Schedule and Room Assignments

Classes meet Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, or Fridays in Herndon, VA. Filter by subject or grade below. You can see key dates in our Google calendar or view our Academic Calendar.

Quarter beginning September 7, 2021

Art / MusicScience / TechnologyHumanities / Social SciencesLanguage Arts
ExtracurricularMathForeign Language(Full Classes)
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Monday Classes

9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00
Room 1

Skills for School: High School and Beyond

Skills for School: High School and Beyond Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 1,2

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 2

p>Quizzes, tests, homework, projects, reports, teams, clubs, jobs, internships, volunteer work, applications, life decisions arghhh! The demands of high school can be overwhelming or downright intimidating to most teens, even those who are homeschooled! And guess what? That variety of new responsibilities and expectations doesn t go away. They will likely increase in the later years of high school and into college. But don t worry- there are strategies and core skills that will help prepare a teen for success in high school and beyond.Study skills and college success basics include a toolbox of key life skills that will help your teen tackle high school and prepare for college. These skills are taught through in-class activities, some at-home trials, and by evaluating best practices. They are not taught as a one-size-fits all, but rather a range of options to accomplish the same thing for individual learners and different learning styles. Skills that will be addressed in this class include time management skills and tools like planners, to-do lists, calendars, and reminders- paper or electronic- what are the options, and what works best? Students will look at ways to manage short-term and long-term assignments; setting goals; how to break a bigger project into manageable steps and milestones; and how to avoid procrastination. The class will also learn fundamentals such as how to tackle a new chapter, read to retain, recall details, annotate, make margin notes, and take notes from readings, lectures, or videos; outline, and the art of brainstorming. Students will learn how to study and prepare for tests.In their toolbox, teens will also learn soft skills needed in school such as communicating and coordinating with a team on group projects and how to ask for information from teachers, employers, and other adults. The group will complete a career inventory and think about what they might be interested in doing in the future and will get tips on internships, mentor relationships, and options for junior/senior summer or a gap year. Finally, the class will look at sleep, diet, stress, screen time, and other personal habits that can impact a teen's work and effectiveness.10.08.24.07

11:00 am-11:55 am

8th-12th

(Semester Long)

Introduction to Photography

Introduction to PhotographyClosed

Quarter(s): 1,2

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 0

Learn the art, craft, and history of photography for hobby, home, or as a possible profession. Students will discuss observation, perspective, and choosing their subjects. They will learn about the exposure triangle and elements of photographic composition, including lighting and exposure. The class will review different genres of photography such as portraiture, nature, sports, black and white, etc., and discuss finding their own "voice" in their photographs. Each week, class time will be split between hands-on practice and review of photographic examples, including works by noteworthy photographers.For this class, students will be required to prepare two projects: a presentation on a photographer of their choice and a special photography project of their choice. On the last day, there will be an art show for the parents.Prerequisites: NoneWorkload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: In addition to the two projects described, students will have weekly homework taking photographs and occasional quizzes.Assessments: Students will receive ongoing, informal assessments and feedback on their photographs.Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.What to Bring: Students are encouraged to bring digital SLR cameras, but any digital camera that is better than a phone camera will be adequate.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.10.06.23.06

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

Secrets of Cybersecurity

Secrets of Cybersecurity Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 1,2

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 3

Social security numbers hacked. Credit card numbers stolen. Pilfered passwords. Phony e-mails. Do you know how to protect your computer, phone, network, and personal information from being compromised? The class is designed to give you the knowledge needed to protect your digital identity and devices from increasingly sophisticated attacks and scams.Few people understand the online risks they take every day. How secure are TikTok, Instagram, SnapChat, and Facebook? Could someone steal your information from these popular apps? What could you do if someone uses your name or takes your photo without permission? What does it mean to be catfished, ghosted, or cyberbullied over social media, and how can you be sure who you are chatting with? How safe is Zoom, and are there safeguards in virtual meetings?Malware, spyware, adware, worms, Trojan horses, and enough cyber viruses to declare a pandemic. Do you have antivirus software installed on your devices, and is it effective? Do you use Google Drive, DropBox, OneDrive, or iCloud? Learn what cloud storage is, where your documents and pictures actually "go", and how to secure your cloud files. Discuss common fails in user passwords and how to select, save, and remember safe passwords.Learn how to tell if an online vendor is legitimate and if its transactions are secure. Discover how to identify online scams and when it is safe- or not- to accept free apps and free downloads. Find out "where" your digital library of games, movies, ebooks, and music downloads are, if they are actually yours, and what would happen to them if the app company closed.For most users, practical computer security poses challenges. This class is designed to help you understand the answers to these questions through a series of real-life user experiences and case studies. We will work on hands-on projects and simulations to test your knowledge and apply what you have learned. Class topics include: introduction to cyber security topics; personal cyber security in the digital world; computer security for beginners and intermediate users; internet security- how you connect and protect yourself online; mobile security for on-the-go users; and privacy over the internet. Topics in this Series: Cyber Security for the Digital Consumer (Semester 1), Cyber Security: Ethical Hacking (Semester 2), etc. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.Prerequisites: NoneWorkload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates.Assessments: Completed assignments will be assessed points. Parents can calculate a letter grade using the student's points earned divided by points available, in weighted categories that include assignments, labs, quizzes, tests, projects, and presentations. Parents may view all scoring and comments at any time through the Canvas site.What to Bring: Students should bring a laptop with charger each week. Students should have the login and primary access to the laptop's systems and software. (i.e., the student should not be just a user with the parent primary on the laptop.) Chromebooks, tablets, and phones are not sufficient for the applications in this class.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Career Exploration, Technology, or Applied Computer Science for purposes of a high school transcript.10.06.17.08

1:30 pm-3:15 pm

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

Room 3

Role Play Economy: Agrarian America

Role Play Economy: Agrarian AmericaClosed

Quarter(s): 1,2

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 0

The United States has enjoyed a century of being known as the industrial or technological powerhouse of the world. But this was not the future envisioned by some of our founding fathers, in particular Thomas Jefferson, who hoped for vast expanses of North America to be populated by "yeoman farmers." His idea was that these "most valuable citizens" would be entirely self-sufficient, and thus make ideal members of the new republic, in which they held personal stakes and were largely left alone by a small government which only taxed "imported luxuries" of the corrupt, wealthy city-dwellers.

Given that the rest of the founding fathers were those corrupt city-dwellers, or like Jefferson, plantation owners who profited off other (enslaved) people's labor and trade, Jefferson's vision did not come true. By the eighteen century, America already had a complex and interconnected economy, and this is what we will simulate. In true role-playing fashion, will create characters and build their "backstories" to fit into this economy. Some will become those independent farmers, but they will be taking part in a larger trade between wealthy landowners (such as Jefferson and Washington) and selling their crops to city-dwelling traders in exchange for "imported luxuries" and goods from abroad. How corrupt they are will be up to the students, but the ultimate goal is to simulate the pre-industrial, agrarian and mercantile economy of the 18th-19th century.

Just as in real America, this class will also need a simulated democratic government with student politicians who fill the various offices that direct the growth of this economy. Will they impose Jefferson's graduated income tax, which taxed the luxuries of the rich, while the common man "pays not a farthing of tax to the general government, but on his salt?" Will the class president enact tariffs to discourage the importing of foreign treasures and encourage self-reliance? Students will race to amass fortunes in industry or their trade, allowing them to shape the future of their model American economy.

Each week, students will take turns keeping ongoing ledgers, tracking profits and losses, and paying the dreaded taxes. If farming doesn't work out for you, do you pack up and move to the city to work in a trade? Or double down and move west to follow Jefferson's vision? The goal will be to model how everyone's role in a living economy interact, for better or worse, and hopefully reward good, honest business.

Students are encouraged, to take both semesters of this class. First semester will use agrarian and mercantile economy model, while second semester will be role play an industrialized economy, resulting in more complex business plans and game strategies.

Topics in this Series: Agrarian America (Semester 1), Industrial America (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Prerequisites: None

Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.

Assignments: Course documents including period plans, photographs and recreations will be made available through a class Google Drive link emailed to parents (and students who provide their email address), as well as a class reading list of articles/excerpts and YouTube playlist for any videos watched in class or assigned as homework.

Assessments: Informal assessments will be given at the instructor's discretion, but assignments will not be scored or graded. Each student's financial success in the game will be an indicator of their learning and participation for purposes of assigning a grade. Parents will also be given shared access to their student's business plan with instructor and ledger, with instructor comments at the conclusion of class.

Textbook/Materials: None

What to Bring: Paper or notebook, pen or pencil

Credit: Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History, Economics, or Business for purposes of a high school transcript.

10:00 am-11:55 am

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

Ancient Justice: Crime & Punishment in Ancient Greece

Ancient Justice: Crime & Punishment in Ancient Greece Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 1,2

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 3

This class will explore the judicial processes of the ancient world, starting with Ancient Greece. Students will learn how justice was carried out in a time before codified written legal systems, prisons, lawyers, or even formal judges existed and where the facts of your case depended entirely on how well your rhetoric could convince hundreds of your fellow citizens that would serve on a jury. Like a traditional mock trial program, the class will hear cases, and students will defend themselves, but will be expected to do so as an Ancient Greek citizen would have, through open debate. Real historical cases will be studied and trial parts assigned to the class, which will be debated from the perspective of both citizen and non-citizen residents of an ancient Polis. The class will serve as the jury and, if necessary, select period-appropriate verdicts and explain how they arrived at their decisions. Topics in this Series: Crime & Punishment in Ancient Greece (Semester 1); Roman law, From Republic to Empire (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Google Drive (period maps, photographs and recreations) and YouTube (videos) links will be e-mailed to parents/students for homework or supplemental investigation.Textbooks: None. Assessments: Will not be given. Lab/Supply Fee: The cost of photocopied class documents is included in the course fee.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History or Civics for purposes of a high school transcript.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

First Aid & CPR for Teens- with Certification (2-Day)

First Aid & CPR for Teens- with Certification (2-Day) Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 1

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 1

Would you know what to do if you cut yourself in the kitchen? What if a friend had an anaphylactic reaction to a food or your teacher suddenly collapsed? Whether you play outdoors, participate in sports, go to the pool, cook at home, supervise siblings, or just hang out with friends, you should know what to do when an emergency arises! First Aid and CPR are the practical life skills you hope you don't have to use, but are thankful for if you do. Earn four American Heart Association certifications in one course in preparation for working as a camp aide, babysitter, assistant coach, counselor-in-training, or part time employee.This workshop will be taught in two hald-day workshops by a certified AHA instructor. Topics include: First Aid and Choking Relief; Adult CPR, AED (automatic external defibrillators), and Child/Infant CPR. The course will use the AHA pediatric first aid curriculum which also emphasizes safety and prevention of accidents and injury, particularly in young children. Key topics include: lacerations/bleeding, broken bones, burns, allergic reactions, breathing problems, heat-related complications, cold-related injuries, bites/stings, fainting/unconsciousness, use of AEDs, chest compressions, rescue breathing, and more. Students will have hands-on practice with many skills and will have to demonstrate competency at certain steps to be "signed off" on learned skills.At the end of the course, students will be certified in First Aid, Adult CPR, Child CPR, and Infant CPR. The certifications will be good for two years, and students will be able to print out their certifications for coaches, employers, scout leaders, or their own records from an online AHA portal. Students must attend both sections in order to earn the certifications. Students registered in the course will receive a 185 page, full color textbook from the AHA, their own face shield for rescue breathing, and have their AHA registration fees covered.This course is recommended for students ages 14+. At a minimum, students must be 5 feet tall and weigh at least 100 pounds to be able to properly perform chest compressions. The class will be conducted using COVID prevention protocols required by the AHA.06.04.23.06

2:00 pm-5:00 pm

9th-12th

Room 4

General Chemistry Lecture (On-Level or Honors)

General Chemistry Lecture (On-Level or Honors) Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 3

Through the study of chemistry, high school students will learn the science behind things they observe every day! Chemistry explains properties of the food we eat, the beverages we drink, the medicines we take, the fibers we wear, and fuels in the cars we drive. Chemistry is a foundation to understanding the world around us and fundamental to other sciences such as biology, physics, geology, and environmental science.This full-year laboratory course makes chemistry come alive through at-home readings, practice problems, supplementary activities, and in-person hands-on labs to demonstrate key concepts. Course themes include matter, changes in state, scientific measurement, atomic structure, electrons in atoms, and characteristics of the periodic table. Students will then study ionic, metallic, and covalent bonding, chemical names and formulas, and chemical reactions. Further chemistry topics include the behavior of gases, water and aqueous solutions, acids, bases, and salts; oxidation-reduction reactions, solutions, and thermochemistry.Students will learn the skills necessary for successful study of chemical reactions and molecular phenomena, using common high school laboratory chemicals, glassware, and techniques. This is not a course done in microscale using pre-mixed solutions: students will learn to calculate molarity and use dimensional analysis to mix solutions, calculate yields, analyze errors, and construct graphs. Example labs include experiments in molar mass, hydrates, precipitates, filtration, density, distillation, reactants, single and double displacement, acid/base titration, polymers, heat of fusion, heat of vaporization, and stoichiometry. Class demonstrations will model other chemical concepts and processes, such as a radioactive cloud chamber.Note:This course has two class meetings: In-person Lecture from 11:00 am-11:55 am on Mondays and in-person Lab from 12:00 pm- 1:30 pm on Fridays. Students must enroll in both sections.Prerequisites: High school Algebra ILevels: This course provides a substantive, full-credit experience on either an on-level or honors track. All class members complete the same core material and participate in the same labs. Students taking the course at the honors level have additional assignments and alternative scoring. Honors students' homework will be graded and recorded as part of the students' total earned points. (On-level students' homework will be corrected and graded, but not factored into the total earned points.) Honors students will complete an additional research paper each semester on a chemistry topic of their choice using a minimum of 5 sources, and Honors students will be asked to memorize the polyatomic ions. Students must identify their level prior to the start of class. At any point in the year, a student may transition from honors to on-level if the workload exceeds the students' expectations.Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class. Outside work must be completed to support the "flipped classroom" approach to this course in which the student pre-reads and prepares much of the lecture content at home, allowing in-person class time to be spent on highlights, clarification of challenging topics, class discussion, homework review, demonstrations, labs, and activities. In addition, students should plan for additional meeting and coordination time most weeks with their lab partners in-person, by phone, shared documents, or via virtual meeting. Students will also be required to read one scientific, non-fiction book or current events article each quarter and prepare a 2-page summary and response book report.Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates. Parents can have an observer account in Canvas to review assignments and graded work. Students will have weekly readings, practice problems, and mandatory pre-lab assignments. The pre-lab assignment must be completed prior to lab and will serve as the student's "ticket" into the lab session each week.Assessments: Students will earn points for completed homework, unit tests, lab reports, book reports, and semester exams. Parents can calculate a letter grade using the student's points earned divided by points available. Parents may view all scoring and comments at any time through the Canvas site.Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase or rent Prentice Hall Chemistry by Wilbraham, Staley, et. al. 2008 edition (ISBN #978-0132512107).Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $125 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a composition notebook, graph paper, lab equipment and supplies, and safety supplies.What to Bring: Students should bring a paper or a notebook, pen or pencil, and a scientific calculator each week.What to Wear: Students should not wear any loose, drapey clothing to lab. They should also come to class with long hair tied back and should wear closed toe shoes.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Lab Science for purposes of a high school transcript.10.09.23.06

11:00 am-11:55 am

10th-12th

(Year Long)

General Chemistry Lecture (On-Level or Honors)

General Chemistry Lecture (On-Level or Honors) Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 9

Through the study of chemistry, high school students will learn the science behind things they observe every day! Chemistry explains properties of the food we eat, the beverages we drink, the medicines we take, the fibers we wear, and fuels in the cars we drive. Chemistry is a foundation to understanding the world around us and fundamental to other sciences such as biology, physics, geology, and environmental science.This full-year laboratory course makes chemistry come alive through at-home readings, practice problems, supplementary activities, and in-person hands-on labs to demonstrate key concepts. Course themes include matter, changes in state, scientific measurement, atomic structure, electrons in atoms, and characteristics of the periodic table. Students will then study ionic, metallic, and covalent bonding, chemical names and formulas, and chemical reactions. Further chemistry topics include the behavior of gases, water and aqueous solutions, acids, bases, and salts; oxidation-reduction reactions, solutions, and thermochemistry.Students will learn the skills necessary for successful study of chemical reactions and molecular phenomena, using common high school laboratory chemicals, glassware, and techniques. This is not a course done in microscale using pre-mixed solutions: students will learn to calculate molarity and use dimensional analysis to mix solutions, calculate yields, analyze errors, and construct graphs. Example labs include experiments in molar mass, hydrates, precipitates, filtration, density, distillation, reactants, single and double displacement, acid/base titration, polymers, heat of fusion, heat of vaporization, and stoichiometry. Class demonstrations will model other chemical concepts and processes, such as a radioactive cloud chamber.Note:This course has two class meetings: In-person Lecture from 11:00 am-11:55 am on Mondays and in-person Lab from 12:00 pm- 1:30 pm on Fridays. Students must enroll in both sections.Prerequisites: High school Algebra ILevels: This course provides a substantive, full-credit experience on either an on-level or honors track. All class members complete the same core material and participate in the same labs. Students taking the course at the honors level have additional assignments and alternative scoring. Honors students' homework will be graded and recorded as part of the students' total earned points. (On-level students' homework will be corrected and graded, but not factored into the total earned points.) Honors students will complete an additional research paper each semester on a chemistry topic of their choice using a minimum of 5 sources, and Honors students will be asked to memorize the polyatomic ions. Students must identify their level prior to the start of class. At any point in the year, a student may transition from honors to on-level if the workload exceeds the students' expectations.Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class. Outside work must be completed to support the "flipped classroom" approach to this course in which the student pre-reads and prepares much of the lecture content at home, allowing in-person class time to be spent on highlights, clarification of challenging topics, class discussion, homework review, demonstrations, labs, and activities. In addition, students should plan for additional meeting and coordination time most weeks with their lab partners in-person, by phone, shared documents, or via virtual meeting. Students will also be required to read one scientific, non-fiction book or current events article each quarter and prepare a 2-page summary and response book report.Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates. Parents can have an observer account in Canvas to review assignments and graded work. Students will have weekly readings, practice problems, and mandatory pre-lab assignments. The pre-lab assignment must be completed prior to lab and will serve as the student's "ticket" into the lab session each week.Assessments: Students will earn points for completed homework, unit tests, lab reports, book reports, and semester exams. Parents can calculate a letter grade using the student's points earned divided by points available. Parents may view all scoring and comments at any time through the Canvas site.Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase or rent Prentice Hall Chemistry by Wilbraham, Staley, et. al. 2008 edition (ISBN #978-0132512107).Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $125 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a composition notebook, graph paper, lab equipment and supplies, and safety supplies.What to Bring: Students should bring a paper or a notebook, pen or pencil, and a scientific calculator each week.What to Wear: Students should not wear any loose, drapey clothing to lab. They should also come to class with long hair tied back and should wear closed toe shoes.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Lab Science for purposes of a high school transcript.10.09.23.06

11:00 am-11:55 am

10th-12th

(Year Long)

Dissection Lab: Anatomy: Organ Systems

Dissection Lab: Anatomy: Organ Systems Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 1,2

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 3

Dissection! The critical lab skill that schools skip and parents hate hosting at home. This lab can be paired with any independent study or online course in high school biology or anatomy in order to gain significant hands-on experience to complete a lab science credit. Students whose public or private school bio class dodges dissection are also welcome to sign up for the course.Students will investigate major organs and organ systems though a through a semester-long dissection study. Students will examine the major functions and features of a system one week and perform a related dissection the following week: circulatory system (cow heart), nervous system (sheep brain), excretory system (cow kidney), senses (cow eyeball), and musculoskeletal system (chicken wings and cow femur).The class will cover lab safety, practice proper dissection techniques, and learn how to set up and maintain a lab journal with notes and drawings of organs and organisms. Students will also use microscopes to look at tissue samples throughout the semester. Students will have a pre-lab activity (video and/or packet) to complete each week as "admission" to the following session's dissection. Topics in this Series: Organ Systems (Semester 1) and Organisms (Quarter 2), etc. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.Prerequisites: Students must have age/grade-level dexterity and fine motor skills for the detailed instrument work in this class.Workload: Students should expect to spend 1 hour per week outside of class.Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates. Students will have a mandatory pre-lab assignment that must be completed and will serve as the student's "ticket" into the lab session each week.Assessments: Will not be givenTextbook/Materials: Students should purchase The Anatomy Coloring Book (ISBN-13 : 978-0321832016)Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.What to Bring: Students should bring a paper or a notebook, pen or pencil, and a set of colored pencils to class each week.What to Wear: Students should not wear any loose, drapey clothing to lab. They should also come to class with long hair tied back and should wear closed toe shoes.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in a laboratory science for purposes of a high school transcript.10.06.23.06

3:30 pm-4:25 pm

8th-10th

(Semester Long)

AP Biology Bootcamp: Practicum and Test Prep

AP Biology Bootcamp: Practicum and Test Prep Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 6

This practicum is designed to support a student who is independently studying or enrolled in a non-lab AP Biology course. This course will facilitate a deep understanding of AP Biology themes through additional lab work and hands-on enrichment activities that follow the AP Biology "Big Ideas" of Evolution (changes in genetic makeup, common ancestry, changing environment); Energy (growth, reproduction, feedback mechanisms); Information (heritable information, genetic expression); and Systems (interactions, competition, cooperation). Tangible application of these concepts will be modelled through labs coming from this Instructor's Anatomy & Physiology course and Dissection Lab program, prior experience teaching AP Biology, and more. Students will write frequent lab reports to assess their understanding of the AP concepts and to practice the technical writing skills needed for the AP Free Response Questions.Prerequisites: Co-requisite: enrollment in an AP Biology course or plan to independently study for the AP Biology exam. In addition, AP Biology students might want to co-register for the Compass Dissection Labs for additional, hands-on laboratory experience.Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-5 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates. Students will write lab reports and have AP-style multiple choice and free response questions as homework throughout the year.Assessments: Full-length AP-style mid-term and final exams will be given to provide practice sitting for the full-length AP exam.Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase Barron's AP Biology Premium (ISBN-13: 978-1438011721)Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $145 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. The fee for the College Board's AP Biology exam in May 2022 is not included; each family is responsible for scheduling and paying for their student's AP exam.What to Bring: Students should bring a paper or a notebook, pen or pencil, and a set of colored pencils to class each week.What to Wear: Students should not wear any loose, drapey clothing to lab. They should also come to class with long hair tied back and should wear closed toe shoes.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in a laboratory science for purposes of a high school transcript.10.06.23.06

5:00 pm-6:55 pm

10th-12th

(Year Long)

Room 5

Preparation for Pre-Algebra

Preparation for Pre-Algebra Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

Day(s): Mon,Thu

Open Spots: 2

Preparation for Pre-Algebra is a year-long curriculum that will teach the fundamentals a student must master before embarking pre-algebra, algebra, and beyond. The class will review arithmetic skills, operations, and number theory. Key topics include fractions, rates, ratios, decimals, and percentages. Students will learn the computational operations of adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing fractions and decimals. They will learn what decimals stand for, how they relate to fractions, and how to convert between the two. They will discover how rates and ratios are also fractions. Students will learn how to work with negative numbers including strategies for completing all four common operations with negative numbers. The class will also cover exponents and orders of magnitude to make sense of really small and really big numbers and common operations.

This class will also emphasize real world applications of the mathematical concepts through word problems so students become comfortable switching between prose (written descriptions) and mathematical representation (numbers, symbols) of real world examples such as money, mileage, weights, percentages, and scientific measures.

Prerequisites: This course can be considered a pre-pre-algebra class that will teach the core concepts typically covered in later elementary school/early middle school after a general arithmetic curriculum and before pre-algebra. While different curriculums and student pacing will vary, this class would be appropriate for a student who has successfully covered long division, multiplication of multiple digit numbers, and an introduction to simple fractions and who has complete mastery of multiplication facts, skills often aligned with 5th grade mathematics.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class to complete practice problems, homework, and assessments.

Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.

Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by: checking that weekly homework sets are complete; spot-checking the full solution 1-2 select problems in class each week, and giving quarterly take-home tests. Points will also be awarded for class participation. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade.

Textbook: Students should purchase the two class texts: "The Complete Book of Math, Grades 5-6" (ISBN# 978-1561896776) and "EP Math 5/6 Workbook" (ISBN# 979-8643323693).

10.06.23.06

11:00 am-11:55 am

6th-7th

(Year Long)

Pre-Algebra

Pre-Algebra Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

Day(s): Mon,Thu

Open Spots: 3

This is a full year course in Pre-Algebra that will provide an introduction to basic algebra concepts and a review of arithmetic algorithms with an emphasis on problem solving. The major topics covered in this course are Numbers and Operations, Expressions & Properties, Equations & Inequalities, Functional Relationships and Ratios, Percent & Proportions. Students will learn to use formulas to solve a variety of math problems encompassing geometry, measurement probability, and statistics. Students will also be applying their learning to real life scenarios to solve problems.Prerequisites: Students must be fluent in the four basic operations- addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. They will need to show proficiency and have a thorough command of basic computation. In addition, a basic, introductory understanding and ability to work with fractions and decimals is required to solve equations and simplify expressions. If you are unsure about your child's readiness for this class, the instructor will recommend one or more practice platforms and/or assessments to confirm placement.Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class to complete practice problems, homework, and assessments.Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, link to quizzes and tests, track grades, and message the instructor and classmates.Assessments: All chapter tests will be taken outside of class with parental oversight to maximize in-class instructional time. Points will be assigned for completed homework, quizzes, and tests. A letter grade will not be assigned, but parents can use total points earned versus total points offered to assign a grade for purposes of a homeschool transcript. Parents can view total points earned at any time through the Canvas site.Textbook: The selected textbook is available free online, and a link will be posted on Canvas. Students who prefer a hard copy textbook may purchase or rent McDougall Littell's Pre-Algebra (ISBN #978-0618250035). As an alternative, for any student who struggles with reading, the textbook can be purchased as an audio CD (ISBN #978-0618478828). In addition, students will be assigned work in IXL and class note packets. (See Supply Fee notes below).Lab/Supply Fee: This course has a $65.00 supply fee which covers a 1-year subscription to IXL online math platform and a class binder with unit notes. The unit notes packet will be distributed at the beginning of each unit and includes additional examples, supplemental explanations, and practice problems. Please bring cash or a check made out to Compass on the first day of class.What to Bring: TI-34 calculatorCredit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Mathematics for purposes of a high school transcript.10.06.23.06

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

7th-9th

(Year Long)

Algebra I

Algebra I Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

Day(s): Mon,Thu

Open Spots: 4

This is a complete course in high school Algebra I which will cover fundamental concepts in algebra and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. This course is designed to emphasize the study of algebraic problem-solving with the incorporation of real-world applications. Topics in Algebra I include number systems, linear systems, rational numbers, complex numbers, exponents, roots, radicals, quadratic equations, polynomials, factoring, absolute values, ratios, and proportions. In addition, the course will cover solving and graphing systems of functions, linear equations, and inequalities. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem-solving.Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation in pre-algebra topics in order to take this class. Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Friday (day 1), lecture on Wednesday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Friday (day 8), and homework due the next Wednesday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Wednesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work. Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload. Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by checking that weekly homework sets are complete and giving periodic take-home tests; class participation is also strongly encouraged. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Algebra I: Expressions, Equations, and Applications by Paul A. Foerster. It is available in a few different editions, each of which is virtually identical: 2nd edition (ISBN-10 020125073X, ISBN-13 978-0201250732), 3rd edition (ISBN-10 0201860945, ISBN-13 978-0201860948), and Classic edition (ISBN-10 020132458X, ISBN-13 978-0201324587). It is also available under the title Foerster Algebra I, Classics edition (ISBN-10 0131657089, ISBN-13 978-0131657083). A calculator is not needed for this course. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Algebra I for purposes of a high school transcript.10.06.23.06

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

7th-10th

(Year Long)

Anatomy & Physiology Lab (On-Level or Honors)

Anatomy & Physiology Lab (On-Level or Honors) Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 6

Did you know? ...The brain is only 2% of the mass of a body, but demands 20% of our oxygen and blood supply. Babies are born with 300 bones, but have only 206 by adulthood, and every second, your body produces 25 million new cells. The anatomy and physiology of the human body is a fascinating field filled with astonishing facts about how we function. Students interested in going into any health or wellness careers in the future should consider taking anatomy and physiology: medicine (doctor), nursing, sports or rehabilitative medicine, medical assistant, medical technician, radiology/imaging, physical therapy, veterinarian, or personal trainer, as examples.In this full-credit high school lab science course, the class will move through systems of the body starting with a holistic look at the cells and tissues as the building blocks and homeostasis as the regulating process (unit 1). The class will study support and movement with an examination of the musculoskeletal system (unit 2), and "communication, control, and integration" (unit 3) through the central, peripheral, and autonomic nervous systems, endocrine system, and senses. The class will also cover "transportation and defense" (unit 4) which encompasses the circulatory system, lymphatic system, and immune responses. Finally, the class will examine respiration, nutrition and excretion (unit 5) encompassing respiratory and urinary system, upper and lower digestive tracts, and nutrition, metabolism, and more. The course will conclude with a look at reproduction and human development (unit 6) include the male and female systems, growth, and genetics/heredity.Weekly, hands-on labs and dissections will correspond to lecture content to reinforce concepts. A partial list of labs includes: blood typing, muscle biophysics, enzymes/digestion, urinalysis, kidneys and blood filtration, and bone construction. Comparative vertebrate anatomy will be examined through four dissections: owl pellet (for vole and shrew skeletal remains), frog, dogfish, and fetal pig. A venipuncture lab unit will teach the basic principles and techniques of phlebotomy.Classwork will come from assigned readings in the text along with online EdX lectures, viewed at home, from the University of Michigan. Students will also be assigned scientific and non-fiction books on anatomy and physiology (The Body: A Guide for Occupants; The Icepick Surgeon; Human Anatomy, a Visual History; Stiff, The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers; and Anatomies: A Cultural History of the Human Body) to read and discuss. Students will be required to write one formal lab report per semester and practice technical writing skills.Note:This course has two class meetings: In-person Lecture from 2:00 pm- 2:55 pm on Thursdays and in-person Lab from 1:00 pm- 2:30 pm on Mondays. Students must enroll in both sections.Prerequisites: High school Algebra ILevels:This course provides a substantive, full-credit experience on either an on-level or honors track. All class members complete the same core material and participate in the same labs. Students taking the course at the honors level have additional assignments and alternative scoring. Honors students will be required to write two research papers during the year--an anatomy topic in the fall and a physiology topic in the spring, using a minimum of five sources each. Honors students will also be expected to memorize anatomical structures observed during dissections and take a test identifying structures on labeled photographs. Finally, Honors students will be expected to memorize the majority of the human skeleton including the Latin names of bones and major muscles. Students must identify their level prior to the start of class. At any point in the year, a student may transition from honors to on-level if the workload exceeds the students' expectations.Workload: Students should expect to spend 5-6 hours per week outside of class. Outside work must be completed to support the "flipped classroom" approach to this course in which the student pre-reads and prepares much of the lecture content at home, allowing in-person class time to be spent on highlights, clarification of challenging topics, class discussion, homework review, demonstrations, labs, and activities. In addition, students should plan for additional meeting and coordination time some weeks with their lab partners in-person, by phone, using shared documents, and/or via virtual meeting.Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message the instructor and classmates. Students will have a mandatory pre-lab assignment that must be completed prior to lab and will serve as the student's "ticket" into the lab session each week.Assessments: Students will earn points for completed lab packets, chapter tests, and semester exams. Parents can calculate a letter grade using the student's points earned divided by points available. Parents may view all scoring and comments at any time through the Canvas site. Students have the option of paying for a verified certificate demonstrating successful completion of the online EdX Anatomy series which is used as a supplement to this course.Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase or rent Anatomy & Physiology, 10th ed. by Patton (ISBN #978-0323528900). Students should purchase Netter's Anatomy Coloring (ISBN-13: 978-0323545037) and The Physiology Coloring Book (ISBN-13: 978-0321036636). Students should also set up access to EdX's online lecture series "Anatomy" by the University of Michigan.Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $125 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a composition notebook, graph paper, lab equipment and supplies, and safety supplies.What to Bring: Students should bring a paper or a notebook, pen or pencil, and a set of colored pencils to class each week.What to Wear: Students should not wear any loose, drapey clothing to lab. They should also come to class with long hair tied back and should wear closed toe shoes.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Lab Science for purposes of a high school transcript.

1:00 pm-2:30 pm

10th-12th

(Year Long)

Room 6

Fashion Design I

Fashion Design I Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 1,2

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 1

Paris. Milan. Madrid. What's on the runways in 2021? Wide disco collars, chic trench coats, and layered skirts in simmering neons, crochet knits, and faux leather. Do you study the pages of Glamour, Vogue, Marie Claire, and wish to be involved in the world of trendy fashion? Perhaps you follow fashion influencers on Instagram. Or, do you enjoy the satisfaction of designing apparel yourself, your way? If so, this class is for you. Each week this course will cover two aspects: the history of fashion and fashion design.

Fashion trends are often cyclical, and elements of style are reimagined every few decades. Students will seek inspiration for new designs and style remixes by learning about the history of fashion in eastern and western cultures for the last century. First semester, students will look at fashion trends by decade from 1900 through the 1960s. This semester will cover chapters 1 through 3 in the textbook.

With inspiration from historical design trends, students will learn how to create fashion renderings, from initial concepts through a chic, coordinated collection. First semester, the class will learn about color theory, color psychology, and composing color palettes. They will learn to draw their designs by sketching a croquis (a quick, rough sketch of a garments on a proportioned figure.) Students will practice vision boarding and developing a story board. This class does not include sewing the fashions.

Topics in this Series: Stellar Style: Fashion Design & History I (Semester 1), Stellar Style: Fashion Design & History II (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Prerequisites: None.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class on reading assignments and completing design activities.

Assignments: Projects and readings will be given out in class and will also be communicated via email.

Assessments: Individual feedback is given in class. Formal assessments will not be given.

Textbook: Students should purchase Fundamentals of Fashion Design, 3rd Edition, by Richard Sorger and Jenny Udale (ISBN# 978-1474270007) before the first class. Additional information will be distributed as handouts in class.

Lab/Supply Fee: None.

What to Bring: Images/sample photos, swatches, and other assigned materials.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts or Career Education for purposes of a high school transcript.

10:00 am-10:55 am

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

Learn to Sew: Beginner

Learn to Sew: Beginner Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 1,2

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 2

Learn to sew to create one-of-a kind articles of clothing, home decor, crafts, or handmade items for your side business like Etsy or Ebay. Sewing can be a relaxing hobby, a profitable side gig, and a practical money-saving life skill. Don't settle for store-bought when you can learn to sew the custom creations you envision!First semester, students will learn the basics of hand sewing. Skills that will be introduced this semester include: quilter's knot, stitches (basting, running, backstitch, whip, ladder), tying a knot, and anchoring a knot. Students will learn to identify and use sewing tools such as fabric scissors, straight pins, thimbles, seam ripper, and various needles.Students will also begin with getting-to-know their sewing machines including different components, attachments, and functions, along with care, use, and maintenance of their machines. They will learn Identify parts of sewing machine; how to fill a bobbin and thread the machine; types of machine needles and how to change a needle, and how to control speeds. Students will practice machine stitches (straight, zig-zag, backstitch) and adjusting the length and width, learn about seam allowance, and sewing corners and curves. Students will begin with simple stitching exercises, and their first project will be sewing a pin cushion that they will use throughout the year.As part of learning to sew, students will learn about different types of fabrics, what each is best used for, and how to identify grain lines, bias, and selvedge. The class will discover how garments are assembled by deconstructing an article of clothing from its seams. Students will learn how to read a sewing pattern and take measurements The group will learn about hems and elastic along with closures and how/where to use them. First semester's project will be sewing a custom pair of pajama pants. Topics in this Series: Learn to Sew: Beginner (Semester 1), Learn to Sew: Beginner and Intermediate (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.Prerequisites: First semester- None. Second semester- No prerequisites for someone to enroll as a beginner. Intermediate students should have taken first semester or have equivalent skills.Workload: Students who practice at home will find that their sewing skills are refined and perfected more quickly. Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class practicing the sewing skill/step covered in class.Assignments: Projects will be given out in class and will also be communicated via Google Classroom.Assessments: Individual feedback is given in class. Formal assessments will not be given.Textbook: NoneEquipment/Fabric: Students must bring to class each week:

  • A portable sewing machine with bobbins. If you are purchasing a new sewing machine for the class, a Singer Heavy Duty Sewing Machine, 4400 series, model is recommended. These can be purchased from Amazon or Joann Fabrics for $160-$180. Students who are bringing a pre-owed or loaned sewing machine are expected to have the machine professionally serviced before the start of class.
  • The sewing machine owner's manual
  • An extension cord
  • Fabric for class assignments. A list of needed fabric and sewing patterns will be sent out the first day of class, with the recommended quantity, type, and deadlines.
Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $50.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a project box, including a sewing kit (with 1 pack of sewing machine needles, thread, and hand sewing essentials), and other materials used in class.What to Bring: Instructor-furnished sewing kit, sewing machine, bobbins, owner's manual, extension cord, fabric, and images/sample photos, swatches, and other assigned materials.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts or Career Education for purposes of a high school transcript.

11:00 am-11:55 am

8th-12th

(Semester Long)

Crafting for Cosplay: Foam & Plastics

Crafting for Cosplay: Foam & PlasticsClosed

Quarter(s): 1

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 0

Kratos wears a leather baldric. Captain America grasps a shield. Harley Quinn sports spiked wrist cuffs, and Lara Croft wouldn't go to war without her weaponry. Great accessories and carefully crafted garments make great cosplay. If you are interested in the world of cosplay and want to bring some of your favorite characters to life, this class will teach you the skills to craft costumes and accessories.First quarter, students will learn to work with EVA foam and thermal plastics. They will learn to use patterns, cut, layer, glue, carve, heat-shape, and paint foam and thermal plastic accessories. Projects for the quarter include a dagger with sheath and a treasure chest.In this class, students will follow templates and patterns provided by and demonstrated by the instructor. Pieces will be individualized through paint and embellishments, but the goal is for cosplayers to learn specialized crafting techniques that they can use at home to make additional, unique pieces. There is a $50.00 supply fee for in-class materials, the shared use of classroom tools/supplies, and some take-home tools to continue crafting at home. First quarter, students will take home 2 types of Exacto knives, a small cutting mat, patterns, and foam remnants.Cosplayers who would like to create original fabric costume elements such as capes, vests, skirts, and more, may want to co-register for this instructor's Learn to Sew classes. Topics in this Series: Foam & Plastics (Quarter 1), Pendants & Ornaments (Quarter 2), Leather Work (Quarter 3), Mending & Alterations (Quarter 4) etc. Students continuing from one quarter receive priority pre-registration for the next quarter.Prerequisites: NoneWorkload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: Will be communicated in weekly e-mails and posted in a Google classroom.Assessments: will not be givenTextbook/Materials: All materials will be furnished.Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $50.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in fine arts/theater for purposes of a high school transcript.

12:00 pm-1:55 pm

8th-12th

Director's Chair: Murder on the Orient Express

Director's Chair: Murder on the Orient ExpressClosed

Quarter(s): 1,2

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 0

Imagine the dapper detective, Hercule Poirot resting aboard an elegant transcontinental train when the locomotive screeches to a stop in a snowdrift, and it is discovered that another passenger was murdered overnight. Picture a colorful cast of characters- a doctor, a governess, a matron and her maid, a businessman, a salesman, a valet, and others...all who have a motive in the murder. How would you tell this story on stage?Have you ever wondered what happens behind the scenes to bring a production to stage? It takes a team of people to put on a show: stage managers, specialized designers for costumes, sets, props, lighting, music, and sound. There are also choreographers, fight directors, a dramaturge, a technical director, casting director, publicist, producer, and stage director to guide them all.This class will explore the different roles of the production team, designers, and crew responsibilities as students analyze a script and make decisions as if they were the Director. Under the guidance of a theater professional, students will learn how the pre-production and design teams develop the director's vision to bring a production to life!Students will begin with reading and analyzing a script without stage directions or notes. The group will make technical and artistic decisions to formulate a vision for the production. Students will learn to notate stage directions (such as 'stumble in from downstage right') and how to block scenes. They will make aesthetic decisions on set design and props, costuming, and technical effects such as lighting, sound effects, or music. The class will consider casting requirements and discuss the audition process. Example class projects include sketching costume concepts, creating a miniature set, and preparing audition notices.This class is recommended for beginners as well as experienced theatre and production students. Every script is different and offers new sets of challenges. The emphasis in this course is on the vision, design decisions, and the teamwork required to bring a performance to stage, but the class will not be putting on an actual production. Students who want to further their study of theatrical production might wish to co-register for the 2021-22 courses on costume fabrication, Sewing for Cosplay, Stage Combat, or one of several acting/improvisation classes. Topics in this Series: Director's Chair: Murder on the Orient Express (Semester 1), Bram Stoker's Dracula (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. Prerequisites: None Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Will be reviewed in class and summarized in the weekly e-mail. Assessments: Qualitative feedback will be given throughout the semester. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided. Textbook/Materials: Furnished by instructor. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $25.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a copy of the licensed script and project materials. What to Bring: Script and notes. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts or Career Exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

Room 8

Introduction to Computer Science: Python Programming

Introduction to Computer Science: Python Programming Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 1,2

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 3

Do you want to learn the world's fastest growing programming language that is used by Google, NASA, YouTube and the CIA? Python is a versatile, easy-to-learn beginner-level programming language and gateway to foundational concepts in computer science.

Students will learn how to code apps and games as they practice the computer science design cycle of writing code, executing the code, interpreting the results, revising the code syntax based on the output. The class will cover the fundamental building blocks of programming including: variables, mathematical operators, logical operators, and boolean arithmetic. They will also learn about data types, built-in functions, conditional statements, for- loops, defining functions, function stacks, interpreting error messages, exception handling, and add-on libraries. At each step, the class will create basic programs and fun, interactive content.

Topics in this Series: Python Programming (Semester 1), JavaScript Programming (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Prerequisites: Algebra I, recommended

Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.

Assignments: Will be given in class.

Assessments: Will not be given.

Lab/Supply Fee: The class tuition includes a student technology fee that covers the rental of classroom laptops and all software, and licenses.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Technology or Career Elective for purposes of a high school transcript.

10:00 am-11:55 am

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

Intro to Coding: App Design

Intro to Coding: App Design Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 1,2

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 4

From ordering food or scheduling a ride, getting directions or checking the weather, editing photos or staying in touch, even a calculator and a flashlight ....everyone is using mobile apps. There are more than 3.1 million apps just in the Google Play store. Teens love their phones and tablets will have fun learning to code custom apps (applications) for them. In this project-based workshop, students will design and develop an app of their choice. Will their personal app connect friends, create memes, play a game, or keep themselves organized?

Students will create apps using Thunkable, a development environment that uses a drag and drop menu to create apps. They will then have the option of moving into coding in C# in Microsoft's Xamarin cross-platform development environment. Both environments support the creation of apps for Android and iOS (iPhone) devices. In all app programming platforms, students will practice the iterative design process to define a problem, generate ideas, build, test, and improve their app. In all app programming platforms, students will practice the iterative design process to define a problem, generate ideas, build, test, and improve their app.

Students will need to bring a PC or Mac laptop to class. Chromebooks and tablets will not suffice for this work. Students should have a laptop with a minimum Intel 64 processor, Windows 7 or 8 operating system, 256 MB of RAM, and 200 MB of available hard-disk space for installation. Students will need their own gmail e-mail accounts to access the Thunkable software.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: Will be given in class and noted in the weekly e-mails. Assessments: Will not be given. Topics in this Series: App Design (Semester 1) and Web Development (Semester 2) What to Bring: A laptop and charger to class each week. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Career Exploration, Technology, or Applied Computer Science for purposes of a high school transcript.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

Robotics Tech Challenge: Mars Rover

Robotics Tech Challenge: Mars Rover Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 1,2

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 1

Following in the footsteps of NASA's latest Perseverance Rover (and its predecessors Sojourner, Spirit, Opportunity, and Curiosity) in the race to the red planet, students will construct a robotic Mars rover in this project-based class. They will work in small teams to design, build, and program prototype rovers that operate with multiple axles and independently powered wheels. Rovers will have cameras (to film the Martian surface) and will be constructed to collect samples, climb craters, traverse sandy and rocky terrain, and re-route around boulders and obstacles.

The class will focus on construction and programming, with an emphasis on the design of functional robots. The rovers will be programmed to sense and react to the environment and to complete a series of missions on a pre-defined course. Students will build with Tetrix Prime metal robotics components, incorporate sensors [such as, ultrasonic distance, infrared (IR) proximity, mini-LIDAR (laser radar), touch, line-following, color- sensing, or sound sensors], electronics, and motors from Tetrix Prizm, and code using the Arduino IDE. Teams will conduct research, apply the engineering design process, follow the general rules and conventions of the engineering profession, including maintaining an engineering notebook. Each robot will be put through a series of tests/challenges related to the specific robot design. Please note that students do not get to keep finished projects. Please note that students do not get to keep finished projects.

Topics in this Series: Mars Rover (Semester 1) and Disaster Response Robots (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Prerequisites: None. Students with no prior experience in robotics or programming are welcome.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class researching robot and automation design

Assessments: Ongoing feedback is provided in class on construction and programming. Formal assessments are not provided.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Technology or Career Exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

1:00 pm-2:55 pm

8th-12th

(Semester Long)

Room 10

Culinary Foundations: Stocks, Soups and Sauces

Culinary Foundations: Stocks, Soups and SaucesClosed

Quarter(s): 1

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 3

Students with a curiosity for culinary careers will explore many aspects of cooking for the hospitality industry and for themselves. In this advanced cooking class, students will make delicious, advanced recipes and learn skills that are the foundation for a future career in culinary arts. This class will get students excited about new foods, flavors, and techniques as they gain a working knowledge of food planning and preparation.Each quarter, new technical, kitchen skills are introduced, and each week, a new recipe is made in class that demonstrates the featured food group or cooking style. Students will also prepare a base or food pairing that showcases the featured recipe.First quarter technical skills will include kitchen essentials, basic kitchen first aid, and knife skills-focusing on the Chef Knife. Chapters covered in the text include Level 1 book, Chapter 3, 4 and 6. First quarter recipes that showcase the lessons on Stocks, Soups and Sauces include:

  • -Bechamel Sauce, White Wine Sauce, Creamy Garlic Sauce, and Three-Cheese Sauce (served over broccoli and pasta)
  • -Hollandaise Sauce and Bearnaise Sauce (served over Eggs Benedict and asparagus)
  • -White Stock and Court Boullion (stocks will be transformed into a hearty Italian vegetable soup)
  • -Chocolate Sauce and Pineapple Cream Sauce (served over coconut cream soft ice cream)
  • -Fumet and Clam Chowder (paired with a savory homemade cheese cracker)
  • -Hot and Sour Soup (paired with a Chinese cucumber salad)
Culinary vocabulary will also be introduced each week. Students will leave this class with an introduction to culinary careers in the hospitality industry and a beginning foundation in culinary arts. Additionally, students will be able to take charge of a home kitchen, prepare advanced dishes, and adhere to safety and hygiene standards. They will have nutrition-planning and cooking skills that will enrich the lives of their friends and families.Notes Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. Pork will be used in the proteins unit during 3rd quarter. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market available ingredients. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Topics in this Series: Stocks, Soups and Sauces (Quarter 1), Potatoes, Grains, and Legumes (Quarter 2), Meat, Poultry, and Seafood (Quarter 3), and Fruits and Vegetables (Quarter 4). Students continuing from the prior quarter will receive priority pre-registration for next quarter.Prerequisites: Students must be in 9th grade (minimum age 14) to take this class. 7th-8th graders may not enroll. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group.Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: Cooking assignments, practicing skills at home, and related homework will be given in class and e-mailed to students and parents. Brief written assignments may be given, such as recipe modification or development. There will also be a brief summer assignment before the start of Quarter 1.Assessments: Individual feedback will be given in class. Formal assessments will not be given. At the end of the second quarter, enrolled students will be required to complete an online Virginia Food Handler Course for food safety certification through the county health department, which will cost $25.00https://courseforfoodsafety.com/states/VA?gclid=CjwKCAjw7LX0BRBiEiwA__gNw4AfZHgp_eOVTeiEXudxZhhF11E2UMggiIeYo6qL33xlUaDXbUeB5RoCG1cQAvD_BwETextbook/Materials: Students should purchase or rent the selected textbooks and workbooks. Used copies are acceptable.
  • -Foundations of Restaurant Management & Culinary Arts: Level 1, published by National Restaurant Association (ISBN# 978-0138019389)
  • -Foundations of Restaurant Management & Culinary Arts: Level 2, published by National Restaurant Association (ISBN# 978-0131380226)
  • -Activity Guide for Foundations of Restaurant Management and Culinary Arts Level 1, published by National Restaurant Association (ISBN# 978-0137070503)
  • -Activity Guide for Foundations of Restaurant Management and Culinary Arts Level 2, published by National Restaurant Association (ISBN# 978-0131380714)
Required Tools/Materials Culinary students will be expected to begin to acquire their own tools. Students should purchase and bring with them each week the following basic, minimum tools and supplies: 

10:00 am-11:55 am

9th-12th

Sweets Shop- Delectable Desserts (MON)

Sweets Shop- Delectable Desserts (MON)Closed

Quarter(s): 1

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 0

The tantalizing aroma of cookies in the oven. A mouth-watering burst of mint. The silky feel of melted chocolate. The sticky sweet of fresh-made caramel. A subtle hint of lemon. Student bakers will enjoy these delicious sensations- and more- as they explore the world of baking homemade desserts.Sweet Shop treats are scrumptious, fun, and simple to make. Compass bakers will learn to prepare a variety of desserts for friends and family, as an everyday treat or for holidays, birthdays, and other special occasions. Each quarter, students will create a range of desserts including a pie, a cake, a tray bake, cookies, a tart, a mousse or pudding, and a chocolate (plus, a frozen dessert in 8-week quarters). The class will include some icing, decorating, and garnishing techniques for completed desserts. This quarter, the Compass bakers' culinary adventures will include:-Lemon Curd Pop Tarts-Ginger Chunk Cookies-Honeycomb Candy-Cinnamon Churro Puff Twists-Buttercream Techniques-Petit Fours-Lemon Rosemary CakeStudents will be eating what they bake each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging baking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen and entertaining. They will learn important baking skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary is introduced each week. Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a small group. Topics in this Series: Delectable Desserts (Quarter 1); Innovative Indulgences (Quarter 2), Decadent Delights (Quarter 3), and Casual Confections (Quarter 4).Assessments: Will not be given.Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided.What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in career exploration, fine arts, or electives for purposes of a high school transcript. For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

8th-12th

Mosaic Masterpieces Open Studio (Q1, MON)

Mosaic Masterpieces Open Studio (Q1, MON)Closed

Quarter(s): 1

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 4

Mosaics is run as a studio art class where students create unique compositions and work at their own pace under the guidance of an experienced mosaic artist. Each quarter, students are taught new design, cutting, layout, and finishing techniques and are introduced to new mosaic materials which they can incorporate into inspired, original pieces. Throughout the quarter, the instructor will suggest possible themes for projects based on the featured materials, but students are always welcome to pursue a different direction.Students who are new to mosaics will complete a quick checkerboard project (complete with wooden checkers) to teach pattern, layout, and lines before starting an individual projects. For each project, students will be able to choose from a variety of substrates- rectangular, square, shaped, or circular backboards (typically first-year students), or special forms or 3D objects (experienced students). Each project will expand a student's understanding of color, pattern, rhythm, texture, and spacing as they complete rich, dimensioned compositions. Students will be able to incorporate other glass, ceramic, and porcelain tiles into their projects and may select feature elements such as beautiful glass gems, millefiori, sliced stone, metallic ornaments, mirrored bits, or shells, to serve as focal points in their mosaic piece. The mosaic can be monochromatic, complimentary, or contrasting colors. A broad pallet of colors is always available, and new colors are added each quarter to reflect the season.Students will develop a skillset for mosaic artistry over multiple quarters or years. As each student demonstrates mastery of basic skills, safety, and artistic expression, that student will be taught advanced techniques, materials, tools, composition, and color theory. A typical progression in mosaics is:-Flat, rectangular substrate, whole tiles, symmetric design, proper spacing and adhesion-Flat, circular substrate, tile cutting with nippers, themed design and color choice-Flat or curved substrate, cutting sheet glass with pistol grip, breaking pliers, and running pliers, composition and color design-3D substrate, adhesion substances, and techniques-Porcelain and ceramic cutting, special application, advanced designThere is no prerequisite for this class. The number of projects completed each quarter depends on the student's work speed and attendance in class. Compass parents are welcome to register for the class to work alongside their teens, or to work on their own, while their teen is in another Compass class.Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.Assessments: will not be given.< />Materials Fee: Materials used vary depending on a student's experience with mosaic. Beginner Material Fee: $40.00 for a selection of Beginner Materials, including: vitreous glass, ceramic, mini, eco recycled glass, beach glass, glitter glass, glass gems, ceramic pebble, shells, metallic crystal, subway glass; Adhesive: weld bond; Grout: bone or charcoal color; Cutters: wheeled tile nippers; Substrate: 2D/Flat 12" x 12",10" x 10", 8" X 8", 4" X 4", framed mirrors, ornament shapes. Advanced Material Fee: $50.00 for a selection of Advanced Materials including: All Beginner Materials plus, iridized glass, cathedral sheet glass, opaque sheet glass, color fusion, millefiori, Van Gogh glass, natural stone and minerals, special effects glass, water glass, colored mirror, illumination glass, china plates, rhinestone, ball chain; Adhesives: weld bond, thin-set mortar, silicone; Grout: Custom colors (purple, rose, green, blue, earth, orange); Cutters: wheeled tile nippers, porcelain hand tool, hand file, pistol grip, beetle bits cutting system; Substrates: All flat shapes plus, 3D forms (egg, sphere, cone, pyramid etc),cut out sentiments, trays, glass bottle, mini sleds, flower pot, picture frame, sun catcher. Additional Fee: Tesserae by request and consultation with instructor: mother of pearl, 24 kt gold tiles (market rate), specially cut substrate. All material fees are due payable to the instructor on the first day of class by cash, check or electronic payment.What to Bring: In-progress project must be brought back to studio each week.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.10.07.23.06

2:00 pm-3:55 pm

7th-Adult

Mosaic Masterpieces Open Studio (Q1, Afterschool)

Mosaic Masterpieces Open Studio (Q1, Afterschool)Closed

Quarter(s): 1

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 7

Mosaics is run as a studio art class where students create unique compositions and work at their own pace under the guidance of an experienced mosaic artist. Each quarter, students are taught new design, cutting, layout, and finishing techniques and are introduced to new mosaic materials which they can incorporate into inspired, original pieces. Throughout the quarter, the instructor will suggest possible themes for projects based on the featured materials, but students are always welcome to pursue a different direction.Students who are new to mosaics will complete a quick checkerboard project (complete with wooden checkers) to teach pattern, layout, and lines before starting an individual projects. For each project, students will be able to choose from a variety of substrates- rectangular, square, shaped, or circular backboards (typically first-year students), or special forms or 3D objects (experienced students). Each project will expand a student's understanding of color, pattern, rhythm, texture, and spacing as they complete rich, dimensioned compositions. Students will be able to incorporate other glass, ceramic, and porcelain tiles into their projects and may select feature elements such as beautiful glass gems, millefiori, sliced stone, metallic ornaments, mirrored bits, or shells, to serve as focal points in their mosaic piece. The mosaic can be monochromatic, complimentary, or contrasting colors. A broad pallet of colors is always available, and new colors are added each quarter to reflect the season.Students will develop a skillset for mosaic artistry over multiple quarters or years. As each student demonstrates mastery of basic skills, safety, and artistic expression, that student will be taught advanced techniques, materials, tools, composition, and color theory. A typical progression in mosaics is:-Flat, rectangular substrate, whole tiles, symmetric design, proper spacing and adhesion-Flat, circular substrate, tile cutting with nippers, themed design and color choice-Flat or curved substrate, cutting sheet glass with pistol grip, breaking pliers, and running pliers, composition and color design-3D substrate, adhesion substances, and techniques-Porcelain and ceramic cutting, special application, advanced designThere is no prerequisite for this class. The number of projects completed each quarter depends on the student's work speed and attendance in class. Parents are welcome to register for the class to work alongside their child, or to work on their own, while their child is in another Compass class.Materials Fee: Materials used vary depending on a student's experience with mosaic. Beginner Material Fee: $40.00 for a selection of Beginner Materials, including: vitreous glass, ceramic, mini, eco recycled glass, beach glass, glitter glass, glass gems, ceramic pebble, shells, metallic crystal, subway glass; Adhesive: weld bond; Grout: bone or charcoal color; Cutters: wheeled tile nippers; Substrate: 2D/Flat 12" x 12",10" x 10", 8" X 8", 4" X 4", framed mirrors, ornament shapes. Advanced Material Fee: $50.00 for a selection of Advanced Materials including: All Beginner Materials plus, iridized glass, cathedral sheet glass, opaque sheet glass, color fusion, millefiori, Van Gogh glass, natural stone and minerals, special effects glass, water glass, colored mirror, illumination glass, china plates, rhinestone, ball chain; Adhesives: weld bond, thin-set mortar, silicone; Grout: Custom colors (purple, rose, green, blue, earth, orange); Cutters: wheeled tile nippers, porcelain hand tool, hand file, pistol grip, beetle bits cutting system; Substrates: All flat shapes plus, 3D forms (egg, sphere, cone, pyramid etc),cut out sentiments, trays, glass bottle, mini sleds, flower pot, picture frame, sun catcher. Additional Fee: Tesserae by request and consultation with instructor: mother of pearl, 24 kt gold tiles (market rate), specially cut substrate. All material fees are due payable to the instructor on the first day of class by cash, check or electronic payment.What to Bring: In-progress project must be brought back to studio each week.10.07.23.06

4:30 pm-6:00 pm

6th-8th

Virtual 1

Principles of Biology Lecture Section *HYBRID*

Principles of Biology Lecture Section *HYBRID*Closed

Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 0

This full-year lab science course introduces classic biology topics updated for the 21st century. Biology studies living things and their relationships from microscopic to massive, ancient to modern, arctic to tropic. Our survey includes: (1) cellular and molecular biology, (2) ecology, (3) genetics, (4) biology of organisms (with selected human health and anatomy topics), and (5) evolution and diversity.

You will observe microscopic organisms and give monarch butterflies a health exam before tagging them for their 2,800 mile migration to Mexico. You will extract DNA, model its processes, and learn how scientists manipulate this magnificent molecule to make mice glow. You will observe animal behavior, test your heart rate, and practice identifying and debunking pseudo-science.

By the end of the course, students will be able to explain the nature of science as a system of knowing; cite evidence for foundational theories of modern biology; explain basic biological processes and functions; describe structures and relationships in living systems; outline systems of information, energy, and resources; demonstrate valid experimental design; discern ethical standards; relate their values and scientific ideas to decision-making; and apply biology knowledge to their own health.

In this flipped classroom, students are responsible for covering new material such as readings from the textbook and additional popular and scholarly sources, videos, and animations PRIOR to class meetings. In-person sessions focus on active discussion, clarification, exploration of content, review, modeling, and hands-on activities.

Labs address not only technical skills and sequential operations, but also forming testable predictions, collecting data, applying math, drawing conclusions, and presenting findings. Hands-on dissection, always optional, is taught with preserved crayfish and fetal pigs.

Sensitive issues: human reproduction is not taught separately, but mentioned as students learn about other, related topics such as sperm, eggs, stem cells, genetic disease, hormones, fetal development, breast-feeding, adolescence, and HIV. While there may be some debate-style discussion of topics such as GMO, abortion will not be debated. Birth control and sexuality education are not covered, but distinctions between gender and biological sex are discussed in detail in the genetics unit. Dissections are optional. Evolution is embedded in every topic, from molecular to ecological, inseparably from other content. It is addressed in a scientific context, not from a faith standpoint.

The course provides a substantive, full-credit experience on either an Honors or On-Level track. All class members share core material and participate in the same labs. Honors has longer or additional readings, more analytical work, and more thorough and difficult assessments. Brief, required summer assignments are due in August for those who elect to take Honors. Students register online for the same course, but must indicate which level they wish to study via e-mail by August 15. Students may move down a level (from Honors to On-Level) at any time.

Schedule: Note:This class will be taught in a Hybrid format with an online lecture on Mondays (9:00 am - 9:55 am) over a live, online platform and in-person lab and activities on Fridays (9:30 am - 10:55 am).

Prerequisites: Students should be very strong, independent readers and able to understand graphs, tables, percentages, decimals, ratios, and averages.

Workload: Homework includes term cards, brief written responses, weekly online quizzes, unit tests, occasional lab reports, and some creative assignments including sketching. Students will sometimes prepare short, in-class presentations, participate in group projects, run simulations, or conduct simple experiments at home. All students should expect to spend 4-6 hours outside of class reading and preparing homework.

Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments; upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests; track grades; message instructor and classmates; and attend virtual conferences.

Assessments: Completed homework, projects, quizzes, and tests receive points and narrative feedback. Parents can calculate a letter grade using the student's points earned divided by points available, in weighted categories that include assignments, reading quizzes, tests, and participation and presentations. Parents may view all scoring and comments at any time through the Canvas site.

Textbook/Materials: Students must purchase or rent the textbook Biology (2010 edition with baby alligator cover) by Stephen Nowicki, published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt/Holt McDougal (ISBN# 9780547219479) An e-book version is also available (ISBN# 9780547221069). Core textbook readings are supplemented by the instructor with updated information drawn from sources such as peer-reviewed science journals, popular science publications, and podcasts.

Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $130 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

Supplies/Equipment: Students will need access to a computer/internet, compound microscope with 400X magnification and cool lighting, splash goggles, water-resistant/acid-resistant lab apron, kitchen or postal scale, 3-ring binder, approximately 400- 3"x5" index cards; and plain, lined, and graph paper. Some of these supplies are used at home. Weekly "Read Me First" web pages and sometimes additional class announcements on Canvas tell students what items to bring to class.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Lab Science for purposes of a high school transcript.

9:00 am-9:55 am

9th-12th

(Year Long)

Modern World History (Lecture Section) *HYBRID*

Modern World History (Lecture Section) *HYBRID* Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 1

This year-long, full credit high school course offers an in-depth look at how our world developed from 1200 CE to today. Long before jet travel, many portions of the globe were connected. By the early 1200s, Persian historian Juvayni, reported that one might walk safely from Southeast Asia to Eastern Europe- thanks to Mongol army units. Silk Roads linked Moscow to Tibet. Vibrant Indian Ocean trade circulated goods, people, and animals from China to Indonesia to India, with linkages to East African coastal cities and the wider Muslim world, including Arab and Turkic peoples. In 200 more years, Muslim Admiral Zheng He would command China's legendary treasure fleet.Despite a few sporadic contacts, most of the Old World remained ignorant of lands from the Arctic Circle to the volcanic Tierra del Fuego. Here in the Americas, precursors to Incan and Aztec empires built urban city-states, while farther north, Cahokia's pyramids and Mesa Verde's cliffside apartments boomed, the Iroquois League united five great nations, and countless other populations lived as hunter-gatherers, horticulturists, whalers, fishers, and farmers. At 1200 CE, when this course begins, two halves of the world had not yet collided, but soon would.We will use the tools and perspectives of historians to see how this collision happened and what else built the world we know today. You will analyze primary sources and secondary sources. You will learn to identify symbols, develop arguments based on evidence, and think critically about the arguments of others. We spend a lot of time interpreting maps, letters, paintings, sculptures, photographs, speeches, and other material to understand context, causation, and continuity and change over time. By the end of the course, you may not have memorized dozens of dates (unless you wanted to), but you WILL have a much clearer idea of who was where, when, and why-- and how that has affected us.*INSTRUCTOR'S NOTE*This is a reading-heavy course suited for students who can commit to completing homework BEFORE each meeting. That prepares you for active discussion, role play, and activities in class. The course is not lecture-based, but instead is taught as a participatory seminar. Students cannot learn the rich course material by simply attending. However, if you come with your readings finished, ready to ask questions and apply what you've learned, the world is yours!LEVELS:This course is offered at three levels: On-Level, Honors, and Advanced Placement (AP). Each has a different workload, but all meet together. AP students work at a university freshman level and have the potential to earn college credit or placement through the spring 2022 AP exam. AP students start class two weeks earlier, with online homework due in mid- and late August. Honors students have assignments that engage higher-level analysis and historical thinking skills. On-Level students use the same college-level textbook, but have fewer readings, less homework, and less rigorous assessments.SCHEDULE: There are two weekly meetings: (1) Friday in-person for all class members; and (2) Monday online in a virtual classroom from 10:00 am - 10:55 am. The Monday online session is required for AP students, but open to all students and recorded for those who cannot attend live. For Honors and On-Level, this is a 28-week course which follows the Compass calendar but ends two weeks early due to the AP exam. AP students have the equivalent of 31 weeks, as they begin two weeks before the regular Compass start date and have an additional session for a mock exam.WORKLOAD: Honors and On-Level students should plan 4-5 hours each week outside of class meetings for reading and homework. AP students typically need 6 hours or more, depending on reading speed and experience. All levels use materials written at a freshman college level, so students must be highly-skilled readers or else have robust reading support at home.Assignments: All assignments will be posted on a password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, message instructor and classmates, and attend virtual conferences.Assessments: Completed homework, projects, quizzes, and tests receive points and narrative feedback. Parents can calculate a letter grade using the student's points earned divided by points available, in weighted categories that include assignments, reading quizzes, tests, and participation and presentations. Parents may view all scoring and comments at any time through the Canvas site.TEXTBOOK: Registered students will receive an e-mail with the required textbook(s) over the summer.REGISTRATION. All students register online for the same course, but students must designate their choice of On-Level, Honors, or AP by emailing Compass before August 4. Once the course has begun, students may move down a level at any time, but the instructor will consider "bumping up" on a case-by-case basis only.AP FEES:An additional tuition fee of $175 is assessed for students approved to take AP level, due to additional instructional time. Families will receive a separate invoice for this amount before the start of classes. The fee is not refundable if the student decides midyear to switch to Honors or On-Level. The fee for the College Board's AP Modern World History exam in May 2022 is not included; each family is responsible for scheduling and paying for their student's AP exam.AP APPROVAL: Students who have taken a prior course with the instructor may seek approval for AP level through a conversation or e-mail with her. For students new to this instructor, a short questionnaire and brief written assignment about a sample textbook chapter are needed to request approval for AP level.CREDIT: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in World History for purposes of a high school transcript.

10:00 am-10:55 am

11th-12th

(Year Long)

Dynamic Dioramas- The Explorers: Vasco Da Gama, 1497 *ONLINE*

Dynamic Dioramas- The Explorers: Vasco Da Gama, 1497 *ONLINE*Closed

Quarter(s): 1

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 1

Vasco Da Gama was the first European to reach India by sea, sailing East around all of Africa, and establishing Portugal's role as a colonial power. This made Portugal, for a time, the only European nation with a direct link to the fantastically wealthy Far East trade. The rest of Europe had to rely on slow, dangerous overland trade, through the hostile Ottoman Empire. To control its monopoly on the spice trade, Portugal established outposts along the coasts of its trade routes, which we will be recreating, along with the fleets that sheltered there. These outposts were heavily fortified, against the hostile natives, and marauding pirates, privateers, and the navies of other European nations seeking their own dominance of trade and empire.Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, paint, and miniatures, each student will craft a 10 X 16 diorama. In class, they will view historical maps, artistic renderings, and/or photographs to understand the topography and development of this time and place in history. Students will customize their dioramas with landforms, landscape elements, waterways, and structures to represent a scene from this period. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature figures. Students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate a larger terrain and then compete in a history-based role-playing game which will reinforce lessons about the culture, economy, and/or warfare of the time. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them.This class will be taught synchronously in a virtual classroom. Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a kit of supplies to be used at home. The supply fee is $25.00 for those picking up the kit at Compass in Herndon or $40.00 for the kit to be shipped by USPS.Topics in this year's series include: Vasco da Gama (Quarter 1); Ferdinand Magellan (Quarter 2); Hernan Cortez (Quarter 3); Francisco Pizarro (Quarter 4).10.06.23.06

2:00 pm-3:00 pm

3rd-5th