Schedule and Room Assignments

Classes meet on Mondays, Wednesdays, and/or Fridays in Oakton, VA. Filter by subject or grade below. You can see key dates in our Google calendar or view our Academic Calendar.

Quarter beginning September 9, 2020

Art / MusicScience / TechnologyHumanities / Social SciencesLanguage Arts
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Wednesday Classes (Click here for Friday Classes)

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11:00
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Outdoors

Nature Quest: Fall Adventurers

Nature Quest: Fall Adventurers

Quarter(s):1

Look up in that tree! Why is that robin alarming? is there a hawk passing by? Is that a drey (a squirrel's nest)? What animal rubbed the bark off that sapling? Which plants are useful and which should be avoided?
Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has lead for several years. Students will follow the paths and create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing fall season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world!
Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

11:00 am-11:55 am

2nd-3rd

Nature Quest: Fall Pathfinders

Nature Quest: Fall Pathfinders

Quarter(s):1

Look up in that tree! Why is that robin alarming? is there a hawk passing by? Is that a drey (a squirrel's nest)? What animal rubbed the bark off that sapling? Which plants are useful and which should be avoided?
Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has lead for several years. Students will follow the paths and create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing fall season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world!
Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

4th-5th

Nature Quest: Fall Explorers

Nature Quest: Fall Explorers

Quarter(s):1

Look up in that tree! Why is that robin alarming? is there a hawk passing by? Is that a drey (a squirrel's nest)? What animal rubbed the bark off that sapling? Which plants are useful and which should be avoided?
Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has lead for several years. Students will follow the paths and create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing fall season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world!
Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 5 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

K-1st

Nature Quest: Fall Adventurers

Nature Quest: Fall Adventurers

Quarter(s):1

Look up in that tree! Why is that robin alarming? is there a hawk passing by? Is that a drey (a squirrel's nest)? What animal rubbed the bark off that sapling? Which plants are useful and which should be avoided?
Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has lead for several years. Students will follow the paths and create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing fall season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world!
Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

2nd-3rd

Sanctuary

Preschool Science with Penny's Puppets: Terrific Trees!

Preschool Science with Penny's Puppets: Terrific Trees!

Quarter(s):1

Preschoolers will have fun with weekly science topics presented through stories, songs, and games with puppeteer Miss Penny! Storytime with Penny is extra-special because she brings a different character from her cast of colorful puppets each week. Three and four- year-olds will dive into the wonderful world of science through play, performing arts, and puppets!

Preschoolers will develop their observational skills as they listen to, act out, and learn from stories. Throughout the quarter, Miss Penny will use drama, puppetry, music, movement and stories to teach science concepts and beginning science vocabulary. Our youngest students will learn to work in a group, exercise their senses, improve their attention spans, make predictions, and think creatively when science is introduced in a fun, multi-sensory setting- with puppets.

First quarter will introduce all the parts of a tree- roots, trunk, leaves, flowers, fruit, and seeds, as well as creatures who call trees home!

Children must be age 3 by the start of this program to enroll. This is program includes a 40-minute structured time with 10-minutes at the beginning for gathering and separating and 5 minutes at the end of the hour for winding-down and leaving. Parents will be invited to sit nearby but may not remain in the classroom, so children must be comfortable separating from the parent for this class. Dates This is a 6-week program that meets on 9/16, 9/23, 9/30, 10/7, 10/14, and 10/21. Topics in this Series: Terrific Trees! (Quarter 1); Imagine Engineering (Quarter 2); Wonders of Water (Quarter 3), and Up, Up, and Away (Quarter 4).

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

10:00 am-10:55 am

PK

Room 1

Integrated Middle School Science

Integrated Middle School Science

Quarter(s):

This year-long, lab-based course is a survey of key concepts in the fields of physical science, Earth science, and life science which will give students the foundational knowledge to succeed in high school level Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Environmental Science. Each class period will involve approximately 25 minutes of lecture and 60 minutes of lab time.

Weekly lab work will allow students to apply the scientific concepts studied, improve laboratory techniques, record observations, take a variety of measurements, use different lab equipment, record and interpret data, convert units of measure, and write lab reports. An effort is made to incorporate recent scientific discoveries and new technologies in class discussions. The background covered in this course will enable a teen to become an educated reader of scientific news and a more knowledgeable consumer.

The life science topics in this class are designed to give the student general knowledge in biology, zoology, botany, genetics and ecology. General themes in the class include life cycles, food webs, and an understanding that living things depend on each other. Microscope work will be used in life science labs. Students may want to dual register with this course and the fall Dissection Lab classes for a more robust introduction to biology and for further lab experience. The physical science portion of the class will overview fundamentals of chemistry and physics such as the properties and classification of matter, the Periodic Table, basic chemical reactions, energy, forces, work, motion, simple and compound machines, waves, light, sound, and electricity. Earth science concepts include the water cycle, weather patterns, climates, and water/air quality.

This class is appropriate for a tween or teen who had limited middle school level science and who expects to pursue high school level Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Earth Science, or Environmental Science on a college-preparatory track. This class is also appropriate for a homeschooled teen who will likely pursue an arts- or vocational- focused path and for whom an overview of high school science concepts is sufficient.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.

Assignments: will be given in class and repeated in the weekly e-mail to parents and students. In addition, students will have some take-home labs to complete observations and measurements longer term at home.

Assessments: The instructor will provide a quarterly student evaluation form which includes metrics on a student's class participation, homework, and general understanding of concepts for the parent's use in assigning a grade.

Textbook: Students should purchase or rent Miller & Levine Biology, 2010 edition (red macaw cover, ISBN # 978-0133669510). Students should also purchase Everything You Need to Ace Science in One Big Fat Notebook: The Complete Middle School Study Guide by Workman Publishing (ISBN # 978-0761160953)

Lab/Supply Fee: A lab fee of $125.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in general science for purposes of a homeschool transcript.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

9:30 am-10:55 am

8th-9th

Inventors' Lab: Eureka!

Inventors' Lab: Eureka!

Quarter(s):1

Razor Scooters, Post It Notes, and electric tooth brushes are cool inventions that kids use all the time! In this class, students will practice creative thinking and be coached through the steps of the invention process. Students will be encouraged to identify a need by noticing a problem or inconvenience and thinking about ways to solve it. They will engage in hands-on, in-class activities to encourage imagination and effective brainstorming- the spontaneous, creative thinking where all ideas are considered. Recognizing that many great inventions are twists or remakes on existing goods or inspired by others ideas, kids will learn to apply the SCAMPER technique to the problems they identify: Substitute, Combine, Adapt, Minify, Magnify, Put to new use, Eliminate, and Reverse/Rearrange.

Students will practice inventive thinking with a class problem and class invention in order to get them comfortable with working on their own inventions. They will learn to consider alternatives and pros and cons of a new idea and narrow down possible solutions. Students will be asked to keep an Inventor s Log (journal) to track all aspects of their inventing process. They will name their invention, sketch it, and build a prototype (model) of the invention.

This class will use a curriculum based on the Project XL program that was developed by the US Patent and Trademark Office in conjunction with educators, inventors, scientists, and specialists. During their discoveries, students will also learn about some inventors and discover that an inventor can be old or young, male or female, and any color or nationality. They will also learn how patents and trademarks protect their ideas. Students will be encouraged to showcase their Invention Dimension creations at Compass s Show What You Know Expo on November 6. In class, the instructor will provide basic prototyping materials such as cardboard, tape, straws, wooden sticks, scissors, glue, and paper. If a student s model-building needs require other materials, his/her family made need to send supplies from home or purchase prototyping materials from a local craft or home improvement store.

Topics in this Series: Inventors' Lab: Eureka (Quarter 1); Inventors' Lab: Going Green (Quarter 2); Kids' Engineering Lab: Aviation Challenge (Quarter 3); and Kids' Engineering Lab: Rocket Race (Quarter 4)Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

11:00 am-11:55 am

5th-6th

Science Kids: Living World

Science Kids: Living World

Quarter(s):1

Science Kids is a lab-based science sampler program where our youngest scientists will be exposed to the concepts, acquire scientific vocabulary, and learn hands-on skills to needed to be comfortable with more advanced science classes as they get older. Your first or second grader will come home with an understanding of concepts like phases of matter, melting point, buoyancy, and life cycles. Most importantly, young students will gain confidence discussing science concepts and working with science equipment. Labs will teach students how to use a thermometer, take linear measurements, weigh items on a scale, peer into a microscope, record elapsed time, and make scientific sketches, for example.

Each quarter will reinforce principles and lab skills around a central, unifying theme. Living World will introduce biology and life science concepts. Students will complete labs such as observing microscopic organisms in a microscope, examining life cycles and metamorphosis, and learning about biological functions such as respiration and digestion. Topics in this Series: Living World (Quarter 1), Earth/Space (Quarter 2), Chemistry (Quarter 3), and Physics (Quarter 4).

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

1st-2nd

Science Kids: Living World

Science Kids: Living World

Quarter(s):1

Science Kids is a lab-based science sampler program where our youngest scientists will be exposed to the concepts, acquire scientific vocabulary, and learn hands-on skills to needed to be comfortable with more advanced science classes as they get older. Your first or second grader will come home with an understanding of concepts like phases of matter, melting point, buoyancy, and life cycles. Most importantly, young students will gain confidence discussing science concepts and working with science equipment. Labs will teach students how to use a thermometer, take linear measurements, weigh items on a scale, peer into a microscope, record elapsed time, and make scientific sketches, for example.

Each quarter will reinforce principles and lab skills around a central, unifying theme. Living World will introduce biology and life science concepts. Students will complete labs such as observing microscopic organisms in a microscope, examining life cycles and metamorphosis, and learning about biological functions such as respiration and digestion. Topics in this Series: Living World (Quarter 1), Earth/Space (Quarter 2), Chemistry (Quarter 3), and Physics (Quarter 4).

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

1st-2nd

Dissection Lab: Comparative Anatomy

Dissection Lab: Comparative Anatomy

Quarter(s):1, 2

Students will investigate the comparative anatomy of a variety of organisms and organs through a semester-long dissection study. Students will complete dissections of organisms from a range of phyla, in order of increasing complexity of the organism. A preliminary list of dissections includes: a sponge, hydra, flatworms, clam, earth worm, starfish, grasshopper, crayfish, crab, squid, octopus, bony fish, and shark. Students will examine major systems in each such as digestion and respiration. Students will also investigate characteristics of major organ systems in higher order animals through the dissections of a heart, brain, kidney, eye, muscles/tendons, and intestines/stomach.

The class will cover lab safety, practice proper dissection techniques, and learn how to set up and maintain a lab journal with notes and drawings of cells, organs, and organisms. Students will also use microscopes to look at tissue samples throughout the semester. In order to accommodate student distancing during the COVID-19 outbreak, all small organism and organ dissections will be done individually, not with a class partner. Dissections of larger, more complex organisms (such as shark), will be performed as an instructor-led, in-class demonstration.

The final list of organs and organisms may vary depending on availability. This class will not include the dissection of amphibians, reptiles, or mammals due to cost, class duration, and ethical and safety concerns. The instructor will provide links to recommended, online virtual dissections of these additional phyla. Note: This class was last taught in two quarters in Fall 2019, and much content will be repeated.

Prerequisites: Students must be able to read at grade level and have age/grade-level dexterity and fine motor skills for the detailed instrument work in this class.

Topics in this Series: Comparative Anatomy Dissection Lab (Semester 1) and CSI Forensic Science Lab (Semester 2).

Workload: Students should expect to spend 0.5 -– 1.0 hours per week outside of class.

Assignments: Students will be given pre-lab work each week that must be completed before they will be allowed to begin the week's dissection.

Lab/Supply Fee: A lab fee of $110 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

7th-9th

(Semester Long)

Dissection Lab: Comparative Anatomy

Dissection Lab: Comparative Anatomy

Quarter(s):1, 2

Students will investigate the comparative anatomy of a variety of organisms and organs through a semester-long dissection study. Students will complete dissections of organisms from a range of phyla, in order of increasing complexity of the organism. A preliminary list of dissections includes: a sponge, hydra, flatworms, clam, earth worm, starfish, grasshopper, crayfish, crab, squid, octopus, bony fish, and shark. Students will examine major systems in each such as digestion and respiration. Students will also investigate characteristics of major organ systems in higher order animals through the dissections of a heart, brain, kidney, eye, muscles/tendons, and intestines/stomach.

The class will cover lab safety, practice proper dissection techniques, and learn how to set up and maintain a lab journal with notes and drawings of cells, organs, and organisms. Students will also use microscopes to look at tissue samples throughout the semester. In order to accommodate student distancing during the COVID-19 outbreak, all small organism and organ dissections will be done individually, not with a class partner. Dissections of larger, more complex organisms (such as shark), will be performed as an instructor-led, in-class demonstration.

The final list of organs and organisms may vary depending on availability. This class will not include the dissection of amphibians, reptiles, or mammals due to cost, class duration, and ethical and safety concerns. The instructor will provide links to recommended, online virtual dissections of these additional phyla. Note: This class was last taught in two quarters in Fall 2019, and much content will be repeated.

Prerequisites: Students must be able to read at grade level and have age/grade-level dexterity and fine motor skills for the detailed instrument work in this class.

Topics in this Series: Comparative Anatomy Dissection Lab (Semester 1) and CSI Forensic Science Lab (Semester 2).

Workload: Students should expect to spend 0.5 -– 1.0 hours per week outside of class.

Assignments: Students will be given pre-lab work each week that must be completed before they will be allowed to begin the week's dissection.

Lab/Supply Fee: A lab fee of $110 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

3:00 pm-3:55 pm

7th-9th

(Semester Long)

Room 2

Eco Scientist: The Americas and Antarctica

Eco Scientist: The Americas and Antarctica

Quarter(s):1

Become a world-travelling eco adventurer and earth scientist without leaving Compass! Study the world's most exciting and diverse ecosystems and learn about the incredible biologic and geologic phenomena that shape them. Venture into caves and coasts, tundra and taiga, and forests and fjords. Each week student scientists will begin by locating the fascinating features on a map before learning about these incredible habitats from the ground-up, starting with the geology of a place, then working their way through the climate, biome, flora, and fauna. Hands-on labs and in-class activities will reinforce regional and ecological diversity by examining rock types, classifying plants, observing insects, or modelling weather phenomena. Throughout their journey to fascinating ecosystems, explorers will keep a science log to document their discoveries. Finally, students will link their studies to current events in these regions.

First quarter, students will journey through the tundra, prairies, temperate rain forests, deciduous forests, and deserts of North and South America. We ll learn how global climate patterns form these different ecosystems, and learn about the amazing diversity of plants and animals that inhabit them. We'll investigate the rainshadow effect, and see why it forms deserts on the leeward side of coastal mountain ranges around the world. Then we ll jump from the tip of Chile across the roaring 40 s to explore one of our planet s most extreme ecosystems- Antarctica!

Topics in this Series: The Americas and Antarctica (Quarter 1); Northern Latitudes (Quarter 2); Africa & Asia (Quarter 3); and All About Islands (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

3rd-4th

Aquatic Biology: Lakes & Ponds

Aquatic Biology: Lakes & Ponds

Quarter(s):1

More than 70% of the Earth s surface is water! Understanding the earth s oceans and freshwater systems is critical to understanding life on our planet- from beginnings in the seas to the water cycle that supports ongoing life. The study of aquatic and marine biology provides a basis for understanding much of the chemistry, physics, biology, and meteorology on our planet. Budding marine biologists will travel inland to learn about freshwater systems like lakes and ponds, rivers and streams before returning to the coast to study marshes and estuaries followed by extreme marine environments- all under the guidance of an experienced marine biologist. The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in several demonstrations and experiments in each class.

During first quarter, the class will focus on freshwater lakes and the variety of unique biomes that exist in them. Students will compare major lake systems around the world and learn about general limnological processes such as seasonal turnover and phytoplankton blooms. They will also explore the incredible range of lake biomes, from acidic, volcanic lakes and hot springs, to ancient temperate lakes like Lake Baikal. Students will learn about the extreme chemistry that occurs in some systems, like stratified lakes with toxic gas layers at the bottom, and will study the many unique, endemic species of plants and animals that have evolved in lake systems.

Topics in this Series: Lakes & Ponds (Quarter 1); Roparian Biomes- Rivers and Streams (Quarter 2); Marshes and Estuaries, Where the River Meets the Sea (Quarter 3); and Extreme Marine (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

5th-6th

Geo Detective: What a Disaster! Volcanoes, Tsunamis & Earthquakes

Geo Detective: What a Disaster! Volcanoes, Tsunamis & Earthquakes

Quarter(s):1

Geo-Detectives discover the many mysteries of Earth Science. From large scale disasters that come from inside the planet to microscopic contaminants in the water and soil, Geo-Detectives look high and low to understand the forces, systems, and cycles that continue to shape the Earth, its climates and ecosystems. Geo-Detectives will explore concepts as diverse as fossils to fault lines, ozone to ocean trenches, and trade winds to tundra. Hands-on labs and in-class activities will reinforce geological phenomena such as examining fossils, classifying rocks, reading the seismographic charts, or modelling the water cycle.

First quarter, students will examine natural disasters that come from activity in the earth's layers such as volcanoes, tsunamis, and earthquakes. Students will study the geological forces that shape our planet by tracing the paths of volcanoes, earthquakes and tsunamis around the world. What do these occurrences tell us about tectonic plate theory? Students will learn about the rock cycle, subduction and spreading zones, and different types of earthquake faults. They will learn about fossils and other lines of evidence that support the theory of plate tectonics, and learn how the sizes, shapes and positions of land masses and oceans have changed through our planet's history.

Topics in this Series: What a Disaster! Volcanoes, Tsunamis & Earthquakes (Quarter 1); Wacky World Weather (Quarter 2); Sensational Cycles and Seasons (Quarter 3); and Exploring Ecosystems (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

3rd-4th

Room 3

Robot Fab Lab: Robotic Claws

Robot Fab Lab: Robotic Claws

Quarter(s):1

Student engineers will be given the challenge of designing, building, and programming a robotic arm and claw to simulate a factory assembly line. Each week, students will improve their assembly though the use of new sensors and additional components and will program their creations to complete specific manufacturing tasks.

Students will use the LEGO MINDSTORMS Education EV3 robotics sets. They will build with motors, wheels/axles, gears, levers, and special components. Students will have to install touch, sound, color, gyro, ultrasonic, and/or infrared sensors while also learning to program sequences and commands that use input/output devices for controlled movements and precise turns. Using the drag-and-drop EV3 programming menu, students will learn to program their robots while experimenting with key concepts such as fixed values, variables, loops, and logic constructs.

This course integrates science, engineering and computational thinking while introducing physical constraints, units of measurement, and coordinate systems. But, don't worry, this is a beginning robotics class. Prior experience is not expected, but returning students are welcome. Each student will build his/her own robotic project, so students can progress and customize at their own pace. In general, in this class, students will spend two weeks assembling, three weeks programming, and two weeks testing and re-designing. Topics in this Series: Robotic Arms (Quarter 1), Spider Bots (Quarter 2), Maze Runner (Quarter 3), and Tomb Explorer (Quarter 4).

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

10:00 am-10:55 am

4th-5th

Electronics Workshop: Circuit Basics

Electronics Workshop: Circuit Basics

Quarter(s):1

Learn all about electricity and electronics in this practical, hands-on workshop! Electronics are fundamental to lots of things that kids want to build such as automated toys, robots, and computers. Student engineers will learn about the properties of electricity through experimentation and circuit building. They will learn the basics of electronic circuits symbolically and in working with actual components. The class will begin by assembling simple circuits on breadboards using real components such as resistors, transistors, relays, and LEDs before moving into soldering real circuit boards. Students will learn to work with Arduino microcontrollers where they will experiment with different inputs and outputs. Each student will assemble, wire, solder test, and take home numerous electronic circuit projects.

Topics in this Series: Circuit Basics (Quarter 1); Circuits + Programming (Quarter 2); Individual Arduino Projects (Quarter 3); and Build a Drone (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $65.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for an electronics kit, soldering iron, and take-home materials.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

11:00 am-11:55 am

7th-9th

Simulation Lab: Aeronautical Engineering- High Altitude Space Planes

Simulation Lab: Aeronautical Engineering- High Altitude Space Planes

Quarter(s):1

Have you wondered about re-usable, high altitude space planes? This simulation class will focus on building planes that can go into space and return to earth. Students will learn about the aeronautical principles of design, form, and fuel as they design and test high altitude space planes- on screen. Each week, students will also learn about aeronautical history and the physics of flight concepts such as lift, drag, and thrust-to-weight ratios.

The class will use KerbalEDU simulation software on laptops to immerse themselves in a realistic, simulated environment to complete a series of challenging missions. In the KerbalEDU environment, students can design and build different high altitude planes, launch them, and use mission data to improve their designs.

Topics in this Series: Aeronautical Engineering- High Altitude Space Planes (Quarter 1); Aerospace Engineering- Space Missions (Quarter 2); Astronautical Engineering- Space Station Design (Quarter 3); Marine Engineering- Ships & Submarines (Quarter 4) .

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

5th-6th

Room 4

Aviation Science: The Physics of Flight

Aviation Science: The Physics of Flight

Quarter(s):1,2

In this semester-long course, students will delve into the fascinating physics of flight and dynamics of aircraft. This class provides a real-world context for applied physics, technology, even meteorology and math, all within the exciting realm of aviation. Students will discover the forces of flight (lift, thrust, drag, and weight) and experiment with the principles of aerodynamics, Bernoulli s Laws of air pressure, and the physics of stalls and spins. In-class labs and activities will include constructing airfoils to compare and contrast wing design and building model aircraft from household materials to understand aerodynamics. As they grasp the principles of flight, students will begin to learn the practical skills of piloting an aircraft. Students will use laptop-based aviation simulators and aircraft controls. The class will learn piloting skills such as instrumentation, the proper maneuvering of aircraft around airports, how to determine compass headings, calculate speed, time, and distance, and how to plot a course using aviation maps. Students will learn about the process of weather and how to determine if conditions are appropriate for flight. After mastering the simulation software and flight preparation, students will plan and execute a virtual, multi-leg, cross-country flight. Emphasis will be on understanding the physics concepts and applied technologies in aviation. While some formulas may be demonstrated, the class does not include an intensive math component.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

7th-9th

(Semester Long)

Atrium A

Jr. Engineering with LEGO: Fantastic Fliers & Space Racers

Jr. Engineering with LEGO: Fantastic Fliers & Space Racers

Quarter(s):1

Students will use LEGO to design and build simple engineering projects out of everyone's favorite building toy! In this 90 minute class, students will explore concepts and vocabulary in physics, mechanical engineering, structural engineering, aerospace engineering, and architecture while playing with their creations.

First quarter, junior engineers will tackle Fantastic Fliers and Space Race with projects inspired by the Space Station, Shuttle, Mars Rover, Gondola Gliders, Helicopeters, and Airplanes.

Each class begins with 10-minutes of free build from tubs of LEGO components followed by a short discussion and demonstration of the day's project and concepts. Students build individually or in groups. Instructors will provide individual assistance, facilitate challenges, performance testing, competitions, and modifications to projects. Some projects may have been introduced in prior year's sessions, but each new build is unique, and student's building skills and understanding will have grown.

Notes:(1)Students must be minimum age 5 and able to separate from their parents for this class. (2) Projects are built from shared, Instructor-owned components, so students will not bring completed projects home. Parents, however, can step into class 15 minutes before the end of each session to photograph their child's construction.

Topics in this Series: Fantastic Fliers & Space Racers (Quarter 1); Animal Architects (Quarter 2); Winter Workshop (Quarter 3); Amusement Park (Quarter 4)

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

12:30 pm-1:55 pm

K-2nd

Little Medical School: Dog Veterinarian

Little Medical School: Dog Veterinarian

Quarter(s):1

Future Veterinarians will learn what it takes to care for dogs! Students will learn how to make measurements and assessments when a dog has come in for an exam. They will learn the ABC's of dog care including the importance of hydration and proper nutrition and discover what to do when a dog is sick or injured. Our future vets will learn about tick borne diseases, what to do when a dog has a tick, and tick prevention. They will learn how to give medicine to a dog and find out what a laceration is, how to suture, and the proper care of stitches. They will also view different types of radiographs and learn how to read them. Little vets will be able to label and explain the digestive organs and find out what happens when a foreign body becomes stuck in the digestive track. Finally, students will learn about dog behavior and how to identify different types of dog body language.

Topics in this Series: Dog Veterinarian (Quarter 1); Cat Veterinarian (Quarter 2); Nutrition (Quarter 3) and Sports Medicine (Quarter 4).

Materials/Supply FeeThere is a $43.00 material fee due on the first day of class and payable to the instructor for a set of high quality, take-home class materials including: a plush dog, dog bandana, adoption certificate, dog bowl, dog bone cookie cutter and recipe card, disposable lab coat, medical gloves, mask, sutures, syringe, tape measure, ruler, journal, dog anatomy worksheet, laminated x-ray and wax pencil, dog body language chart, and a class diploma.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

2nd-3rd

Little Medical School: Dog Veterinarian

Little Medical School: Dog Veterinarian

Quarter(s):1

Future Veterinarians will learn what it takes to care for dogs! Students will learn how to make measurements and assessments when a dog has come in for an exam. They will learn the ABC's of dog care including the importance of hydration and proper nutrition and discover what to do when a dog is sick or injured. Our future vets will learn about tick borne diseases, what to do when a dog has a tick, and tick prevention. They will learn how to give medicine to a dog and find out what a laceration is, how to suture, and the proper care of stitches. They will also view different types of radiographs and learn how to read them. Little vets will be able to label and explain the digestive organs and find out what happens when a foreign body becomes stuck in the digestive track. Finally, students will learn about dog behavior and how to identify different types of dog body language.

Topics in this Series: Dog Veterinarian (Quarter 1); Cat Veterinarian (Quarter 2); Nutrition (Quarter 3) and Sports Medicine (Quarter 4).

Materials/Supply FeeThere is a $43.00 material fee due on the first day of class and payable to the instructor for a set of high quality, take-home class materials including: a plush dog, dog bandana, adoption certificate, dog bowl, dog bone cookie cutter and recipe card, disposable lab coat, medical gloves, mask, sutures, syringe, tape measure, ruler, journal, dog anatomy worksheet, laminated x-ray and wax pencil, dog body language chart, and a class diploma.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

3:00 pm-3:55 pm

K-1st

Atrium C

Coding Workshop: Minecraft Mods

Coding Workshop: Minecraft Mods

Quarter(s):1

Coding Workshop is a computer lab environment in which students work through the Coder Kids curriculum under the direction of computer science coaches. Work in the Coding Lab is self-paced which allows students to progress through skill-building activities and instructional coding modules at their own rate of learning. The Lab environment allows students to enroll at any quarter, fosters brand new coders, and encourages those with prior coding experience. Computer science-trained coaches work with small pull-out groups, pairs, or individuals to provide additional instruction and support on the skillset each needs each week.

Kids are introduced to coding in the virtual world they already know and love. Students learn to enhance their Minecraft world through mods (modifications) that they program themselves. Young coders begin by creating custom structures and cool new effects using Python. Later they create mods that add custom items and blocks to the game using Java. Students use their imaginations to make Minecraft do what they want it to do- through the power of coding.

Coder Kids proprietary curriculum is designed to meet and exceed the standards of the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA). Students work on modern MacBook Air laptops. Students may enroll in a Coding course at any quarter, as they can start with initial lessons at any time. Coaches send prompts for parents in the weekly e-mail updates to encourage discussion and reflection about what the student learned in class each week. The class tuition includes a student technology fee that covers repair/maintenance of hardware, software, and licenses. Students can continue from one quarter to the next with no repeat or overlap; instead they will just keep building and enhancing their ongoing projects.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

5th-6th

Coding Lab: Mobile App Design

Coding Lab: Mobile App Design

Quarter(s):1

Coding Lab is a computer lab environment in which students work through the Coder Kids curriculum under the direction of computer science coaches. Work in the Coding Lab is self-paced which allows students to progress through skill-building activities and instructional coding modules at their own rate of learning. The Lab environment allows students to enroll at any quarter, fosters brand new coders, and encourages those with prior coding experience. Computer science-trained coaches work with small pull-out groups, pairs, or individuals to provide additional instruction and support on the skillset each needs each week.

Tweens and teens love their phones and tablets and have fun coding custom apps (applications) for them. Students start with the Swift programming language which is used for iOS devices like the iPhone and iPad. Later students move into programming responsive web design to create hybrid apps for both desktop and mobile devices using Web App Maker. In all app programming languages, students practice the iterative design process to define a problem, generate ideas, build, test, and improve their app.

Coder Kids proprietary curriculum is designed to meet and exceed the standards of the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA). Students work on modern MacBook Air laptops. Students may enroll in a Coding course at any quarter, as they can start with initial lessons at any time. Coaches send prompts for parents in the weekly e-mail updates to encourage discussion and reflection about what the student learned in class each week. The class tuition includes a student technology fee that covers repair/maintenance of hardware, software, and licenses. Students can continue from one quarter to the next with no repeat or overlap; instead they will just keep building and enhancing their ongoing projects.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

3:00 pm-3:55 pm

7th-8th

Music Room

Wizard's Workshop: Hogwart's Handicrafts- Guest Prof. Dumbledore

Wizard's Workshop: Hogwart's Handicrafts- Guest Prof. Dumbledore

Quarter(s):1

You've dreamed about going to Hogwarts, and now is your chance to experience a year of magical classes! In this maker class, students will create projects inspired by their core classes at Hogwarts (Charms, Defense Against the Dark Arts, Herbology, Potions, and Transfiguration) and a Hogwarts guest professor. Students learn to work with a variety of materials and learn a broad range of crafting skills such as hand-sewing, painting, papercrafting (including precision cutting, folding stamping, and stenciling) sculpting, and wireworking to create magical pieces inspired by the World of Harry Potter.

Welcome to the first term at Hogwarts! This term, we welcome Professor Dumbledore to inspire us as we create a Pensieve along with crafts related to your core classes such as a magic wand (Charms), Repelling Dementors (Defense Against the Dark Arts), pictures that "magically" change from one image to another (Transfiguration), and more!

This is a great class for Harry Potter fans who love the magical world, even for those who have not read all of the books or watched all of the movies. Projects and class discussions are geared to not reveal significant series spoilers. Note: A few classes may include a Harry Potter-inspired food creation or personal care product. The ingredients will be identified in advance, and students with food or ingredient allergies or dietary restrictions will need to check before handling/consuming. Substitute ingredients cannot be provided for those with food allergies or restrictions.

Topics in this Series: Guest Prof. Dumbledore (Quarter 1); Guest Prof. Snape (Quarter 2); Guest Profs. Snape & Slughorn (Quarter 3), and Guest Profs. Hagrid & Hooch (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $30.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: Students should bring good scissors for cutting paper/fabric, a ruler, and a (low temp, mini) hot glue gun to class each week, which will earn them house points.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

3:00 pm-3:55 pm

5th-8th



Friday Classes (Click here to jump back up to Wednesday classes)

9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00
Room 1

Principles of Biology (Honors or On-Level)

Principles of Biology (Honors or On-Level)

Quarter(s):

This full-year lab science course introduces classic biology topics updated for the 21st century. Biology studies living things and their relationships from microscopic to massive, ancient to modern, arctic to tropic. Our survey includes: (1) cellular and molecular biology, (2) ecology, (3) genetics, (4) biology of organisms (with selected human health and anatomy topics), and (5) evolution and diversity.

You will observe microscopic organisms and give monarch butterflies a health exam before tagging them for their 2,800 mile migration to Mexico. You will extract DNA, model its processes, and learn how scientists manipulate this magnificent molecule to make mice glow. You will observe animal behavior, test your heart rate, and practice identifying and debunking pseudo-science.

By the end of the course, students will be able to explain the nature of science as a system of knowing; cite evidence for foundational theories of modern biology; explain basic biological processes and functions; describe structures and relationships in living systems; outline systems of information, energy, and resources; demonstrate valid experimental design; discern ethical standards; relate their values and scientific ideas to decision-making; and apply biology knowledge to their own health.

In this flipped classroom, students are responsible for covering new material such as readings from the textbook and additional popular and scholarly sources, videos, and animations prior to class meetings. In-person sessions focus on active discussion, clarification, exploration of content, review, modeling, and hands-on activities.

Labs address not only technical skills and sequential operations, but also forming testable predictions, collecting data, applying math, drawing conclusions, and presenting findings. Hands-on dissection, always optional, is taught with preserved crayfish and fetal pigs.

Sensitive issues: human reproduction is not taught separately, but mentioned as students learn about other, related topics such as sperm, eggs, stem cells, genetic disease, hormones, fetal development, breast-feeding, adolescence, and HIV. While there may be some debate-style discussion of topics such as GMO, abortion will not be debated. Birth control and sexuality education are not covered, but distinctions between gender and biological sex are discussed in detail in the genetics unit. Dissections are optional. Evolution is embedded in every topic, from molecular to ecological, inseparably from other content. It is addressed in a scientific context, not from a faith standpoint.

The course provides a substantive, full-credit experience on either an Honors or On-Level track. All class members share core material and participate in the same labs. Honors has longer or additional readings, more analytical work, and more thorough and difficult assessments; it is appropriate for students who seek more challenge or plan to take the SAT Subject Test in Biology. Brief, required summer assignments are due in August for those who elect to take Honors. Students register online for the same course, but must indicate which level they wish to study via e-mail by August 15. Students may move down a level (from Honors to On-Level) at any time.

Prerequisites: Students should be very strong, independent readers and able to understand graphs, tables, percentages, decimals, ratios, and averages.

Workload: Homework includes term cards, brief written responses, weekly online quizzes, unit tests, occasional lab reports, and some creative assignments including sketching. Students will sometimes prepare short, in-class presentations, participate in group projects, run simulations, or conduct simple experiments at home. All students should expect to spend 4-6 hours outside of class reading and preparing homework.

Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments; upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests; track grades; message instructor and classmates; and participate in a weekly conference held in addition to the in-person meeting at Compass. That online session is conducted live but can be viewed asynchronously if a student has a conflict.

Assessments: Points will be assigned for completed homework, projects, quizzes, and tests. A letter grade will not be assigned, but parents can use total points earned versus total points offered to assign a grade for purposes of a homeschool transcript. Parents can view total points earned at any time through the Canvas site

Textbook/Materials: Students must purchase or rent the textbook Biology (2010 edition with baby alligator cover) by Stephen Nowicki, published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt/Holt McDougal (ISBN# 9780547219479) An e-book version is also available (ISBN# 9780547221069). By second semester, those who elect to take the SAT Subject Test will also need the College Board's "Official SAT Subject Test in Biology Study Guide" (ISBN# 978-1457309205) and a prep book of their choice, such as the latest Princeton Review's Cracking the SAT Subject Test in Biology E/M or Barron's SAT Subject Test Biology E/M.

Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $130 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. The cost for the SAT Subject Test in Biology in spring or summer 2021 is not included. Each family is responsible for scheduling and paying for their student's exam through the College Board.

Supplies/Equipment: Students will need access to a computer/internet, compound microscope with 400X magnification and cool lighting, splash goggles, water-resistant/acid-resistant lab apron, kitchen or postal scale, 3-ring binder, at least 400, 3"x5" index cards, and plain, lined, and graph paper. Some of these supplies are used at home. Students should watch class announcements on Canvas to know when to bring items to class.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Lab Science for purposes of a high school transcript.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

9:30 am-10:55 am

9th-12th

Room 3

Anatomy, Physiology, & Pathology through Veterinary Case Studies

Anatomy, Physiology, & Pathology through Veterinary Case Studies

Quarter(s):

Discover how anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, pathology, and biochemistry come together in the science of small animal medicine! Students will use actual case studies, anatomical dissections, and histopathology materials to understand how veterinarians and physicians diagnose a medical issue and formulate a treatment plan. The class will learn how the physical exam, imaging studies (radiographs, CT, MRI), laboratory findings, and other diagnostics provide clues in actual cases!

This full-year class will include lectures on anatomy and physiology of selected body systems, dissections of representative organs (to include the brain, eye, heart, kidney, and other virtual dissections), and case presentations involving the body system being studied. Students will work with an emergency/ critical care veterinarian and use deductive reasoning and logic to piece together the clues of each case. This class is geared towards high school students interested in pursuing a career in the biological sciences, medicine, research, and related fields. Please note that some veterinary cases presented in this course may be repeated from cases reviewed in Veterinary Science in 2017-18 and 2018-19.

Prerequisites:Introductory Biology

Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.

Assignments: Will be sent to parents and students by e-mail.

Assessments: An exam will be given at the end of each quarter which parents can use to formulate a letter grade for their student.

Textbook/Materials: Students will receive a class notebook from the Instructor with all required readings and lab handouts.

Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $150 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for the year's class notebook, dissection specimens, and lab supplies.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Laboratory Science for purposes of a high school transcript

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

9th-12th



Monday Classes (Click here to jump back up to Wednesday classes)

9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00
Room 2

Robotics Tech Challenge: Medical Robots

Robotics Tech Challenge: Medical Robots

Quarter(s):1, 2

Working in small teams, students will design, build, and program a medical-assist robot capable of one of the following medical-related tasks: telepresence (to minimize in-person interactions), remote patient processing and vitals inspection, autonomous delivery of critical supplies, shut-in companionship (must be soft, cuddly, and cute), or autonomous sanitization of areas and surfaces.

The class will focus on construction and programming, with heavy emphasis on design of functional robots. The medical robots will be programmed to sense and react to their environment, users, or patients through sensors. Sensors for medical robots may include: digital infrared (IR) temperature, IR proximity, mini-LIDAR (laser radar), gesture (for patient input/communication with the robot), heart-rate, galvanic skin response, muscle movement, and cameras.

Teams will conduct research, apply the engineering design process, follow the general rules and conventions of the engineering profession, including maintaining an engineering notebook. Teams will be using the Tetrix Prime robotics system, Grove sensors, and other components to build the robot, and Arduino software to program it. Each robot will be put through a series of tests/challenges related to the specific robot design. Please note that students do not get to keep finished projects.

Topics in this Series: Medical Robots (Semester 1) and Autonomous Delivery Vehicles (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Prerequisites: None

Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class researching robot and automation design

Assessments: Ongoing feedback is provided in class on construction and programming. Formal assessments are not provided.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Technology or Career Exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

10:00 am-11:55 am

7th-12th

(Semester Long)

Code for a Cause: Technovations Team for Girls

Code for a Cause: Technovations Team for Girls

Quarter(s):

Imagine a phone app that could quickly reunite lost pets, connect the poor with resources that they need, or report a problem in the community! Code for a Cause is the Compass-based Technovation hub where middle school girls will participate in the "world's largest technology entrepreneurship program for girls." Each year, Technovation teams solve real world problems through technology that they develop!

Through Technovation, girls work with women mentors, identify a problem in their community, develop a mobile app, and launch a startup. Since 2010, 23,000 girls around the world have developed mobile apps and startups to solve problems around a diverse range of problems, including food waste, nutrition, women's safety, and much more. In this year-long program, girls will work in teams and learn the skills they need to change the world with technology.

Girls will beging with get-to-know-you and team building activities before breaking into teams of 3-4. Each team will brainstorm to identify a problem in the community. They will propose a mobile app solution to their problem and conduct market research to see if their idea is the best possible solution. Next, the girls will learn to program their unique application using a web-based software called MIT App Inventor. In class, girls will be coached step-by-step on the process and logic of creating an interactive application. Finally, girls will learn how to brand their app, create a business plan, and look at what it would take to bring the app to market.

Girls will work on laptops provided by the instructor to eliminate technology or connectivity problems in class. However, since the app inventor platform is web-based, girls may continue to code at home. The course tuition includes a technology use/access fee.

Participation in Technovation gives girls the confidence to pursue more computer science courses (70%), and give many the foundation to eventually major in computer science (26%). Technovation teams are in 100 countries, and the program is sponsored by Oracle, Google, 3M, Adobe Foundation, and others. The Compass Technovation facilitator/instructor will be a coding coach from Coder Kids. This is a year-long program that follows the Compass Monday calendar.

Add to Cart

12:00 pm-1:25 pm

6th-8th

Cybersecurity Basics: Operating Systems/Hardware

Cybersecurity Basics: Operating Systems/Hardware

Quarter(s):1, 2

More than 4.4 billion people saw their personal data stolen in just three of the top data breeches in the last decade! Key personal, financial, and business data is unintentionally released, or worse, hacked, when digital information is not properly secured in cyberspace. Cyber-viruses crippled and compromised major businesses long before Coronavirus was in the news. This is why the cybersecurity industry is in high demand, with a job growth projection of 38% per year and starting salaries in excess of $100,000!

This course is an introduction to fundamentals of cybersecurity in an interactive, information technology (IT) class taught by a cybersecurity expert and college professor. The course is designed to give students an overview of cybersecurity as a potential career field and get them interested in pursuing cybersecurity learning at a higher level.

First semester, students will learn the basics about computer operating systems (OS) and hardware and how to secure them. The class will cover operating system components, drivers, applications, networking, troubleshooting, data protection, and preventing and responding to threats. Students will also examine personal computers (PCs) to understand all of the functions and components, such as processors, memory, motherboards, drivers, storage, and peripheral devices.

Topics in this Series: Operating Systems/Hardware (Semester 1) and Networks (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Prerequisites: None.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class completing reading and virtual labs.

Assignments: Homework will be a combination of reading chapters, completing online quizzes, virtual labs, and a semester project. All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates.

Assessments: Points will be awarded for the competition of assignments, quizzes, and projects, and parents can assign a grade based on the number of points earned as compared to the number of points available.

Textbook/Materials: First semester, students should purchase or rent CompTIA A+ Core 2 Exam: Guide to Operating Systems and Security, 10th edition, by Jean Andrews, Joy Dark, Jill West. (ISBN 978-0357108502). This text is available as an e-book or a loose-leaf publication.

Software Fee: Students will have to pay a fee of $119 (estimated) for a one-year subscription to the Cengage online learning platform which allows students to complete virtual lab exercises.

What to Bring/Equipment: Students must bring a PC or Mac laptop to class each week. These should be no more than 3 years old. Chromebooks and tablets cannot be used. Students should also bring their laptop charger and a 6 foot extension cord to class each week.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Technology or Career Exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

1:30 pm-3:25 pm

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

Room 5

First Aid and CPR for Teens

First Aid and CPR for Teens

Quarter(s):1

Would you know what to do if you cut yourself in the kitchen? What if a friend had an anaphylactic reaction to a food or your teacher suddenly collapsed? Whether you play outdoors, participate in sports, go to the pool, cook at home, supervise siblings, or just hang out with friends, you should know what to do when an emergency arises! First Aid and CPR are the practical life skills you hope you don't have to use, but are thankful for if you do. Earn four American Heart Association certifications in one course in preparation for working as a camp aide, babysitter, assistant coach, counselor-in-training, or part time employee.

This workshop will be taught in five (5) sessions by certified AHA instructor Melissa Schaaf: First Aid (weeks 1, 2), Adult CPR (week 3), AED (automatic external defibrillators) and Choking Relief (week 4) and Child/Infant CPR (week 5). The course will use the AHA pediatric first aid curriculum which also emphasizes safety and prevention of accidents and injury, particularly in young children. Key topics include: lacerations/bleeding, broken bones, burns, allergic reactions, breathing problems, heat-related complications, cold-related injuries, bites/stings, fainting/unconsciousness, use of AEDs, chest compressions, rescue breathing, and more. Students will have hands-on practice with many skills and will have to demonstrate competency at certain steps to be "signed off" on learned skills.

At the end of the course, students will be certified in First Aid, Adult CPR, Child CPR, and Infant CPR. The certifications will be good for two years, and students will be able to print out their certifications for coaches, employers, scout leaders, or their own records from an online AHA portal. Students must attend all sessions in order to earn the certifications. Students registered in the course will receive a 185 page, full color textbook from the AHA, their own face shield for rescue breathing, and have their AHA registration fees covered.

This course is recommended for students ages 14+. At a minimum, students must be 5 feet tall and weigh at least 100 pounds to be able to properly perform chest compressions. This class will meet from 10:00 am - 11:20 am on five (5) Mondays: 9/14, 9/21, 9/28, 10/5, and 10/19.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

10:00 am-11:30 am

8th - 12th