Schedule and Room Assignments

Classes meet on Wednesdays and Fridays in Oakton, VA. Filter by subject or grade below.

Quarter beginning September 6, 2019

Art / MusicScience / TechnologyHistory / HumanitiesLanguage Arts
ExtracurricularMathForeign Language(Full Classes)
Choose a quarter:

Filter by Grade

 

 

Wednesday Classes (Click here for Friday Classes)

9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00
Other 2

Nature Quest: Adventurers Nature Quest: Adventurers - Look up in that tree! Why is that robin alarming ? is there a hawk passing by? Is that a drey (a squirrel's nest)? What animal rubbed the bark off that sapling? Which plants are useful and which should be avoided?
Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has lead for several years. Students will follow the paths and create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing fall season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world!
Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Sorry, but the explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

11:00 am-11:55 am

2nd-3rd

Nature Quest: Path Finders Nature Quest: Path Finders - Look up in that tree! Why is that robin alarming ? is there a hawk passing by? Is that a drey (a squirrel's nest)? What animal rubbed the bark off that sapling? Which plants are useful and which should be avoided?
Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has lead for several years. Students will follow the paths and create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing fall season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world!
Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Sorry, but the explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

4th-5th

Nature Quest: Explorers Nature Quest: Explorers - Look up in that tree! Why is that robin alarming ? is there a hawk passing by? Is that a drey (a squirrel's nest)? What animal rubbed the bark off that sapling? Which plants are useful and which should be avoided?
Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has lead for several years. Students will follow the paths and create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing fall season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world!
Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Sorry, but the explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 5 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the length of the class.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

K-1st

Nature Quest: Adventurers Nature Quest: Adventurers - Look up in that tree! Why is that robin alarming ? is there a hawk passing by? Is that a drey (a squirrel's nest)? What animal rubbed the bark off that sapling? Which plants are useful and which should be avoided?
Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has lead for several years. Students will follow the paths and create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing fall season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world!
Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Sorry, but the explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

2nd-3rd

Room 1

Principles of High School Science Principles of High School Science - This year-long, lab-based course is a survey of key concepts in the fields of physical science, Earth science, and life science which will give students the foundational knowledge to succeed in high school level Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Environmental Science. Each class period will involve approximately 25 minutes of lecture and 60 minutes of lab time.
Weekly lab work will allow students to apply the scientific concepts studied, improve laboratory techniques, record observations, take a variety of measurements, use different lab equipment, record and interpret data, convert units of measure, and write lab reports. An effort is made to incorporate recent scientific discoveries and new technologies in class discussions. The background covered in this course will enable a teen to become an educated reader of scientific news and a more knowledgeable consumer.
The life science topics in this class are designed to give the student general knowledge in biology, zoology, botany, genetics and ecology. General themes in the class include life cycles, food webs, and an understanding that living things depend on each other. Microscope work will be used in life science labs. Students may want to dual register with this course and the 7th-8th grade fall Dissection Lab classes for a more robust introduction to biology and for even more lab experience. The physical science portion of the class will overview fundamentals of chemistry and physics such as the properties and classification of matter, the Periodic Table, basic chemical reactions, energy, forces, work, motion, simple and compound machines, waves, light, sound, and electricity. Earth science concepts include the water cycle, weather patterns, climates, and water/air quality.
This class is appropriate for a tween or teen who had limited middle school level science and who expects to pursue high school level Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Earth Science, or Environmental Science on a college-preparatory track. This class is also appropriate for a homeschooled teen who will likely pursue an arts- or vocational- focused path and for whom an overview of high school science concepts is sufficient.
Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: will be given in class and repeated in the weekly e-mail to parents and students. In addition, students will have some take-home labs to complete observations and measurements longer term at home. Assessments: The instructor will provide a quarterly student evaluation form which includes metrics on a student's class participation, homework, and general understanding of concepts for the parent's use in assigning a grade. Textbook: Students should purchase or rent Miller & Levine Biology, 2010 edition (red macaw cover, ISBN # 978-0133669510). Students should also purchase Everything You Need to Ace Science in One Big Fat Notebook: The Complete Middle School Study Guide by Workman Publishing (ISBN # 978-0761160953) Lab/Supply Fee: A lab fee of $125.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in general science for purposes of a high school transcript.

9:30 am-10:55 am

8th-9th

Room 2

Experimental Methods & Design: Animal Behavior Experimental Methods & Design: Animal Behavior - In this class, middle school students will learn to work as independent investigators using the scientific method. Students will observe the systems under investigation, choose a pattern or trend that interests them, and then develop a testable hypothesis. Students will learn how to: design a scientific experiment for either a laboratory or field setting, choose appropriate controls, minimize investigator bias, correctly perform measurements and to record and analyze data.
During first quarter, students will design experiments relating to animal behavior. Possible areas of investigation include behavior at the individual level (such as substrate selection with pill bugs or millipedes); learned behavior with planaria; foraging and habitat preferences with hermit crabs; territoriality among betta fish or hissing cockroaches; or social behavior with ant colonies. Others may design experiments that test intraspecific interactions, predator-prey relationships, or animal competition.
Students will learn how to locate peer-reviewed scientific literature to research their subject. By the end of the quarter, students will have completed their independent investigations, summarized the results in a poster, and will present their data to the class and families. Each quarter will focus on a different aspect of science. Topics in this Series: Animal Behavior (Quarter 1), Chemistry (Quarter 2), Microscopic (Quarter 3), and Botany (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

7th-8th

Who Wants to Be a Scientist? Chemist, Medical Scientist, Nutritionist Who Wants to Be a Scientist? Chemist, Medical Scientist, Nutritionist - There are so many ways to do science! This class allows our youngest scientists to explore different careers in the sciences and shows them that science is fun, approachable, and that anyone can do it! Students will use real scientific equipment and learn actual science terminology to investigate questions in different fields. Try out SCUBA gear as a marine biologist, learn the basics for studying DNA, perform experiments in chemistry, and try your hand at operating an ROV (remote operated vehicle). The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in at least three demonstrations or experiments during each class.
During the first quarter, students will begin as paleontologists, learning the science and methods they will need as they prepare for a fossil dig. Students will handle real fossils, learn how the process of fossilization occurs and try their hand at excavating fossils and reconstructing a dig site. While they are still in the dirt, students will learn about the field of geology. The class will discover how geologists study rocks, dig up our own mineral samples, identify them and learn about the geologic processes that formed them. Students will make their own crystal gardens to take home and observe. Next, the team will venture out into the woods and get our hands dirty as field biologists! Students will learn how field scientists measure data in the real world and try out some field methods of collecting data like running transects, point-intercept quadrats, sediment coring, and more.
Topics in this Series: Chemist & Medical Scientist (Quarter 1); Physicist, Astonomer, & Engineer (Quarter 2)Paleontologist, Geologist & Field Biologist (Quarter 3), Entomologist, Marine Biologist (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

1st-2nd

Scientist for a Day: Chemist, Medical Scientist, Nutritionist Scientist for a Day: Chemist, Medical Scientist, Nutritionist - Find out what different scientists do! This class allows young scientists to explore different careers in the sciences and shows them that science is fun, approachable, and that anyone can do it! Students will use real scientific equipment and learn actual science terminology to investigate questions in different fields. Try out SCUBA gear as a marine biologist, learn the basics for studying DNA, perform experiments in chemistry, and try your hand at operating an ROV (remote operated vehicle). The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in at least three demonstrations or experiments during each class.
During the first quarter, students will begin as paleontologists, learning the science and methods they will need as they prepare for a fossil dig. Students will handle real fossils, learn how the process of fossilization occurs and try their hand at excavating fossils and reconstructing a dig site. While they are still in the dirt, students will learn about the field of geology. The class will discover how geologists study rocks, dig up our own mineral samples, identify them and learn about the geologic processes that formed them. Students will make their own crystal gardens to take home and observe. Next, the team will venture out into the woods and get our hands dirty as field biologists! Students will learn how field scientists measure data in the real world and try out some field methods of collecting data like running transects, point-intercept quadrats, sediment coring, and more.
Topics in this Series: Chemist & Medical Scientist (Quarter 1); Physicist, Astonomer, & Engineer (Quarter 2)Paleontologist, Geologist & Field Biologist (Quarter 3), Entomologist, Marine Biologist (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

3:00 pm-3:55 pm

3rd-4th

Room 4

Paleontology: Fossil Fieldwork Paleontology: Fossil Fieldwork - When you hear the term paleontology, you probably think of dinosaurs! Plant-tearing, earth-stomping creatures with strange-shaped heads and spiky plates down their backs. And you're right, but paleontology spans the entire history of life on this planet. Paleontology draws elements from physics, botany, ecology, chemistry, biology, and geology--and works to explain how all of these fields are intertwined in our planet's past.
In this class, students will work with a real life paleontologist! Dr. Kristin Keenan will help students understand how paleontologists use physical clues- fossils- to ask and answer questions about the evolution of ancient life and Earth history.
First quarter, students will find out how paleontologists prepare for fieldwork, what they do in the field, how they collect fossils, and what they do with their samples once they return to the lab. Students will explore topics such as ichnology (ancient track ways), ancient ecosystems and how they formed, evolved, and sometimes disappeared. They will learn about trace fossils, how to find fossils in the geologic record, types of fossils, how plants and animals have adapted to their environment, what happened when adaptation was unsuccessful, and what becomes of plants and animals when they die. The class will perform hands-on activities, observe demonstrations, and examine real fossils to learn all about paleontology!
Topics in this Series: Fossil Fieldwork (Quarter 1); Prehistoric Creatures (Quarter 2); Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $25.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

10:00 am-10:55 am

5th-6th

Room 5

Integrated Science 2 (Honors) Integrated Science 2 (Honors) - This is year 2 of a two-year class in Integrated Science. Only students who completed Year 1 in 2018-19 may register for this course.
Biotechnology. Geophysics. Astrochemistry. These specialties evolved because scientific fields are interrelated, interdependent, and inseparable. Today's research and innovation take place across many disciplines demonstrating the chemistry, biology, physics, and geosystems work together and are not stand-alone subjects. This view, called Integrated Science, is how Princeton now teaches science as do Harvard, Northwestern, and locally, Virginia Tech.
Many of today's most pressing scientific problems and tomorrow's technological challenges will require an interdisciplinary understanding of science. The modern world's greatest scientific dilemmas, such as the global supply of clean water, alternative fuels, and prolonged space travel will require Integrated Science solutions.
In this course, students will learn how to think, discover logical connections, and come to scientifically sound conclusions based on multidisciplinary scientific facts. This approach will build knowledge and understanding in a systematic and interconnected manner. Integrated Science is intended to be a two-year course, that will prepare a student to pursue AP- level, higher-level, or dual enrollment biology, chemistry, or physics in high school. For students who will not be pursuing the sciences further, this course will give them a solid foundation in the basics for everyday application and will cover a general-education level high school biology, chemistry, and physics. However, because of the compact, accelerated approach to the material, this course is considered an honors level course.
Prerequisites: Integrated Science Year 1. In addition, students should be able to read and perform math at grade level for this class. Workload: Students should expect to spend 5-7 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: This class will have both lecture and laboratory components. Students will be expected to maintain a science notebook and write laboratory reports. Weekly homework will be assigned, along with occasional independent or collaborative projects or presentations. Assessments: Homework and assignments will be graded under the same metrics as Year 1. Textbook: Students should bring textbook and materials from Year 1 Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $100.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: Students should bring a snack for the 10-minute class break. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Laboratory Science for purposes of a high school transcript.

2:00 pm-4:15 pm

8th-11th

Atrium A
Atrium C

Build It Better! Simple Machine Contraptions Build It Better! Simple Machine Contraptions - Young engineers will participate in a Lego "Great Ball Contraption" challenge! Lego Mindstorm components and motors are not just for building robots! These interconnecting pieces can be constructed into an infinite number of unique, mechanized machines- much like an erector set! Students will each be challenged with developing a unique, individual segment of a contraption that moves a ball from point A to point B, and each segment will link to a classmate's invention to keep the ball moving! A contraption is a series of simple machines and transitions that will automate the process of moving a small ball along, much like a Rube Goldberg innovation.
During first quarter, students will be challenged to incorporate as many simple machines as possible into their contraption. They will learn about levers, inclined planes, wheel and axle, wedges, screws, and pulleys while inventing. Can they move a ball through a maze with a ramp (inclined plane), a flipper (lever), or lowered bucket (pulley) without using their hands? Can they pass the ball to their neighbor without hitting the floor? Parents will be invited to the final class to see the demonstration of all of students' contraptions linked together. See http://greatballcontraption.com/ or You Tube videos for impressive examples of the Great Ball Contraption. Second quarter students will be challenged to build bigger, better, more complex contraptions with compound machines and more mechanization!
Topics in this Series: Simple Machine Contraptions (Quarter 1); Wacky Contraptions (Quarter 2): Gadgets & Gizmos (Quarter 3); and Widgets and Whatsits (Quarter 4).

10:00 am-10:55 am

3rd-4th

Robot Fab Lab: Lunar Lander Challenge Robot Fab Lab: Lunar Lander Challenge - Student engineers will be given the challenge of designing, building and programming a robotic lander for a simulated lunar challenge. Once in the Compass moon environment, each student's lander must be able to maintain a course while driving over a bumpy terrain and will have to pick up and collect moon rocks.
Students will use the LEGO MINDSTORMS Education EV3 robotics sets. They will build with motors, wheels/axles, gears, levers, and special components. Students will have to install touch, sound, color, and infrared sensors while also learning to program sequences and commands that use input/output devices for controlled movements and precise turns. Using the drag-and-drop EV3 programming menu, students will learn to program their robots while experimenting with key concepts such as fixed values, variables, loops, and logic constructs.
This course integrates science, engineering and computational thinking while introducing physical constraints, units of measurement, and coordinate systems. But, don't worry, this is a beginning robotics class. Prior experience is not expected, but returning students are welcome. Each student will build his/her own robotic project, so students can progress and customize at their own pace. In general, in this class, students will spend two weeks assembling, three weeks programming, and two weeks testing and re-designing. Topics in this Series: Lunar Lander Challenge (Quarter 1); BattleBots (Quarter 2); Walking Humanoid (Quarter 3); and To Be Determined(Quarter 4).

11:00 am-11:55 am

5th-6th

Coding Club: Animations & Games Coding Club: Animations & Games - In Coding Club, students will create interactive stories, games, and animations. Our youngest coders will use the simple drag-and-drop block programming from the new 3.0 version of Scratch, a visual coding language designed for kids. Kids will learn the logic and patterns behind coding and will be introduced to hardware integration- where outside devices can be controlled by the code they construct. They will learn to use add-ons called "extensions" to incorporate new and interesting features to their code. Kids will discover how to integrate text-to-speech to make more immersive and interactive stories, and they will learn how to integrate a camera into their project for a whole new twist!
Coding Club is a computer lab environment in which students work through the Coder Kids curriculum under the direction of computer science coaches. Work in the Programming Lab is self-paced which allows students to progress through skill-building activities and instructional coding modules at their own rate of learning. The Lab environment allows students to enroll at any quarter, fosters brand new coders, and encourages those with prior coding experience. Coder Kids coaches work with small pull-out groups, pairs, or individuals to provide additional instruction and support on the skillset each needs each week.
Coder Kids proprietary curriculum is designed to meet and exceed the standards of the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA). Students work on modern MacBook Air laptops. Students may enroll in a Coding course at any quarter, as they can start with initial lessons at any time. Coaches send prompts for parents in the weekly e-mail updates to encourage discussion and reflection about what the student learned in class each week. The class tuition includes a student technology fee that covers repair/maintenance of hardware, software, and licenses. Coding Club continues all quarters. Students can continue from one quarter to the next with no repeat or overlap; instead they will just keep building and enhancing their ongoing projects.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

2nd-3rd

Coding Studio: Interactive Electronics Coding Studio: Interactive Electronics - In Coding Studio, students will learn how to create coded instructions that make electronic devices come to life! Students will explore digital communications through interactive block programming in the new 3.0 version of Scratch, a visual coding language designed for kids. Coders will connect their programmed instructions to a micro:bit: a tiny, external, programmable circuit board (i.e. hardware). The micro:bit helps kids code with technology by providing responsive LEDs, buttons, and sensors which can be incorporated into creative projects. Students will begin by coding the micro:bit to respond as a digital musical instrument!
Coding Studio is a computer lab environment in which students work through the Coder Kids curriculum under the direction of computer science coaches. Work in the Programming Lab is self-paced which allows students to progress through skill-building activities and instructional coding modules at their own rate of learning. The Lab environment allows students to enroll at any quarter, fosters brand new coders, and encourages those with prior coding experience. Coder Kids coaches work with small pull-out groups, pairs, or individuals to provide additional instruction and support on the skillset each needs each week. /p>Coder Kids proprietary curriculum is designed to meet and exceed the standards of the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA). Students work on modern MacBook Air laptops. Students may enroll in a Coding course at any quarter, as they can start with initial lessons at any time. Coaches send prompts for parents in the weekly e-mail updates to encourage discussion and reflection about what the student learned in class each week. The class tuition includes a student technology fee that covers repair/maintenance of hardware, software, and licenses. Coding Club continues all quarters. Students can continue from one quarter to the next with no repeat or overlap; instead they will just keep building and enhancing their ongoing projects.

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

4th-5th

Coding Lab: Video Game Design Coding Lab: Video Game Design - In Coding Lab, middle school students will learn to code what they love to play- video games! Students will learn how to code more sophisticated game interface by combining data input and output. They will learn how to connect and code external hardware and collect data from sensors, such as gyroscopes, to function as hand-held game controllers. They will experiment with combining LEDs (small lights) to provide feedback, such as when a point is earned or enemy eliminated, and they will discover how to make their games more interactive and interesting by allowing multiple players, keeping score, and integrating music or sound effects. Never programmed a video game? No problem, beginners are welcome.
Coding Lab is a computer lab environment in which students work through the Coder Kids curriculum under the direction of computer science coaches. Work in the Programming Lab is self-paced which allows students to progress through skill-building activities and instructional coding modules at their own rate of learning. The Lab environment allows students to enroll at any quarter, fosters brand new coders, and encourages those with prior coding experience. Coder Kids coaches work with small pull-out groups, pairs, or individuals to provide additional instruction and support on the skillset each needs each week.
Coder Kids proprietary curriculum is designed to meet and exceed the standards of the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA). Students work on modern MacBook Air laptops. Students may enroll in a Coding course at any quarter, as they can start with initial lessons at any time. Coaches send prompts for parents in the weekly e-mail updates to encourage discussion and reflection about what the student learned in class each week. The class tuition includes a student technology fee that covers repair/maintenance of hardware, software, and licenses. Students can continue from one quarter to the next with no repeat or overlap; instead they will just keep building and enhancing their ongoing projects.

3:00 pm-3:55 pm

6th-8th



 

Friday Classes (Click here to jump back up to Wednesday classes)

9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00
Room 1

Principles of Biology (Honors or On-Level) Principles of Biology (Honors or On-Level) - This full-year lab science course introduces classic biology topics updated for the 21st century. Biology studies living things and their relationships from microscopic to massive, ancient to modern, arctic to tropic. Our survey includes: (1) cellular and molecular biology, (2) ecology, (3) genetics, (4) biology of organisms (with selected human health and anatomy topics), and (5) evolution and diversity.
You will observe microscopic organisms and give monarch butterflies a health exam before tagging them for their 2,800 mile migration to Mexico. You will extract DNA, model its processes, and learn how scientists manipulate this magnificent molecule to make mice glow. You will observe animal behavior, test your heart rate, and practice identifying and debunking pseudo-science.
By the end of the course, students will be able to explain the nature of science as a system of knowing; cite evidence for foundational theories of modern biology; explain basic biological processes and functions; describe structures and relationships in living systems; outline systems of information, energy, and resources; demonstrate valid experimental design; discern ethical standards; relate their values and scientific ideas to decision-making; and apply biology knowledge to their own health.
In this flipped classroom, students are responsible for covering new material such as readings from the textbook and additional popular and scholarly sources, videos, and animations prior to class meetings. In-person sessions focus on active discussion, clarification, exploration of content, review, modeling, and hands-on activities.
Labs address not only technical skills and sequential operations, but also forming testable predictions, collecting data, applying math, drawing conclusions, and presenting findings. Hands-on dissection, always optional, is taught with preserved crayfish and fetal pigs.
Sensitive issues: human reproduction is not taught separately, but mentioned as students learn about other, related topics such as sperm, eggs, stem cells, genetic disease, hormones, fetal development, breast-feeding, adolescence, and HIV. While there may be some debate-style discussion of topics such as GMO, abortion will not be debated. Birth control and sexuality education are not covered, but distinctions between gender and biological sex are discussed in detail in the genetics unit. Dissections are optional. Evolution is embedded in every topic, from molecular to ecological, inseparably from other content. It is addressed in a scientific context, not from a faith standpoint.
The course provides a substantive, full-credit experience on either an Honors or On-Level track. All class members share core material and participate in the same labs. Honors has longer or additional readings, more analytical work, and more thorough and difficult assessments; it is appropriate for students who seek more challenge or plan to take the SAT Subject Test in Biology. Brief, required summer assignments are due in August for those who elect to take Honors. Students register online for the same course, but must indicate which level they wish to study via e-mail by August 15. Students may move down a level (from Honors to On-Level) at any time. However, once classes have started, students may not "bump up" a level.
Prerequisites: Students should be very strong, independent readers and able to understand graphs, tables, percentages, decimals, ratios, and averages. Workload: Homework includes term cards, brief written responses, weekly online quizzes, unit tests, occasional lab reports, and some creative assignments including sketching. Students will sometimes prepare short, in-class presentations, participate in group projects, run simulations, or conduct simple experiments at home. All students should expect to spend 4-6 hours outside of class reading and preparing homework.
Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments; upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests; track grades; message instructor and classmates; and participate in a weekly conference held in addition to the in-person meeting at Compass. That online session is conducted live but can be viewed asynchronously if a student has a conflict. Assessments: Points are assigned for class submissions, and parents can view total points earned at any time through the Canvas site. Textbook: Students must purchase or rent the textbook ?Biology? (2010 edition with baby alligator cover) by Stephen Nowicki, published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt/Holt McDougal (ISBN# 9780547219479) An e-book version is also available (ISBN# 9780547221069). By second semester, those who elect to take the SAT Subject Test will also need the College Board's "Official SAT Subject Test in Biology Study Guide" (ISBN# 978-1457309205) and a prep book of their choice, such as the latest '"Princeton Review's Cracking the SAT Subject Test in Biology E/M" or "Barron's SAT Subject Test Biology E/M." Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $130 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.
Supplies/Equipment: Students will need access to a computer/internet, compound microscope with 400X magnification and cool lighting, splash goggles, water-resistant/acid-resistant lab apron, kitchen or postal scale, 3-ring binder, at least 400, 3"x5" index cards, and plain, lined, and graph paper. Some of these supplies are used at home. Students should watch class announcements on Canvas to know when to bring items to class. Notes: The cost for the SAT Subject Test in Biology in spring or summer 2020 is not included. Each family is responsible for scheduling and paying for their student's exam through the College Board. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Lab Science for purposes of a high school transcript.

11:00 am-12:30 pm

9th-12th

Applied Physics Applied Physics - Applied Physics is a hands-on, lab-based physics course which will help students explore everyday phenomena in the physical world. An understanding of physics will help teens appreciate the forces on a roller coaster, wave action at the beach, speakers for their music, batteries in electric cars, and the electronics that power all of their favorite devices.
Topics covered will include Newton's laws of motion, gravitation, energy, momentum, rotation, fluid dynamics, heat and kinetic theory, thermodynamics, harmonic motion, waves and sound, light and optics, and electricity and magnetism.
In general, 30-45 minutes of each class session will be dedicated to reviewing homework exercises, and the remainder of the time will be spent performing labs, taking measurements, and recording data. Students will develop a conceptual and analytical understanding of the principals of physics. This course will use algebra- and trigonometry- based mathematical models to describe physics concepts. The course is designed to emphasize scientific thinking and reasoning, problem solving, and experimentation. For students who have not had trigonometry in a math class, in-class explanations and out-of-class supplements will be provided.
Students will be expected to study independently, read, and take detailed notes on concepts before coming to class, complete various problem-solving activities, analyze data, and write formal lab reports.
Prerequisites: Algebra I Workload: Students should expect to spend 5-6 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload. Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by: checking that weekly homework sets are complete; spot-checking the full solution 1-2 select problems in class each week, and giving quarterly take-home tests. Points will also be awarded for class participation. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. Textbook: Students should purchase or rent Physics Fundamentals by Vincent Coletta, 2010 ed. (ISBN #978-0971313453) Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $125 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: Students will need a lab notebook with graph paper and a scientific calculator.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Lab Science for purposes of a high school transcript.

2:00 pm-3:55 pm

9th-12th

Room 2

Outbreak! The Microbiology of Disease: Bacteria & Prions (H... Outbreak! The Microbiology of Disease: Bacteria & Prions (Honors or On-Level) - Out of breath, sudden fever, rash! What could be wrong with this patient? This class is a case-based approach to the many infectious diseases that humans share and contract from domestic animals. Each week, students will be introduced to a new pathogen.
The class will integrate principles of microbiology, immunology, physiology, and pharmacology within the framework of each epidemic. We will also discuss the historical, economic, and societal impacts that plagues and pestilence resulting from these infectious agents have wrought over the course of recorded history.
The class will include laboratory activities in microbiologic techniques. Students will become familiar with principles of laboratory safety, light microscopy, biologic stains, culture techniques, and common immunologic tests.
First semester lectures and labs will introduce the basic microbiology and diseases caused by bacteria and prions, an introduction to the immune system, and antibiotic therapy/resistance. Cases will include zoonotic diseases such as Bubonic Plague, Lyme Disease, Mad Cow Disease, Anthrax, and many others!
This class will be offered on two levels: Honors and On-Level. All class members share core material and participate in the same labs. Honors students will be assigned additional readings, homework questions, and lab reports. Students register online for the same course, but must indicate which level they wish to study via e-mail by August 15. Students may move down a level (from Honors to On-Level) at any time. However, once classes have started, students may not "bump up" a level.
Topics in this Series: Bacteria & Prions (Semester 1), Viruses and Parasites (Semester 2), etc.Prerequisites: Although previous classwork in Biology and Chemistry will be helpful, they are not prerequisites. Workload: On-level students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week on assigned readings and lab reports. Honors students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week on work outside of the classroom. Assignments: All students will be expected to keep a lab manual for notetaking, lab reports, and assigned homework questions. Weekly readings will be documented in the course syllabus. Assessments: At the end of the semester, the instructor will review student notebooks and assign numerical scores to their notebooks, if requested, for the parents use in assigning letter grades. Textbook: Students should purchase or rent Microbiology: A Systems Approach, 5th Edition" by Marjorie Kelly Cowan (ISBN # 978-1259706615). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $100.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Equipment/Supplies: Students will be asked to bring microscopes to class some weeks. Students should have access to a compound microscope with 400X magnification and cool lighting. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Lab Science for purposes of a high school transcript.

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

9th-12th

Room 4

Earth Science (Honors or On-Level) Earth Science (Honors or On-Level) - An earthquake rocks Irvine, CA; A cyclone hits the Soloman Islands; New fossils found in the Phillipines; Volcanoes viewed on Venus. Aspects of Earth Science are in the news every single day! Earth Science is a study of the physical Earth and the universe- past and present- around us. It is a course that focuses on the study of space, geologic structures and forces, the waters on our planet, and the atmospheric forces above us, all of which shape our world. Students will explore the Earth's spheres including the geosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, and atmosphere, as well as the cycles of the Earth such as the water and carbon cycle.
In this course, students will use scientific practices to understand overarching concepts related to Earth and space science and to recognize unifying themes that integrate the major areas of study such as plate tectonics, weather, climate and climate change, water, ocean circulation, topography, natural resources, human impact on the environment, ecology, ice ages, and mass extinctions, among others. The curriculum integrates critical thinking and laboratory skills that stress the development of experimental design, detailed observation, accurate recording, data interpretation, and analysis. Ultimately, this course prepares students to be scientifically literate as well as prepare them for future courses in biology, physics, and environmental science.
An estimated 45 minutes of each class will be dedicated to delving into a specific, and the remainder of the time will be spent performing labs, observing demonstrations, reading and discussing articles, or using laptops for in-class investigation. Each student will do a long-term project that will incorporate research, data collection, a paper, and a year-end presentation. Ultimately, students will develop a conceptual and analytical understanding of the principals of Earth Science, with the design of this course being to introduce students to scientific thinking and reasoning, problem solving, and experimentation.
This class will be offered on two levels: Honors and On-Level. All class members share the core, weekly lesson and participate in the same in-class labs and activities. Honors students will be assigned supplemental articles, videos, and/or additional homework problems each week. Students register online for the same course, but must indicate which level they wish to study via e-mail by August 15. Students may move down a level (from Honors to On-Level) at any time. However, once classes have started, students may not "bump up" a level.
Students will be expected to take notes during class, study independently, read, and take detailed notes on concepts before coming to class, complete various problem-solving activities or handouts, analyze data, and write formal lab reports.
Pre- or co-requisite: Pre-algebra Workload: Students should expect to spend 5-6 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload. Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by: checking that weekly homework assignments are complete; spot-checking the full solution to 1-2 select problems in class each week, and giving quarterly take-home tests. Points will also be awarded for class participation. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. Textbook: Students should purchase or rent Earth Science by Tarbuck and Lutgens, 2015 ed. (ISBN-13: 978-0134543536) Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $150 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: Students will need a class notebook, a lab notebook with graph paper, a scientific calculator, and a laptop.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Lab Science for purposes of a high school transcript.

9:30 am-10:55 am

9th-12th

Room 5

Website Development I: Visual Design Website Development I: Visual Design - Website Development is a fun, tangible way to introduce teens to coding! Students will be coding for themselves- to create their very own website! In this project-based class, students will design and develop a website on a topic of their choice. Will their personal website showcase a hobby, a club, a home business, or will it be used as their digital portfolio for future college applications?
In Visual Design, Students will learn to set up a website that follows industry standards and best practices. They will discover how HTML, CSS, and JavaSript are integrated as the core internet technologies that make a website useful, intuitive, and appealing. In the vast industry of website development, HTML serves as a website's framework, controlling content such as photos, videos, and text, while CSS is used for styling choices such as font styles, sizes, colors, and backgrounds. JavaScript is the dynamic, industry language that controls not only functionality such as inputs, interface, and responses within websites, but is also used for app and game development.
Students will build their websites on protected development sites. They can take their in-progress work home on a thumb drive each week. All work will be done on instructor-furnished laptops to prevent connectivity and technology problems in class. In order to work at home, students should have a laptop or desktop with a minimum Intel 64 processor, Windows 7 or 8 operatins system, 256 MB of RAM, and 200 MB of available hard-disk space for installation.
Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.
Assignments: Will be given in class and noted in the weekly e-mails. Assessments: Will not be given. Topics in this Series: Visual Design (Semester 1) and Interactive Design (Semester 2) Lab/Supply Fee: The technology fee is included in the cost of the class. What to Bring: A thumbdrive Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Technology for purposes of a high school transcript.

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

8th-12th

Code for a Cause: Technovation Team for Girls Code for a Cause: Technovation Team for Girls - Imagine a phone app that could quickly reunite lost pets, connect the poor with resources that they need, or report a problem in the community! Code for a Cause is the Compass-based Technovation hub where middle school girls will participate in the "world's largest technology entrepreneurship program for girls." Each year, Technovation teams solve real world problems through technology that they develop!
Through Technovation, girls work with women mentors, identify a problem in their community, develop a mobile app, and launch a startup. Since 2010, 23,000 girls around the world have developed mobile apps and startups to solve problems around a diverse range of problems, including food waste, nutrition, women's safety, and much more. In this year-long program, girls will work in teams and learn the skills they need to change the world with technology.
Girls will beging with get-to-know-you and team building activities before breaking into teams of 3-4. Each team will brainstorm to identify a problem in the community. They will propose a mobile app solution to their problem and conduct market research to see if their idea is the best possible solution. Next, the girls will learn to program their unique application using a web-based software called MIT App Inventor. In class, girls will be coached step-by-step on the process and logic of creating an interactive application. Finally, girls will learn how to brand their app, create a business plan, and look at what it would take to bring the app to market.
Girls will work on laptops provided by the instructor to eliminate technology or connectivity problems in class. However, since the app inventor platform is web-based, girls may continue to code at home. The course tuition includes a technology use/access fee.
Participation in Technovation gives girls the confidence to pursue more computer science courses (70%), and give many the foundation to eventually major in computer science (26%). Technovation teams are in 100 countries, and the program is sponsored by Oracle, Google, 3M, Adobe Foundation, and others. The Compass Technovation facilitator/instructor will be a coding coach from Coder Kids. This is a year-long program that follows the Compass calendar.

3:00 pm-4:30 pm

6th-8th

Music Room

Robotics Tech Challenge: Mars Rover Robotics Tech Challenge: Mars Rover - Following in the footsteps of NASA's Sojourner, Spirit, Opportunity, and Curiosity rovers, in the race to the red planet, students will build a robotic Mars rover prototype in this project-based class. Students will work in small teams to design, build, and program rovers that operate with multiple axles and independently powered wheels. Rovers will have cameras (to film the Martian surface) and will be constructed to collect samples, climb craters, traverse sandy and rocky terrain, and re-route around boulders and obstacles.
The class will focus on construction and programming, with heavy emphasis on design. The robots will be programmed to sense and react to the environment and to complete a series of missions on a pre-defined course. Students will build with Tetrix metal components, incorporate sensors, electronics, and motors from Tetrix Prizm, and will program using the Arduino IDE. Teams will conduct research, apply the engineering design process, follow the general rules and conventions of the engineering profession, including maintaining an engineering notebook. Please note that students do not get to keep finished projects.
Topics in this Series: Mars Rover (Semester 1) and Robo Ball Race (Semester 2). Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class researching rover design. All other work is done in class. Assessments: Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Technology for purposes of a high school transcript.

1:00 pm-2:55 pm

8th-12th