, decode the questions, and boost your scores. While SAT/ACT test scores are not automatic ticket into the college of your choice, higher scores will get your application in the to-be-considered pile where admissions staff will take a closer look at all the other amazing things you have done.This class will help you feel prepared to face standardized admissions tests and take away some of the worry and mystery that surround these assessments. Each week, students will spend time on strategies for math and English portions of the tests. Students will learn about test designs and the types and difficulty levels of reading, grammar, and math questions. The class will learn how to approach multiple choice questions, how to read passages for comprehension, and what to do when you don t know an answer. This class is not a crash course that preps you for one test sitting, but rather teaches you lasting techniques to get you ready for whenever you decide to take a standardized test. The instructor will lay out a study plan for test-ready students and be able to offer tips on many aspects of the college admissions process. When the class wraps up, students and parents will understand the process of SAT and ACT testing and feel prepared for the personal challenge of the test experience.Topics in this Series: Success Skills for School: High School and Beyond (Semester 1).Prerequisites: For this class, students should be reading and have comprehension at or above grade level and have completed Algebra I. While geometry is included on the tests, completion of geometry is not assumed. Geometry formulas are provided within the tests, and the instructor will teach how to find and apply those formulas.Workload: Students should expect to spend one hour per week on homework for this class. Assignments: Prior to the start of class, each student should have taken a scored, practice SAT or ACT exam (found on the College Board or ACT website). All other assignments will be made in class and e-mailed to parents/students. Assessments: Students will take a variety of in-class and at-home time, practice test sections. The instructor will not provide additional assessments beyond the practice tests. Textbook: Students should purchase either The Official SAT Study Guide, 2020 Edition, published by the College Board (2018 ISBN # 978-1457312199) or the The Official ACT Prep Guide, 2022-23 Edition (2018-19 ISBN #978-1119865902).What to Bring: Students should bring their test book, notebook/paper, and a TI-83 or equivalent calculator to class to practice math questions that permit the use of a calculator. Phone calculators cannot be used.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) elective credit purposes of a high school transcript.

11:00 am-11:55 am

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

Room 3

Ancient Justice: Crime & Punishment in the Early Modern Era

Ancient Justice: Crime & Punishment in the Early Modern Era Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 1

This class will explore the judicial processes of mainland Europe and their divergence from English Common Law. Like a traditional mock trial program, the class will hear cases, and students will defend themselves. Real historical cases will be studied, and trial parts assigned to the class, which will be debated from the perspective of Englishmen, from commoners to nobility, and Europeans in both criminal and church courts. The class will serve as the jury and, if necessary, select period-appropriate verdicts and explain how they arrived at their decisions, while striving for period accuracy. This semester will examine the Justice systems of Renaissance Europe up to Colonial Britain.Topics in this Series: Crime & Punishment in Medieval Times (Semester 1), Crime and Punishment in the Early Modern Era (Semester 2).Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: Period maps, photographs, and re-creations will be posted on a class Google Drive, and video links from YouTube will be e-mailed to parents and students for homework or supplemental investigation.Assessments: A mid-term and final exam may be given.Textbooks: None. Case documents are provided in class.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History or Civics for purposes of a high school transcript.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

3D History- End of WWII- Operation Downfall, 1944-45 (MON)

3D History- End of WWII- Operation Downfall, 1944-45 (MON) Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 2

Why read about key military battles on maps or in books when you can learn about them hands-on, in three dimensions, using historical miniature gaming? In 3D History, pivotal engagements come to life for new and experienced students, as they navigate a table-top terrain, deploy hundreds of miniature soldiers, ships, and tanks... all while playing a military strategy game. Each student will have the opportunity to fight a battle from both sides, allowing them to test various strategies, try multiple scenarios, predict different outcomes, and rewrite history- an effective way to gain a deeper understanding of what actually happened and why!In 1942, American General Douglas MacArthur was forced to leave the Philippines in the face of the seemingly unstoppable Imperial Japanese juggernaut in the South Pacific. Just two years later, he made good on his promise to return. However, this time he had the most powerful armada the world has ever seen at his back, the culmination of years of work of The Arsenal of Democracy. More than 600 cutting-edge ships, dwarfing almost every other navy combined, carried a million soldiers and marines from the Allied Forces. Faced with overwhelming material and manpower superiority, the Japanese leveraged what remained of their skill and determination to fight to the last ship, the last bullet, the last blade, and the last man, to stop the Americans and end the war as quickly as possible.Students will fight the last battles of the Pacific theater on land, sea, and air using a wide range of miniature soldiers, aircraft, vehicles, and ships. From massive naval action around the Philippines and Okinawa to the shores of Iwo Jima, students will simulate a variety of jungle and island-hopping combat engagements using a modified version of the Axis and Allies war at sea system. Students will study the technical and strategic elements that led to the outcomes of the battle and attempt to recreate the Japanese or Allied successes (or failures). At the end of each semester, every student will understand the conditions that led to war, the objectives for both sides, and how successful or realistic these objectives were, both from a modern academic point of view and from the historical point of view given each country's available information. This will be accomplished with primary sources, newsreels from the time, propaganda material, and modern analysis. The instructor will provide online access to all of this material via Google Drive and a class YouTube Playlist.Note: This is a 1 hour, 55 minute class with a 10-minute break part way through.Topics in this Series: WWII- The Invasion of Fortress Europe 1943-45 (Semester 1) and WWII- Operation Downfall 1944-45 (Semester 2).Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: Period maps, photographs, and re-creations will be posted on a class Google Drive, and video links from YouTube will be e-mailed to parents and students for homework or supplemental investigation.Assessments: Will not be given.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript.

1:00 pm-2:55 pm

8th-12th

(Semester Long)

Room 4

Role Play Economy: The Global Supply Chain of Today

Role Play Economy: The Global Supply Chain of Today Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 2

The aftermath of the World Wars remade the map of politics and economics. Two surviving superpowers were left to battle for dominance on the world stage, the USA and the USSR. Large portions of the global economy were locked behind an Iron Curtain of communist, state-run industry. Half of what remained on the free side had been bombed to rubble, leaving the United States the uncontested juggernaut of international commerce. The legacy of having run logistics for two world wars spurred important advancements in the global shipping industry, allowing democratic nations to emerge as the world's factories.Moving into the late 20th century, the class will transition from a multipolar world where nations enacted protectionist policies and closed markets to squeeze global traffic to the beginnings of today's market economy where free trade is the norm. The class will use a custom role-playing game (RPG) to simulate multiple, interacting industrial economies and global supply chains. Students will begin the semester as the head of logistics for either a global shipping company or a state-run organization like the Merchant Marine. In either role, they will be responsible for planning and implementing supply lines for their customers and integrating the improvements of 20th century technology. Their goal will be to balance investments in improved technology while still providing the lowest cost goods and services to their customers. Students will scramble to outbid their classmates for contracts put forward by the instructor.By the end of the semester, students will understand how improvements in technology have built the modern world, the effects disruption can have, and possible strategies for meeting those challenges. This will mean creating and managing detailed plans managing employees, equipment, and costs to be the most efficient operator possible in a custom role playing scenario. Topics in this Series: Global Supply Chain of the Early Twentieth Century (Semester 1), Global Supply Chain of Today (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.Prerequisites: NoneWorkload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: Course documents including period plans, photographs and recreations will be made available through a class Google Drive link emailed to parents (and students who provide their email address), as well as a class reading list of articles/excerpts and YouTube playlist for any videos watched in class or assigned as homework.Assessments: Informal assessments will be given at the instructor's discretion, but assignments will not be scored or graded. Each student's financial success in the game will be an indicator of their learning and participation for purposes of assigning a grade. Parents will also be given shared access to their student's business plan with instructions and ledger, with instructor comments at the conclusion of class.Textbook/Materials: NoneWhat to Bring: Paper or notebook, pen or pencilCredit: Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History, Economics, or Business for purposes of a high school transcript.

10:00 am-11:55 am

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

Special Topics in Digital Photography

Special Topics in Digital Photography Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 3

Reflections on a rainy day, a sheepish sister smirking, a white-washed winter wonderland- all captured in dynamic digital images. Students will expand on photography fundamentals with an exploration of three special topics: nature photography, portraiture, and black and white photography. For each unit, teen photographers will learn techniques and camera settings that highlight the genre. Class time will be split between classroom instruction/discussion and outdoor photography exercises.Students will have fun taking pictures of friends and family. They will learn how to capture natural expressions and record unique personalities when photographing people. They will be introduced to the lighting, posing, and composition for creating studio and lifestyle portraiture. Students will practice as both photographers and the models.In the spring, students will take advantage of the buds and blooms to learn to photograph natural subjects. Students will practice seeing the world around them including details, macro observations, close-range subjects, and elements of composition. They will learn to do isolation studies using natural light to photograph objects and plants in their environment. The class will discuss and practice techniques for landscapes, seasons, weather, water, reflections, and animals in nature and captivity.Finally, students will learn how to make beautiful black and white images and what elements to look for to make a stunning monochromatic composition.Students will turn their favorite photos into a personal project to be shared on the last day of class.Prerequisites: Introduction to Digital Photography or similar class recommended.Meeting Dates: This is a 12-week class that concludes on April 17, 2023Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: Students will have weekly homework taking photographs.Assessments: Students will receive ongoing, informal assessments and feedback on their photographs.Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $15.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for composite prints of select photos.What to Bring: Students are encouraged to bring digital SLR cameras, but any digital camera that is better than a phone camera will be adequate.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

8th-12th

(Semester Long)

Room 5

Algebra I (MON, WED)

Algebra I (MON, WED)Closed

Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

Day(s): Mon, Wed

Open Spots: 5

This is a complete course in high school Algebra I which will cover fundamental concepts in algebra and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. This course is designed to emphasize the study of algebraic problem-solving with the incorporation of real-world applications. Topics in Algebra I include number systems, linear systems, rational numbers, complex numbers, exponents, roots, radicals, quadratic equations, polynomials, factoring, absolute values, ratios, and proportions. In addition, the course will cover solving and graphing systems of functions, linear equations, and inequalities. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem-solving.Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation in pre-algebra topics in order to take this class. Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Thursday (day 1), lecture on Monday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Thursday (day 8), and homework due the next Monday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Wednesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work. Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload. Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by checking that weekly homework sets are complete and giving periodic take-home tests; class participation is also strongly encouraged. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Algebra I: Expressions, Equations, and Applications by Paul A. Foerster. It is available in a few different editions, each of which is virtually identical: 2nd edition (ISBN-10 020125073X, ISBN-13 978-0201250732), 3rd edition (ISBN-10 0201860945, ISBN-13 978-0201860948), and Classic edition (ISBN-10 020132458X, ISBN-13 978-0201324587). It is also available under the title Foerster Algebra I, Classics edition (ISBN-10 0131657089, ISBN-13 978-0131657083). A calculator is not needed for this course. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Algebra I for purposes of a high school transcript.

10:00 am-10:55 am

7th-10th

(Year Long)

Preparation for Pre-Algebra

Preparation for Pre-AlgebraClosed

Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

Day(s): Mon,Thu

Open Spots: 2

Preparation for Pre-Algebra is a year-long curriculum that will teach the fundamentals a student must master before embarking pre-algebra, algebra, and beyond. The class will review arithmetic skills, operations, and number theory. Key topics include fractions, rates, ratios, decimals, and percentages. Students will learn the computational operations of adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing fractions and decimals. They will learn what decimals stand for, how they relate to fractions, and how to convert between the two. They will discover how rates and ratios are also fractions. Students will learn how to work with negative numbers including strategies for completing all four common operations with negative numbers. The class will also cover exponents and orders of magnitude to make sense of really small and really big numbers and common operations.This class will also emphasize real world applications of the mathematical concepts through word problems so students become comfortable switching between prose (written descriptions) and mathematical representation (numbers, symbols) of real world examples such as money, mileage, weights, percentages, and scientific measures.Prerequisites: This course can be considered a pre-pre-algebra class that will teach the core concepts typically covered in later elementary school/early middle school after a general arithmetic curriculum and before pre-algebra. While different curriculums and student pacing will vary, this class would be appropriate for a student who has successfully covered long division, multiplication of multiple digit numbers, and an introduction to simple fractions and who has complete mastery of multiplication facts, skills often aligned with 5th grade mathematics.Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class to complete practice problems, homework, and assessments.Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by: checking that weekly homework sets are complete; spot-checking the full solution 1-2 select problems in class each week, and giving quarterly take-home tests. Points will also be awarded for class participation. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade.Textbook: Students should purchase the two class texts: "The Complete Book of Math, Grades 5-6" (ISBN# 978-1561896776) and "EP Math 5/6 Workbook" (ISBN# 979-8643323693).

10:00 am-10:55 am

6th-7th

(Year Long)

Geometry (MON, WED)

Geometry (MON, WED)Closed

Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

Day(s): Mon, Wed

Open Spots: 4

This is a complete course in high school Geometry which will cover fundamental concepts and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. Students will learn deductive reasoning, and logic by completing geometric proofs. Topics in geometry include: lines, angles, congruence, concurrence, inequalities, parallel lines, quadrilaterals, transformations, area, similarity, right triangles, circles, regular polygons, and geometric solids. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem- solving.Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation Algebra I in order to take this class. Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Friday (day 1), lecture on Tuesday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Friday (day 8), and homework due the next Tuesday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Tuesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work. Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload. Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by checking that weekly homework sets are complete and giving periodic take-home tests; class participation is also strongly encouraged. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Geometry: Seeing, Doing, Understanding, 3rd edition (ISBN-10 0716743612, ISBN-13 978-0716743613) A calculator is not needed for this course. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Geometry for purposes of a high school transcript.

11:00 am-11:55 am

8th-11th

(Year Long)

Pre-Algebra

Pre-AlgebraClosed

Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

Day(s): Mon,Thu

Open Spots: 2

This is a complete course in Pre-Algebra that will provide an introduction to basic algebra concepts and a review of arithmetic algorithms with an emphasis on problem solving. The major topics covered in this course are Numbers and Operations, Expressions & Properties, Equations & Inequalities, Functional Relationships and Ratios, Percent & Proportions. Students will learn to use formulas to solve a variety of math problems encompassing geometry, measurement probability, and statistics. Students will also be applying their learning to real life scenarios to solve problems.Prerequisites: Students must be fluent in the four basic operations- addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. They will need to show proficiency and have a thorough command of basic computation. In addition, a basic, introductory understanding and ability to work with fractions and decimals is required to solve equations and simplify expressions. If you are unsure about your child's readiness for this class, the instructor will recommend one or more practice platforms and/or assessments to confirm placement.Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class to complete practice problems, homework, and assessments.Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, link to quizzes and tests, track grades, and message the instructor and classmates.Assessments: All chapter tests will be taken outside of class with parental oversight to maximize in-class instructional time. Points will be assigned for completed homework, quizzes, and tests. A letter grade will not be assigned, but parents can use total points earned versus total points offered to assign a grade for purposes of a homeschool transcript. Parents can view total points earned at any time through the Canvas site.Textbook: The selected textbook is available free online, and a link will be posted on Canvas. Students who prefer a hard copy textbook may purchase or rent McDougall Littell's Pre-Algebra (ISBN #978-0618250035). As an alternative, for any student who struggles with reading, the textbook can be purchased as an audio CD (ISBN #978-0618478828).What to Bring: TI-34 calculatorCredit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Mathematics for purposes of a high school transcript.

11:00 am-11:55 am

7th-9th

(Year Long)

Algebra I (1:00 pm)

Algebra I (1:00 pm)Closed

Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

Day(s): Mon,Thu

Open Spots: 0

This is a complete course in high school Algebra I which will cover fundamental concepts in algebra and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. This course is designed to emphasize the study of algebraic problem-solving with the incorporation of real-world applications. Topics in Algebra I include number systems, linear systems, rational numbers, complex numbers, exponents, roots, radicals, quadratic equations, polynomials, factoring, absolute values, ratios, and proportions. In addition, the course will cover solving and graphing systems of functions, linear equations, and inequalities. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem-solving.Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation in pre-algebra topics in order to take this class. Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Thursday (day 1), lecture on Monday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Thursday (day 8), and homework due the next Monday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Wednesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work. Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload. Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by checking that weekly homework sets are complete and giving periodic take-home tests; class participation is also strongly encouraged. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Algebra I: Expressions, Equations, and Applications by Paul A. Foerster. It is available in a few different editions, each of which is virtually identical: 2nd edition (ISBN-10 020125073X, ISBN-13 978-0201250732), 3rd edition (ISBN-10 0201860945, ISBN-13 978-0201860948), and Classic edition (ISBN-10 020132458X, ISBN-13 978-0201324587). It is also available under the title Foerster Algebra I, Classics edition (ISBN-10 0131657089, ISBN-13 978-0131657083). A calculator is not needed for this course. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Algebra I for purposes of a high school transcript.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

7th-10th

(Year Long)

Probability & Statistics (On-Level, Honors)

Probability & Statistics (On-Level, Honors)Closed

Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

Day(s): Mon,Thu

Open Spots: 3

The odds of winning the Powerball jackpot are 1 in 292 million. 77% of teens ages 12-17 have cell phones. One out of every two of youth voters cast a ballot in 2020. From election polls to stock market data and weather reports to medical test results, statistics and probability are all around us. They are quoted in the podcasts we listen to, the news we watch, and the textbooks and articles we read. Statistics and probability are used in almost every field of study and career for forecasting, decision making, and tracking progress. In 2021-22, the government will release a tsunami of 2020 census statistics about our country's population. (Coincidentally, the odds of a tsunami hitting the east coast- less than the Powerball win.) But statistics and probability are also often misused, misquoted or incorrectly applied, so having a solid understanding of what these numbers represent will help make teens informed consumers and decision-makers.This course will explore the collection and analysis of data, inferences and conclusions, and the use of this information. Themes include relationships between variables, gathering data, interpreting categorical versus quantitative data. The class will also cover sample surveys, experiments, and observational studies and evaluate randomness and probability. Finally, students will learn about making inferences, justifying conclusions, and using probability to make decisions.Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation Algebra I and Geometry in order to take this class. It is an ideal class for a student who needs an additional credit in high school math, but who may not wish to pursue more advanced mathematics courses such as Algebra II and Pre-Calculus. Levels:The course provides a substantive, full-credit experience on either an Honors or On-Level track. All class members share core material and participate in the same class lectures. Honors students will receive additional, more challenging problems. Students register online for the same course, but must indicate which level they wish to follow by the first day of class. Students may move down a level (from Honors to On-Level) at any time.Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-1.5 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on an approximately 11-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Thursday (day 1), lecture on Monday (day 4), questions and answers on the next Thursday (day 8), and homework due the next Monday (day 11). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the next lecture. Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work.Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by: checking that weekly homework sets are complete; spot-checking the full solution 1-2 select problems in class each week, and giving quarterly take-home tests. Points will also be awarded for class participation. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade.Textbook: The required textbook for this class is "Stats In Your World" 1st edition by David E. Bock (ISBN-13 : 978-0131384897).Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Probability & Statistics for purposes of a high school transcript.

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

11th-12th

(Year Long)

Room 6

Website Development: Coding with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript

Website Development: Coding with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 7

Website design and development is a fun, tangible way to introduce teens to coding! Rather than writing code for the sake of memorizing syntax and symbols, students will be coding for themselves- to create their very own website! In this project-based class, students will design and develop a website on a topic of their choice. Will their personal website showcase a hobby, a club, a home business, or will it be used as their digital portfolio for future college applications?Students will learn to set up a website that follows industry standards and best practices. They will discover how HTML, CSS, and JavaSript are integrated as the core internet technologies that make a website useful, intuitive, and appealing. In the vast industry of website development, HTML serves as a website's framework, controlling content such as photos, videos, and text, while CSS is used for styling choices such as font styles, sizes, colors, and backgrounds. JavaScript is the dynamic language that controls not only functionality such as inputs, interface, and responses within websites, but is also used for app and game development. Students will have links to protected development sites where they can continue to work on their websites during the week, between classes.Prerequisites: Basic typing skillsWorkload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: Will be given in class.Assessments: Will not be given.Lab/Supply Fee: The class tuition includes a student technology fee that covers the use of classroom laptops and all software and licenses installed on the laptops.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Technology or Career Elective for purposes of a high school transcript.

10:00 am-11:55 am

8th - 12th

(Semester Long)

Video Game Developer- 2D

Video Game Developer- 2D Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 6

What does it take to make a game? Art, music, storytelling, programming? All these things and more. Whether you are interested in game art, game design or coding, Unity is the place where it all comes together. Unity is a professional game development environment that has been used to create AAA games like Hearthstone and Kerbal Space Program and can also be used to create fun learning games, like ball rolling and pickup games. Unity games can be compiled for Mac, Windows, iOS, Android or Web GL, all from the same project file.Students will learn their way around the Unity development environment. They will learn to incorporate audio and art assets from the internet, as well as any original audio or art students have created. The class will use Unity's non-coding features to create action and will also do some scripting in C#. Students will create their own game, either chosen from Unity's catalog of beginner game tutorials or designed from scratch, and learn to deploy on the platform of their choice.Second semester will focus on 2D game design and will cover concepts like manipulating game objects in 2D space, working with "sprites" (2D game objects), and using the 2D camera setting. The class will learn techniques to create games like side-scrolling, top-down, platform and puzzle games. Even if you are most interested in 3D games, 2D development skills are useful for creating quick prototypes to show off your ideas.This course is for teens who are interested in either the artistic/graphic design aspect or programming aspect of video game development. Students should bring a laptop and charger to class each week. A gaming laptop with enhanced graphics card is preferred. No prior coding experience is expected. Topics in this Series: Video Game Designer: 3D (Semester 1) and Video Game Designer: 2D (Semester 2) Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: Will be given in class and noted in the weekly e-mails.Assessments: Will not be given.What to Bring: A laptop and charger to class each week.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Career Exploration, Technology, or Applied Computer Science for purposes of a high school transcript.

12:00 pm-1:55 pm

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

Room 8

LEGO Robotics Training Team

LEGO Robotics Training Team Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 3

LEGO Robotics Training Team is a semester-long “boot camp” and training ground for future Compass FIRST LEGO League (FLL) teams. FLL is a time-intensive extracurricular activity with fall competitions, meaning competing teams must “hit the ground running” at the beginning of the school year. The Training Team will allow potential team members to work through a complete FLL challenge at a more relaxed pace to ensure that they understand the project and enjoy the process before forming Compass competition teams in 2023.Compass Training Team members will complete a full FLL challenge from a previous year. They will learn 21st century skills in robotics and programming while enjoying the camaraderie of working as a team to solve challenges. Kids will gain confidence and build skills in leadership and communication. The Training Team members will compete in-house against each other, but will not participate in a regional competition in 2022-23.FIRST LEGO League (FLL) is an accessible, guided, beginners’ robotics program that encourages teamwork, discovery, innovation, and problem-solving. The FLL competition is comprised of three components: the Robot Game, an Innovation Project, and Core Values. The Robot Game is an annual theme-based challenge that encourages kids to think of technology solutions to real-world problems. Teams design and program an autonomous robot that scores points on a themed table-top playing field. Past challenges have been inspired by environment, transportation, accessibility, and exploration. FLL team members engage in brainstorming, research, design, and coding while practicing the engineering design process of building, testing, re-building, re-testing, etc. Students will work with LEGO Mindstorms EV3 robotics components and use drag-and-drop coding blocks to program their robots on laptop computers. No robotics or programming experience is necessary to join the Training Team.FLL members have fun with friends, encourage and support each other, and learn the art of gracious competition. In addition to the robot challenge, FLL team members compete in short, on-the-spot challenge problems in the Innovation Project phase of the competitions. FLL is also known for its philosophies of “professionalism” and “cooperation” which are expressed in the organization’s Core Values of discovery, innovation, impact, inclusion, teamwork, and fun. Teams are also judged on how well they promote and exhibit these core values.The Compass Training Team is open to students in 2nd- 7th grade* with the expectation that they could form FLL teams in the 3rd-5th grade* or 6th-8th grade* categories the next year. (Please note that grade determined by age-based enrollment if the student were in traditional school without acceleration, grade skipping, or delayed entry.) The Training Team will also expose Compass parents to the FLL program which will require parents to serve as assistant coaches and team parents on a future team.There is a $40.00 supply/equipment fee payable to Compass on the first day for practice competition materials.

10:00 am-11:55 am

2nd-7th

(Semester Long)

Robotics Challenge Lab

Robotics Challenge Lab Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 2

Students will explore the science and technology of robotics in an open workshop environment. They will work in pairs by experience level and interests to plan, conceptualize, build, program, and test a robot of their own design. Student partners will set their own design and performance criteria for their robot. Will it be one that plays a game, gathers data, or completes a mission using custom code that the team has written and tested? This laboratory is open to beginners as well as returning students with prior experience.The class will focus on construction and programming, with the goal of having functional robots by the end of the semester. There will be an emphasis on the engineering-design process with repeated build-test-redesign iterations until the robot performs as expected. Student pairs will be encouraged to think creatively and apply problem-solving skills to find unique solutions to their scenario. Groups will move at their own pace, and completed robots may have different levels of complexity depending on the experience of the team.An experienced robotics professional will serve as a mentor and facilitator during the lab. He will not teach formal lessons but will instead circulate among the partner teams to trouble-shoot and offer advice on hardware and software issues, spending more time with newer builders and programmers. Students will enjoy the collaboration and camaraderie that comes from watching the successes, missteps, and eventual solutions of other teams. They will build with Tetrix Prime metal robotics components, incorporate sensors [such as, ultrasonic distance, infrared (IR) proximity, mini-LIDAR (laser radar), touch, line-following, color- sensing, or sound sensors], electronics, and motors from Tetrix Prizm, and code using the Arduino IDE. Please note: Prior experience with robotics and coding are not required. Also, students do not get to keep finished projects.

1:00 pm-2:55 pm

7th-12th

(Semester Long)

Room 9

Compass Kindergarten

Compass Kindergarten Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 2

Can your child sit in a circle for story time? Line up for lunch? Take turns talking? This one-day, 3-hour (half-day) program is a "taste" of kindergarten for 5- year-olds. Start your child's week off right with "Monday mornings with Miss M" at Compass Kindergarten. Children will work in a small group with an experienced early elementary educator for this dynamic, play-based program that offers regular interaction and socialization.This fun, activity-based program will create rhythm and routine in a homeschooled kindergartner's week and give them a sense of community and a peer group. Children will practice routines and transitions as they move through the morning. Each session will include some simple structure such as a daily arrival song/greeting, circle time, story, snack time, activity, lunch, active game, and closing/goodbyes. Through games and activities, they will also practice key childhood social skills such as sharing, taking turns, and entering play with others. Academic basics such as the ABCs, days of the week, colors, shapes, and number sense will be integrated into activities involving fairy tales, nature and art. The teacher will provide ideas for parents to work on at home with their child during the week.Children can be dropped-off for this program (different than Compass's school-year policies for 55 minute classes.) Children should bring a snack, bagged lunch, and water bottle to each session. There is a $40.00 material fee for class consumables due payable to the teacher on the first day of class. Registration for this program is by semester (16 weeks) with priority registration for continuing students.. Students must be age five (5) at the start of the program. For families who want to extend the experience for an additional hour, consider registering for the Kinder Kitchen class at 1:00 pm.

10:00 am-12:55 pm

K

Room 10

Culinary Foundations: Meat, Poultry, and Seafood

Culinary Foundations: Meat, Poultry, and SeafoodClosed

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 0

Students with a curiosity for culinary careers will explore many aspects of cooking for the hospitality industry and for themselves. In this advanced cooking class, students will make delicious, advanced recipes and learn skills that are the foundation for a future career in culinary arts. This class will get students excited about new foods, flavors, and techniques as they gain a working knowledge of food planning and preparation.Each quarter, new technical, kitchen skills are introduced, and each week, a new recipe is made in class that demonstrates the featured food group or cooking style. Students will also prepare a base or food pairing that showcases the featured recipe.Third-quarter skills covered will include nutrition, menu planning, and knife skills -Santoku. Chapters covered in the text include Level 2 Book, Chapters 2, 6 and 7. Third-quarter recipes that showcase the lessons on Meat, Fish and Poultry include:

  • -Roasted Chicken and Vegetables
  • -Stuffed Flank Steak
  • -Honey Dijon Salmon
  • -Chili Lime Cod
  • -Thai Pork
  • -Parmesan Crusted Turkey
  • -Steak Oscar
Culinary vocabulary will also be introduced each week. Students will leave this class with an introduction to culinary careers in the hospitality industry and a beginning foundation in culinary arts. Additionally, students will be able to take charge of a home kitchen, prepare advanced dishes, and adhere to safety and hygiene standards. They will have nutrition-planning and cooking skills that will enrich the lives of their friends and families.Notes Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. Pork will be used in the proteins unit during 3rd quarter. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market available ingredients. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Topics in this Series: Stocks, Soups and Sauces (Quarter 1), Potatoes, Grains, and Legumes (Quarter 2), Meat, Poultry, and Seafood (Quarter 3), and Fruits and Vegetables (Quarter 4). Students continuing from the prior quarter will receive priority pre-registration for next quarter.Prerequisites: Students must be in 9th grade (minimum age 14) to take this class. 7th-8th graders may not enroll. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group.Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: Cooking assignments, practicing skills at home, and related homework will be given in class and e-mailed to students and parents. Brief written assignments may be given, such as recipe modification or development.Assessments: Individual feedback will be given in class. Formal assessments will not be given. At the end of the second quarter, enrolled students will be required to complete an online Virginia Food Handler Course for food safety certification through the county health department, which will cost $25.00https://courseforfoodsafety.com/states/VA?gclid=CjwKCAjw7LX0BRBiEiwA__gNw4AfZHgp_eOVTeiEXudxZhhF11E2UMggiIeYo6qL33xlUaDXbUeB5RoCG1cQAvD_BwETextbook/Materials: Students should purchase or rent the selected textbooks and workbooks. Used copies are acceptable.
  • -Foundations of Restaurant Management & Culinary Arts: Level 1, published by National Restaurant Association (ISBN# 978-0138019389)
  • -Foundations of Restaurant Management & Culinary Arts: Level 2, published by National Restaurant Association (ISBN# 978-0131380226)
  • -Activity Guide for Foundations of Restaurant Management and Culinary Arts Level 1, published by National Restaurant Association (ISBN# 978-0137070503)
  • -Activity Guide for Foundations of Restaurant Management and Culinary Arts Level 2, published by National Restaurant Association (ISBN# 978-0131380714)
Required Tools/Materials Culinary students will be expected to begin to acquire their own tools. Students should purchase and bring with them each week the following basic, minimum tools and supplies:

10:00 am-11:30 am

9th-12th

Sweets Shop: Best Bon Bons (MON)

Sweets Shop: Best Bon Bons (MON) Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 1

The tantalizing aroma of cookies in the oven. A mouth-watering burst of mint. The silky feel of melted chocolate. The sticky sweet of fresh-made caramel. A subtle hint of lemon. Student bakers will enjoy these delicious sensations- and more- as they explore the world of baking homemade desserts.

  • Lemon Cupcakes
  • Strawberry Bars
  • Apple Turnover
  • Cherry Cobbler
  • Blueberry Jam
  • Edible Cookie Dough
  • Tart
  • Icebox Cake
Sweet Shop treats are scrumptious, fun, and simple to make. Each week they will prepare a fresh, handmade dessert or sweet such as: pies, cakes, cookies, tarts, trifles, mousses, puddings, candies, fudge, brittle, or chocolate. The class will include some icing, decorating, and garnishing techniques for completed desserts. This quarter, the Compass bakers' culinary adventures will include:
  • Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. This engaging sweets class will get students excited about helping in the kitchen and entertaining. They will learn important baking skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary is introduced each week.Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a small group. Topics in this Series: Decadent Delights (Quarter 1); Gooey Goodies (Quarter 2), Best Bon Bons (Quarter 3), and Casual Confections (Quarter 4).Assessments: Qualitative Feedback will be given in class. Formal grades/assessment will not be given.Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided.What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in career exploration, fine arts, or electives for purposes of a high school transcript. For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

8th-12th

Kinder Kitchen: Winter Warm-Ups (MON)

Kinder Kitchen: Winter Warm-Ups (MON) Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 2

Kinder-aged cooks will enjoy making hearty favorites and winter weather comfort foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Festive Fall recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. In Kinder Kitchen, young chefs will make the same recipes as all other, higher level Compass cooking classes, however, some foods may be pre-cut and some steps may be simplified or completed by the cooking teacher in to support the speed and skills of the younger students. Students must be age 5 for this class. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

  • Caprese tarts
  • Loaded Baked Potato Soup
  • Spinach Pear Salad
  • Cauliflower Bake
  • Stuffed Peppers
  • Spinach with Sun-Dried Tomatoes
  • Mexican Inspired Casserole
  • Lemon Cake
Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get young students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Students must be age 5 for this class. (3- and 4- year olds cannot be accommodated. No exceptions.) Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

K (age 5)

Mosaic Masterpieces Open Studio (Q3, MON)

Mosaic Masterpieces Open Studio (Q3, MON) Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 2

Mosaics is run as a studio art class where students create unique compositions and work at their own pace under the guidance of an experienced mosaic artist. Each quarter, students are taught new design, cutting, layout, and finishing techniques and are introduced to new mosaic materials which they can incorporate into inspired, original pieces. Throughout the quarter, the instructor will suggest possible themes for projects based on the featured materials, but students are always welcome to pursue a different direction.Students who are new to mosaics will complete a quick checkerboard project (complete with wooden checkers) to teach pattern, layout, and lines before starting an individual projects. For each project, students will be able to choose from a variety of substrates- rectangular, square, shaped, or circular backboards (typically first-year students), or special forms or 3D objects (experienced students). Each project will expand a student's understanding of color, pattern, rhythm, texture, and spacing as they complete rich, dimensioned compositions. Students will be able to incorporate other glass, ceramic, and porcelain tiles into their projects and may select feature elements such as beautiful glass gems, millefiori, sliced stone, metallic ornaments, mirrored bits, or shells, to serve as focal points in their mosaic piece. The mosaic can be monochromatic, complimentary, or contrasting colors. A broad pallet of colors is always available, and new colors are added each quarter to reflect the season.Students will develop a skillset for mosaic artistry over multiple quarters or years. As each student demonstrates mastery of basic skills, safety, and artistic expression, that student will be taught advanced techniques, materials, tools, composition, and color theory. A typical progression in mosaics is:-Flat, rectangular substrate, whole tiles, symmetric design, proper spacing and adhesion-Flat, circular substrate, tile cutting with nippers, themed design and color choice-Flat or curved substrate, cutting sheet glass with pistol grip, breaking pliers, and running pliers, composition and color design-3D substrate, adhesion substances, and techniques-Porcelain and ceramic cutting, special application, advanced designThere is no prerequisite for this class. The number of projects completed each quarter depends on the student's work speed and attendance in class. Compass parents are welcome to register for the class to work alongside their teens, or to work on their own, while their teen is in another Compass class.Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.Assessments: will not be given.< />Materials Fee: Materials used vary depending on a student's experience with mosaic. Beginner Material Fee: $40.00 for a selection of Beginner Materials, including: vitreous glass, ceramic, mini, eco recycled glass, beach glass, glitter glass, glass gems, ceramic pebble, shells, metallic crystal, subway glass; Adhesive: weld bond; Grout: bone or charcoal color; Cutters: wheeled tile nippers; Substrate: 2D/Flat 12" x 12",10" x 10", 8" X 8", 4" X 4", framed mirrors, ornament shapes. Advanced Material Fee: $50.00 for a selection of Advanced Materials including: All Beginner Materials plus, iridized glass, cathedral sheet glass, opaque sheet glass, color fusion, millefiori, Van Gogh glass, natural stone and minerals, special effects glass, water glass, colored mirror, illumination glass, china plates, rhinestone, ball chain; Adhesives: weld bond, thin-set mortar, silicone; Grout: Custom colors (purple, rose, green, blue, earth, orange); Cutters: wheeled tile nippers, porcelain hand tool, hand file, pistol grip, beetle bits cutting system; Substrates: All flat shapes plus, 3D forms (egg, sphere, cone, pyramid etc),cut out sentiments, trays, glass bottle, mini sleds, flower pot, picture frame, sun catcher. Additional Fee: Tesserae by request and consultation with instructor: mother of pearl, 24 kt gold tiles (market rate), specially cut substrate. All material fees are due payable to the instructor on the first day of class by cash, check or electronic payment.What to Bring: In-progress project must be brought back to studio each week.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

2:00 pm-3:55 pm

6th-Adult

Virtual 1

Principles of Biology (Honors or On-Level)- Lecture (Online)

Principles of Biology (Honors or On-Level)- Lecture (Online)Closed

Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 0

This is a place-holder for the Principles of Biology lecture. Students should register for the Principles of Biology Lab, which will automatically enroll them in both class sections.

9:00 am-9:55 am

9th-12th

(Year Long)

Human Geography (Honors or On-Level)- Lecture (Online)

Human Geography (Honors or On-Level)- Lecture (Online)Closed

Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 0

This is a place-holder for the Human Geography online lecture. Students should register for the Human Geography Class Meeting which will automatically enroll them in both class sections.

10:00 am-10:55 am

9th-12th

(Year Long)

Virtual 2

Everyday Physics- Lecture (Online)

Everyday Physics- Lecture (Online)Closed

Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 0

This is a place-holder for the Everyday Physics online lecture. Students should register for the Physics Lab which will automatically enroll them in both class sections.

9:00 am-9:55 am

11th-12th

(Year Long)