Schedule and Room Assignments

Classes meet Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, or Fridays in Herndon, VA. Filter by subject or grade below. You can see key dates in our Google calendar or view our Academic Calendar.

Quarter beginning January 18, 2021

Art / MusicScience / TechnologyHumanities / Social SciencesLanguage Arts
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Friday Classes

9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
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1:30
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Room 3

Ancient Justice: Crime & Punishment in the Early Modern Era

Ancient Justice: Crime & Punishment in the Early Modern EraClosed

Quarter(s): 3, 4

Day(s): Fri.

Open Spots: 0

This class will explore the judicial processes of mainland Europe and their divergence from English
Common Law. Like a traditional mock trial program, the class will hear cases, and students will defend themselves. Real historical cases will be studied, and trial parts assigned to the class, which will be
debated from the perspective of Englishmen, from commoners to nobility, and Europeans in both
criminal and church courts. The class will serve as the jury and, if necessary, select period-appropriate
verdicts and explain how they arrived at their decisions, while striving for period accuracy. This semester
will examine the Justice systems of Renaissance Europe up to Colonial Britain.

Topics in this Series: Crime & Punishment in Medieval Times (Semester 1), Crime and Punishment in the Early Modern Era (Semester 2).

Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.

Assignments: Period maps, photographs, and re-creations will be posted on a class Google Drive, and video links from YouTube will be e-mailed to parents and students for homework or supplemental investigation.

Assessments: A mid-term and final exam may be given.

Textbooks: None. Case documents are provided in class.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History or Civics for purposes of a high school transcript.

10:00 am-10:55 am

8th-12th

(Semester Long)

Spy Games RPG, The History of Espionage in The Cold War

Spy Games RPG, The History of Espionage in The Cold WarClosed

Quarter(s): 3, 4

Day(s): Fri.

Open Spots: 0

This class will pull aside the Iron Curtain, and uncover the secrets of spying during the Cold War, learning about far more than spying in the process- using an RPG (role playing game).

When the world's last two superpowers faced off for fifty years, the intelligence battle had to go incognito. It was the USA vs the USSR, and any advantage could mean the difference between life and nuclear annihilation. No expense was spared as spying went Space Age. The real stories of espionage were just as interesting as James Bond and Q, and the stakes just as high. Computers worked on large scale to obscure secrets from invasion plans and to nuclear codes and knowing just who is really on your side. Field agents subtly advised potential allies and sometimes outright topples whole regimes with well (or poorly) placed assassinations.

The class will use a Role-Playing Game system, designed by the instructor for the Spy Games series of classes, to allow for "Dungeons and Dragons" style game play. The class will examine the lives and techniques of real Cold War spies, adopt their methods and replicate them for ourselves, pitting one half of the class against the other. Once students have the enemy's secrets, they will attempt to make use of this stolen information and learn just how much power there is in knowledge.

Topics in this Series: Early American Spying in The Civil War (Semester 1), Modern American Spying in the Cold War (Semester 2)

Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.

Assignments: Period maps, photographs, and re-creations will be posted on a class Google Drive, and video links from YouTube will be e-mailed to parents and students for homework or supplemental investigation.

Assessments: Will not be given.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript

11:00 am-11:55 am

8th-12th

(Semester Long)

3D History: WWI- Over the Top, 1916-1918

3D History: WWI- Over the Top, 1916-1918 Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3, 4

Day(s): Fri.

Open Spots: 1

Why read about key military battles on maps or in books when you can learn about them hands-on, in three dimensions, using historical miniature gaming? In 3D History, pivotal engagements come alive for new and experienced students, as they navigate a table-top terrain, deploy hundreds of miniature soldiers, ships, and tanks... all while playing a military strategy game. Each student will have the opportunity to fight a battle from both sides, allowing them to test various strategies, try multiple scenarios, predict different outcomes, and rewrite history- an effective way to gain a deeper understanding of what actually happened and why!

In 1916 The Great War had been churning through men and material for two years. Something had to be done- warring countries were driving deep into debt and losing entire generations of young men at the front. The armies had to go "Over the Top." Great Battle Plans were drawn up for massive, simultaneous attacks across the whole of Western Europe. In secret, the British built new technological horrors to drive through the German lines: land battleships bristling with guns, covered in armor and belching smoke and fire. The gears of war reached as far as Gallipoli in Turkey and the deserts of the Middle East. In the West, an untapped American giant slowly stirred to war. Provoked by unrestricted submarine warfare, diplomatic intrigue, and a righteous desire to defend democracy, would America arrive in time to decide the outcome of the Great War?

This semester will study later years of WWI, the major battles of the Western Front, where tens of thousands of men went "over the top" of their trenches to near certain death, as well as the desperate attempts to break the stalemate in other theaters of war with new technologies.

Note: This is a 1 hour, 55 minute class with a 10-minute break part way through.

Topics in this Series: WWI- No Man's Land 1914-1915 (Semester 1) and WWI- Over the Top 1916-1918 (Semester 2).

Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.

Assignments: Period maps, photographs, and re-creations will be posted on a class Google Drive, and video links from YouTube will be e-mailed to parents and students for homework or supplemental investigation.

Assessments: Will not be given.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript.

1:00 pm-2:55 pm

8th-12th

(Semester Long)

Room 4

Paint Studio I: Landmarks & Landscapes

Paint Studio I: Landmarks & Landscapes Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Fri

Open Spots: 4

Students will be introduced to painting with acrylics in a relaxed, informal studio setting under the guidance of a professional painter. Students will work on canvas boards and easels and will learn elements of art and principles of design in addition to methods in painting. Painters will learn basic techniques such as color mixing, shading, blending, stippling, broad stroke, dry brush, and glazing techniques. Each quarter, the instructor will demonstrate techniques by developing a sample painting. Students may elect to follow the class sample or may apply the painting skills to an entirely unique composition. Students will complete two or three 8" X 10" or 11" X 14" canvases each quarter, depending on the level of detailing.

Third quarter, students will paint compositions of landscapes and natural landmarks inspired by America’s National Parks. “From sea to shining sea,” paintings may feature majestic mountains, craggy canyons, desolate desserts, or arid arches. These projects will introduce perspective in addition to the representation of light (shadows, reflections, silhouettes) and textures.

This class is suitable for beginners who have never painted before, and for experienced art students who have worked in other mediums and are interested in exploring acrylic painting. Compass parents are welcome to register for this class to work alongside their teens, or to work on their own, while their teen is in another Compass class. Painting can provide a relaxing, needed break from rigorous academic classes and over-scheduled lives in a fun, supportive environment.

Prerequisites: None

Topics in this Series: Botanicals (Quarter 1); Stunning Sunsets & Starry Skies (Quarter 2); TBD (Quarter 3); and TBD (Quarter 4).

Workload: Work outside of class is optional, however students who want to continue to practice their painting techniques might want to purchase a tabletop easel (approx. $10.00) and set of basic acrylic paints ($30.00+) for home use.

Assessments: Individual feedback is given in class. Formal assessments will not be given.

Lab/Supply Fee: A new student class fee of $20.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for canvases and brushes and use of shared class supplies (desktop easels, paints, paper products, etc.). Returning students who are continuing in this class from a prior quarter can continue using their personal brushes, but there is a $10.00 fee for canvases and shared supplies.

What to Wear: Students may wish to bring an apron, smock, or paint shirt to wear when working with acrylic paints.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

10:00 am-10:55 am

7th-Adult

Fundamentals of Drawing: Fantasy Figures

Fundamentals of Drawing: Fantasy Figures Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Fri

Open Spots: 4

Students will be introduced to drawing in a relaxed, informal setting, where they will learn the fundamentals of drawing along with the elements of art and principles of design.

Third quarter, teens will be doing basic, freehand sketching of favorites from the realm of fantasy such as dragons, fairies, elves, mermaids, unicorns, and a project from anime. Teen artists will learn to draw different types of lines, fading, shading, and blending using crosshatching and smudging. Through fantasy drawings, artists be introduced to basic figure drawing and proportions. This class will introduce composition by introducing backgrounds such as a castle, garden, or woods. Over the course, students should progress to draw more carefully, more accurately and to represent more refined details in their drawings. Towards the end of the quarter, students may also choose to add color to their drawings.

The instructor will demonstrate various techniques by developing a sample drawing. Students may elect to follow the class sample or may apply the drawing skills to an entirely unique drawing. This class is suitable for beginners who have never drawn before and for intermediate art students who have worked in other mediums and are interested in exploring drawing. Drawing can provide a relaxing, needed break from rigorous academic classes and over-scheduled lives in a fun, supportive environment.

Topics in this Series: Marine Life (Quarter 1), Endangered Animal Art (Quarter 2), Fantasy Figures (Quarter 3), and TBD (Quarter 4).

Workload: Work outside of class is optional for those who wish to practice their drawing techniques.

Assessments: Individual feedback is given in class. Formal assessments will not be given.

Lab/Supply Fee: A new student class fee of $15.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a sketchbook, a pencil box with pencils of varying hardness, and an eraser. Returning drawing students do not need to pay a supply fee and are expected to replace their drawing supplies as needed, with similar or better quality.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

11:00 am-11:55 am

7th-12th

Acting- Teen Stage: Immersive Improv *HYBRID*

Acting- Teen Stage: Immersive Improv *HYBRID* Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3

Day(s): Fri

Open Spots: 3

Snappy comebacks, one-liners, sarcasm, exaggeration, irony...and teenagers. These things just go together! Improv gives kids an outlet for fun, creative stories and spontaneous humor. Teens who find amusement in the unexpected and humor in the unpredictable will enjoy improvisational acting!

Third quarter, actors will continue to hone their "short game", or short form improv skills. Class activities will teach students how to do edits, perfect their scene work, create characters, escalate emotions, elevate relationships, and use object work to create a more involved stories. They learn about timing, transitions, and how to connect scenes and travel through the improv story with recurring characters, patterns, and common themes to portray a hilarious or witty situation. Class exercises will help students improve listening stills and build the collective, group imagination.

Improvisation is the art of entertaining with connected, unpredictable twists and turns often seen from the great comedians and best live entertainers. Improv students will improve their ability to think on-their-feet, play off each other, and react with spontaneous wit, sarcasm, and irony. Actors' creative thinking and communication skills will be strengthened as they work "outside-of-the-box" and learn to read their audience.

Improv can be for everyone! No previous experience is needed. Beginners are welcome, and experienced students will further develop their improv skills. This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, flexible, and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work collaboratively in a group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class.

Format:This class will run as a hybrid format with 50% of the classes being taught in-person and 50% taught online, in a virtual classroom environment. The dates of in-person and virtual sessions will be announced in the first class meeting.

Topics in this Series: Irresistible Improv (Quarter 1), Innovative Improv (Quarter 2), Immersive Improv (Quarter 3), Improv in Action (Quarter 4). Continuing students from the prior quarter will receive priority pre-registration for next quarter.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hour per week outside of class.

Assignments: If any, will be sent to parents and students by e-mail.

Assessments: will not be given.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

9th-12th

Room 5

Algebra I

Algebra IClosed

Quarter(s):

Day(s): Wed, Fri

Open Spots: 4

This is a complete course in high school Algebra I which will cover fundamental concepts in algebra and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. This course is designed to emphasize the study of algebraic problem-solving with the incorporation of real-world applications. Topics in Algebra I include number systems, linear systems, rational numbers, complex numbers, exponents, roots, radicals, quadratic equations, polynomials, factoring, absolute values, ratios, and proportions. In addition, the course will cover solving and graphing systems of functions, linear equations, and inequalities. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem-solving.

Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation in pre-algebra topics in order to take this class.
Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Friday (day 1), lecture on Wednesday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Friday (day 8), and homework due the next Wednesday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Wednesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work.
Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.
Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by checking that weekly homework sets are complete and giving periodic take-home tests; class participation is also strongly encouraged. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade.
Textbook: Students should purcashe or rent the required textbook for this class: Algebra I: Expressions, Equations, and Applications by Paul A. Foerster. It is available in a few different editions, each of which is virtually identical: 2nd edition (ISBN-10 020125073X, ISBN-13 978-0201250732), 3rd edition (ISBN-10 0201860945, ISBN-13 978-0201860948), and Classic edition (ISBN-10 020132458X, ISBN-13 978-0201324587). It is also available under the title Foerster Algebra I, Classics edition (ISBN-10 0131657089, ISBN-13 978-0131657083). A calculator is not needed for this course.
Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Algebra I for purposes of a high school transcript.

10:00 am-10:55 am

7th-10th

Geometry

GeometryClosed

Quarter(s):

Day(s): Wed, Fri

Open Spots: 2

This is a complete course in high school Geometry which will cover fundamental concepts and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. Students will learn deductive reasoning, and logic by completing geometric proofs. Topics in geometry include: lines, angles, congruence, concurrence, inequalities, parallel lines, quadrilaterals, transformations, area, similarity, right triangles, circles, regular polygons, and geometric solids. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem- solving.

Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation Algebra I in order to take this class.
Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Friday (day 1), lecture on Wednesday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Friday (day 8), and homework due the next Wednesday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Wednesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work.
Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.
Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by checking that weekly homework sets are complete and giving periodic take-home tests; class participation is also strongly encouraged. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade.
Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Geometry: Seeing, Doing, Understanding, 3rd edition (ISBN-10 0716743612, ISBN-13 978-0716743613) A calculator is not needed for this course.
Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Geometry for purposes of a high school transcript.

11:00 am-11:55 am

8th-11th

Calculus (Honors or AP A/B)

Calculus (Honors or AP A/B)Closed

Quarter(s):

Day(s): Wed, Fri

Open Spots: 3

This is a complete course in high school Calculus which will cover fundamental concepts and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. Topics in Calculus include limits of functions (one-sided and two-sided limits, limits at infinity and infinite limits, limits of sequences, and continuity of functions), derivatives (various definitions of derivatives, estimating derivatives from tables and graphs, rules of differentiation, properties of derivatives, separable differential equations, and the Mean Value Theorem), applications of derivatives (related rates, optimization, and exponential growth and decay models), integrals (basic techniques of integration including basic antiderivatives and substitution), applications of integrals (in finding areas and volumes, describing motion, and as accumulation functions), and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem-solving.

Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation PreCalculus in order to take this class.
Level: This course is offered at two levels, Honors and Advanced Placement (AP). The scope and sequence are identical, however AP students may have additional practice problems. Students who wish to take the AP exam must register and pay for their own exam through the College Board in fall 2020 for the May 2021 exam.
Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Friday (day 1), lecture on Wednesday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Friday (day 8), and homework due the next Wednesday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Wednesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work.
Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.
Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by checking that weekly homework sets are complete and giving periodic take-home tests; class participation is also strongly encouraged. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade.
Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Calculus: Single Variable/Early Transcendentals, 8th edition by James Stewart (ISBN-13 9781305270336). A scientific calculator similar to the Casio fx-115ES PLUS is required for this class, and it is highly recommended that students preparing for the AP exam have a graphing calculator similar to the TI-83. Students without a graphing calculator must have access to desmos.com and/or wolframalpha.com for graphing assignments.
Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Calculus for purposes of a high school transcript.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

11th-12th

Algebra II

Algebra IIClosed

Quarter(s):

Day(s): Wed, Fri

Open Spots: 2

This is a complete course in high school Algebra II which will cover fundamental concepts and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. Topics in Algebra II include linear functions, systems of equations and inequalities, quadratic functions and complex numbers, exponential and logarithmic functions, rational and irrational algebraic functions, and quadratic relations and systems. In addition, this course will cover higher degree functions with complex numbers, sequences and series, probability, data analysis, and trigonometric and circular functions. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem solving.

Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation Algebra I in order to take this class.
Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Friday (day 1), lecture on Wednesday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Friday (day 8), and homework due the next Wednesday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Wednesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work.
Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload. In lieu of a graphing calculator, students should have access to websites desmos.com and wolframalpha.com for graphing assignments.
Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by checking that weekly homework sets are complete and giving periodic take-home tests; class participation is also strongly encouraged. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade.
Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Algebra and Trigonometry: Functions and Applications- Prentice Hall Classics (ISBN-10 0131657100, ISBN-13 978-0131657106). A scientific calculator similar to the Casio fx-115ES PLUS is required for this class.
Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Algebra II for purposes of a high school transcript.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

9th-12th

Room 6

Spanish II (On-Level or Honors)

Spanish II (On-Level or Honors)Closed

Quarter(s):

Day(s): Fri.

Open Spots: 0

Get ready for a full year of intermediate level high school Spanish! This is a conversation-focused program in which students will build their vocabulary quickly and learn essential grammar skills in Spanish. Vocabulary will include describing homes and chores; planning a party; health, body parts and sports; vacations, leisure time activities, fun events and places of interest; communicating via phone and computer; and daily routines. There will be a strong emphasis on competency using regular and irregular past tense verbs and common grammar concepts such as commands, direct and indiect object pronouns, reflexive verbs, and the differences between ser vs. estar and saber vs. conocer.

Class will be conducted primarily in Spanish and will focus on listening and speaking skills, asking and answering questions, and correct use of grammar. At home, students will be responsible for memorizing vocabulary and grammar, completing worksheets and written assignments, and watching both grammar instruction and language immersion videos.

Level:This class will be offered on two levels: Honors and On-Level. Spanish II offers a substantive, full-credit experience taught at either level. All class members share core material and participate in the same class activities, but honors students will be given homework that requires higher level reasoning and advanced application of various grammar skills. All students will register online for the same course. Students must indicate which level they want to study via e-mail by August 15. Once the course has begun, students may move down a level (from honors to on-level) at any time. However, once classes have started, students may not "bump up" a level.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 30-45 per day, 4 days per week on homework outside of class.

Assignments: Are sent by e-mail to parents and students. Students must have access to a computer and internet service for computer-based videos and practice tools that are assigned as homework and are essential to success in the class.

Assessments: Quizzes, tests, and individual performance reviews will be given to all students at regular intervals to provide parents with sufficient feedback to assign a grade.

Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $30.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for class materials in lieu of a textbook.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Foreign Language for purposes of a high school transcript.

10:00 am-10:55 am

9th-12th

French I (On-Level or Honors)

French I (On-Level or Honors)Closed

Quarter(s):

Day(s): Fri.

Open Spots: 4

Bonjour and get ready for a full year of beginner level high school French! This is a conversation-focused program in which students will build their vocabulary quickly and learn essential grammar skills in French. Vocabulary will include the alphabet, numbers, time, dates, seasons, school, free time activities/hobbies, likes/dislikes, personal descriptions, family relationships, emotions, food/restaurants, places/locations in town, and shopping/clothing. There will be a strong emphasis on competency using regular and irregular present tense verbs and common grammar concepts such as articles, pronouns, adjectives, and comparative phrases.
Class will be conducted primarily in French and will focus on listening and speaking skills, asking and answering questions, and correct use of grammar. At home, students will be responsible for memorizing vocabulary and grammar, completing homework assignments, and watching both grammar instruction and language immersion videos.

Level: This class will be offered on two levels: Honors and On-Level. French I offers a substantive, full-credit experience taught at either level. All class members share core material and participate in the same class activities, but honors students will be given homework that requires higher level reasoning and advanced application of various grammar skills. All students will register online for the same course. Students must indicate which level they want to study by the end of the first month of class.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 30-45 minutes per day, 4 days per week on homework outside of class.

Assignments: Are sent by e-mail to parents and students. Students must have access to a computer and internet service for computer-based videos and practice tools that are assigned as homework and are essential to success in the class.

Assessments: Quizzes, tests, and individual performance reviews will be given to all students at regular intervals to provide parents with sufficient feedback to assign a grade.

Textbook: Students should purchase or rent the required textbook for this class: Bien Dit!: Student Edition Level 1 2013 (French Edition) (ISBN-13 978-0547871790)

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Foreign Language for purposes of a high school transcript.

Prerequisites: None

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

8th-12th

Virtual 1

Principles of Biology (Honors or On-Level) *ONLINE/TRANSITION*

Principles of Biology (Honors or On-Level) *ONLINE/TRANSITION*Closed

Quarter(s):

Day(s): M, Fri

Open Spots: 2

This full-year lab science course introduces classic biology topics updated for the 21st century. Biology studies living things and their relationships from microscopic to massive, ancient to modern, arctic to tropic. Our survey includes: (1) cellular and molecular biology, (2) ecology, (3) genetics, (4) biology of organisms (with selected human health and anatomy topics), and (5) evolution and diversity.

You will observe microscopic organisms and give monarch butterflies a health exam before tagging them for their 2,800 mile migration to Mexico. You will extract DNA, model its processes, and learn how scientists manipulate this magnificent molecule to make mice glow. You will observe animal behavior, test your heart rate, and practice identifying and debunking pseudo-science.

By the end of the course, students will be able to explain the nature of science as a system of knowing; cite evidence for foundational theories of modern biology; explain basic biological processes and functions; describe structures and relationships in living systems; outline systems of information, energy, and resources; demonstrate valid experimental design; discern ethical standards; relate their values and scientific ideas to decision-making; and apply biology knowledge to their own health.

In this flipped classroom, students are responsible for covering new material such as readings from the textbook and additional popular and scholarly sources, videos, and animations prior to class meetings. In-person sessions focus on active discussion, clarification, exploration of content, review, modeling, and hands-on activities.

Labs address not only technical skills and sequential operations, but also forming testable predictions, collecting data, applying math, drawing conclusions, and presenting findings. Hands-on dissection, always optional, is taught with preserved crayfish and fetal pigs.

Sensitive issues: human reproduction is not taught separately, but mentioned as students learn about other, related topics such as sperm, eggs, stem cells, genetic disease, hormones, fetal development, breast-feeding, adolescence, and HIV. While there may be some debate-style discussion of topics such as GMO, abortion will not be debated. Birth control and sexuality education are not covered, but distinctions between gender and biological sex are discussed in detail in the genetics unit. Dissections are optional. Evolution is embedded in every topic, from molecular to ecological, inseparably from other content. It is addressed in a scientific context, not from a faith standpoint.

The course provides a substantive, full-credit experience on either an Honors or On-Level track. All class members share core material and participate in the same labs. Honors has longer or additional readings, more analytical work, and more thorough and difficult assessments; it is appropriate for students who seek more challenge or plan to take the SAT Subject Test in Biology. Brief, required summer assignments are due in August for those who elect to take Honors. Students register online for the same course, but must indicate which level they wish to study via e-mail by August 15. Students may move down a level (from Honors to On-Level) at any time.

Schedule: Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous ONLINE instruction via videoconferencing for fall semester. At the instructors' option, the class may transition to HYBRID instruction for second semester as COVID-19 scenarios improve. Hybrid instruction would include online instruction on Mondays (8:00 am - 8:55 am) and in-person instruction on Fridays. Instruction is recommended to be synchronous, but recordings will be made for students with schedule conflicts.

Prerequisites: Students should be very strong, independent readers and able to understand graphs, tables, percentages, decimals, ratios, and averages.

Workload: Homework includes term cards, brief written responses, weekly online quizzes, unit tests, occasional lab reports, and some creative assignments including sketching. Students will sometimes prepare short, in-class presentations, participate in group projects, run simulations, or conduct simple experiments at home. All students should expect to spend 4-6 hours outside of class reading and preparing homework.

Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments; upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests; track grades; message instructor and classmates; and virtual conferences.

Assessments: Points will be assigned for completed homework, projects, quizzes, and tests. A letter grade will not be assigned, but parents can use total points earned versus total points offered to assign a grade for purposes of a homeschool transcript. Parents can view total points earned at any time through the Canvas site

Textbook/Materials: Students must purchase or rent the textbook Biology (2010 edition with baby alligator cover) by Stephen Nowicki, published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt/Holt McDougal (ISBN# 9780547219479) An e-book version is also available (ISBN# 9780547221069). By second semester, those who elect to take the SAT Subject Test will also need the College Board's "Official SAT Subject Test in Biology Study Guide" (ISBN# 978-1457309205) and a prep book of their choice, such as the latest Princeton Review's Cracking the SAT Subject Test in Biology E/M or Barron's SAT Subject Test Biology E/M.

Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $130 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. The cost for the SAT Subject Test in Biology in spring or summer 2021 is not included. Each family is responsible for scheduling and paying for their student's exam through the College Board.

Supplies/Equipment: Students will need access to a computer/internet, compound microscope with 400X magnification and cool lighting, splash goggles, water-resistant/acid-resistant lab apron, kitchen or postal scale, 3-ring binder, at least 400, 3"x5" index cards, and plain, lined, and graph paper. Some of these supplies are used at home. Students should watch class announcements on Canvas to know when to bring items to class.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Lab Science for purposes of a high school transcript.

9:30 am-10:55 am

9th-12th

US Government and Politics (Honors or On Level) *ONLINE/TRANSITION*

US Government and Politics (Honors or On Level) *ONLINE/TRANSITION*Closed

Quarter(s):

Day(s): M, Fri

Open Spots: 0

As Thomas Jefferson wrote to Richard Price in 1788, "wherever the people are well informed they can be trusted with their own government." That's what this course aims to do!

US Government and Politics is a year-long political science and civics course for high school students to build their knowledge of essential political structures and processes. Key themes in the course include Congress, Presidency, Bureaucracy, American Legal System and the Courts (30%); Constitutional Underpinnings of American Democracy (15%); Political Parties and Interest Groups (15%); Political Beliefs and Behavior (20%); and Civil Liberties and Civil Rights (15%).

Students will learn about the formal and informal machinery that "makes the system go" -– including the so-called "fourth branch of government," the bureaucracy we know so well here in the Washington, DC metropolitan area. By the end of the course, students will also be able to explain the development of civil rights and liberties from their constitutional roots and through several Supreme Court cases; how political parties and interest groups work; the structure of elections; and the means by which citizens learn about politics and form political beliefs. Students will understand enduring issues, including separation of powers, checks and balances, and then tension between majority rule and minority rights.

LevelsThe course provides a substantive, full-credit experience in either an Honors or On-Level track. Honors and On-Level students meet together and share core preparation each week, but assignments and assessments are differentiated, with longer readings, more practice of synthesis and analysis, and additional writing at the Honors level. Both tiers offer a serious, full-credit experience. A student who wishes to move up or down a level during the year may consult with the instructor. Students register online for the same course, but must indicate which level they wish to study via e-mail by August 15.

Schedule: Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous ONLINE instruction via videoconferencing for fall semester. At the instructors' option, the class may transition to HYBRID instruction for second semester as COVID-19 scenarios improve. Hybrid instruction would include online instruction on Mondays (9:00 am - 9:55 am) and in-person instruction on Fridays. Instruction is recommended to be synchronous, but recordings will be made for students with schedule conflicts.

Prerequisites: Students must be highly-skilled readers at the high school level or above; or else have very robust assistance at home with weekly reading assignments.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-5 hours per week outside class meetings for reading and homework, a range which may vary based on reading speed. Note that the core textbook is written at a basic college level, while other materials are targeted at either a high school audience or the news-reading public.

Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates. These are due by 10 AM on Thursdays before each Friday meeting to promote active, knowledgeable discussion in class. There will be a summer assignment that is due on September 10, before the first class meeting. The class Canvas site will open on August 3 with introductory information, a syllabus, and the initial assignment.

Assessments: Points will be assigned for completed homework, projects, quizzes, and tests. A letter grade will not be assigned, but parents can use total points earned versus total points offered to assign a grade for purposes of a homeschool transcript. Parents can view total points earned at any time through the Canvas site.

This course was structured to allow interested students to prepare for the College Boards' CLEP exam in American Government. Time spent on major course themes intentionally mirror the CLEP test's percentages. Students interested in taking the CLEP exam will have to register and pay for those exams individually. This course is not offered at an AP level, but the instructor is willing to advise experienced students who wish to independently prepare for the AP United States Government and Politics exam in May 2021. Additional preparation outside of class, particularly in essay-writing and analysis of Supreme Court cases, would be needed for AP.

https://clep.collegeboard.org/history-and-social-sciences/american-government
https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/courses/ap-united-states-government-and-politics/exam

Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase or rent Keeping the Republic: Power and Citizenship in American Politics, Brief 8th Edition by Christine Barbour and Gerald Wright (ISBN-13: 978-1544316215). Electronic versions are available. Be sure to purchase the EIGHTH (8th) edition that is also labeled "BRIEF." Other readings will be provided by the instructor.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component full year, one-credit course in US Government, Civics, or Humanities for purposes of a high school transcript

11:00 am-11:55 am

10th-12th

Media Literacy in the Age of Misinformation *ONLINE/TRANSITION*

Media Literacy in the Age of Misinformation *ONLINE/TRANSITION* Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3, 4

Day(s): Fri.

Open Spots: 2

Media Literacy in the Age of Misinformation is a two-semester high school course that looks at media literacy from both social science and journalism perspectives. Students will develop analytical skills, awareness of national and global current events, and an understanding of how news information is acquired and packaged for our consumption. You will read news each week and discuss current stories in our live meetings. We will examine arguments and evidence, considering reliability, verification, ethical standards, balance and bias, context, and more. We will study some logical fallacies, such as the Slippery Slope and Straw Man. By the end of this course, you will be a better-informed, smarter consumer of news -– and hopefully a more involved citizen, better able to take action on issues you care about.

Note: Class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for 3rd quarter. At the instructors' option, the class may transition to in-person instruction mid-semester as COVID-19 scenarios improve.

Topics in this Series: Media Literacy in the Age of Misinformation (Semester 1 and Semester 2). Although both semesters have the same title, content will naturally be different because of changing events and circumstances in national and world news. Students may register for either or both semesters independently.

Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Strong independent reading skills (or robust home support) are necessary, as much news material aims for a reading level pegged at approximately tenth grade. Students must also be able to discuss sometimes difficult and mature themes

Workload: Students should plan for 2-3 hours per week outside class meetings for reading and homework, a range which may vary based on reading speed. Additional time may be needed to pursue individual news interests, as the student wishes.

Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post weekly assignments, such as readings, videos, podcasts, written work, and news quizzes, and scores. These are due by 10:00 AM each Thursday (the day before Friday in-person meetings) to promote active, knowledgeable discussion. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.

Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by checking that weekly homework sets are complete and giving periodic take-home tests; class participation is also strongly encouraged. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade.

Textbook/Materials: The cost of an individual subscription to New York Times Upfront, a high school current events magazine is included in the course fee. Families should budget approximately $30.00 for one additional paid news subscription (details to be provided in class). Other readings and materials will be provided by the instructor.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Social Science or Journalism for purposes of a high school transcript.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

Intro to Economics: Choices, Decisions, People & Policy *ON...

Intro to Economics: Choices, Decisions, People & Policy *ONLINE/TRANSITION*Closed

Quarter(s):

Day(s): Fri

Open Spots: 5

Where does the money come from for stimulus checks or a tax cut? How is a debt different than a deficit? These topics can be understood with a practical, everyday, concept-based approach to Economics. This course in applied economics spans key themes in micro-economics and macro-economics in a tangible, approachable way using cases and real examples from the community around us and avoids the traditional math-heavy, dull, and difficult study of the field.

Economics is all about choosing and then deciding. It involves the study of how and why these choices and decisions are made and then determining their outcomes for a person, a firm, or even a nation. Sometimes the study of economics is referred to as the study of the political economy because it involves public decisions. For this course, we start off with smaller units first--often called micro-economics--and stress practical or applied concepts. Later on, the course will examine the larger-scale implications for using the tools of economics to better understand public policy formation and to explore case studies on such issues as alleviating poverty, addressing climate change, and protecting public health.

In his classic text Economics, Paul Samuelson of MIT says economics is the study of how people choose and use limited resources having alternative uses. The material in this class incorporates his traditional often called neoclassical approach as well as the ideas from the so-called free-market Austrian-School economists like Henry Hazlitt and Milton Friedman. The course connects these concepts through the approachable books, Whatever Happened to Penny Candy? A Fast, Clear, and Fun Explanation of the Economics You Need For Success in Your Career, Business, and Investments and Economics in One Lesson

In short, this course aims to build a better understanding of a teen’s personal stake in using the concepts and tools of economics in daily life as well as offering a way to visualize how they are used to create the public policies. The course starts small and moves to larger subjects over time. It offers students a chance to explore ideas, evaluate case studies, discuss them in class, and then write about them. The course encourages the development of critical thinking skills using the basic terms and concepts of applied microeconomics.

Note: Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing. At the instructors' option, the class may transition to in-person instruction later in the year as COVID-19 scenarios improve.

Prerequisites: None

LevelsThe course provides a substantive, full-credit experience in either an Honors or On-Level track. All students complete the same assignments for Semester 1. Near the end of Semester 1, students may decide to differentiate their workload and continue On-Level or at an Honors level for Semester 2. Honors students will have more in-depth assignments with longer and additional readings, more practice of synthesis and analysis, and additional writing. Both tiers offer a sunstantial, full-credit experience. Students register online for the same course.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class on homework.

Assignments: Assignments will consist of readings, worksheets, individual and group projects. All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates.

Assessments: Points will be awarded for the competition of assignments, quizzes, and projects, and parents can assign a grade based on the number of points earned as compared to the number of points available.

Textbook/Materials: A class bundle consisting of two books and a packet of photocopied articles will be provided. Additional readings, if selected, will be identified by August 15.

Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $38.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as full credit in Economics for purposes of a high school transcript.

AP Exam Option: Students who take this course at the Honors level Semester 2 will have covered a substantial portion of the preparation for the AP exam in Microeconomics. The instructor will create a list of additional topics and analyses needed for any student who wishes to concurrently and independently study for the AP exam. Students who wish to take the AP exam must register and pay for on their own exam through the College Board in fall 2020 for the May 2021 exam.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

10th-12th

Virtual 2

Literature Roundtable Seminar- Dystopian Discourse *ONLINE ONLY*

Literature Roundtable Seminar- Dystopian Discourse *ONLINE ONLY* Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3, 4

Day(s): Fri.

Open Spots: 3

Roundtable is a seminar-style literature analysis and discussion class for high school students. Instead of a broad, general survey of literature, Roundtable students will examine a focused, "special topic" in literature through critical evaluation and rich discussion. Written works will be selected for their contribution to a specific genre and their influence on society.

Second semester, the class will examine the genre of dystopian literature with a critical eye on what elements are found in all dystopian fiction works. The class will examine the role of government and society in the imagined, oppressive or apocalyptic realms through a study of works such as: Brave New World (1932) by Aldous Huxley; Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949) by George Orwell; The Lottery (1948), a short story by Shirley Jackson; and Handmaid's Tale (1985) by Margaret Atwood. Genre-aligned poetry and excerpts will be incorporated throughout the semester.

For this course, students should be engaged readers who come to class prepared to participate in intellectual discussion. Students are also expected to take part in in weekly class discussions by sharing their reflections and reactions to the readings and drawing conclusions and comparisons with other works. For each novel, the instructor will provide a guide with thoughtful questions and prompts on the reading that students must come to class prepared to discuss with textual evidence. The course instructor will serve as a facilitator-moderator to lead Socratic, "roundtable" discussions in addition to other in-class activities, such as partner and small group work, to further the class's understanding of the literature. This course will focus on comprehension and analysis through discussion rather than composition. Students will be assigned creative, short assignments to enhance and demonstrate their understanding of each novel such as re-writing a scene, imagining a conversation between characters from different books, developing a prequel or sequel scene, writing a review, etc.

When discussing written works, students will be expected to give textual references such as specific quotes and examples- a higher-order high school and college-level skill that will be needed in later courses which require written analysis of literature. A key skill that will be taught in this class is how to annotate texts. Students will begin by examining samples of the instructor's own annotated novels then move to annotating the first short story in class as a group. For each novel, students will be given specific details to search for and annotate such as major plot points, character traits, interesting word choice, setting details, quotations, or questions. Later, students will be prepared to annotate automatically as they read with their own questions and reactions, a skill that can also be applied to the readings in other courses.

Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for the remainder of the year.

Topics in this Series: Science Fiction (Semester 1) and Dystopian Literature (Semester 2).

Prerequisites: Students should be able to read and comprehend at a minimum 9th grade level for this course. Per Compass guidelines, accelerated 8th grade students may register for this course, however, in addition to the 9th+ grade reading level, they must possess the maturity to handle high school level topics and more mature discussion.

Workload: Students should expect to read approximately 100 pages per week. For students who have challenges with reading, audio books may be used, but students should still be prepared to follow along and annotate in the physical novel.

Assignments: Weekly assignments will be posted in the Canvas classroom management system. Students will need their own e-mail addresses to access the system, and parents may be set up as additional "observers" to their teen's Canvas account.

Assessments: Points will be assigned for preparation, participation, and short assignments, and parents may use the total points earned to calculate a grade.

Textbook: Because students will need clean, inexpensive copies of each novel to mark in, and because they must be able to refer to the passages on the same page numbers, a "class pack" of mass market paperbacks will be pre-purchased and bundled for students. (See Supply Fee below).

Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $51.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class.

What to Bring: Students should bring the current novel, paper, pen or pencil and highlighter to class each week. Some students may wish to bring paper clips, adhesive flags or post-it notes for marking pages.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript. For a full credit in English, families would need to "bundle" this course with additional coursework in composition.

10:00 am-10:55 am

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

English: Introduction to Literary Analysis & Writing- Forms...

English: Introduction to Literary Analysis & Writing- Forms of Literature *ONLINE ONLY* Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3, 4

Day(s): Wed, Fri

Open Spots: 1

Overview

The Introduction to Literary Analysis & Writing is a high school student's first look at the higher-level relationship between literature and personal writing. Literary analysis and critical writing move a teen from being merely a good reader- a middle school skill- to becoming a scholarly reader and diagnostic writer which are the foundations of high school and college level inquiry into all forms of written works.

In this seminar-style course, literature is not restricted to a particular genre or form, and writing is not limited to a common five-paragraph composition. Instead, literature is presented as a survey, sampling many different types of works, and composition is approached as the development of a student's personal responses to what he reads. During the second semester, students will examine forms and genres to create a "big picture" of the development of literature.

Literature

Second semester Literary Analysis will focus on forms of literature- novels, short stories, essays, plays, poems, etc.- and the different ways they tell a story. Some well-known literature will be used to introduce students to the different forms. Some well-known literature will be used to introduce students to the various literary elements, and new works will be studied to demonstrate the best examples of a vivid fictional universe, a strong narrator, beloved (or feared) characters, and other literary components. Examples of some literature that students may read in this course are The Alchemist (Paulo Coelho), Journey to the Center of Earth (Jules Verne), Fahrenheit 451 (Ray Bradbury), All the Light We Cannot See (Anthony Doerr), Brown Girl Dreaming (Jacqueline Woodson), and Their Eyes Were Watching God (Zora Neale Hurston). The full reading list will be presented in the course syllabus at the beginning of the term.

Composition

Second semester writing will continue to incorporate the personal response to literature, through a personal writing journal. The students' journals will be a place to record what they think and feel about what they are reading. Students will learn to annotate, to cite passages from text, and to format. Notes made in the journals will be used to develop short, informal written pieces about the literature read in the course. Observations from the student's journal will also be used to collect supporting, textural evidence to support the reader's opinions which will be formulated into a thesis (personal position). Written assignments will include summaries, compare/contrast analyses, and parallel structure writings that focus on character, setting, plot, conflict, etc., to further underscore and assess student's understanding of the building blocks of literature. First semester will conclude with a culminating project on a subgenre of the student's own choosing which will analyze works for character, plot, setting, and other literary elements studied.

Class Structure

This course is part of a custom curriculum developed and team-taught by Anne Sharp and Melanie Kosar. The courses are designed in a sequential program that complements the developmental skills of the adolescent learner. It is a seminar-style approach that mirrors university literature and writing classes. Mrs. Kosar will teach the literature components of the course on Wednesdays, and Mrs. Sharp will teach the writing portion of the class on Fridays.

Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for the remainder of the year.

Topics in this Series: Elements of Literature (Semester 1) and Forms of Literature (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at grade level, and it is recommended that students have had a middle school writing class.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class. In addition, students should complete the summer assignments consisting of the literature identified above and a hand-out of literary terminology to learn.

Assignments: will be posted on a Google Classroom.

Assessments: are portfolio-based. Students will create a digital portfolio that incorporates annotated reading lists, reflects individual interests and accomplishments and showcases a variety of writing. See the Compass memorandum for more information on assessments in Language Arts.

Textbook: Students should purchase or borrow the assigned literature. In some cases, specific editions will be identified with ISBN numbers so students can be on the "same page" (literally!)

What to Bring: Students should bring paper or notebook, pen or pencil, current literature selection, and personal writing journal to both class meetings each week.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

11:00 am-11:55 am

9th-10th

(Semester Long)

English: Advanced Literary Criticism & Composition- Survey ...

English: Advanced Literary Criticism & Composition- Survey of Themes in Literature *ONLINE ONLY* Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3, 4

Day(s): Wed, Fri

Open Spots: 1

Overview

Advanced Literary Criticism & Composition is a seminar-style course that introduces the high school student to a deeper investigation into literary movements and literary themes throughout the ages. Like art, literature is a writer's response to his world and a reflection of his society and contemporary culture. Literary genres evolved in response to significant events, prevailing philosophies, and impactful innovations and discoveries in the writer's lifetime. Literary movements create a timeline that reflects those influences. In this course, students will read and evaluate selections from a number of literary movements such as: Romanticism, Dark Romanticism, Gothic, Transcendentalism, Realism, Naturalism, Magical Realism, Stream of Consciousness, Expressionism, Harlem Renaissance, Modernism, Beat, etc., and make connections to significant effects of the period.

Advanced composition in this course will move beyond personal interpretation of the work ("What do I think?") and transition into two Schools of Literary Criticism: Biographical Criticism, which views literature through the personal world of the writer ("What did the writer think?"), and Historical/Societal Criticism which views literature through the society/times of the writer ("What was going on around the writer?")

Literature

Second semester of Advanced Literary Criticism will include a grouping of literature in "themes" and a study of how themes combine to create genre. Students will be assigned brief, weekly mini-research assignments on history, geography (if applicable), music and art of the period, politics, religion, philosophy, author biography, etc, to establish a foundation and background information on the literary movement. Students will discover how literature reflects the people, events, discoveries, and ideology of the time and how literary movements provide clues to the philosophical, scientific, and societal climate. The class will look at wars and conflict as a creative element that drives evolution in literary movements. The types of literature used to examine movements will span novels, short stories, poetry, letters, political writings, slave narratives and analytical essays. Examples of works that will be read second semester include complete texts or selections from Wordsworth, Byron, Keats, Shelley, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Mark Twain, Charles Dickens, Virginia Woolf, and more recent writers. Other selections include The Importance of Being Ernest (Oscar Wilde), The Great Gatsby (F. Scott Fitzgerald), and The Metamorphosis (Franz Kafka). The full reading list will be presented in the course syllabus at the beginning of the term.

Composition

First semester Composition will apply the Schools of Literary Criticism to craft essays that demonstrate and understanding of themes in the broader context of literature- across eras, across genre/form, across writers and across the world. Teens will write a series of short essays that use different "filters" or "lenses" to view literary genres. Students will develop skills in notetaking, adding research to their literary essays, and managing their writing portfolios. They will also perform parallel, independent research in literature to develop a presentation on a literary theme culminating a semester project.

Class Structure

This course is part of a custom curriculum developed and team-taught by Anne Sharp and Melanie Kosar. The courses are designed in a sequential program that complements the developmental skills of the adolescent learner. It is a seminar-style approach that mirrors university literature and writing classes. Mrs. Kosar will teach the literature components of the course on Wednesdays, and Mrs. Sharp will teach the writing portion of the class on Fridays.

Topics in this Series: Overview of Literary Movements (Semester 1) and Survey of Themes in Literature (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for the remainder of the year.

Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at grade level. Students should have had a prior course in literature to have established a firm foundation in basic literary elements and form.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class. In addition, students should complete the summer assignments consisting of the literature identified above and a hand-out of literary terminology to learn.

Assignments: will be posted on a Google Classroom.

Assessments: are portfolio-based. Students will create a digital portfolio that incorporates annotated reading lists, reflects individual interests and accomplishments and showcases a variety of writing. See the Compass memorandum for more information on assessments in Language Arts.

Textbook: Students should purchase or borrow the assigned literature. In some cases, specific editions will be identified with ISBN numbers so students can be on the "same page" (literally!)

What to Bring: Students should bring paper or notebook, pen or pencil, current literature selection, and personal writing journal to both class meetings each week.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

10th-11th

(Semester Long)

English: Nobel and Pulitzer Prize-Winning Non Fiction *ONLINE ONLY*

English: Nobel and Pulitzer Prize-Winning Non Fiction *ONLINE ONLY* Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3, 4

Day(s): Wed, Fri

Open Spots: 2

Overview

Nobel and Pulitzer Prize-Winning Non Fiction is a seminar-style course that focuses on the incorporation of style, voice, and tone in literature and in writing. Viewing literature as "published writing", students will examine the products and processes of other writers in order to understand and refine their own. Through the analysis of professional and student works, students will explore what makes truly great writing.

Literature

Second semester will examine Nobel and Pulitzer-Prize winning non-fiction. Examples of some essays that may read in this course include Long Day's Journey Into Night (Eugene O'Neill), The Old Man and the Sea (Ernest Hemingway), The Bluest Eyes (Toni Morrison) and other prize-winning poets and journalists. In addition, the class will use style manuals and classic writing texts such as Strunk & White's The Elements of Style and William Zinsser's On Writing Well. The full reading list will be presented in the course syllabus at the beginning of the term. In addition, students will be asked to read several selections over the summer. Students will be assigned brief, individual research assignments and take turns leading the class discussion on topics related to the featured author or event.

Composition

Second semester Senior Composition will focus on criteria for the assessment of writing, the writing that fulfills that criteria, and how a writer can meet those expectations. Students will develop a variety of non-fiction writings that reflect communication in the "real world" such as writing boards, contests, ads/solicitations conveying criteria, awards, letters of acceptance and rejection, press releases, announcements, decisions. Finally, students will set their own writing goals called, Personal Writing Agendas (PWAs) and design the criteria for exploration of a genre such as poetry, personal narrative, op-ed, or articles. Going beyond the five-paragraph template that encourages "cookie cutter" essays, students will create a unique architecture embedded with personal style, voice, and narrative structure. In short, students will uncover not just who they are as individuals, but who they are as writers... and how to fuse these two identities into a creative, organized, clear, and elegant essay.

In the process, students will master their writing process and identify personal writing strengths. These strengths will be developed into a writing workshop that they will present to classmates and the Compass community. Portfolios (now a potential college resume addition) will be expanded to include essays, research papers, and extracurricular support (artwork, performances, PowerPoints, etc.).

Class Structure

This course is part of a custom curriculum developed and team-taught by Anne Sharp and Melanie Kosar. The courses are designed in a sequential program that complements the developmental skills of the adolescent learner. It is a seminar-style approach that mirrors university literature and writing classes. Mrs. Kosar will teach the literature components of the course on Wednesdays, and Mrs. Sharp will teach the writing portion of the class on Fridays.

Topics in this Series: Modern Narratives in Nonfiction Works (Semester 1) and Nobel and Pulitzer Prize Writings (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for the remainder of the year.

Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at grade level.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class.

Assignments: will be posted on a Google Classroom.

Assessments: are portfolio-based. Students will create a digital portfolio that incorporates annotated reading lists, reflects individual interests and accomplishments and showcases a variety of writing. See the Compass memorandum for more information on assessments in Language Arts.

Textbook: Students should purchase or borrow the assigned literature. In some cases, specific editions will be identified with ISBN numbers so students can be on the "same page" (literally!)

What to Bring: Students should bring paper or notebook, pen or pencil, current literature selection, and personal writing journal to both class meetings each week.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

11th-12th

(Semester Long)

Compass Literarians: Creative Writing & Literary Magazine B...

Compass Literarians: Creative Writing & Literary Magazine Board *ONLINE ONLY*Closed

Quarter(s): 3, 4

Day(s): Fri.

Open Spots: 0

This Literarians writing board is a home for students who love to write, who love to read writing, and who love to share writing with others. Writing is often a solitary act, but writers also need a community in which to grow. Mirroring the design of famous writing salons/groups like The Bloomsbury Group, The Algonquin Round Table, and The Inklings, this course fosters a Compass community that will encourage individual writers, promote literary collaboration and provide challenging feedback to boost creativity and artistic development.

Our second semester will focus on editing and publishing. Students in this course will select writings from their portfolios and prepare them to submit to contests, anthologies and publications beyond our Compass campus. While continuing to draft and explore their own personal writing, students will assume editorial roles in the production of Pen Point, a beyond-our-classroom anthology. As editors, students will design and build an anthology, advertise the publication, solicit manuscripts and artwork, develop selection criteria, review/select/edit material, and learn the principles of layout and design. Embedded in this process are real-world experiences, and students will improve their communication and organization skills through goal-setting, time management, meeting deadlines, emailing, confirmations, proofreading, etc. There is a $20.00 supply fee due payable to the instructor on the first day to cover publishing costs of the printed literary magazine anthology.

Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for the remainder of the year.

Topics in this Series: A Creative Writing and Literary Magazine Board (Semesters 1 and 2, with registration by semester.) Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Prerequisites: Advanced reading, writing, and analytical skills.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class on investigation, writing, or editing for this class. Assignments: Writing and editing assignments will be delegated by the student board. Assessments: In lieu of a teacher-provided assessments, writers will receive peer feedback on their own work, and the finished product will be a printed anthology for their portfolio.

Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $20.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for publishing expenses

What to Bring: Students should bring laptops to class to work collaboratively and real-time on shared documents and the class portal.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

Virtual 3

Introduction to Philosophy: Minds and Knowledge *ONLINE ONLY*

Introduction to Philosophy: Minds and Knowledge *ONLINE ONLY* Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3, 4

Day(s): Fri.

Open Spots: 5

How can we be sure we are not a character in someone else's videogame? How can a brain know itself? What kinds of things can be known? This course introduces the basics of epistemology and philosophy of mind though a discussion of Bart Simpson's actions, movies such as The Matrix, and Asimov's robot stories. Through relevant pop culture references and modern examples, students will become familiar with some theories of Plato, Descartes, and Heidegger.

Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for the remainder of the year.

Topics in this Series: Morals and Ethics (Semester 1), Minds and Knowledge (Semester 2), etc. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at or above grade level and be able to participate in thoughtful class discussion.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-3 hours per week outside of class, depending on speed of reading.

Assignments: Students will be assigned weekly pre-reading consisting of a chapter or article, which will be discussed in the next class. Students will have two papers or projects during the semester. All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates.

Assessments: Points will be assigned for class participation (50%), projects/papers (40%), and written journal responses to pre-readings (10%).

Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase two books: (1) Science Fiction and Philosophy: From Time Travel to Superintelligence, Second Edition by Susan Schneider (Print ISBN# 978-1118922613, Online ISBN:9781118922590) and (2) The Simpsons and Philosophy: The D'oh! of Homer, by William Irwin, Mark T Conard, Aeon J Skoble (ISBN#978-0812694338).

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Humanities for purposes of a high school transcript.

11:00 am-11:55 am

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

Art History: Asia to Africa, Non-Western and Global Modern ...

Art History: Asia to Africa, Non-Western and Global Modern Art *ONLINE ONLY* Add to Cart

Quarter(s): 3, 4

Day(s): Fri.

Open Spots: 2

Students will travel through time and around the world in this survey of the history of art! The class will look at images of art as religious icons, records of historical events, myths, portraits, propaganda, conveyors of power and authority, and fantasy to answer the big question, "What is the function of art aside from being aesthetically pleasing?" Students will be asked to predict how their definition of art will change throughout the course of the year.

This unique exploration of art history will be enlivened by rich class discussions, projects, visits to exhibits, and the instructor's own creative style and personal experience at significant historical sites throughout the ancient world. Following the AP syllabus for this course, students will learn about the people and concepts behind each type of art, considering that the conditions of the time influenced the art and architecture: physical location, settlement, innovation, warfare, politics, beliefs, religion, funerary practices, and interconnections to other, contemporary cultures.

This study of the history of art will begin with the early 20th century, leap back to the origins and development of arts in Asia, Africa, Oceania, and the Americas, then return to World War II to trace the influences of a global culture on modern art. Starting with Cubism, Primitivism, Neoplasticism, and Readymades will allow the students to see the recombined elements before breaking them down by cultural contribution. Returning to India, students will discover the origins of Hindu and Buddhist architecture and sculpture and examine their many similarities. Next, the class will travel to early China, to trace the evolution from pottery, to stonewares, to the origin of Chinese writing on bronze cast vessels. The class will be introduced to ideas of the afterlife through the terracotta warriors and uses of jade before moving to Japan to examine investigate the arts before the introduction of Buddhism. Human sacrifice, ball games, and a fabulous slew of composite deities will frame the discussion of the role of art in Native American cultures from Vancouver Island to the southern tip of the Andes. Next, students will discuss prehistoric African rock art, the idea of kingship in Benin through royal portraiture, and the visual interaction of cultures through the Sapi-Portuguese saltcellars. Later, students will travel to Oceania to investigate images of the Australian Dreamtime, Tongan barkcloth, and Maori men's meetinghouse architecture. We will return to the aftermath of World War II to see how each of these elements is expressed in the contradictions and complexity of Modernist art and architecture. Finally, the class will discuss how personal and group identity can be symbolized in art, investigate environmental and site-specific art, and consider the possible futures of artistic expression.

Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for the remainder of the year.

Levels:This course is AP Optional for students who took the prior semesters in 2019-20. All four Compass semesters are needed to prepare for the 2020 AP Art History exam.

Topics in this Series: Renaissance to Recent, Western Art Part 2 (Semester 1), Asia to Africa, Non-Western Art (Semester 2)

Workload: AP students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class; on-level students should expect to spend 1 hour outside of class.

Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments, quizzes, and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload. For each chapter, there will be open book quizzes, and students should be able to describe their three favorite works. There will be a semester project based on the creation of one's own myth and culture. Image recognition is key to learning art history. Each semester, students will be assigned approximately 60 images to identify (25% of the AP's 250) on the midterm and final. On-level students should be able to identify the art or object by style. AP students are expected to learn the name, description and compare/contrast the images.

Assessments: Points will be assigned for projects, quizzes, chapter summaries, and exams, and parents may use the total points earned to assign a class grade. Quizzes will be administered through Canvas.

Textbook: Students should purchase or rent Gardner's Art through the Ages: A Global History, 15th Edition by Fred Kleiner (ISBN 13- 978-285754994).

AP Fees: The fee to take the College Board's AP Art History exam in May 2021 is not included; each family will be responsible for scheduling and paying for their student's AP exam

Credit:Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History or Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

American Sign Language (ASL) I *ONLINE/TRANSITION*

American Sign Language (ASL) I *ONLINE/TRANSITION*Closed

Quarter(s):

Day(s): Fri.

Open Spots: 1

Are you interested in learning a new language that is used right here in America? Are you intrigued by a modern language that has no written form? Do you want to find out why American Sign Language is much more closely linked to French Sign Language than British Sign Language? If so, American Sign Language (ASL) is a great language for you! In this class, students will learn the basic skills in production and comprehension of ASL while covering thematic units such as personal and family life, school, social life, and community. Each unit will include presentations and readings on Deaf culture and Deaf history. Students will learn fingerspelling and numbers, developing conversational ability, culturally appropriate behaviors, and fundamental ASL grammar. Class time will be dedicated to interactive ASL activities and face-to-face signing practice with the instructor and partners.

ASL students will have a Deaf instructor. He regularly teaches all-hearing classes and is an excellent role model for students to meet and interact with a native speaker of ASL and to lean natural facial expressions, gestures, and body language used in Deaf communications. ASL students will have more confidence when they encounter Deaf instructors in college or greet speakers of ASL in social settings. Because the instructor is Deaf, students are not permitted to speak aloud in class. This approach improves visual attention and encourages immersion in the language. Students will be able to ask questions of the instructor by writing on individual white boards, but they will be encouraged to sign in order to communicate with the instructor. Lessons are facilitated with Power Point presentations, and a professional ASL interpreter will assist the class on the first day and in second semester for a Deaf culture lesson. Enrolled students are not expected to know any sign language prior to beginning ASL I.

Hundreds of colleges and universities, including all public institutions of higher learning in Virginia, accept ASL as a distinct foreign language. This allows hearing and Deaf students to fulfill foreign language requirements for admission to college. Teens who have difficulty writing, spelling, or have challenging pronunciation in English, can be successful with ASL as a second or foreign language choice. Penn State University research demonstrated that the visual and kinesthetic elements of ASL helped to enhance the vocabulary, spelling, and reading skills in hearing students.

Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for fall semester. At the instructors' option, the class may transition to in-person instruction for second semester as COVID-19 scenarios improve.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours each week outside of class on required vocabulary exercises, readings, and signing practice.

Assignments: Homework assignments will be posted online in the Canvas digital classroom platform. There may be some brief written assignments, but for most homework assignments, students will be asked to post short videos of themselves signing. Students will need either a camera phone or webcam to complete these assignments.

Assessments: The instructor will assign points using a class rubric for the parent's use in assigning a course grade. Course rubrics will evaluate students on their sign production, fingerspelling, ASL grammar, facial expressions including “above the nose” grammar (brows and body movement), and “below the nose” modifiers (lip expressions).

Textbook: Students should purchase or rent "Signing Naturally Units 1-6 workbook" (ISBN# 978-1581212105) which includes a DVD or signing videos. This class will cover units 1-4.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in World Languages for purposes of a high school transcript.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

9th-12th

American Sign Language (ASL) II *ONLINE/TRANSITION*

American Sign Language (ASL) II *ONLINE/TRANSITION*Closed

Quarter(s):

Day(s): Fri.

Open Spots: 5

Students of ASL will continue to improve their fluency in this 2nd year course. As students become more advanced signers, emphasis will be on focusing on the meaning of a conversation (whole) rather than individual signs (parts). In conversation, students will learn to confirm information by asking questions in context. Second year students will continue to build their vocabulary, apply ASL grammar, and will learn to make requests, ask for advice, give opinions, make comparisons and use superlatives, and narrate stories. Other skills covered in ASL II include expressing year, phone numbers, time, and currency in numbers, appearance, clothing, giving directions, locations, etc. Each unit will include presentations and readings on Deaf culture and Deaf history. Class time will be dedicated to interactive ASL activities and signing practice.

ASL students will have a Deaf instructor. He regularly teaches all-hearing classes and is an excellent role model for students to meet and interact with a native speaker of ASL and to lean natural facial expressions, gestures, and body language used in Deaf communications. ASL students will have more confidence when they encounter Deaf instructors in college or greet speakers of ASL in social settings. Because the instructor is Deaf, students are not permitted to speak aloud in class. This approach improves visual attention and encourages immersion in the language. Students will be able to ask questions of the instructor by writing on individual white boards, but they will be encouraged to sign in order to communicate with the instructor. Lessons are facilitated with Power Point presentations, and a professional ASL interpreter will assist the class on the first day and in second semester for a Deaf culture lesson. Enrolled students are not expected to know any sign language prior to beginning ASL I.

Hundreds of colleges and universities, including all public institutions of higher learning in Virginia, accept ASL as a distinct foreign language. This allows hearing and Deaf students to fulfill foreign language requirements for admission to college. Teens who have difficulty writing, spelling, or have challenging pronunciation in English, can be successful with ASL as a second or foreign language choice. Penn State University research demonstrated that the visual and kinesthetic elements of ASL helped to enhance the vocabulary, spelling, and reading skills in hearing students.

Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing for fall semester. At the instructors' option, the class may transition to in-person instruction for second semester as COVID-19 scenarios improve.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours each week outside of class on required vocabulary exercises, readings, and signing practice.

Assignments: Homework assignments will be posted online in the Canvas digital classroom platform. Through Canvas, students will be asked to post short videos of themselves signing as homework. Enrolled students will be asked to review ASL 1 vocabulary, grammar, and facial expressions.

Assessments: The instructor will assign points using a class rubric for the parent's use in assigning a course grade. Course rubrics will evaluate students on their sign production, fingerspelling, ASL grammar, facial expressions including “above the nose” grammar (brows and body movement), and “below the nose” modifiers (lip expressions).

Textbook: Students should purchase or rent "Signing Naturally Units 1-6 workbook" (ISBN# 978-1581212105) and "Signing Naturally Units 7-12 Student Workbook" (ISBN# 978-1581212211) which includes a DVD of signing videos. This class will cover units 5-8.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in World Languages for purposes of a high school transcript.

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

9th-12th

Virtual 4

Psychology (AP, Honors, On-Level) *ONLINE/TRANSITION*

Psychology (AP, Honors, On-Level) *ONLINE/TRANSITION*Closed

Quarter(s):

Day(s): Fri.

Open Spots: 0

Why do we dream? What happens to your brain when you are in love? Why do all babies like peek-a-boo? The course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of behavior and mental processes of human beings. Students are exposed to psychological facts, principles and phenomena associated with each of the sub fields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice. Students will be challenged to think like a psychologist as they analyze research and design future experiments.

This is a year-long, multi-level high school course. It will cover the nine major content areas covered on the College Board's AP Psychology Exam including: Scientific Foundations of Psychology; Biological Bases of Behavior; Sensation and Perception; Learning and Cognitive Psychology; Developmental Psychology; Motivation; Emotion and Personality; Clinical Psychology; and Social Psychology. Students will also learn to analyze data and psychological research studies. Themes in psychology are made tangible and approachable to students through rich, in-class discussion and debate, games, interactive models, and group work. Throughout the year, students will enjoy personalized surveys and assessments, such as those on learning style, parenting style, and personality type, and will complete individualized projects involving observations, case studies, interviews, or experiments.

The class offers a substantive, full-credit experience and will be a mixture of lecture, discussion, group work, and short videos. There is some mature content discussed in this course, especially as it pertains to abnormal psychology. A section on sexual motivation, including homosexuality, must be covered for the AP test. These topics will be discussed in a purely scientific manner, and students need to be prepared to have a respectful discussion about these subjects.

The course is offered at three levels, which meet together: Advanced Placement (AP), Honors, and On-Level. Students can pick their desired workload. Students can always do more if they would like, but at any level they are expected to keep up with weekly readings and homework which will prepare them for in-class discussions, assignments, and projects. Students who choose to take this class at the AP level will be prepared to take the AP Exam on Tuesday May, 11 2021.

All students will register online for the same course. Upon completion of the summer assignment, students must indicate which level they want to study by e-mail to the instructor on August 28. Once the course has begun, students may move down a level (from AP to honors, or from honors to on-level) at any time. However, once classes have started, students may not "bump up" a level.

Prerequisites: Students must be strong, independent readers at a high school or greater reading level. The text used is equivalent to a first year college textbook. Students can read a chapter excerpt here to confirm the reading level expected in the course.

Workload: All students must be prepared to read approximately 30 pages per week and should expect to spend 4-5 hours outside of class for reading and homework, regardless of level. The amount and type of homework varies for on-level, honors, and AP students.

Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message the instructor and classmates. Students will also have practice assignments in the Launchpad system from the publisher, and AP students will have work in the virtual AP classroom site through the College Board. Summer Assignment: Students will have two weeks of work to complete before classes begin. This will give students a feel for the different levels offered in the class. The summer assignment will cover Unit 1: Scientific Foundations of Psychology and will be due at the end of August. Successful completion of the summer assignment is a prerequisite take the course at the AP level.

Assessments: Points will be assigned for completed homework, projects, quizzes, and tests. A letter grade will not be assigned, but parents can use total points earned versus total points offered to assign a grade for purposes of a homeschool transcript. Parents can view total points earned at any time through the Canvas site.

Textbook: With their license fee, students will receive access to the electronic version of their textbook, Myers' Psychology for AP, Updated 3rd Edition. Hard copies of the textbook are available for separate purchase. Contact the course instructor for details on different editions of the textbook. AP students will also need to have an AP Classroom account through the College Board website.

Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $85.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for the access to the student Launchpad platform which includes the e-textbook and practice modules. The fee to take the AP exam in May 2021 is not included. Each family will be responsible for registering, scheduling, and paying for their student's AP exam.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete, full-year credit in Social Sciences for purposes of a high school transcript.

1:00 pm-2:55 pm

10th-12th