Schedule and Room Assignments

Classes meet on Wednesdays and Fridays in Oakton, VA. Filter by subject or grade below.

Quarter beginning September 6, 2019

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Wednesday Classes (Click here for Friday Classes)

9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00
Sanctuary

Acting- Kids' Theater: Our Wacky Vacation Acting- Kids' Theater: Our Wacky Vacation - With fresh, fun vacation memories in mind, we'll twist up our super silly summer experiences into a a play about the weirdest, wackiest vacation we can think of!
Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other and to start to brainstorm about their original play. Through group activities and guided discussion, the actors will decide on characters, conflict, conclusion, and the story they want to tell. Students will pitch ideas to the group, and those concepts will be developed and blended to into a script that reflects the contributions of each student. The script will be customized for this class by the instructor with input from the students.
The class will learn the practical aspects of acting, as they work on script read-through, blocking, costume/prop design, and planning the show. Students will develop their own "actor's toolkit" of voice, body, and imagination in this creative process! Actors will grow in confidence and communication skills in preparation for a final sharing with parents on the final day of the quarter.
Students will work from a written script, and ideally, students would be able to read at grade level. Emerging readers can be accommodated if the parent is willing to do a little extra memorization work with the student at home including memorizing cues in the script. Parents will be emailed the script after the 3rd or 4th class and will be expected make sure their child learns his/her lines and assembles a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity. All actors must be at least age 8 to sign up for this class.
Topics in this Series: Our Wacky Vacation (Quarter 1), The Day We Woke Up in Oz (Quarter 2), Freaky Friday (Quarter 3), and The Craziest Dream Ever (Quarter 4)

10:00 am-10:55 am

3rd-5th

Acting- Young Actor's Playhouse: Zany Zoo Acting- Young Actor's Playhouse: Zany Zoo - Acting is an adventure! Young actors will find themselves in an creative Zany Zoo where they will create an imaginative storyline and unique characters for their very own original play about wacky animals, kooky caretakers, and their crazy escapades!
Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other and to begin to brainstorm about their original play. Through group activities and guided discussion, the young actors will decide on characters, conflict, and conclusion, and the story they want to tell. The script will be developed and customized for this class with input from the students.
Young actors will explore skills such as sensory awareness, listening, stage movement, character development, emotional expression, and observation/concentration while learning to portray their original character. Young actors will learn aspects of acting by script read-through, blocking, costume/prop discussion, and planning the show. Through individual and group activities, young actors build confidence in preparation for a final sharing for parents.
Students will work from a simple, written script, but emerging readers can be accommodated. Parents will be emailed the script after the 3rd or 4th class and will be expected to help their children memorize their lines and assemble a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity. All actors must be at least age 6 to sign up for this class.
Topics in this Series: Zany Zoo (Quarter 1), Cat & Dog Drama (Quarter 2), Our Arctic Adventure (Quarter 3), and Rainforest Rescue! (Quarter 4).10.08.0612

11:00 am-11:55 am

1st-2nd

Acting- Tween Stage: Quick Scripts Acting- Tween Stage: Quick Scripts - Imagine a scene at a crazy concert, an awkward birthday party, the worst movie ever, a misunderstanding in a foreign country, or a close encounter with a celebrity!
Envision those scenarios all in one zany production, as a collection of one-minute plays! The class will race through at least twenty super-short scripts featuring a range of whacky mini stories. The class will cast, practice, and perform them in a rapid-fire form called tiny theater and flash fiction. One-minute plays are popular around the country in venues such as college theater, indie stage, and countless festivals such as the annual "Gone in 60 Seconds" event.
New and returning acting students will have fun and be challenged to think on their feet with the rapid-fire pace of these super-short plays as they connect with the audience, bring their character to life, and tell their story... in just one minute. Students will change characters and plots in quick succession and have to bring the audience along with them. If they forget a line, they'll improvise! From story to story, students will develop clever transitions and sequence the short scenes to a coherent class production.
In this class, actors will learn the art of a cold read in front of a director. If a student would like to write a script for the class, he/she should bring a hard copy to the first day of class to review and edit with the instructor before the script is offered to the class.
The students will perform for family and friends at the end of the quarter. This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, are flexible and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work in a collaborative group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class.
Topics in this Series: Quick Scripts (Quarter 1); Nutty News (Quarter 2); Improv Scenes (Quarter 3); and Mystery Busters (Quarter 4). Taken these classes before? No problem, you can take them again as improv-based acting will be a new and different experience every time!

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

6th-8th

Acting- Teen Scene: One Minute Plays Acting- Teen Scene: One Minute Plays - Imagine a scene on a long airplane flight, in a Chinese restaurant, at an awkward class reunion, a doctor's waiting room, a kooky family reunion, an English pub, a football game, or even the mall. Envision those scenarios all in one zany production, as a collection of one-minute plays! The class will race through at least twenty super-short scripts featuring a range of zany mini stories. The class will cast, practice, and perform them in a rapid-fire form called tiny theater and flash fiction. One-minute plays are popular around the country in venues such as college theater, indie stage, and countless festivals such as the annual "Gone in 60 Seconds" event.
New and returning acting students will have fun and be challenged to think on their feet with the rapid-fire pace of these super-short plays as they connect with the audience, bring their character to life, and tell their story... in just one minute. Students will change characters and plots in quick succession and have to bring the audience along with them. If they forget a line, they ll improvise! From story to story, students will develop clever transitions and sequence the short scenes to a coherent class production.
In this class, actors will learn the art of a cold read in front of a director. If a student would like to write a script for the class, he/she should bring a hard copy to the first day of class to review and edit with the instructor before the script is offered to the class.
The students will perform for family and friends at the end of the quarter. This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, are flexible and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work in a collaborative group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class.
Topics in this Series: Wednesday Afternoon Live (Quarter 2); Long Form Improv (Quarter 3); and Mystery on Demand (Quarter 4). Taken these classes before? No problem, you can take them again as improv-based acting will be a new and different experience every time! Workload: Students should expect to spend 1 hour per week outside of class learning his/her lines. Assignments: Parts will be assigned in class. Assessments: Will not be given. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.12.08.0612

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

9th-12th

MP Room
Room 2
Room 3

Fundamentals of Graphic Design: Composition and Creativity Fundamentals of Graphic Design: Composition and Creativity - Is there any mistaking McDonalds' "golden arches" or the Nike "swoosh"? Can you identify the Disney and Star Wars fonts or the specific shade of Barbie doll pink? Of course, because behind each of these strong, recognizable brands is the work of a graphic artist!
Students will be introduced the field of Graphic Design and learn what designers do: communicate visually while striving to achieve "intellectual and emotional responses" through simple, to-the-point messages and clear, memorable designs. Students will see how graphic designers use intentional, visual manipulation to create meaning through the careful selection, thoughtful layout, strategic placement of images, illustrations, and typography.
In this class, teen designers will learn about the elements of art- line, shape, color, and texture- and the principles of design. They will practice working with points, lines, and planes, and experiment with color theory. The class will learn to apply Gestalt theory to their compositions: that is, the natural human tendency to group pieces together to create a whole (in other words, all design elements work together to communicate the whole message.) They will also examine the power of words through typography including type choices that make text more readable and understandable. They will learn how to organize text for content, ease of use, and comprehension through the selection of fonts, font pairing, and font hierarchy.
Through in-class design exercises and homework projects, students will practice the skills of "design thinking" and the design process which includes identifying a need to generating ideas through implementation. Students will learn to express and develop their visual concepts through the building blocks of the design process: thumbnail sketches, rough sketches, and comprehensive design.
This course will help prepare high school students who are interested in pursuing graphic design or many other, related visual arts or design fields like advertising, marketing, illustrating, multimedia, digital design, and more. Some works created in this class may be used for a high school student's portfolio. The curriculum used in this class was developed by the American Institute of Graphic Arts (AIGA) and adheres to the National Visual Arts curriculum standards.
Topics in this Series: Fundamentals of Graphic Design: Composition and Creativity (Semester 1), Fundamentals of Graphic Design: Computer Art Applications (Semester 2) Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: will be given in class and repeated in the weekly e-mail to parents and students. In order to complete some assignments, students should have access to and working knowledge of Microsoft Office, including PowerPoint. Students should also have access to a smart phone for taking and editing photos. Assessments: The instructor will use standardized rubrics that are part of the AIGA curriculum for assessing student projects. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $20.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for class handouts and supplies. What to Bring: Students will need to bring art supplies each week such as a sketch book, tracing paper, makers, sharpies, erasers, ruler, tape, pencils, and scissors. A final supply list with details will be provided mid-summer to registered students. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Visual Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.
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10:00 am-10:55 am

9th-12th

Creating Comics: Marvel Characters Creating Comics: Marvel Characters - What makes those instantly recognizable comic heroes and cartoon characters so special? Do you recognize Spiderman, Wonder Woman, BB-8, or Pikachu every time you see them? Students will work with renowned comic artist Pop Mhan (DC, Marvel, and Dark Horse Comics) to learn the art of illustrating comic characters!
Each quarter, students will complete several character studies by following along as Pop breaks well-known characters down into elemental steps. Students will draw step-by-step following the artist's lead as they learn to visualize how a character's form is composed of basic geometric shapes. The class will discover the many ways artists can portray motion and feelings in these characters as well as what makes them so fun and interesting. In the process, students will learn about the world of comics and how comic books are created. p>
First quarter, students will learn to draw favorite Marvel characters. The first character study will be Spiderman. Students will vote in class on the other two Marvel characters that they will learn to draw. Students should expect to complete 3 characters each quarter with approximately two classes drawing each character in pencil. Students will outline in Sharpie and color their characters in during the final week of class. Students can use the techniques learned in class to create their own, unique comic characters.
Topics in this Series: Marvel Characters (Quarter 1); DC Characters (Quarter 2); Star Wars (Quarter 3); and Manga Characters (Quarter 4).Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a class kit that the students will need to bring every week.

11:00 am-11:55 am

7th-8th

Creating Comics: Marvel Characters Creating Comics: Marvel Characters - What makes those instantly recognizable comic heroes and cartoon characters so special? Do you recognize Spiderman, Wonder Woman, BB-8, or Pikachu every time you see them? Students will work with renowned comic artist Pop Mhan (DC, Marvel, and Dark Horse Comics) to learn the art of illustrating comic characters!
Each quarter, students will complete several character studies by following along as Pop breaks well-known characters down into elemental steps. Students will draw step-by-step following the artist's lead as they learn to visualize how a character's form is composed of basic geometric shapes. The class will discover the many ways artists can portray motion and feelings in these characters as well as what makes them so fun and interesting. In the process, students will learn about the world of comics and how comic books are created. p>
First quarter, students will learn to draw favorite Marvel characters. The first character study will be Spiderman. Students will vote in class on the other two Marvel characters that they will learn to draw. Students should expect to complete 3 characters each quarter with approximately two classes drawing each character in pencil. Students will outline in Sharpie and color their characters in during the final week of class. Students can use the techniques learned in class to create their own, unique comic characters.
Topics in this Series: Marvel Characters (Quarter 1); DC Characters (Quarter 2); Star Wars (Quarter 3); and Manga Characters (Quarter 4).Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a class kit that the students will need to bring every week.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

5th-6th

Room 4

Art: Anyone Can Draw! Art: Anyone Can Draw! - Anyone can learn to draw! In this class, students will complete weekly projects which will build confidence and teach drawing fundamentals. This class will combine classical drawing techniques in pencil and charcoal, pen-and-ink, and colored pencils Although we will concentrate on black, white, and gray-scale values, we will introduce basic color theory.
The emphasis will be on learning how to draw what you see while still preserving and encouraging each students' individual style. Projects will incorporate drawing fundamentals such as perspective, composition, shading and blending, various drawing techniques (contour, continuous line, etc.) and styles (realistic, abstract, cubism, etc.). Subjects will range from basic still life shapes (vases, fruits, etc.) to human figure (hands, faces, and gestures) to landscape elements, observed both in-person and from photographs. Some curriculum will come from a new skill-based art trailed atelier called the Da Vinci Initiative. This class is suitable for beginners as well as returning art students who want to hone their skills. Topics in this Series: Anyone Can Draw! (Quarter 1); Wonders of Watercolor (Quarter 2); Drawing with Color & Texture (Quarter 3); and Painting with Pastels (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: All materials are furnished. A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Non-Meeting Days: This class does not meet on Sept. 11. The first day of class will be Sept. 18.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

3rd-4th

Art: Anyone Can Draw! Art: Anyone Can Draw! - Anyone can learn to draw! In this class, students will complete weekly projects which will build confidence and teach drawing fundamentals. This class will combine classical drawing techniques in pencil and charcoal, pen-and-ink, and colored pencils Although we will concentrate on black, white, and gray-scale values, we will introduce basic color theory.
The emphasis will be on learning how to draw what you see while still preserving and encouraging each students' individual style. Projects will incorporate drawing fundamentals such as perspective, composition, shading and blending, various drawing techniques (contour, continuous line, etc.) and styles (realistic, abstract, cubism, etc.). Subjects will range from basic still life shapes (vases, fruits, etc.) to human figure (hands, faces, and gestures) to landscape elements, observed both in-person and from photographs. Some curriculum will come from a new skill-based art trailed atelier called the Da Vinci Initiative. This class is suitable for beginners as well as returning art students who want to hone their skills. Topics in this Series: Anyone Can Draw! (Quarter 1); Wonders of Watercolor (Quarter 2); Drawing with Color & Texture (Quarter 3); and Painting with Pastels (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: All materials are furnished. A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Non-Meeting Days: This class does not meet on Sept. 11. The first day of class will be Sept. 18.10.08.0612

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

5th-6th

Art: Anyone Can Draw! Art: Anyone Can Draw! - Anyone can learn to draw! In this class, students will complete weekly projects which will build confidence and teach drawing fundamentals. This class will combine classical drawing techniques in pencil and charcoal, pen-and-ink, and colored pencils Although we will concentrate on black, white, and gray-scale values, we will introduce basic color theory.
The emphasis will be on learning how to draw what you see while still preserving and encouraging each students' individual style. Projects will incorporate drawing fundamentals such as perspective, composition, shading and blending, various drawing techniques (contour, continuous line, etc.) and styles (realistic, abstract, cubism, etc.). Subjects will range from basic still life shapes (vases, fruits, etc.) to human figure (hands, faces, and gestures) to landscape elements, observed both in-person and from photographs. Some curriculum will come from a new skill-based art trailed atelier called the Da Vinci Initiative. This class is suitable for beginners as well as returning art students who want to hone their skills. Topics in this Series: Anyone Can Draw! (Quarter 1); Wonders of Watercolor (Quarter 2); Drawing with Color & Texture (Quarter 3); and Painting with Pastels (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: All materials are furnished. A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Non-Meeting Days: This class does not meet on Sept. 11. The first day of class will be Sept. 18. 10.06.0612

3:00 pm-3:55 pm

7th-9th

Music Room

Homeschool String Ensemble Homeschool String Ensemble - Students who play violin, viola, cello, or bass are invited to join this homeschool string ensemble! Musicians will have an opportunity to develop ensemble skills and enjoy the experience of practicing, playing, and performing as a group. The class will start each week with tuning and warm-ups such as playing musical scales and simple exercises. Then the class will work on several group songs each semester where they will improve musical literacy, learn to follow the directions from the conductor, and learn to play in different keys- as a group. During the final class of the semester, a concert will be held for friends and family.
This ensemble is intended for advanced beginners and intermediate strings students who are currently (or recently) enrolled in private lessons. As a guideline, a student should be able to play a D major scale in two octaves on his/her instrument. Students are expected to be able to locate notes on the their instruments, read music, and be able to identify all rhythmical patterns. Students with less experience will be asked to play for the conductor or to submit a brief video to help establish placement.
The instructor will provide the emsemble repertoires, and these arrangements will be specially composed to accommodate the range of abilities of all stringed players in the orchestra. Students will be asked to pay a fee $5.00 for their individual music which will be provided on the first day of class. Participants are expected to prepare and practice at home for at least 15 - 20 minutes per day. Five (5) students are needed for the ensemble, and if the group reaches 10-12 students, it will reorganize as a string orchestra. This is a 13-week semester program, and the week off will be announced by the instructor.12.08.0612

10:00 am-10:55 am

6th-12th



 

Friday Classes (Click here to jump back up to Wednesday classes)

9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00
MP Room

Stage Combat for Beginners & Masters: Acting in Action & Cr... Stage Combat for Beginners & Masters: Acting in Action & Creative Choreography - In this unique semester-long Stage Combat class, students will participate in one of two tracks as they work collaboratively to create an action scene from stage, cinema, or literature. In the Performance Track, students will participate as actor-combatants and will adopt a character, learn choreography, and work towards a performance of their fight within the context of the scene- not just doing moves in this class, but learning a role and exploring how the character fights and why. In the Choreography Track, students will take on the role of fight choreographer for a scene. Choreographers will analyze the chosen script, look for context clues as to why and how the characters fight, create choreography, teach it to their Performance Track actors, and make sure that everyone is safe and looks great.
Students who have previously taken Masters' level stage combat can take either the Performance Track or Choreography Track, depending on their preference to work as an actor-combatant or as a fight choreographer. Students who have had some stage combat experience may register for the class but will need the instructor's approval to take the more advanced Choreography track. Students who are all new to stage combat must take the Performance Track. All students will register for the same course online.
Topics in this Series: Acting in Action & Courageous Choreography (Semester 1) Close-Up Conflict (Semester 2)Prerequisites: Prior Master's level work or instructor approval for Choreography Track. Workload: Students should expect to spend 1 hour per week outside of class. Assignments: Will be made in class and repeated in the weekly e-mail to parents and students. Assessments: At the end of the first semester, students who have not previously taken Masters level stage combat will be evaluated by the instructor for safety and skills and given a recommendation for their next stage combat course. What to Wear: Students should wear clothes they are comfortable moving in and athletic shoes. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

10:00 am-10:55 am

8th-12th

Mosaic Masterpieces: Open Studio Mosaic Masterpieces: Open Studio - Mosaics is run as a studio art class where students create unique compositions and work at their own pace under the guidance of an experienced mosaic artist. Each quarter, students are taught new design, cutting, layout, and finishing techniques and are introduced to new mosaic materials which they can incorporate into inspired, original pieces. Throughout the quarter, the instructor will suggest possible themes for projects based on the featured materials, but students are always welcome to pursue a different direction.
Students who are new to mosaics will complete a quick checkerboard project (complete with wooden checkers) to teach pattern, layout, and lines before starting their specialized projects. For each project, students will be able to choose from a variety of substrates- rectangular, square, shaped, or circular backboards (typically first-year students), or special forms or 3D objects (experienced students). Each project will expand a student's understanding of color, pattern, rhythm, texture, and spacing as they complete rich, dimensioned compositions. Students will be able to incorporate other glass, ceramic, and porcelain tiles into their projects and may select feature elements such as beautiful glass gems, millifiori, sliced stone, metallic ornaments, mirrored bits, or shells, to serve as focal points in their mosaic piece. The mosaic can be monochromatic, complimentary, or contrasting colors. A broad pallet of colors is always available, and new colors are added each quarter to reflect the season.
Students will develop a skillset for mosaic artistry over multiple quarters or years. As each student demonstrates mastery of basic skills, safety, and artistic expression, that student will be taught advanced techniques, materials, tools, composition, and color theory. A typical progression in mosaics is:
-Flat, rectangular substrate, whole tiles, symmetric design, proper spacing and adhesion
-Flat, circular substrate, tile cutting with nippers, themed design and color choice
-Flat or curved substrate, cutting sheet glass with pistol grip, breaking pliers, and running pliers, composition and color design
-3D substrate, adhesion substances, and techniques
-Porcelain and ceramic cutting, special application, advanced design
There is no prerequisite for this class. The number of projects completed each quarter depends on the student s work speed and attendance in class. Compass parents are welcome to register for the class to work alongside their teens, or to work on their own, while their teen is in another Compass class.
Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.
Assessments: will not be given. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: In-progress project must be brought back to studio each week.
Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

1:00 pm-2:55 pm

7th-Adult

Room 3

Paint Studio II: Advanced Fundamentals I, Color Studies Paint Studio II: Advanced Fundamentals I, Color Studies - In Paint Studio II, student artists will further develop their skills in acrylic painting in a relaxed, informal studio setting under the guidance of a professional paint instructor. Paint Studio II is a 2-hour session where a focused lesson is demonstrated and practiced in the first hour, and students may continue to paint in open studio (shared with Paint Studio I students) the second hour. The second hour of Paint Studio II is optional in the event that a student must attend a 10:00 am class.
Students will work on framed canvas and easels and will learn elements of art and principles of design in addition to methods in painting. Advanced painting techniques that will be taught include dry brush work, washing, splattering, dabbing, pallet knife, underpainting, glazing, and layering. Each quarter, the instructor will demonstrate techniques by developing a sample painting. Students may elect to follow the class sample, or may apply the painting skills to an entirely unique composition. Students will complete one or two 16" X 20" canvases each quarter, depending on the level of detailing.
First quarter's lessons will include color studies such as partial mixing of colors and creating a family of colors, to achieve a variety of effects and contrasting textures.
This class is suitable for returning teen students who have completed at least two quarters of Paint Studio I, or adult students. Compass parents are welcome to register for this class to work alongside their teens or to work on their own while their teen is another Compass class. Painting can provide a relaxing, needed break from rigorous academic classes and over-scheduled lives in a fun, supportive environment.
Topics in this Series: Advanced Fundamentals I, Color Studies (Quarter 1), Advanced Fundamentals II, Blending & Brush Techniques (Quarter 2), Advanced Perspective (Quarter 3), and Paint Your Own with Rhythm, Balance, Unity (Quarter 4). Prerequisites: at least 2 quarters of Paint Studio I Workload: Work outside of class is optional, however students who want to continue to practice their painting techniques might want to purchase a tabletop easel (approx. $10.00) and set of basic acrylic paints ($30.00+) for home use.Assessments: Individual feedback is given in class. Formal assessments will not be given. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for canvases, pallet, pallet knife, 12 piece paint brush set, a sketchbook, and use of shared class supplies (desktop easels, acrylic paint, brushes, paper products, etc.). What to Wear: Students may wish to wear an apron, smock, or paint shirt when working acrylic paints. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.06.04.0612

9:00 am-10:55 am

8th-Adult

Paint Studio I: Botanicals - Line, Color, Shape, and Texture Paint Studio I: Botanicals - Line, Color, Shape, and Texture - Students will be introduced to painting with acrylics in a relaxed, informal studio setting under the guidance of a professional paint instructor
Students will work on framed canvas and easels and will learn elements of art and principles of design in addition to methods in painting. Painters will learn basic techniques such as shading, blending, stippling, and broad stroke. Each quarter, the instructor will demonstrate techniques by developing a sample painting. Students may elect to follow the class sample, or may apply the painting skills to an entirely unique composition. Students will complete one or two 16" X 20" canvases each quarter, depending on the level of detailing.
First quarter, students will begin painting botanicals such as flowers, plants, or leaves. Through the botanical study, painters will learn to represent different textures and effects in natural subjects. Elements of art introduced in the first quarter projects include line, shape, form, space, color, value, and texture.
This class is suitable for beginners who have never painted before, and for experienced art students who have worked in other mediums and are interested exploring acrylic painting. Compass parents are welcome to register for this class to work alongside their teens, or to work on their own, while their teen is in another Compass class. Painting can provide a relaxing, needed break from rigorous academic classes and over-scheduled lives in a fun, supportive environment.
Topics in this Series: Botanicals- Line, Color, Shape, and Texture (Quarter 1); Still Life- Values, Form, and Space (Quarter 2); Landscapes- Composition, Unity, and Repetition (Quarter 3) and Create Your Own- Balance, Emphasis, and Proportion (Quarter 4). Workload: Work outside of class is optional, however students who want to continue to practice their painting techniques might want to purchase a tabletop easel (approx. $10.00) and set of basic acrylic paints ($30.00+) for home use Assessments: Individual feedback is given in class. Formal assessments will not be given. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $20.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for two canvases, a sketchbook, and use of shared class supplies (desktop easels, paints, brushes, paper products, etc.). Returning students who are continuing in this class from a prior quarter can continue using their sketchpad, but there is still a $14.00 fee for the other materials. What to Wear: Students may wish to wear an apron, smock, or paint shirt when working acrylic paints.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.10.08.0612

10:00 am-10:55 am

7th-Adult

Art History: Caves to Colosseum, Prehistoric to Ancient Art... Art History: Caves to Colosseum, Prehistoric to Ancient Art (On-Level or AP1) - Students will travel through time and around the world in this survey of the history of art! The class will look at images of art as religious icons, records of historical events, myths, portraits, propaganda, conveyors of power and authority, and fantasy to answer the big question, "What is the function of art aside from being aesthetically pleasing?" Students will be asked to predict how their definition of art will change throughout the course of the year.
This unique exploration of art history will be enlivened by rich class discussions, projects, visits to exhibits, and the instructor's own creative style and personal experience at significant historical sites throughout the ancient world. Following the AP syllabus for this course, students will learn about the people and concepts behind each type of art, considering that the conditions of the time influenced the art and architecture: physical location, settlement, innovation, warfare, politics, beliefs, religion, funerary practices, and interconnections to other, contemporary cultures.
This study of the history of art will begin with prehistoric art through Paleolithic examples (image making, cave painting, etc); Neolithic art, created as humans settled into communities such as Jericho and Catalhoyuk; and Megalithic remains like Stonehenge. The class will then move into Near Eastern art looking at examples from around the Fertile Crescent region: Sumerian, Akkadian, Neo-Sumerian, Babylonian, Hittite, Assyrian, Neo-Babylonian, and Sasanian. Next the study of art will take students to ancient Egypt where art was dominated for millennia by their religion, the ruling pharaohs, and a belief in the afterlife giving them embellish rock-cut tombs, elaborate pyramids, and intricate sarcophagi.
After Egypt, the students' exploration will move into Aegean art including the funeral Cycladic art, Minoan art with frescoes and palaces, and Mycenaean art with its bold fortresses and celebrated Cyclopean masonry. The class will survey the influential art and architecture of Ancient Greece covering the Greek Geometric, Orientalizing, Archaic, Classical, Late Classical, and Hellenistic periods with its emphasis on form, balance, harmony, and an idealized human form on vases, statues, temples, and monuments. Next, students will journey across the Mediterranean to examine Etruscan art and architecture in the Orientalizing and Archaic periods, recognized by terra-cottas, sarcophagi, and bronze sculpture. Finally, the class will reach ancient Rome to view its art and architecture across several periods including the Roman Republic, Early Empire, High Empire, and Late Empire, with emphasis on painting styles, mosaics, and architecture spanning the typical Roman home, triumphal arches, public arenas, and aqueducts.
Levels:This course is offered at two levels, On-Level and Advanced Placement (AP). They have different workloads, but meet together. AP level students will work at a university freshman level and have the potential to earn college credit or placement through the spring 2021 AP exam. On-level students will use the same textbook, but will have less homework. The AP Art History curriculum will be taught using an approved AP syllabus over the course of four semesters (two years) in order to appreciate the depth and complexities of the topic. AP Art History taught in a typical one-year course would compact and compress the study to not be a thorough, enjoyable exploration of art. In order to list AP Art History on the student's syllabus, all four (4) semesters would be needed. Otherwise, any student may enroll in any semester for a solid Art History (non-AP) experience.
Topics in this Series: Caves to Colosseum, Prehistoric to Ancient Art (Semester 1), Catacombs to Cathedrals, Western Art Part 1 (Semester 2), Renaissance to Recent, Western Art Part 2 (Semester 3), Asia to Africa, Non-Western Art (Semester 4) Workload: AP students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class; on-level students should expect to spend 1 hour outside of class. Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments, quizzes, and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload. For each chapter, there will be open book quizzes, and students should be able to describe their three favorite works. There will be a semester project based on the creation of one's own myth and culture. Image recognition is key to learning art history. Each semester, students will be assigned approximately 60 images to identify (25% of the AP's 250) on the midterm and final. On-level students should be able to identify the art or object by style. AP students are expected to learn the name, description and compare/contrast the images. Assessments: Points will be assigned for projects, quizzes, chapter summaries, and exams, and parents may use the total points earned to assign a class grade. Quizzes will be administered through Canvas. Textbook: Students should purchase or rent Gardner's Art through the Ages: A Global History, 15th Edition by Fred Kleiner (ISBN 13- 978-285754994). Registration. All students will register online for the same course. Students must designate their intent to take the On-Level or AP version by emailing Compass before August 16. Once the course has begun, students may move down a level (from AP to on-level) at any time. However, once classes have begun, students may not "bump up" a level. AP Fees: The fee to take the College Board's AP Art History exam in May 2021 is not included; each family will be responsible for scheduling and paying for their student's AP exam Credit:Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History or Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.12.07.0612

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

9th-12th

Architecture in 2D- Drafting and Drawing Architecture in 2D- Drafting and Drawing - Students will get creative and design their own special use space using technical drawings and renderings to convey their building concepts. Students will learn not only the technical side of architectural design and construction techniques, but also how light, space, and material selections make great buildings.
Classes will begin with instruction on basic, two-dimensional architectural drawings (i.e., floor plans, elevations, sections, and details). Using tracing paper, grid paper, an architect's scale, pencil, and pen, students will develop graphic skills to draw like an architect and communicate room shapes, wall materials, window patterns, door swings, bathroom fixtures, etc. Later, using their drawing skills and relying on inspiration from favorite buildings and architects, students will begin working on the design of their own project. The design process will begin with site studies and programming before moving on to block diagrams, schematic design, design development, and construction drawings.
The student's design challenge will be to dream, draw, diagram, and detail a 2000 SF addition to an existing home that will house the student's ultimate hobby or hangout room. A student who is passionate about music might design a rehearsal studio with a recording room. A baseball enthusiast might design an indoor workout facility with a batting cage and a pitching bullpen. Student architect will use their own interests to guide their special use space: will it be a mega media room, an art studio, an indoor bowling area, a gourmet kitchen, a spa, or an arcade?
Completed projects consisting of drawings, renderings, and design boards will be presented at the final class for classmates and parents.
Topics in this Series: Architecture in 2D- Drafting and Drawing
(Semester 1) and Architecture in 3D- Modelling (Semester 2) Prerequisites: Students should be able to work with fractions for scaled drawing work.Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Will be given in class and e-mailed to parents and students. Assessments: Throughout the semester, the class will work as in a collaborative design studio atmosphere with frequent, informal reviews.Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a kit consisting of tracing paper, grid paper, pencils, architect's and engineer's scales, presentation boards, and printing architectural drawings. What to Bring: Students should bring their architectural kit materials to class each week.
Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts or Visual Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

1:00 pm-2:55 pm

9th-12th

Room 11

Creative Journaling for Teens Creative Journaling for Teens - Don't write poetry? Think you can't draw? Maybe not, but you may still want a creative way to record your thoughts, feelings, dreams, and ideas! Journaling is an ongoing process of discovery and exploration that allows one to be conscious of and connect with his/her thoughts, emotions and ideas. It is a form of expression that supports both academic and personal growth.
Creative journaling is not writing daily "Dear Diary" style entries on dated pages. Instead, students will explore various journaling methods, blending self-expression and self-discovery to guide them in learning new ways to problem-solve, achieve goals, and process emotions. Students will work with several writing techniques and a range of art media to develop a personal journal throughout the quarter, and will have the opportunity to expand on it in subsequent quarters. Techniques such as freeform writing, black-out poetry, stream-of-consciousness writing, and creative list making- in addition to experimenting with simple mixed media like collage and photography- will be explored. Weekly prompts will cover a range of topics such as choices, ambition, fear, and self-esteem as they relate to the students' personal lives and current events. Conversation around the prompts will complement the students' work in their individual journals.
Topics in this Series: Journal work is done in an open studio environment that allows students to join in any quarter throughout the year. Prerequisites: No formal writing or art experience is needed. All teens are welcome. Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-2 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: are given in class. Assessments: Not provided. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $20.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a spiral bound journal and a kit of supplies. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English, Fine Arts, or general Elective for purposes of a high school transcript.

10:00 am-10:55 am

8th-12th

Comic Art: Sketching Superheroes & Story Sequencing Comic Art: Sketching Superheroes & Story Sequencing - How does a comic illustrator portray the Incredible Hulk thundering through a concrete wall or sketch Captain America escaping the clutches of an enemy? Students will work with renowned comic artist Pop Mhan (DC, Marvel, and Dark Horse Comics) to learn the art of comic illustration.
During the first semester, students will learn to how to illustrate figures by tracing, sketching, and modifying familiar comic characters to be able to visualize how their forms are composed of simple geometric shapes. Then, once a student can draw a static, standing figure, he/she will learn how to manipulate the character's form to portray running, crouching, falling, flying, or fighting, and how to draw the same character again with the familiar proportions and detailing each time. Students will also learn the art of looking at common objects and breaking them down into simple lines and shapes, to portray props and backgrounds. Students will work from a furnished script (yep, comics are scripted stories), and will practice "laying out", or rough-sketching, sequential scenes in multiple panels, to tell the story. The student?s product in the first semester will be a working portfolio of figure studies, practice character sketches, a refined, unique character (or re-envisioning a known, existing character), and rough sketch lay-outs for sequential scenes. All first semester work will be done in pencil on paper.
Topics in this Series: Comic Art: Sketching Superheroes & Story Sequencing (Semester 1) and Comic Art: Developiong Detail & Finishing Touches (Semester 2) Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-3 hours per week illustrating outside of class. Assessments: The assessment for this class will include an individual e-mail at the conclusion of the semester with the instructor's qualitative feedback on the student's work. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for pencils, paper, tracing paper, eraser, and portfolio. What to Bring: Students should bring their class supplies each week. Non-Meeting Days: This is a 13- week class that does not meet on October 18. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts or Visual Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

11:00 am-12:30 pm

8th-12th