Schedule and Room Assignments

4th quarter classes begin the week of March 18, 2024. 

You can see key dates in our Google calendar or view our Academic Calendar. You can also view the schedule as a grid (below) or as a list.

Quarter beginning March 18, 2024

View by Grade(s)

Monday

9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00
D-1

Fashion Design & History- 1970s-Today*

Fashion Design & History- 1970s-Today*Closed

Quarter(s): 3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 1

London. New York. Tokyo. What will be on the runways in 2024? Statement coats, full-body capes, tailored suits, layered skirts, vests, metallic detailing, iridescent fabrics and natural fibers. Do you study the pages of Glamour, Vogue, Marie Claire, and wish to be involved in the world of trendy fashion? Perhaps you follow fashion influencers on Instagram. Or, do you enjoy the satisfaction of making things yourself, your way? If so, this class is for you. Each week this course will cover three parallel tracks: the history of fashion, fashion design, and sewing, with the first hour of each class being lessons and design work and the second hour dedicated to application and sewing. Fashion trends are often cyclical, and elements of style are reimagined every few decades. Students will seek inspiration for new designs and style remixes by learning about the history of fashion in eastern and western cultures for the last century. Second semester, students will examine fashion trends by decade from the 1970s through the 2000s. The class will also highlight the work of influential designers such as Charles Frederick Worth, Gabrielle Chanel, Christian Dior, Valentino, Kenzo Takada, Prada, and others. This semester will cover chapters 4 and 5 in the textbook. With inspiration from historical design trends, students will learn how to create fashion renderings, from initial concepts through a chic, coordinated collection. Second semester, students' design work will focus on creating a collection and sharing those designs through a collection story board. The class will also culminate with presentation of designs and a discussion of related careers including fashion design, art, graphic design, advertising, merchandising, costuming, manufacturing, retail work or virtual style influencer. Topics in this Series: Stellar Style: Fashion Design & History I (Semester 1), Stellar Style: Fashion Design & History II (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. Prerequisites: None. Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class on reading assignments and completing design activities. Assignments: Projects and readings will be given out in class and will also be communicated via email. Assessments: Individual feedback is given in class. Formal assessments will not be given. Textbook: Students should purchase Fundamentals of Fashion Design, 3rd Edition, by Richard Sorger and Jenny Udale (ISBN# 978-1474270007) before the first class. Additional information will be distributed as handouts in class. Lab/Supply Fee: None. What to Bring: Images/sample photos, swatches, and other assigned materials. Non-Meeting Dates:11/6/23 Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts or Career Education for purposes of a high school transcript.

10:00 am-10:55 am

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

Learn to Sew: Beginner and Advanced Beginner

Learn to Sew: Beginner and Advanced BeginnerClosed

Quarter(s): 3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 1

Learn to sew to create one-of-a kind articles of clothing, home decor, crafts, or handmade items for your side business like Etsy or Ebay. Sewing can be a relaxing hobby, a profitable side gig, and a practical money-saving life skill. Don't settle for store-bought when you can learn to sew the custom creations you envision! Second semester, Beginner students will learn the basics of hand sewing. Skills that will be introduced this semester include: quilter's knot, stitches (basting, running, backstitch, whip, ladder), tying a knot, and anchoring a knot. Students will learn to identify and use sewing tools such as fabric scissors, straight pins, thimbles, seam ripper, and various needles. Advanced Beginner students (those continuing from first semester or those with prior experience), will learn how to read and cut our a sewing pattern, how to take body measurements and match to pattern measurements, and how to select the best fabric for a pattern. Advanced Beginner students will learn how to finish pieces by selecting and attaching closures (buttons, button holes, grommets, zippers, & hook and eyes); gathering and pleating, using binding and bias tape, and attaching pockets and waistbands. Students will also begin with getting-to-know their sewing machines including different components, attachments, and functions, along with care, use, and maintenance of their machines. They will learn Identify parts of sewing machine; how to fill a bobbin and thread the machine; types of machine needles and how to change a needle, and how to control speeds. Students will practice machine stitches (straight, zig-zag, backstitch) and adjusting the length and width, learn about seam allowance, and sewing corners and curves. Students will begin with simple stitching exercises, and their first project will be sewing a pin cushion that they will use throughout the year. As part of learning to sew, students will learn about different types of fabrics, what each is best used for, and how to identify grain lines, bias, and selvedge. The class will discover how garments are assembled by deconstructing an article of clothing from its seams. Students will learn how to read a sewing pattern and take measurements The group will learn about hems and elastic along with closures and how/where to use them. Second semester's Beginner project will be sewing a custom pair of pajama pants, while the Advanced Beginner project will be a small block quilt. Topics in this Series: Learn to Sew: Beginner (Semester 1), Learn to Sew: Beginner and Advacned Beginner (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. Prerequisites: First semester- None. Second semester- No prerequisites for someone to enroll as a beginner. Intermediate students should have taken first semester or have equivalent skills. Workload: Students who practice at home will find that their sewing skills are refined and perfected more quickly. Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class practicing the sewing skill/step covered in class. Assignments: Projects will be given out in class and will also be communicated via Google Classroom. Assessments: Informal qualitative feedback will be given in class throughout the semester. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided. Textbook: None Equipment/Fabric: Students must bring to class each week:

  • A portable sewing machine with bobbins. If you are purchasing a new sewing machine for the class, a Singer Heavy Duty Sewing Machine, 4400 series, model is recommended. These can be purchased from Amazon or Joann Fabrics for $160-$180. Students who are bringing a pre-owed or loaned sewing machine are expected to have the machine professionally serviced before the start of class.
  • The sewing machine owner's manual
  • An extension cord
  • Fabric for class assignments. A list of needed fabric and sewing patterns will be sent out the first day of class, with the recommended quantity, type, and deadlines.
Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $50.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a project box, including a sewing kit (with 1 pack of sewing machine needles, thread, and hand sewing essentials), and other materials used in class. What to Bring: Instructor-furnished sewing kit, sewing machine, bobbins, owner's manual, extension cord, fabric, and images/sample photos, swatches, and other assigned materials. Non-Meeting Days: Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts or Career Education for purposes of a high school transcript.

11:00 am-11:55 am

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

Eureka 4! 4th Grade Math: A Complete Curriculum*

Eureka 4! 4th Grade Math: A Complete Curriculum*Closed

Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

Day(s): Mon,Thu

Open Spots: 1

Eureka Math 4 is a full-year, complete math curriculum for students who have mastered the equivalent of Eureka's Math 3 content (below). This class meets twice a week and is designed to be a full program where students receive instruction in person at Compass and complete homework on off-days at home. Parents do not have to select a curriculum or deliver the instruction, but rather are expected to ensure that homework is being completed before class and assisting the student in checking attempted homework. Topics in Eureka 4 include:

  • Four basic operations with whole numbers to solve work problems.
  • Factors and multiples
  • Multi-digit place value
  • Adding and subtracting multi-digit whole numbers
  • Multiplication of multi-digit whole numbers using several methods
  • Division of four-digit dividend by one digit divisor
  • Fraction equivalents and common decimal equivalents
  • Adding and subtracting fractions with like denominators
  • Word problems with measurement and conversion from larger unit to smaller
  • Representing and interpreting data
  • Drawing and classifying lines, angles, and shapes
  • Introduction to angles and angle measurements
Publisher Great Minds.org describes the Eureka curriculum as a "holistic Prekindergarten through Grade 12 curriculum that carefully sequences mathematical progressions in expertly crafted modules, making math a joy to teach and learn." Eureka is aligned with most state standards. Read more about Eureka Math HERE. https://greatminds.org/math/eurekamath. Eureka Math 4 is being offered at Compass as a full year class with 59 in-person class meetings. Attendance is very important. In the event of a missed class due to illness or travel, students may cover the missed lesson through online recorded lectures available in the Eureka suite of online supplements. Prerequisites: Math 3 or equivalent with mastery of the following:
  • Has learned/memorized all math facts fluently: addition/subtraction (1-20) and multiplication/division through 10 x 10
  • Represents and solves problems using multiplication and division
  • Solves word problems with the 4 basic operations
  • Uses place value understanding to perform multi-digit arithmetic
  • Adds and subtracts within 1000
  • Understands fractions as part of a whole
  • Understands area and perimeter
Assignments: Assignments will be made in class as a range of pages to complete on the topics that were taught in class. The instructor will follow up with an email repeating the assigned pages. Assessments: Each class, the instructor will check that students have completed the assigned homework. Homework will be recorded as attempted or not attempted. Parents will be provided with an answer key for homework. Students will be given short, in-class quizzes to encourage them to be prepared and engaged. The instructor will record quiz scores in order to track a student's overall understanding and progression in class, but the instructor will not provide a letter grade. Parents may track quiz scores in order to assign their own grades and complete homeschool record-keeping. Textbooks/Workbooks: Students will need a set of 4 "Learn" softcover textbooks and 3 "Succeed" softcover workbooks. To make sure that students get the correct edition, Compass will purchase book bundles for each students (See supply fee below). Students will receive one textbook and one workbook at a time, and the future editions will be stored at Compass until needed to prevent loss or damage. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $86.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for the class books. What to Bring: Students should bring a spiral notebook, pencil, and their workbook to class each week.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

4th-5th

(Year Long)

Room D-1

Crafting for Cosplay: Mending & Alterations

Crafting for Cosplay: Mending & AlterationsClosed

Quarter(s): 4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 0

Kratos wears a leather baldric. Captain America grasps a shield. Harley Quinn sports spiked wrist cuffs, and Lara Croft wouldn't go to war without her weaponry. Great accessories and carefully crafted garments make great cosplay. If you are interested in the world of cosplay and want to bring some of your favorite characters to life, this class will teach you the skills to craft costumes and accessories. Fourth quarter, students will learn how to transform ready-made clothing items. They will learn basic hand-sewing techniques to mend and perform alterations on store-bought items. The class will participate in a "Thrift Store Challenge" in which they will be asked to find clothing items at bargain prices that remind them of a character without spending more than $20.00. In class, students will work on the alterations or repairs to create costume pieces. In addition, students will learn to work with custom-made, iron-on vinyl to add logos, symbols, or monograms to their costumes.*Note:Mending and Alterations projects this quarter are all new from those in Spring 2023, so a student could repeat the class to build his/her cosplay wardrobe and to practice and refine crafting skills. In this class, students will follow templates and patterns provided by and demonstrated by the instructor. Pieces will be individualized through paint and embellishments, but the goal is for cosplayers to learn specialized crafting techniques that they can use at home to make additional, unique pieces. There is a $40.00 supply fee for in-class materials, the shared use of classroom tools/supplies, and some take-home tools to continue crafting at home. Fourth quarter, students will take home a basic sewing kit. Note: Project themes or materials are subject to change due to availability or sourcing at the time of the class. Cosplayers who would like to create original fabric costume elements such as capes, vests, skirts, and more, may want to co-register for this instructor's Learn to Sew classes. Topics in this Series: Foam & Plastics (Quarter 1), Resins and Metal Work (Quarter 2), Leather Work (Quarter 3), Mending & Alterations (Quarter 4) etc. Students continuing from one quarter receive priority pre-registration for the next quarter. Prerequisites: None Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Will be communicated in weekly e-mails and posted in a Google classroom. Assessments: will not be given Textbook/Materials: All materials will be furnished. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in fine arts/theater for purposes of a high school transcript.

12:00 pm-1:25 pm

8th-12th

D-2

Reading Rally: A Complete Language Arts Program- Red 2 Group (Mon)*

Reading Rally: A Complete Language Arts Program- Red 2 Group (Mon)*Closed

Quarter(s): 3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 2

Reading and writing affect a student's achievement in all aspects of schoolwork, so strong language arts skills are fundamental to success in homeschooling. This weekly class is a small group of 3-6 students who read and write at a similar level. Students follow a comprehensive language arts curriculum under the guidance of an experienced reading specialist. Each Monday class meeting will include a short story with select vocabulary words, a graphic organizer, main themes, and embedded learning objectives. Students will continue to practice language arts skills at home with easy-to-implement "page a day" workbook activities assigned by the instructor and implemented by the parents. For most early elementary learners, enrollment in Reading Rally can serve as a complete, self-contained language arts curriculum where families will not need additional resources in reading, comprehension, composition, spelling, and grammar. Weekly readings are organized around thematic units. The instructor will teach students how to approach a new story as a fun reading puzzle. For example, before reading aloud in class, students will conduct a "picture walk" to overview and predict elements of the story from the illustrations, review a graphic organizer to assist in writing sentences, define vocabulary words, and preview summary questions. Then, the instructor will read the story aloud, model good reading practices, and encourage students to read. Students will only be asked to read aloud when they feel comfortable and have built trust in their group. All follow-up activities are designed around learning objectives such as decoding, comprehension, prediction, visualization, and verbalization. READINESS: As a comprehensive language arts curriculum, a student must be at a similar grade level ability in reading, comprehension, and writing. Early readers who have not learned to write, for example, or emerging readers who struggle with comprehenion, may not be a good fit for this class. In addition, students must have the hand-eye coordination and basic handwriting skills to be able to copy the instructor's many notes, examples, and definitions from the classroom white board into their own notebook. Grade level references in Reading Rally are based on scope, sequence and pacing that correlate to the Grade Level Equivalent (GLE) standards of learning. Students who are more than one year behind in GLE  in language arts or who have a difference in skill level between their reading and writing may be recommended for a second, weekly class meeting on Fridays or 1-on-1 private instruction to make up ground in reading or writing skills. Additional class meetings or private instruction will be an additional cost. ATTENTION! Parents should not register for a Reading Rally class until they have had a Language Arts Skills Inventory (i.e. brief assessment) and placement determination by the reading specialist. This must be scheduled separately through Compass at a cost of $125.00. The fee is due prior to the assessment and is not refundable in the event the child is not recommended for a reading group. The instructor has experience working with reluctant and fearful readers, those who are late bloomers, neurodivergent, dyslexic, and ESOL students. However, she might recommend a more complete evaluation by another professional if she suspects other learning differences are impacting the student's langauge arts learning. Students will work from a spiral bound copy of reading textbook and workbook by Pearson. A class fee of $68.00 is due payable to Compass for class materials. Students continuing from one semester to the next will receive priority registration to remain with their reading group.

10:00 am-10:55 am

2nd+

(Semester Long)

Reading Rally: A Complete Language Arts Program- Green 2 Gr...

Reading Rally: A Complete Language Arts Program- Green 2 Group (Sem 2)*Closed

Quarter(s): 3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: -1

Reading and writing affect a student's achievement in all aspects of schoolwork, so strong language arts skills are fundamental to success in homeschooling. This weekly class is a small group of 3-6 students who read and write at a similar level. Students follow a comprehensive language arts curriculum under the guidance of an experienced reading specialist. Each Monday class meeting will include a short story with select vocabulary words, a graphic organizer, main themes, and embedded learning objectives. Students will continue to practice language arts skills at home with easy-to-implement "page a day" workbook activities assigned by the instructor and implemented by the parents. For most early elementary learners, enrollment in Reading Rally can serve as a complete, self-contained language arts curriculum where families will not need additional resources in reading, comprehension, composition, spelling, and grammar. Weekly readings are organized around thematic units. The instructor will teach students how to approach a new story as a fun reading puzzle. For example, before reading aloud in class, students will conduct a "picture walk" to overview and predict elements of the story from the illustrations, review a graphic organizer to assist in writing sentences, define vocabulary words, and preview summary questions. Then, the instructor will read the story aloud, model good reading practices, and encourage students to read. Students will only be asked to read aloud when they feel comfortable and have built trust in their group. All follow-up activities are designed around learning objectives such as decoding, comprehension, prediction, visualization, and verbalization. READINESS: As a comprehensive language arts curriculum, a student must be at a similar grade level ability in reading, comprehension, and writing. Early readers who have not learned to write, for example, or emerging readers who struggle with comprehenion, may not be a good fit for this class. In addition, students must have the hand-eye coordination and basic handwriting skills to be able to copy the instructor's many notes, examples, and definitions from the classroom white board into their own notebook. Grade level references in Reading Rally are based on scope, sequence and pacing that correlate to the Grade Level Equivalent (GLE) standards of learning. Students who are more than one year behind in GLE  in language arts or who have a difference in skill level between their reading and writing may be recommended for a second, weekly class meeting on Fridays or 1-on-1 private instruction to make up ground in reading or writing skills. Additional class meetings or private instruction will be an additional cost. ATTENTION! Parents should not register for a Reading Rally class until they have had a Language Arts Skills Inventory (i.e. brief assessment) and placement determination by the reading specialist. This must be scheduled separately through Compass at a cost of $125.00. The fee is due prior to the assessment and is not refundable in the event the child is not recommended for a reading group. The instructor has experience working with reluctant and fearful readers, those who are late bloomers, neurodivergent, dyslexic, and ESOL students. However, she might recommend a more complete evaluation by another professional if she suspects other learning differences are impacting the student's langauge arts learning. Students will work from a spiral bound copy of reading textbook and workbook by Pearson. A class fee of $68.00 is due payable to Compass for class materials. Students continuing from one semester to the next will receive priority registration to remain with their reading group.

11:00 am-11:55 am

3rd

(Semester Long)

Eureka 5! 5th Grade Math: A Complete Curriculum*

Eureka 5! 5th Grade Math: A Complete Curriculum*Closed

Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

Day(s): Mon,Thu

Open Spots: 3

Eureka Math 5 is a full-year, complete math curriculum for students who have mastered the equivalent of Eureka's Math 4 content (below). This class meets twice a week and is designed to be a full program where students receive instruction in person at Compass and complete homework on off-days at home. Parents do not have to select a curriculum or deliver the instruction, but rather are expected to ensure that homework is being completed at home and assist the student in checking attempted homework. Topics in Eureka 5 include:

    • Writing and interpreting numerical expressions
    • Understanding place value system
    • Performing four basic operations on multi-digital whole numbers with decimals to hundredths.
    • Adding and subtracting fractions with unlike denominators
    • Multiplying and dividing fractions
    • Converting units within a measurement system
    • Working with volumes
    • Graphing points on a coordinate plane
    • Classifying 2D figures
Publisher Great Minds.org describes the Eureka curriculum as a "holistic Prekindergarten through Grade 12 curriculum that carefully sequences mathematical progressions in expertly crafted modules, making math a joy to teach and learn." Eureka is aligned with most state standards. Read more about Eureka Math HERE. https://greatminds.org/math/eurekamath. Eureka Math 5 is being offered at Compass as a full year class with 59 in-person class meetings. Attendance is very important. In the event of a missed class due to illness or travel, students may cover the missed lesson through online recorded lectures available in the Eureka suite of online supplements. Prerequisites: Math 4 or equivalent with mastery of the following:
  • Has learned/memorized all math facts fluently: addition/subtraction (1-20) and multiplication/division through 10 x 10
  • Uses four basic operations with whole numbers to solve work problems.
  • Understands factors and multiples
  • Understands multi-digit place value
  • Adds and subtracts multi-digit whole numbers
  • Multiplies multi-digit whole numbers
  • Divides four-digit dividends by one digit divisors
  • Understands fraction equivalents and common decimal equivalents
  • Adds and subtracts fractions with like denominators
  • Completes word problems with measurements and conversions from larger unit to smaller
  • Represents and interpreting data
  • Draws and classifies lines, angles, and shapes
  Assignments: Assignments will be made in class as a range of pages to complete on the topics that were taught in class. The instructor will follow up with an email repeating the assigned pages. Assessments: Each class, the instructor will check that students have completed the assigned homework. Homework will be recorded as attempted or not attempted. Parents will be provided with an answer key for homework. Students will be given short, in-class quizzes to encourage them to be prepared and engaged. The instructor will record quiz scores in order to track a student's overall understanding and progression in class, but the instructor will not provide a letter grade. Parents may track quiz scores in order to assign their own grades and complete homeschool record-keeping. Textbooks/Workbooks: Students will need a set of 4 "Learn" softcover textbooks and 3 "Succeed" softcover workbooks. To make sure that students get the correct edition, Compass will purchase book bundles for each students (See supply fee below). Students will receive one textbook and one workbook at a time, and the future editions will be stored at Compass until needed to prevent loss or damage. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $90.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for the class workbook. What to Bring: Students should bring a spiral notebook, pencil, and their workbook to class each week.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

5th-6th

(Year Long)

Reading Rally: A Complete Language Arts Program- Lt Green Group (Mon)*

Reading Rally: A Complete Language Arts Program- Lt Green Group (Mon)*Closed

Quarter(s): 3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 1

Reading and writing affect a student's achievement in all aspects of schoolwork, so strong language arts skills are fundamental to success in homeschooling. This weekly class is a small group of 3-6 students who read and write at a similar level. Students follow a comprehensive language arts curriculum under the guidance of an experienced reading specialist. Each Monday class meeting will include a short story with select vocabulary words, a graphic organizer, main themes, and embedded learning objectives. Students will continue to practice language arts skills at home with easy-to-implement "page a day" workbook activities assigned by the instructor and implemented by the parents. For most early elementary learners, enrollment in Reading Rally can serve as a complete, self-contained language arts curriculum where families will not need additional resources in reading, comprehension, composition, spelling, and grammar. Weekly readings are organized around thematic units. The instructor will teach students how to approach a new story as a fun reading puzzle. For example, before reading aloud in class, students will conduct a "picture walk" to overview and predict elements of the story from the illustrations, review a graphic organizer to assist in writing sentences, define vocabulary words, and preview summary questions. Then, the instructor will read the story aloud, model good reading practices, and encourage students to read. Students will only be asked to read aloud when they feel comfortable and have built trust in their group. All follow-up activities are designed around learning objectives such as decoding, comprehension, prediction, visualization, and verbalization. READINESS: As a comprehensive language arts curriculum, a student must be at a similar grade level ability in reading, comprehension, and writing. Early readers who have not learned to write, for example, or emerging readers who struggle with comprehenion, may not be a good fit for this class. In addition, students must have the hand-eye coordination and basic handwriting skills to be able to copy the instructor's many notes, examples, and definitions from the classroom white board into their own notebook. Grade level references in Reading Rally are based on scope, sequence and pacing that correlate to the Grade Level Equivalent (GLE) standards of learning. Students who are more than one year behind in GLE  in language arts or who have a difference in skill level between their reading and writing may be recommended for a second, weekly class meeting on Fridays or 1-on-1 private instruction to make up ground in reading or writing skills. Additional class meetings or private instruction will be an additional cost. ATTENTION! Parents should not register for a Reading Rally class until they have had a Language Arts Skills Inventory (i.e. brief assessment) and placement determination by the reading specialist. This must be scheduled separately through Compass at a cost of $125.00. The fee is due prior to the assessment and is not refundable in the event the child is not recommended for a reading group. The instructor has experience working with reluctant and fearful readers, those who are late bloomers, neurodivergent, dyslexic, and ESOL students. However, she might recommend a more complete evaluation by another professional if she suspects other learning differences are impacting the student's langauge arts learning. Students will work from a spiral bound copy of reading textbook and workbook by Pearson. A class fee of $116.00 is due payable to Compass for class materials. Students continuing from one semester to the next will receive priority registration to remain with their reading group.

1:30 pm-2:25 pm

6th

(Semester Long)

D-3

War Room: Military Intelligence- Directing the Downfall*

War Room: Military Intelligence- Directing the Downfall*Closed

Quarter(s): 3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 0

Perhaps you have heard that "knowing is half the battle." This class will realize that as we examine the roles of military intelligence and espionage in conflicts. A fundamental goal of military intelligence is to fight smarter, not harder, on the battlefield. For context and inspiration, the class will examine the history of the real spies of WWII, their methods, failures, and successes. This second semester picks up in 1943, after the setbacks of the winter of 1942 and German losses in the South. From here our goal is to identify the site of Axis counter offensives, determine their strength and direct appropriate defensive resources. From there, we must take the fight to the enemy's homeland, all while frustrating any potential Axis spies attempts to infiltrate the class! The continuing mission, should students choose to accept it, is to use actual enigma codes and a modified tabletop RPG (role playing game) system to simulate missions, write encoded messages, and attempt to crack the enemy's defense plan as the Soviet Union moves into Germany to end the Nazi Threat. While Compass's 3D History classes will simulate the battles in the field, this class will assume the supporting role by attempting to infiltrate German lines with field agents. War Room students in the "headquarters" will direct both their field agents and the missions of the frontline troops in 3D History. The decisions of War Room students on Monday will affect the play of 3D History students on Friday, and outcomes of the 3D History role play on Friday will dictate the work of the War Room the following Monday. While co-registration in both classes is not required, some students may want to dual register in order to see both the tactical and strategic aspects of a major engagement and how military intelligence affects the outcomes. This course is recommended for teens who have a passion for military history or an interest in a future career in intelligence. Topics in this Series: Brains That Broke the Blitzkreig (Semester 1) and Directing the Downfall (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hour per week outside of class. Assignments: Course documents including period maps, photographs and recreations will be made available through a class Google Drive link emailed to parents and students, as well as a class YouTube playlist for any videos watched in class or assigned as homework.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

D:3

Ancient Justice: Crime & Punishment in the Roman Republic*

Ancient Justice: Crime & Punishment in the Roman Republic*Closed

Quarter(s): 3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 1

This class will explore the judicial processes of the Roman Republic. Starting with the Regicide of the Tarquin King, followed by the first legal code, the Laws of the 12 Tables, all the way to the Codes of Emperor Justinian. This Semester will explore the foundation of the Roman Legal system that endures in some forms to this day. Like a traditional mock trial program, the class will hear cases, and students will defend themselves. Real historical cases will be studied and trial parts assigned to the class, which will be debated from the perspective of Plebes and Senators of ancient Rome. The class will serve as the jury and, if necessary, select period-appropriate verdicts and explain how they arrived at their decisions, while striving for period accuracy. Topics in this Series: Crime & Punishment in Ancient Greece (Semester 1); Roman law, From Republic to Empire (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Google Drive (period maps, photographs and recreations) and YouTube (videos) links will be e-mailed to parents/students for homework or supplemental investigation. Textbooks: None Assessments: Will not be given. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in World History or Civics for purposes of a high school transcript.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

Room 4

Geology (On-Level or Honors)- Lecture*

Geology (On-Level or Honors)- Lecture*Closed

Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 0

This is a place-holder for the Geology lecture. Students should register for the Geology Lab, which will automatically enroll them in both class sections.

10:00 am-10:55 am

9th-12th

(Year Long)

D-5

Algebra II*

Algebra II*Closed

Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

Day(s): Mon,Thu

Open Spots: 4

This is a complete course in high school Algebra II which will cover fundamental concepts and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. Topics in Algebra II include linear functions, systems of equations and inequalities, quadratic functions and complex numbers, exponential and logarithmic functions, rational and irrational algebraic functions, and quadratic relations and systems. In addition, this course will cover higher degree functions with complex numbers, sequences and series, probability, data analysis, and trigonometric and circular functions. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem solving. Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation Algebra I in order to take this class. Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Friday (day 1), lecture on Wednesday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Friday (day 8), and homework due the next Wednesday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Wednesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work. Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload. In lieu of a graphing calculator, students should have access to websites desmos.com and wolframalpha.com for graphing assignments. Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by checking that weekly homework sets are complete and giving periodic take-home tests; class participation is also strongly encouraged. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Algebra and Trigonometry: Functions and Applications- Prentice Hall Classics (ISBN-10 0131657100, ISBN-13 978-0131657106). A scientific calculator similar to the Casio fx-115ES PLUS is required for this class. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Algebra II for purposes of a high school transcript.

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

9th-12th

(Year Long)

D:5

Introduction to CS: JavaScript Programming*

Introduction to CS: JavaScript Programming*Closed

Quarter(s): 3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 4

Do you want to learn one of the top five coding languages? Javascript is part of every software developer's toolbox. Learn an array of core programming concepts with JavaScript by experimenting with a series of digital challenges. Begin by programming animated memes and creating filters then tackle advancedskills suc h as interactive 3D experiences to program character movements, object interactions, and level creation. Javascript is a versatile, easy-to-learn beginner-level programming language and gateway to foundational concepts in computer science. Students will learn how to code apps and games as they practice the computer science design cycle of writing code, executing the code, interpreting the results, revising the code syntax based on the output. The class will cover the fundamental building blocks of programming including: variables, mathematical operators, logical operators, and boolean arithmetic. They will also learn about data types, built-in functions, conditional statements, for- loops, defining functions, function stacks, interpreting error messages, exception handling, and add-on libraries. At each step, the class will create basic programs and fun, interactive content. Topics in this Series: Python Programming (Semester 1), JavaScript Programming (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. Prerequisites: Algebra I, recommended Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Will be given in class. Assessments: Will not be given. Lab/Supply Fee: The class tuition includes a student technology fee that covers the rental of classroom laptops and all software and licenses installed on the laptops. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Technology or Career Elective for purposes of a high school transcript.

11:00 am-12:55 pm

8th-12th

(Semester Long)

D-6

Pre-Algebra*

Pre-Algebra*Closed

Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

Day(s): Mon,Thu

Open Spots: 2

This is a complete course in Pre-Algebra that will provide an introduction to basic algebra concepts and a review of arithmetic algorithms with an emphasis on problem solving. The major topics covered in this course are Numbers and Operations, Expressions & Properties, Equations & Inequalities, Functional Relationships and Ratios, Percent & Proportions. Students will learn to use formulas to solve a variety of math problems encompassing geometry, measurement probability, and statistics. Students will also be applying their learning to real life scenarios to solve problems. Prerequisites: Students must be fluent in the four basic operations- addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. They will need to show proficiency and have a thorough command of basic computation. In addition, a basic, introductory understanding and ability to work with fractions and decimals is required to solve equations and simplify expressions. If you are unsure about your child's readiness for this class, the instructor will recommend one or more practice platforms and/or assessments to confirm placement. Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class to complete practice problems, homework, and assessments. Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, link to quizzes and tests, track grades, and message the instructor and classmates. Assessments: All chapter tests will be taken outside of class with parental oversight to maximize in-class instructional time. Points will be assigned for completed homework, quizzes, and tests. A letter grade will not be assigned, but parents can use total points earned versus total points offered to assign a grade for purposes of a homeschool transcript. Parents can view total points earned at any time through the Canvas site. Textbook: The selected textbook is available free online, and a link will be posted on Canvas. Students who prefer a hard copy textbook may purchase or rent McDougall Littell's Pre-Algebra (ISBN #978-0618250035). As an alternative, for any student who struggles with reading, the textbook can be purchased as an audio CD (ISBN #978-0618478828). What to Bring: TI-34 calculator Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Mathematics for purposes of a high school transcript.

10:00 am-10:55 am

7th-9th

(Year Long)

Algebra I (Mon, Thu)*

Algebra I (Mon, Thu)*Closed

Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

Day(s): Mon,Thu

Open Spots: 1

This is a complete course in high school Algebra I which will cover fundamental concepts in algebra and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. This course is designed to emphasize the study of algebraic problem-solving with the incorporation of real-world applications. Topics in Algebra I include number systems, linear systems, rational numbers, complex numbers, exponents, roots, radicals, quadratic equations, polynomials, factoring, absolute values, ratios, and proportions. In addition, the course will cover solving and graphing systems of functions, linear equations, and inequalities. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem-solving. Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation in pre-algebra topics in order to take this class. Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Friday (day 1), lecture on Wednesday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Friday (day 8), and homework due the next Wednesday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Wednesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work. Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload. Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by checking that weekly homework sets are complete and giving periodic take-home tests; class participation is also strongly encouraged. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Algebra I: Expressions, Equations, and Applications by Paul A. Foerster. It is available in a few different editions, each of which is virtually identical: 2nd edition (ISBN-10 020125073X, ISBN-13 978-0201250732), 3rd edition (ISBN-10 0201860945, ISBN-13 978-0201860948), and Classic edition (ISBN-10 020132458X, ISBN-13 978-0201324587). It is also available under the title Foerster Algebra I, Classics edition (ISBN-10 0131657089, ISBN-13 978-0131657083). A calculator is not needed for this course. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Algebra I for purposes of a high school transcript.

11:00 am-11:55 am

7th-10th

(Year Long)

Geometry (Mon,Thu)*

Geometry (Mon,Thu)*Closed

Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

Day(s): Mon,Thu

Open Spots: 2

This is a complete course in high school Geometry which will cover fundamental concepts and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. Students will learn deductive reasoning, and logic by completing geometric proofs. Topics in geometry include: lines, angles, congruence, concurrence, inequalities, parallel lines, quadrilaterals, transformations, area, similarity, right triangles, circles, regular polygons, and geometric solids. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem- solving. Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation Algebra I in order to take this class. Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Friday (day 1), lecture on Wednesday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Friday (day 8), and homework due the next Wednesday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Wednesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work. Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload. Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by checking that weekly homework sets are complete and giving periodic take-home tests; class participation is also strongly encouraged. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Geometry: Seeing, Doing, Understanding, 3rd edition (ISBN-10 0716743612, ISBN-13 978-0716743613) A calculator is not needed for this course. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Geometry for purposes of a high school transcript.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

8th-11th

(Year Long)

H-7

3D Design & Printing Studio*

3D Design & Printing Studio*Closed

Quarter(s): 3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 2

Students will learn to think like inventors and designers when creating 3D! 3D design is used not only for modeling and fabricating objects but is also at the heart of many cutting-edge technologies such as AR and VR, video game design, interactive exhibits, and more. 3D printing is used in nearly all industries and design fields today from art to animation, manufacturing to medicine, and engineering to entertainment. In this class, students will first learn to use Tinkercard, a 3D modeling software that works in solid forms (like LEGO bricks). Then, students will transition to MeshMixer, a software that creates smooth, curved, organic shapes (like clay). They will learn to think about their design from all angles and how to subtract forms to create holes, voids, and concave features, and add forms to create projections, contours, appendages, and convex details. They will discover the limitations of 3D printing and how to handle overhanging elements or delicate details. Students will practice the artistic design process with simple sketches before diving into the software. They will be encouraged to use reference material, whether photos, a model, or even by modifying existing, public domain 3D files. Students will use an iterative printing process in which they print their project, check it for design intent, functionality, or fit, make modifications, and print again. The class will learn how to save and convert between 3D solid object files (.stl) and object files (.obj) and work with metadata fields to protect the intellectual property of their designs. To demonstrate the range and capability of 3D-printed designs, favorite student projects include D & D miniatures, cosplay props, Minecraft-designed creations, and beloved characters such as anime, baby Yoda, and Pokemon creatures. Second semester, continuing students will progress to more complex assemblies including multiple parts and parts with hinges. Second semester, some students may wish to work with alternative filaments such as TPU (rubber), metal, or magnetized filament. Because of the studio format, new students can enroll second semester. The class instructor is a design engineer with 3D Herndon and expert in 3D technologies and other areas of design and invention. A typical class will be structured with 5-10 minutes of lecture or demonstration of a new design skill, followed by 40 minutes of design "studio" time where students can receive trouble-shooting support and design tips from the instructor and have dedicated work time, and 5-10 minutes of sharing time at the end of class. As a studio class, students will work on individual projects at their own pace. Topics in this Series: As an open studio for individual projects, students may continue from one semester to the next or enroll mid-year. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. Prerequisites: None What to Bring:Students will need to bring a laptop to class for design work. Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1+ hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Project criteria will be explained in class to students. Assessments: Informal, qualitative feedback will be given in class throughout the semester as the student works. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for 3D printing and filament. This provides the student with 800 g of printed product per semester. Students who are prolific designers and print often will be asked to pay an additional $5.00 per 100 g or fraction thereof. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Visual Arts, Technology, or Career Exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

10:00 am-10:55 am

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

3D Design & Printing Studio- Middle School*

3D Design & Printing Studio- Middle School*Closed

Quarter(s): 3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 4

Students will learn to think like inventors and designers when creating 3D! 3D design is used not only for modeling and fabricating objects but is also at the heart of many cutting-edge technologies such as AR and VR, video game design, interactive exhibits, and more. 3D printing is used in nearly all industries and design fields today from art to animation, manufacturing to medicine, and engineering to entertainment. In this class, students will first learn to use Tinkercard, a 3D modeling software that works in solid forms (like LEGO bricks). Then, students will transition to MeshMixer, a software that creates smooth, curved, organic shapes (like clay). They will learn to think about their design from all angles and how to subtract forms to create holes, voids, and concave features, and add forms to create projections, contours, appendages, and convex details. They will discover the limitations of 3D printing and how to handle overhanging elements or delicate details. Students will practice the artistic design process with simple sketches before diving into the software. They will be encouraged to use reference material, whether photos, a model, or even by modifying existing, public domain 3D files. Students will use an iterative printing process in which they print their project, check it for design intent, functionality, or fit, make modifications, and print again. The class will learn how to save and convert between 3D solid object files (.stl) and object files (.obj) and work with metadata fields to protect the intellectual property of their designs. To demonstrate the range and capability of 3D-printed designs, favorite student projects include D & D miniatures, cosplay props, Minecraft-designed creations, and beloved characters such as anime, baby Yoda, and Pokemon creatures. Second semester, continuing students will progress to more complex assemblies including multiple parts and parts with hinges. Second semester, some students may wish to work with alternative filaments such as TPU (rubber), metal, or magnetized filament. Because of the studio format, new students can enroll second semester. The class instructor is a design engineer with 3D Herndon and expert in 3D technologies and other areas of design and invention. A typical class will be structured with 5-10 minutes of lecture or demonstration of a new design skill, followed by 40 minutes of design "studio" time where students can receive trouble-shooting support and design tips from the instructor and have dedicated work time, and 5-10 minutes of sharing time at the end of class. As a studio class, students will work on individual projects at their own pace. Topics in this Series: As an open studio for individual projects, students may continue from one semester to the next or enroll mid-year. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. Prerequisites: None What to Bring:Students will need to bring a laptop to class for design work. Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1+ hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Project criteria will be explained in class to students. Assessments: Informal, qualitative feedback will be given in class throughout the semester as the student works. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for 3D printing and filament. This provides the student with 800 g of printed product per semester. Students who are prolific designers and print often will be asked to pay an additional $5.00 per 100 g or fraction thereof. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Visual Arts, Technology, or Career Exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

11:00 am-11:55 am

6th-8th

(Semester Long)

H-13

Special Topics in Digital Photography

Special Topics in Digital PhotographyClosed

Quarter(s): 3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 2

Reflections on a rainy day, a sheepish sister smirking, a white-washed winter wonderland- all captured in dynamic digital images. Students will expand on photography fundamentals with an exploration of three special topics: nature photography, portraiture, and black and white photography. For each unit, teen photographers will learn techniques and camera settings that highlight the genre. Class time will be split between classroom instruction/discussion and outdoor photography exercises. Students will have fun taking pictures of friends and family. They will learn how to capture natural expressions and record unique personalities when photographing people. They will be introduced to the lighting, posing, and composition for creating studio and lifestyle portraiture. Students will practice as both photographers and the models. In the spring, students will take advantage of the buds and blooms to learn to photograph natural subjects. Students will practice seeing the world around them including details, macro observations, close-range subjects, and elements of composition. They will learn to do isolation studies using natural light to photograph objects and plants in their environment. The class will discuss and practice techniques for landscapes, seasons, weather, water, reflections, and animals in nature and captivity. Finally, students will learn how to make beautiful black and white images and what elements to look for to make a stunning monochromatic composition. Students will turn their favorite photos into a personal project to be shared on the last day of class. Prerequisites: Introduction to Digital Photography or similar class recommended. Meeting Dates: This is a 10-week class that concludes on March 25. This class will meet on Monday, March 11, which is a non-meeting day for other Compass classes. Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Students will have weekly homework taking photographs. Assessments: Students will receive ongoing, informal assessments and feedback on their photographs. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $20.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for composite prints of select photos. What to Bring: Students are encouraged to bring digital SLR cameras, but any digital camera that is better than a phone camera will be adequate. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

8th-12th

(Semester Long)

H:14

Compass Kindergarten- Language Arts*

Compass Kindergarten- Language Arts*Closed

Quarter(s): 3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 0

Can your child sit in a circle for story time? Line up for lunch? Take turns talking? This one-day, 3-hour (half-day) program is a "taste" of kindergarten for 5- year-olds. Start your child's week off right with "Monday mornings with Miss M" at Compass Kindergarten. Children will work in a small group with an experienced early elementary educator for this dynamic, play-based program that offers regular interaction and socialization. This fun, activity-based program will create rhythm and routine in a homeschooled kindergartner's week and give them a sense of community and a peer group. Children will practice routines and transitions as they move through the morning. Each session will include some simple structure such as a daily arrival song/greeting, circle time, story, snack time, activity, lunch, active game, and closing/goodbyes. Through games and activities, they will also practice key childhood social skills such as sharing, taking turns, and entering play with others. Academic basics such as the ABCs, days of the week, colors, shapes, and number sense will be integrated into activities involving fairy tales, nature and art. The teacher will provide ideas for parents to work on at home with their child during the week. Compass Kindergarten is offered in three weekly sessions: Monday, Wednesday, Friday. Registration is stand-alone for each day so parents can register for one, two, or all three. While each kindergarten class will give children the opportunities for learning and playing in a social environment along with classroom routines, each of the three days will focus on a particular area of study and discovery of how each is connected. On Mondays, the focus will be on Language Arts where students will be exposed to folktales, seasonal stories, and classic favorites while also practicing basic reading and writing skills such as sound blends, digraphs and long vowel sounds. Parents can choose to drop children off for this program (different than Compass's school-year policies for 55 minute classes.) Children should bring a bagged lunch and water bottle to each session. There is a $40.00 material fee for class consumables due payable to the teacher on the first day of class. Registration for this program is by 16-week semester with priority registration for continuing students. Students must be age five (5) at the start of the program. Parents who are shopping around or applying to alternate kindergarten programs should review the Compass withdrawal policy.

10:00 am-12:55 pm

K

(Semester Long)

H-16

Band-Ready: Percussion Spring Clinic

Band-Ready: Percussion Spring Clinic Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 6

Would your child enjoy the camaraderie and cooperation of making music with others in a school band? Starting in the fall of 2024, Compass will introduce the first homeschool concert band in the region under an experienced band director . The spring clinic is an 8-week introduction to a specific instrument so students can be comfortable and confident with their instrument choices and get a taste of group music instruction before committing to a semester of band. Students in the Percussion Clinic will learn to play the snare drum and mallet instruments (such as glockenspiel and xylophone). They will learn proper stick and mallet grip, posture, and playing position for concert percussion instrumentals. Students will learn the fundamentals of music reading. The group will practice short songs in Concert B-flat and Concert E-flat major (and their relative minors) on mallet instruments and basic rudiments on snare drum. Students will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing percussion instruments and will play both cooperatively in small ensembles and independently. Students will need to rent or purchase an instrument and accessories for the spring clinic. See the attached list by instrument. Mark your calendar for an Instrument Test Drive event on Tuesday, February 21, from 1:00 pm- 3:00 pm at Compass. Representatives from a local store, Music & Arts, will be on hand with instruments for students to try. They will explain rental and purchase options to parents and will sell some of the supplies that students will need for the spring clinic and the homeschool concert band. Students who enrolled in one clinic (percussion, woodwinds, or brass) during early registration may switch clinics if they change their minds about their preferred instrument after the test drive event. Participation in a spring clinic is neither a prerequisite nor a commitment for the fall concert band. Students will have an additional opportunity to improve their comfort level and proficiency on their instruments at the one-week Dulles Summer Band Clinic that will be held at Compass the week of July 29.

10:00 am-10:55 am

4th-8th

Band-Ready: Woodwinds Spring Clinic

Band-Ready: Woodwinds Spring Clinic Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 1

Would your child enjoy the camaraderie and cooperation of making music with others in a school band? Starting in the fall of 2024, Compass will introduce the first homeschool concert band in the region under an experienced band director . The spring clinic is an 8-week introduction to a specific instrument so students can be comfortable and confident with their instrument choices and get a taste of group music instruction before committing to a semester of band. Students in the Woodwinds Clinic will learn to play the flute or clarinet (4th-8th grade) or alto saxophone (7th-8th grade only). They will learn how to hold their instruments with proper posture and hand position and correct embouchure (mouth position and blowing technique) for the instrument. Students will receive instruction on the parts of their instruments and how to safely, correctly, and independently assemble and clean them. Students will learn the fundamentals of music reading, and the group will practice short songs in Concert B-flat and Concert E-flat major (and their relative minors). Students will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing woodwind instruments and will play both cooperatively in small ensembles and independently. Students will need to rent or purchase an instrument and accessories for the spring clinic. See the attached list by instrument. Mark your calendar for an Instrument Test Drive event on Tuesday, February 21, from 1:00 pm- 3:00 pm at Compass. Representatives from a local store, Music & Arts, will be on hand with instruments for students to try. They will explain rental and purchase options to parents and will sell some of the supplies that students will need for the spring clinic and the homeschool concert band. Students who enrolled in one clinic (percussion, woodwinds, or brass) during early registration may switch clinics if they change their minds about their preferred instrument after the test drive event. Participation in a spring clinic is neither a prerequisite nor a commitment for the fall concert band. Students will have an additional opportunity to improve their comfort level and proficiency on their instruments at the one-week Dulles Summer Band Clinic that will be held at Compass the week of July 29.

11:00 am-11:55 am

4th-8th

Band-Ready: Brass Spring Clinic

Band-Ready: Brass Spring Clinic Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 4

Would your child enjoy the camaraderie and cooperation of making music with others in a school band? Starting in the fall of 2024, Compass will introduce the first homeschool concert band in the region under an experienced band director . The spring clinic is an 8-week introduction to a specific instrument so students can be comfortable and confident with their instrument choices and get a taste of group music instruction before committing to a semester of band. Students in the Brass Clinic will learn to play the trumpet, trombone, or euphonium (4th-8th grade) and French hornor tuba (7th-8th grade students only). They will learn how to hold their instruments with proper posture and hand position and correct embouchure (mouth position and blowing technique) for the instrument. Students will receive instruction on the parts of their instruments and how to safely, correctly, and independently assemble and clean them. Students will learn the fundamentals of music reading, and the group will practice short songs in Concert B-flat and Concert E-flat major (and their relative minors). Students will practice audiation skills by singing, moving, and playing woodwind instruments and will play both cooperatively in small ensembles and independently. Students will need to rent or purchase an instrument and accessories for the spring clinic. See the attached list by instrument. Mark your calendar for an Instrument Test Drive event on Tuesday, February 21, from 1:00 pm- 3:00 pm at Compass. Representatives from a local store, Music & Arts, will be on hand with instruments for students to try. They will explain rental and purchase options to parents and will sell some of the supplies that students will need for the spring clinic and the homeschool concert band. Students who enrolled in one clinic (percussion, woodwinds, or brass) during early registration may switch clinics if they change their minds about their preferred instrument after the test drive event. Participation in a spring clinic is neither a prerequisite nor a commitment for the fall concert band. Students will have an additional opportunity to improve their comfort level and proficiency on their instruments at the one-week Dulles Summer Band Clinic that will be held at Compass the week of July 29.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

4th-8th

H-20

Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) Training*

Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) Training*Closed

Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 4

Physician. Physical Therapist. Phlebotomist. Paramedic. Did you know that the Healthcare Industry makes up more than 18% of the US economy and employs 20 million workers in the US? Chances are that several Compass teens will work in this field. This course is designed to give students an overview of the healthcare field and a foot in the door to begin work as an EMT. An EMT, or Emergency Medical Technician, is a frontline healthcare worker who, in Virginia, can work as early as age 16 once certified. Work as an EMT can be a young adult's side gig throughout college and can help them earn clinical hours that advanced medical programs want to see. This year-long course will cover medical terminology, anatomy, trauma scenarios- such as bleeding, broken bones, wounds, head injuries, and medical scenarios- such as illness, seizures, stroke, and cardiac or respiratory distress. The class will learn field techniques like using a tourniquet, applying dressings, splinting, testing blood glucose level, taking vital signs, and administering a few, limited OTC medications. Students will identify the role of an EMT during a mental health crisis and how to help deescalate a confrontation. They will discover how HIPPA, privacy, consent, and legal issues play in the EMT's role and how EMTs interface with law enforcement, hospitals, and other specialties in the community. Students in this class will use critical thinking skills to reason through problems they might encounter during emergencies. Finally, students will learn how to care for themselves in a field which can be emotionally and physically draining. This course is organized to prepare students to take the National Registry exam and earn their Virginia license as an EMT. Once licensed, a student can volunteer as an EMT on an ambulance until age 18 when he/she can be paid. At age 18, certified individuals could work for private transport companies or as a Clinical Technician in an Emergency Room. Notes: (1) Students must be age 16 no later than October 1 to enroll in this course. (2) Some colleges will retroactively award a student credit for earning their EMT certification. Prerequisite: Students should have completed a workshop in CPR prior to taking this course and will be asked to provide a copy of their certification. An option is the Compass 2-day. 6-hour First Aid/CPR training on May 14 and 21. Workload: Students should expect to spend 6 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Students will be assigned 1-2 chapters each week to read at home each week so class time can be dedicated to the practice of hands-on skills. Assessments: The instructor may give short quizzes to ensure that students are keeping up with their reading, which is necessary to prepare for the exam. In addition, students will be "signed off" and approved on hands-on skills throughout the course. The National Registry Exam will be administered in May 2024. Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase or rent Emergency Care and Transportation of the Sick and Injured Essentials Package 12th Edition by AAOS (ISBN # 978-1284227222) Supplies: Students should purchase the following items and bring to class each week:

  • Lightning X Small First Responder Stocked EMT Trauma Bag (student's choice of 7 colors) on Amazon.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B010G2I3PU/?coliid=I18ZZZ79D6Z0EF&colid=1BQJV62J905ZD&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it&th=1 Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $50.00 is due payable to the instructor for consumable and in-class supplies and equipment. What to Bring: Students should bring their textbook, notebook/paper, pen or pencil, and medical kit to class each week. What to Wear: Students should wear comfortable clothing that would allow them to participate in occasional demonstrations on the floor. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Science, Health, Elective, or Career Exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

1:00 pm-2:55 pm

10th-12th

(Year Long)

H-22

Law and Order: Courts and Corrections*

Law and Order: Courts and Corrections*Closed

Quarter(s): 3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 5

Separate fact from fiction in the study of law and order. Did you know that on average it can take up to six months to get a DNA report, not same day? Did you realize that law enforcement only spend 4% of their time on violent crimes, not in high-speed car chases or high stakes foot races? This course is taught by a PhD candidate and adjunct professor in Criminology, Tayler Shreve. It is a survey of the Criminal Justice system for teens who are interested in becoming practitioners or professionals in this vast field which includes attorneys, investigators, detectives, forensic scientists, law enforcement officers, corrections officials, wardens, FBI, DEA, or ATF agents, researchers, or advocates. Second semester, the class will take the information they have learned about criminals, crimes, cases, and law enforcement, and find out what happens when this information is brought into the judicial system. The class will learn to follow a case from discovery to trial while examining real documents such as rap sheets, case files, summary of the case, and the pre-sentencing reports. Students will consider the roles of police officer, detective, prosecutor, defense attorney, and judge and how each party forms a theory and strategy about the case. The class may take a field trip to a courtroom to see legal proceedings. This course is not a study in social justice or reform but instead relies heavily on the facts, statistics and policies of our existing criminal justice system, details that every advocate and reformer should also understand. Rating/Advisory: For sensitive students, please note that in the examination of actual crimes, violence such as assault and murder will be discussed. References may be made to illicit substances and weapons used in the commission of crimes. Course content will be filtered to be age-appropriate for high school students in the instructor's judgement. For example, real crime scene photos may be shown with evidentiary details, but not victims or body parts. Students may read autopsy reports, but they will not be shown autopsy photos, and cases of rape will be referred to as sexual assault with no intimate details. Topics in this Series: Crimes and Cases (Semester 1), Courts and Corrections (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. Prerequisites: Students should be on-level for high school reading and comprehension. Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class on class reading and activities. Assignments: The instructor offers a Choose-Your-Own-Assignment policy in which students will be required to complete a certain number of assignments out of a selection of assignments offered. This allows a student to drill down on themes that they prefer and spend less time on topics that they do not prefer. All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, find course documents, upload homework, track points earned, and message instructor and classmates. Assessments: The instructor will award points for completed assignments that parents can use to assign a grade. Textbook/Materials: All materials will be links to open-source materials or scans of documents provided by the instructor and posted to the class Canvas site. Lab/Supply Fee: None What to Bring: Notebook or paper, pen, or pencil. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Civics or Career Exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

10:00 am-11:55 am

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

Latin I*

Latin I*Closed

Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 2

Discover the exciting world of Latin language and Roman civilization! Learn the foundations of the language of great conquerors, orators, and men and women who shaped the course of history. Studying Latin also opens many doors to learning other Romance languages and deepens students' understanding of English structure and mechanics, including rhetorical and grammatical constructs. This is an introductory class focusing on the basics of Latin grammar, vocabulary and syntax. Students will also study Roman history and culture, Roman civilization, Roman numerals, and English derivatives of Latin words. In addition, they will discover the Roman world through geography, mythology, and daily life. For grammar, the class will cover parts of speech, word endings, and idioms. Students will also discuss the Latin roots for medical terms and various Latin mottoes and expressions. While Latin is primarily a written language, the class will cover basic oral Latin for conversation. Students will learn the necessary skills to be prepared for the option of taking the National Latin Exam in the spring. Workload: Students should expect to spend about 3-4 hours per week on grammar, culture and applied Latin skills. Assignments: Homework assignments will be explained in class and emailed to parents and students. Most will be paper-based, so computer access is only necessary outside of class for referencing the homework and researching projects. Assessments: The instructor will assign points using a class rubric, which will include quizzes, tests, projects and participation. Parents will receive a detailed evaluation at the end of the year with sufficient information and feedback to calculate a grade. Textbook: Students should purchased a pre-owned copy of Ecce Romani I, 3rd edition (ISBN: 978-0131163706) What to Bring: Students will need loose leaf paper, a binder or notebook, and pencils for daily classes and homework. Projects may require occasional additional materials. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Foreign Language for purposes of a high school transcript.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

8th-12th

(Year Long)

Room 9

First Aid & CPR for Teens- with Certifications (2-Day)

First Aid & CPR for Teens- with Certifications (2-Day) Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 1

Would you know what to do if you cut yourself in the kitchen? What if a friend had an anaphylactic reaction to a food or your grandparent suddenly collapsed? Whether you play outdoors, participate in sports, go to the pool, cook at home, supervise siblings, or just hang out with friends, you should know what to do when an emergency arises! First Aid and CPR are the practical life skills you hope you don't have to use, but are thankful for if you do. Earn four American Heart Association certifications in one course in preparation for working as a camp aide, babysitter, assistant coach, counselor-in-training, or part time employee. <br> This workshop will be taught in two half-day workshops by a certified AHA instructor. Topics include: First Aid and Choking Relief; Adult CPR, AED (automatic external defibrillators), and Child/Infant CPR. The course will use the AHA pediatric first aid curriculum which also emphasizes safety and prevention of accidents and injury, particularly in young children. Key topics include: lacerations/bleeding, broken bones, burns, allergic reactions, breathing problems, heat-related complications, cold-related injuries, bites/stings, fainting/unconsciousness, use of AEDs, chest compressions, rescue breathing, and more. Students will have hands-on practice with many skills and will have to demonstrate competency at certain steps to be "signed off" on learned skills. <br> At the end of the course, students will be certified in First Aid, Adult CPR, Child CPR, and Infant CPR. The certifications will be good for two years, and students will be able to print out their certifications for coaches, employers, scout leaders, or their own records from an online AHA portal. This workshop has two class meetings: Monday, March 18 and Monday, March 25, from 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm. Students must attend both class meetings in order to earn the certifications. Students registered in the course will receive a 185 page, full color textbook from the AHA, their own face shield for rescue breathing, and have their AHA registration fees covered. <br> This course is recommended for students ages 14+. At a minimum, students must be 5 feet tall and weigh at least 100 pounds to be able to properly perform chest compressions.  

1:00 pm-4:00 pm

9th-12th

C-24

LEGO Robotics Training Team*

LEGO Robotics Training Team*Closed

Quarter(s): 3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 0

LEGO Robotics Training Team is a semester-long "boot camp" and training ground for future FIRST LEGO League (FLL) competitors. The Training Team allows Compass students to work through a complete FLL challenge to ensure that they understand the project and enjoy the process before joining a competition team. Training Team students are sub-divided into smaller teams that compete against each other in building and coding challenges at a more relaxed pace than FLL competition teams which may require 6-10+ hours per week. Compass Training Team members will complete a full FLL challenge from a previous year. They will learn 21st century skills in robotics and programming while enjoying the camaraderie of working as a team to solve challenges. Kids will gain confidence and build skills in leadership and communication. The Training Team members will compete in-house against each other, but will not participate in a regional competition in 2023-24. FIRST LEGO League (FLL) is an accessible, guided, beginners' robotics program that encourages teamwork, discovery, innovation, and problem-solving. The FLL competition is comprised of three components: the Robot Game, an Innovation Project, and Core Values. The Robot Game is an annual theme-based challenge that encourages kids to think of technology solutions to real-world problems. Teams design and program an autonomous robot that scores points on a themed table-top playing field. Past challenges have been inspired by environment, transportation, accessibility, and exploration. FLL team members engage in brainstorming, research, design, and coding while practicing the engineering design process of building, testing, re-building, re-testing, etc. Students will work with LEGO Mindstorms EV3 robotics components and use drag-and-drop coding blocks to program their robots on laptop computers. No robotics or programming experience is necessary to join the Training Team, but it is beneficial if students have experience building with LEGO Technics components (beams, gears, and axel pins rather than bricks with studs). FLL members have fun with friends, encourage and support each other, and learn the art of gracious competition. In addition to the robot challenge, FLL team members compete in short, on-the-spot challenge problems in the Innovation Project phase of the competitions. FLL is also known for its philosophies of "professionalism" and "cooperation" which are expressed in the organization's Core Values of discovery, innovation, impact, inclusion, teamwork, and fun. Teams are also judged on how well they promote and exhibit these core values. There is a $40.00 supply/equipment fee payable to Compass on the first day for practice competition materials.

10:00 am-11:55 am

4th-6th

(Semester Long)

Robotics Challenge Lab*

Robotics Challenge Lab*Closed

Quarter(s): 3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 3

Students will explore the science and technology of robotics in an open workshop environment. They will work in pairs by experience level and interests to plan, conceptualize, build, program, and test a robot of their own design. Student partners will set their own design and performance criteria for their robot. Will it be one that plays a game, gathers data, or completes a mission using custom code that the team has written and tested? This laboratory is open to beginners as well as returning students with prior experience. The class will focus on construction and programming, with the goal of having functional robots by the end of the semester. There will be an emphasis on the engineering-design process with repeated build-test-redesign iterations until the robot performs as expected. Student pairs will be encouraged to think creatively and apply problem-solving skills to find unique solutions to their scenario. Groups will move at their own pace, and completed robots may have different levels of complexity depending on the experience of the team. An experienced robotics competitor will serve as a mentor and facilitator during the lab. He will not teach formal lessons but will instead circulate among the partner teams to trouble-shoot and offer advice on hardware and software issues, spending more time with newer builders and programmers. Students will enjoy the collaboration and camaraderie that comes from watching the successes, missteps, and eventual solutions of other teams. They will build with Tetrix Prime metal robotics components, incorporate sensors [such as, ultrasonic distance, infrared (IR) proximity, mini-LIDAR (laser radar), touch, line-following, color- sensing, or sound sensors], electronics, and motors from Tetrix Prizm, and code using the Arduino IDE. Please note: Prior experience with robotics and coding are not required. Also, students do not get to keep finished projects. This is a 15-week course that will begin on January 22.

1:00 pm-2:55 pm

8th-12th

(Semester Long)

Room C-25

Animal Kingdom Alive! (11 AM)*

Animal Kingdom Alive! (11 AM)* Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 1

Pet a parrot, meet a Madagascar hissing cockroach, touch a giant tortoise, study a sea star, and peek at a porcupine! Meet live animals at Compass each week as we explore some of the major animal families through interactive presentations. Each week, wildlife educators will bring a variety of animal ambassadors. They will discuss adaptations, habitats, diets, and diversity in the animal family. They will help students discover similarities and differences among species in animal families. Students will learn about adaptations and plenty of fun facts about the live animals that they meet each week. Our 2024 schedule is:

  • 3/18/2024: Ocean Invertebrates (clam, mussel, oyster, whelk, hermit crab, spider, crab, sea urchin, and horseshoe crab)
  • 3/25/2024: Raptors (hawks, owls, eagles)
  • 4/8/2024: Insects (roaches, tarantualas, centipedes, scorpions, stick bugs)
  • 4/15/2024: Ocean Vertebrates (oyster toadfish, hogchoker fish, small shark, other smaller fishes, and artifacts)
  • 4/22/2024: Tropical Birds (conures, parrots, macaws, parakeet)
  • 4/29/2024: Exotic Mammals (kangaroo, cavy, capybara, porcupine, kinkajou, hedgehog)
  • 5/6/2024: Amphibians (frogs, salamanders)
  • 5/13/2024: Reptiles (snakes, lizards, monitors, tortoises)
This is a 45-minute program. Participants must be age 6 or older for the program.

11:00 am-11:45 am

1st-3rd

Animal Kingdom Alive! (12 PM)*

Animal Kingdom Alive! (12 PM)* Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 3

Pet a parrot, meet a Madagascar hissing cockroach, touch a giant tortoise, study a sea star, and peek at a porcupine! Meet live animals at Compass each week as we explore some of the major animal families through interactive presentations. Each week, wildlife educators will bring a variety of animal ambassadors. They will discuss adaptations, habitats, diets, and diversity in the animal family. They will help students discover similarities and differences among species in animal families. Students will learn about adaptations and plenty of fun facts about the live animals that they meet each week. Our 2024 schedule is:

  • 3/18/2024: Ocean Invertebrates (clam, mussel, oyster, whelk, hermit crab, spider, crab, sea urchin, and horseshoe crab)
  • 3/25/2024: Raptors (hawks, owls, eagles)
  • 4/8/2024: Insects (roaches, tarantualas, centipedes, scorpions, stick bugs)
  • 4/15/2024: Ocean Vertebrates (oyster toadfish, hogchoker fish, small shark, other smaller fishes, and artifacts)
  • 4/22/2024: Tropical Birds (conures, parrots, macaws, parakeet)
  • 4/29/2024: Exotic Mammals (kangaroo, cavy, capybara, porcupine, kinkajou, hedgehog)
  • 5/6/2024: Amphibians (frogs, salamanders)
  • 5/13/2024: Reptiles (snakes, lizards, monitors, tortoises)
This is a 55-minute program.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

4th-6th

C-26

Culinary Foundations: Seafood Celebration

Culinary Foundations: Seafood Celebration Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 1

Students with a curiosity for culinary careers will explore many aspects of cooking for the hospitality industry and for themselves. In this advanced cooking class, students will make delicious, advanced recipes and learn skills that are the foundation for a future career in culinary arts. This class will get students excited about new foods, flavors, and techniques as they gain a working knowledge of food planning and preparation. Each quarter, new technical, kitchen skills are introduced, and each week, a new recipe is made in class that demonstrates the featured food group or cooking style. Fourth quarter covers Chapter 6 in the Level 2 textbook and features Fish and Seafood recipes including:

  • Crab Mornay
  • Shrimp Scampi
  • Clam Chowder
  • Shrimp and Crawfish Stuffed Potato
  • Seafood Newburg
  • Seafood Salad
  • Fish Tacos
  • Shrimp and Crab Gratin
Culinary vocabulary will also be introduced each week. Students will leave this class with an introduction to culinary careers in the hospitality industry and a beginning foundation in culinary arts. Additionally, students will be able to take charge of a home kitchen, prepare advanced dishes, and adhere to safety and hygiene standards. They will have nutrition-planning and cooking skills that will enrich the lives of their friends and families. Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. Pork will be used in a meat pie during 2nd quarter. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Topics in this Series: Lotsa Pasta (Quarter 1); Meat Pies and Sweet Pies (Quarter 2); Soups and Stews (Quarter 3); and Seafood Celebration (Quarter 4). Students continuing from the prior quarter will receive priority pre-registration for next quarter. Prerequisites: Students must be in 9th grade (minimum age 14) to take this class. 7th-8th graders must have Instructor's permission to enroll. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Cooking assignments, practicing skills at home, and related homework will be given in class and e-mailed to students and parents. Brief written assignments may be given, such as recipe modification or development. Assessments: Individual feedback will be given in class. Formal assessments will not be given. At the end of the second quarter, enrolled students will be required to complete an online Virginia Food Handler Course for food safety certification through the county health department, which will cost $25.00 https://courseforfoodsafety.com/states/VA?gclid=CjwKCAjw7LX0BRBiEiwA__gNw4AfZHgp_eOVTeiEXudxZhhF11E2UMggiIeYo6qL33xlUaDXbUeB5RoCG1cQAvD_BwE Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase or rent the selected textbooks and workbooks. Used copies are acceptable.
  • Foundations of Restaurant Management & Culinary Arts: Level 1, published by National Restaurant Association (ISBN# 978-0138019389)
  • Foundations of Restaurant Management & Culinary Arts: Level 2, published by National Restaurant Association (ISBN# 978-0131380226)
  • Activity Guide for Foundations of Restaurant Management and Culinary Arts Level 1, published by National Restaurant Association (ISBN# 978-0137070503)
  • Activity Guide for Foundations of Restaurant Management and Culinary Arts Level 2, published by National Restaurant Association (ISBN# 978-0131380714)
Required Tools/Materials: Culinary students will be expected to begin to acquire their own tools. Students should purchase and bring with them each week the following basic, minimum tools and supplies: -Chef's Knife Set, Professional Quality- (purchased individually or as a starter set) Recommended model (Amazon): J.A Henckels International 31425-000 Classic Starter Knife Set, 3-Piece, Black/Stainless Steel /p> -Knife Guards- Recommended model (Amazon): 3- Piece Universal Knife Edge Guards Set -Carrying Case- Recommended model (Amazon): Tosnail Chef Knife Case Roll Bag with 15 Slots -Chef's Jacket- (long sleeve, white. Brought to class clean each week) Recommended model- women's (Amazon): Chef Works Women's Le Mans Chef CoatRecommended model-men's (Amazon): Chef Works Men's Bordeaux Chef Coat -Chef's Cap - (student's choice of color) Recommended model (Amazon): Nanxson 3pcs Chef Hat Office Supplies: Ring binder, pen or pencil, note cards and loose-leaf paper Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $90.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for perishable food items, ingredients, and supplies that are used in this class. For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts or Career Education for purposes of a high school transcript. Non-Meeting Dates: Class will not be meeting March 13, the makeup day for this lesson is March 2o.

10:00 am-11:55 am

9th-12th

Sweet Shop: Casual Confections (Mon)

Sweet Shop: Casual Confections (Mon) Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 4

The tantalizing aroma of cookies in the oven. A mouth-watering burst of mint. The silky feel of melted chocolate. The sticky sweet of fresh-made caramel. A subtle hint of lemon. Student bakers will enjoy these delicious sensations- and more- as they explore the world of baking homemade desserts. Sweet Shop treats are scrumptious, fun, and simple to make. Each week they will prepare a fresh, handmade dessert or sweet such as: pies, cakes, cookies, tarts, trifles, mousses, puddings, candies, fudge, brittle, or chocolate. The class will include some icing, decorating, and garnishing techniques for completed desserts. This quarter, the Compass bakers' culinary adventures will include:

  • Coconut Macaroons (nut)
  • Mini Lemon Meringue Pie
  • Blueberry Honey Cakes
  • Mint Chocolate Pecan Trifle (nuts)
  • Glazed Blackberry Cake
  • Strawberry Rhubarb Cobbler
  • Chocolate Caramel Toffee Fudge (nuts)
  • Lemon Cupcakes with Lavender Frosting
Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. This engaging sweets class will get students excited about helping in the kitchen and entertaining. They will learn important baking skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary is introduced each week. Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Topics in this Series: Decadent Delights (Quarter 1); Gooey Goodies (Quarter 2), Best Bon Bons (Quarter 3), and Casual Confections (Quarter 4). Assessments: Qualitative Feedback will be given in class. Formal grades/assessment will not be given. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in career exploration, fine arts, or electives for purposes of a high school transcript. Non-Meeting Dates: Class will not be meeting March 13, the makeup day for this lesson is March 2o.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

8th-12th

Advanced Baking & Pastry: Piecrust, Sweet Crust, Nut Crust

Advanced Baking & Pastry: Piecrust, Sweet Crust, Nut Crust Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 1

The warm, welcoming smell of baking bread, flavorful fondant, carefully crackled creme brulee, mile-high mille-feuille, and proper puffed pastry. These are just some of the advanced baking techniques that Compass bakers will learn in Perfecting Pastries. From pate a choux to piecrust, students chefs will create more complex baked items in this course. This quarter, the Compass bakers' culinary adventures will include:

  • Pear Tart
  • Chocolate Cream Pie with Chocolate Chip Cookie Crust
  • Peach Sponge Pudding
  • Mint Chocolate Tart
  • Raspberry Meringue Torte with Chocolate Sauce
  • Lemon Blackberry Swiss Roll Cake
  • Strawberry Shortcake
This engaging advanced baked goods class will get students excited about pasties for a career, side gig, hobby, or special occasions. Some recipes will be completed over two class periods, and several, due to the complexity of the dough or crust, will be sent home with instructions on how to fill or finish baking. Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. They will learn important baking skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary is introduced each week. Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain nuts, dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market ingredients. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Topics in this Series: Cakes and Cookies (Quarter 1); Puffs, Pies, and Pudding (Quarter 2), Breads and Dough (Quarter 3), and Piecrust, Sweet Crust, Nut Crust (Quarter 4). Assessments: Qualitative Feedback will be given in class. Formal grades/assessment will not be given. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in career exploration, fine arts, or electives for purposes of a high school transcript. Non-Meeting Dates: Class will not be meeting March 13, the makeup day for this lesson is March 2o.

1:00 pm-2:25 pm

9th-12th

Online

Principles of Biology (On-Level or Honors)- Lecture **Online** *

Principles of Biology (On-Level or Honors)- Lecture **Online** *Closed

Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 0

This is a place-holder for the Principles of Biology lecture. Students should register for the Principles of Biology Lab, which will automatically enroll them in both class sections.

9:00 am-9:55 am

9th-12th

(Year Long)

Everyday Physics- Lecture **Online** *

Everyday Physics- Lecture **Online** *Closed

Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 0

This is a place-holder for the Physics lecture. Students should register for the Physics Lab, which will automatically enroll them in both class sections.

10:00 am-10:55 am

11th-12th

(Year Long)

Physical Science- Lecture **Online** *

Physical Science- Lecture **Online** *Closed

Quarter(s): 1,2,3,4

Day(s): Mon

Open Spots: 0

This is a place-holder for the Physical Science lecture. Students should register for the Physical Science Lab, which will automatically enroll them in both class sections.

11:00 am-11:55 am

9th-10th

(Year Long)



Art / Music Science / Technology Humanities / Social Sciences Language Arts
Extracurricular Math Foreign Language (Full Classes)
Private Lessons Cooking Lunch N Learn