Schedule and Room Assignments

Classes meet on Wednesdays and Fridays in Oakton, VA. Filter by subject or grade below.

Quarter beginning January 8, 2020

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Wednesday Classes (Click here for Friday Classes)

9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
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3:00
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5:00
Sanctuary

Acting- Kids' Theater: Freaky Friday Acting- Kids' Theater: Freaky Friday - From dawn to dusk, freaky, funny things keep happening, in this kooky caper our concocted by our loony, loopy cast of characters!
Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other and to start to brainstorm about their original play. Through group activities and guided discussion, the actors will decide on characters, conflict, conclusion, and the story they want to tell. Students will pitch ideas to the group, and those concepts will be developed and blended to into a script that reflects the contributions of each student. The script will be customized for this class by the instructor with input from the students.
The class will learn the practical aspects of acting, as they work on script read-through, blocking, costume/prop design, and planning the show. Students will develop their own "actor's toolkit" of voice, body, and imagination in this creative process! Actors will grow in confidence and communication skills in preparation for a final sharing with parents on the final day of the quarter.
Students will work from a written script, and ideally, students would be able to read at grade level. Emerging readers can be accommodated if the parent is willing to do a little extra memorization work with the student at home including memorizing cues in the script. Parents will be emailed the script after the 3rd or 4th class and will be expected make sure their child learns his/her lines and assembles a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity. All actors must be at least age 8 to sign up for this class.
Topics in this Series: Our Wacky Vacation (Quarter 1), The Day We Woke Up in Oz (Quarter 2), Freaky Friday (Quarter 3), and The Craziest Dream Ever (Quarter 4)

10:00 am-10:55 am

3rd-5th

Acting- Young Actor's Playhouse: Arctic Adventure Acting- Young Actor's Playhouse: Arctic Adventure - Acting is an adventure! Young actors will find themselves in on an Arctic Adventure where they will create an imaginative storyline and unique characters for their very own original play about polar pals having icy incidents and frigid fun.
Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other and to begin to brainstorm about their original play. Through group activities and guided discussion, the young actors will decide on characters, conflict, and conclusion, and the story they want to tell. The script will be developed and customized for this class with input from the students.
Young actors will explore skills such as sensory awareness, listening, stage movement, character development, emotional expression, and observation/concentration while learning to portray their original character. Young actors will learn aspects of acting by script read-through, blocking, costume/prop discussion, and planning the show. Through individual and group activities, young actors build confidence in preparation for a final sharing for parents.
Students will work from a simple, written script, but emerging readers can be accommodated. Parents will be emailed the script after the 3rd or 4th class and will be expected to help their children memorize their lines and assemble a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity. All actors must be at least age 6 to sign up for this class.
Topics in this Series: Zany Zoo (Quarter 1), Cat & Dog Drama (Quarter 2), Our Arctic Adventure (Quarter 3), and Rainforest Rescue! (Quarter 4).

11:00 am-11:55 am

1st-2nd

Acting- Tween Stage: Improv Scenes Acting- Tween Stage: Improv Scenes - This is a fun improvisation class where tweens will learn how to spontaneously get into character and set the scene for some hilarious "off-the-cuff" scenarios! Students will learn how to develop a scene with a partner with no script and no advanced planning or casting! They will learn how to react, interact, and respond "on the fly" and in character to each other in situations that are made-up on-the-spot. Teens will practice taking cues from their partners to keep the scene going in a hilarious, creative development that no one can anticipate or replicate.
Popular improvisational exercises such as "Scene Jump", "Columns," and "Two-Minute Story" will be the backdrop for unusual, unexpected, and mixed-up settings which will be the catalyst for wild and crazy interactions among characters. Students' cooperative work will improve their creative thinking, interpersonal skills, and ability to think outside the box.
This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, are flexible and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work in a collaborative group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class. Drawing on their favorite improv exercises, the students will perform for family and friends at the end of the quarter.
Topics in this Series: Quick Scripts (Quarter 1); Nutty News (Quarter 2); Improv Scenes (Quarter 3); and Mystery Busters (Quarter 4). Taken these classes before? No problem, you can take them again as improv-based acting will be a new and different experience every time!

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

6th-8th

Acting- Teen Scene: Long Form Improv Acting- Teen Scene: Long Form Improv - This is a fun improvisation class for teens to learn ways to interact spontaneously within character to create a scenes. Students will work on long form improv, which is taking an idea and creating a multi-character and multi-scene play. The art of developing a scene with a partner will be explored. Students will learn the components of scene building such as character development, environment, listening skills, accepting ideas from your partner, and building upon those ideas. A random or unusual setting can be a catalyst for wild and funny ideas.
Popular improvisational techniques such a Scene Jump and Columns will be performed. Students who took the scripted One-Minute Plays class and all new students, will have fun going script -free and strengthening their improvisation skills, with games such as "Two-Minute Stories." Students cooperative work will result in a scene full of fascinating facts, objects, and relationships. Students will improve their ability to think and react "on the fly." Actors' creative thinking and interpersonal skills will be strengthened as they work "out-of-the-box." This class will enhance cognitive development, imagination, and listening skills.
> The students will perform for family and friends at the end of the quarter. This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, are flexible and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work in a collaborative group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class.
Topics in this Series: Wednesday Afternoon Live (Quarter 2); Long Form Improv (Quarter 3); and Mystery on Demand (Quarter 4). Taken these classes before? No problem, you can take them again as improv-based acting will be a new and different experience every time! Workload: Students should expect to spend 1 hour per week outside of class learning his/her lines. Assignments: Parts will be assigned in class. Assessments: Will not be given. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

9th-12th

MP Room
Room 2
Room 5
Music Room

Fundamentals of Graphic Design: Digital Art Applications Fundamentals of Graphic Design: Digital Art Applications - Is there any mistaking McDonalds' "golden arches" or the Nike "swoosh"? Can you identify the Disney and Star Wars fonts or the specific shade of Barbie doll pink? Of course, because behind each of these strong, recognizable brands is the work of a graphic artist!
Students will be introduced the field of Graphic Design and learn what designers do: communicate visually while striving to achieve "intellectual and emotional responses" through simple, to-the-point messages and clear, memorable designs. Students will see how graphic designers use intentional, visual manipulation to create meaning through the careful selection, thoughtful layout, strategic placement of images, illustrations, and typography.
In this class, teen designers will continue using the Fundamentals of Graphic Design by applying the Design Process and incorporating art elements to understand composition and create several graphic design projects such as logos, brochures, fliers, web layout, magazine ads, etc. We will be discussing these different types of projects in class and how they are used for communication. Ideas and sketching for projects will be done in class. Students will take their concepts home and work on their own computers to make a more finished mock-up.
Students will need access to MicroSoft Word and MicroSoft PowerPoint and a camera phone or iPhone. Word will be used for gathering or composing text, while PowerPoint will be used for page/project layouts. The camera phone/ iPhone will be used to take pictures that can be cropped, edited, and uploaded to a computer and incorporated into finished projects.
This course will help prepare high school students who are interested in pursuing graphic design or many other, related visual arts or design fields like advertising, marketing, illustrating, multimedia, digital design, and more. Some works created in this class may be used for a high school student's portfolio. The curriculum used in this class was developed by the American Institute of Graphic Arts (AIGA) and adheres to the National Visual Arts curriculum standards.
Topics in this Series: Fundamentals of Graphic Design: Composition and Creativity (Semester 1), Fundamentals of Graphic Design: Digital Art Applications (Semester 2) Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: will be given in class and repeated in the weekly e-mail to parents and students. In order to complete some assignments, students should have access to and working knowledge of Microsoft Office, including PowerPoint. Students should also have access to a smart phone for taking and editing photos. Assessments: The instructor will use standardized rubrics that are part of the AIGA curriculum for assessing student projects. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $20.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for class handouts and supplies. What to Bring: Students will need to bring first semester art supplies each week such as a sketch book, tracing paper, makers, sharpies, erasers, ruler, tape, pencils, and scissors. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Visual Arts for purposes of a high school transcript. This is a 15-week class with one day off. The specific date off will be announced.

10:00 am-10:55 am

9th-12th



 

Friday Classes (Click here to jump back up to Wednesday classes)

9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00
MP Room

Stage Combat Masters: A Survey of Weapons & Scene Building Stage Combat Masters: A Survey of Weapons & Scene Building - Stage Combat Mastes will take their work to the next level, try their hand and writing and directing, and test a variety of interesting variety of weapons they haven't yet used, such as small swords and quarterstaffs. Then, students will select their preferred weapons, develop characters, compose, and choreograph their own fight scenes. Actors will intensify the excitement, danger, or drama of their scene through stage combat; carefully planned fight scenarios with unique weaponty. Our stage combat masters' fight scenes will be shared in the final class.
Costumes and makeup are welcome for the final sharing, but are not required. Students who wish to wear costumes for the final sharing, need to use good judgement and wear those costumes to class for at least the last four practices to ensure free-movement and safety. Headgear that impedes ability to see, such as a mask, is prohibited. Costumes and make-up should not be overly mature, bloody, gruesome, or revealing.
This class is for continuing Stage Combat Masters students. Students who have had only beginning stage combat classes on Wednesdays, must seek the instructor's approval before registering. Students who are all new to stage combat should take the Wednesday, 2pm Stage Combat class, in preparation to take this Masters class next school year.
Topics in this Series: Acting in Action & Courageous Choreography (Semester 1) A Survey of Weapons (Semester 2)Prerequisites: Prior Master's level work or instructor approval. Workload: Students should expect to spend 1 hour per week outside of class. Assignments: Will be made in class and repeated in the weekly e-mail to parents and students. Assessments: What to Wear: Students should wear clothes they are comfortable moving in and athletic shoes. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

10:00 am-10:55 am

8th-12th

Mosaic Masterpieces Open Studio (Q3) Mosaic Masterpieces Open Studio (Q3) - Mosaics is run as a studio art class where students create unique compositions and work at their own pace under the guidance of an experienced mosaic artist. Each quarter, students are taught new design, cutting, layout, and finishing techniques and are introduced to new mosaic materials which they can incorporate into inspired, original pieces. Throughout the quarter, the instructor will suggest possible themes for projects based on the featured materials, but students are always welcome to pursue a different direction.
Students who are new to mosaics will complete a quick checkerboard project (complete with wooden checkers) to teach pattern, layout, and lines before starting their specialized projects. For each project, students will be able to choose from a variety of substrates- rectangular, square, shaped, or circular backboards (typically first-year students), or special forms or 3D objects (experienced students). Each project will expand a student's understanding of color, pattern, rhythm, texture, and spacing as they complete rich, dimensioned compositions. Students will be able to incorporate other glass, ceramic, and porcelain tiles into their projects and may select feature elements such as beautiful glass gems, millifiori, sliced stone, metallic ornaments, mirrored bits, or shells, to serve as focal points in their mosaic piece. The mosaic can be monochromatic, complimentary, or contrasting colors. A broad pallet of colors is always available, and new colors are added each quarter to reflect the season.
Students will develop a skillset for mosaic artistry over multiple quarters or years. As each student demonstrates mastery of basic skills, safety, and artistic expression, that student will be taught advanced techniques, materials, tools, composition, and color theory. A typical progression in mosaics is:
-Flat, rectangular substrate, whole tiles, symmetric design, proper spacing and adhesion
-Flat, circular substrate, tile cutting with nippers, themed design and color choice
-Flat or curved substrate, cutting sheet glass with pistol grip, breaking pliers, and running pliers, composition and color design
-3D substrate, adhesion substances, and techniques
-Porcelain and ceramic cutting, special application, advanced design
There is no prerequisite for this class. The number of projects completed each quarter depends on the student s work speed and attendance in class. Compass parents are welcome to register for the class to work alongside their teens, or to work on their own, while their teen is in another Compass class.
Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.
Assessments: will not be given.
Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.
What to Bring: In-progress project must be brought back to studio each week.
Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

1:00 pm-2:55 pm

7th-Adult

Room 4

Paint Studio II: Advanced Fundamentals II, Blending & Brush Techniques Paint Studio II: Advanced Fundamentals II, Blending & Brush Techniques - In Paint Studio II, student artists will further develop their skills in acrylic painting in a relaxed, informal studio setting under the guidance of a professional paint instructor. Paint Studio II is a 2-hour session where a focused lesson is demonstrated and practiced in the first hour, and students may continue to paint in open studio (shared with Paint Studio I students) the second hour. The second hour of Paint Studio II is optional in the event that a student must attend a 10:00 am class.
Students will work on framed canvas and easels and will learn elements of art and principles of design in addition to methods in painting. Advanced painting techniques that will be taught include dry brush work, washing, splattering, dabbing, pallet knife, underpainting, glazing, and layering. Each quarter, the instructor will demonstrate techniques by developing a sample painting. Students may elect to follow the class sample, or may apply the painting skills to an entirely unique composition. Students will complete one or two 16" X 20" canvases each quarter, depending on the level of detailing.
Third quarter's lessons will have students experimenting and practicing blending and brushstrokes, to create a variety of effects and textures. They will learn the names and uses for all of the brushes in their kit, including: liner, flat, angular, filbert, dagger, round, and fan. Newly introduced brush techniques and exercises will enable budding artists to paint a variety of textures found in nature, which might include clouds, running and still water, sand, pebbles, rough and smooth rocks, moss, grass, bark, pine needles, and snow. Finally, students will experiment with the difference in effects, when blending wet-with-wet paint and wet-on-dry paint.
This class is suitable for returning teen students who have completed at least two quarters of Paint Studio I, or adult students. Compass parents are welcome to register for this class to work alongside their teens or to work on their own while their teen is another Compass class. Painting can provide a relaxing, needed break from rigorous academic classes and over-scheduled lives in a fun, supportive environment.First quarter will begin on September 20 and run for 7 weeks, ending November 1.
Topics in this Series: Advanced Fundamentals I, Color Studies (Quarter 1), Special Effects in Acrylics Workshop (Quarter 2); Advanced Fundamentals II, Blending & Brush Techniques (Quarter 3), Advanced Perspective (Quarter 4). Prerequisites: at least 2 quarters of Paint Studio I Workload: Work outside of class is optional, however students who want to continue to practice their painting techniques might want to purchase a tabletop easel (approx. $10.00) and set of basic acrylic paints ($30.00+) for home use.Assessments: Individual feedback is given in class. Formal assessments will not be given. Lab/Supply Fee: A New Student class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for canvases, pallet, pallet knife, 12 piece paint brush set, a sketchbook, and use of shared class supplies (desktop easels, acrylic paint, brushes, paper products, etc.). The Returning Student class fee is $20.00 for canvases and shared class supplies.What to Wear: Students may wish to wear an apron, smock, or paint shirt when working acrylic paints. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

9:00 am-10:55 am

8th-Adult

Paint Studio I: Still Life- Values, Form, and Space Paint Studio I: Still Life- Values, Form, and Space - Students will be introduced to painting with acrylics in a relaxed, informal studio setting under the guidance of a professional paint instructor
Students will work on framed canvas and easels and will learn elements of art and principles of design in addition to methods in painting. Painters will learn basic techniques such as shading, blending, stippling, and broad stroke. Each quarter, the instructor will demonstrate techniques by developing a sample painting. Students may elect to follow the class sample, or may apply the painting skills to an entirely unique composition. Students will complete one or two 16" X 20" canvases each quarter, depending on the level of detailing.
Third quarter, students will begin painting still life such as fruits, vegetables, bowls, and glassware. Through the still life study, painters will learn techniques with acrylic paints such as shading, blending, stippling, and broad stroke to help them replicate the different effects in still life subjects with contrasting textures. Elements of art taught in the second quarter projects include line, shape, form, space, color, value, and texture.
This class is suitable for beginners who have never painted before, and for experienced art students who have worked in other mediums and are interested exploring acrylic painting. Compass parents are welcome to register for this class to work alongside their teens, or to work on their own, while their teen is in another Compass class. Painting can provide a relaxing, needed break from rigorous academic classes and over-scheduled lives in a fun, supportive environment. First quarter will begin on September 20 and run for 7 weeks, ending November 1.
Topics in this Series: Botanicals- Line, Color, Shape, and Texture (Quarter 1); Special Effects Workshop (Quarter 2); Still Life- Values, Form, and Space (Quarter 3); Landscapes- Composition, Unity, and Repetition (Quarter 4). Workload: Work outside of class is optional, however students who want to continue to practice their painting techniques might want to purchase a tabletop easel (approx. $10.00) and set of basic acrylic paints ($30.00+) for home use Assessments: Individual feedback is given in class. Formal assessments will not be given. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $20.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for two canvases, a sketchbook, and use of shared class supplies (desktop easels, paints, brushes, paper products, etc.). Returning students who are continuing in this class from a prior quarter can continue using their sketchpad, but there is still a $14.00 fee for the other materials. What to Wear: Students may wish to wear an apron, smock, or paint shirt when working acrylic paints.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.10.08.0612

10:00 am-10:55 am

7th-Adult

Room 11

Creative Journaling for Teens (Q3) Creative Journaling for Teens (Q3) - Don't write poetry? Think you can't draw? Maybe not, but you may still want a creative way to record your thoughts, feelings, dreams, and ideas! Journaling is an ongoing process of discovery and exploration that allows one to be conscious of and connect with his/her thoughts, emotions and ideas. It is a form of expression that supports both academic and personal growth.
Creative journaling is not writing daily "Dear Diary" style entries on dated pages. Instead, students will explore various journaling methods, blending self-expression and self-discovery to guide them in learning new ways to problem-solve, achieve goals, and process emotions. Students will work with several writing techniques and a range of art media to develop a personal journal throughout the quarter, and will have the opportunity to expand on it in subsequent quarters. Techniques such as freeform writing, black-out poetry, stream-of-consciousness writing, and creative list making- in addition to experimenting with simple mixed media like collage and photography- will be explored. Weekly prompts will cover a range of topics such as choices, ambition, fear, and self-esteem as they relate to the students' personal lives and current events. Conversation around the prompts will complement the students' work in their individual journals.
Topics in this Series: Journal work is done in an open studio environment that allows students to join in any quarter throughout the year. Prerequisites: No formal writing or art experience is needed. All teens are welcome. Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-2 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: are given in class. Assessments: Not provided. Lab/Supply Fee: A NEW STUDENT class fee of $20.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a spiral bound journal and a kit of supplies. A RETURNING STUDENT class fee of $10.00 is due for consumable, in-class supplies.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English, Fine Arts, or general Elective for purposes of a high school transcript.

10:00 am-10:55 am

8th-12th

Art History: Catacombs to Cathedrals, West Art Part 1 (On-L... Art History: Catacombs to Cathedrals, West Art Part 1 (On-Level or AP1b) - Students will travel through time and around the world in this survey of the history of art! The class will look at images of art as religious icons, records of historical events, myths, portraits, propaganda, conveyors of power and authority, and fantasy to answer the big question, "What is the function of art aside from being aesthetically pleasing?" Students will be asked to predict how their definition of art will change throughout the course of the year.
This unique exploration of art history will be enlivened by rich class discussions, projects, visits to exhibits, and the instructor's own creative style and personal experience at significant historical sites throughout the ancient world. Following the AP syllabus for this course, students will learn about the people and concepts behind each type of art, considering that the conditions of the time influenced the art and architecture: physical location, settlement, innovation, warfare, politics, beliefs, religion, funerary practices, and interconnections to other, contemporary cultures.
This study of the history of art will begin with the earliest known Christian art, and how its symbols evolved from Old Testament figures while still illegal. The image of Jesus will be traced from a young shepherd reminiscent of Apollo, to a stern Byzantine pantokrator, to a threatening Romanesque judge, to the caring and almost human Gothic hippy Christ. Covering the thousand years from the secretive catacombs of 200 AD through the height of Gothic architecture, the class will examine cross-cultural and pan-European elements of artworks and architecture. Next the study of art will take students to the East, to see the various influences in Byzantine art. Students will learn about the techniques of mosaic and see the grandeur of the Orthodox relics and icons. The influence of contact with Islam through the Crusades will be seen in the periods of iconoclasm.
After considering the differences between Islamic and Muslim arts, the students' exploration will move into the Early Medieval Period to investigate Carolingian and Ottonian painting, furniture and tapestries, and how these were based upon a desire to emulate those of the Roman Empire. The return of sculpture through decorative capitals enclosing cloisters and tympana covering the entranceways to churches is seen in the Romanesque Period, named for the first universalizing style across all of Europe. Finally, the class will reach the Gothic period across Europe to discuss the origins of its name, modifications to cathedrals across the early high and decadent Gothic periods, and compare French with English Gothic styles.
Levels:This course is offered at two levels, On-Level and Advanced Placement (AP). They have different workloads, but meet together. AP level students will work at a university freshman level and have the potential to earn college credit or placement through the spring 2021 AP exam. On-level students will use the same textbook, but will have less homework. The AP Art History curriculum will be taught using an approved AP syllabus over the course of four semesters (two years) in order to appreciate the depth and complexities of the topic. AP Art History taught in a typical one-year course would compact and compress the study to not be a thorough, enjoyable exploration of art. In order to list AP Art History on the student's syllabus, all four (4) semesters would be needed. Otherwise, any student may enroll in any semester for a solid Art History (non-AP) experience.
Topics in this Series: Caves to Colosseum, Prehistoric to Ancient Art (Semester 1), Catacombs to Cathedrals, Western Art Part 1 (Semester 2), Renaissance to Recent, Western Art Part 2 (Semester 3), Asia to Africa, Non-Western Art (Semester 4) Workload: AP students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class; on-level students should expect to spend 1 hour outside of class. Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments, quizzes, and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload. For each chapter, there will be open book quizzes, and students should be able to describe their three favorite works. There will be a semester project based on the creation of one's own myth and culture. Image recognition is key to learning art history. Each semester, students will be assigned approximately 60 images to identify (25% of the AP's 250) on the midterm and final. On-level students should be able to identify the art or object by style. AP students are expected to learn the name, description and compare/contrast the images. Assessments: Points will be assigned for projects, quizzes, chapter summaries, and exams, and parents may use the total points earned to assign a class grade. Quizzes will be administered through Canvas. Textbook: Students should purchase or rent Gardner's Art through the Ages: A Global History, 15th Edition by Fred Kleiner (ISBN 13- 978-285754994). Registration. All students will register online for the same course. Students must designate their intent to take the On-Level or AP version by emailing Compass before August 16. Once the course has begun, students may move down a level (from AP to on-level) at any time. However, once classes have begun, students may not "bump up" a level. AP Fees: The fee to take the College Board's AP Art History exam in May 2021 is not included; each family will be responsible for scheduling and paying for their student's AP exam Credit:Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History or Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

9th-12th