Schedule and Room Assignments

Classes meet on Wednesdays and Fridays in Oakton, VA. Filter by subject or grade below.

Quarter beginning January 9, 2019

Art / Music Science / Technology History / Humanities Language Arts
Extracurricular Math Foreign Language (Full Classes)
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Wednesday Classes (Click here for Friday Classes)

9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00
Room 3

Battle Strategies & Dioramas: Civil War, Gettysburg Battle Strategies & Dioramas: Civil War, Gettysburg - Students will learn the basic history of the Civil war, with a focus on the bloodiest battle ever fought on American Soil, the three days at Gettysburg. Gettysburg would be the last major offensive action of the Confederate Army on Union soil, shattering the myth of Lee s invincibility on the field and signaling the beginning of the Confederacy s downfall. Students will engage in a hands-on 3D battle strategy game using the military dioramas that they make! Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will each form a 12 X 18 shaped, foam diorama with landscape elements (hills, valleys, rivers, ridges, vegetation, fences, etc) to represent a scene of a famous historical engagement. Students will each receive 1:72 scale miniature soldiers to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate the larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices. The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical background and circumstances leading up to the specific battle. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year s series include: Revolutionary War, Battles of Lexington and Concord (1st quarter), Revolutionary War, Yorktown (2nd quarter), Civil War, Gettysburg (3rd quarter), and Civil War, The Siege of Petersburg (4th quarter).

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

5th-8th

Dynamic Dioramas: Titans of the Mediterranean- Rome vs Carthage Dynamic Dioramas: Titans of the Mediterranean- Rome vs Carthage - Travel back, across the Sea in the Middle of the Earth, or on the backs of elephants across the frozen Alps, into a war torn Ancient Italy. This struggle would set the course of European history for a thousand years, two very different empires intertwined by history and dead set upon the total annihilation of the other. The victor will rule the known world almost unopposed, and leave a legacy still respected today. The loser, will be all but forgotten. Each student will create an individual diorama of ancient Carthage or Italy. Students will craft and hand-shape their scene on a 10" x 12" foam board using artistic, model-making techniques. They will customize their dioramas with landscape elements, waterways, structures of the time, and paint. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature figures and combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to create a larger terrain. Students will then compete in a history-based survival strategy game. This will reinforce lessons about the culture, economy, warfare, and politics of the time. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them. Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $15.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year s series include Sumerian Settlement (1st quarter), Ancient Greece, The Iliad & Odyssey (2nd quarter), Roman Republic, Hannibal & The Punic Wars (3rd quarter), and Ancient China and The Three Kingdoms (4th quarter).

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

2nd-4th

Modelling the Great Conquests: Edward the Black Prince & th... Modelling the Great Conquests: Edward the Black Prince & the 100 Years War - The history of Modern England and France has been closely intertwined since before the Duke of Normandy conquered England. It has also been an often violent history, notably with nearly 100 years of almost continuous medieval warfare. On the fields of Crecy and Agincourt, the English Army would shatter the most renowned and noble army in Europe, but time and progress would eventually favor the French Kings, who would in turn forge one of the strongest and most modern nations in Europe. We ll be starting well before that however, at the beginning of the Hundred Years War. Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will create a 12 X 18 diorama board of a 100 Years War battle, and populate it with 1:72 scale invading armies and their adversaries for historical re-enactments. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate a larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the conquest while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and siege equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how battles progressed and test different scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year s series include: Genghis Khan (1st quarter), Alexander Nevsky, Russia's Hero (2nd quarter), Edward the Black Prince & Henry V, The 100 Years War (3rd quarter), and French King Charles VIII, The Italian Wars (4th quarter).

3:00 pm-3:55 pm

5th-8th

Room 4

Money Matters: Entrepreneurship Money Matters: Entrepreneurship - Explore the real life "money matters" of entrepreneurship through fun, interactive activities! Middle schoolers will investigate aspects of what it takes to be an entrepreneur and how to take a great idea and turn it into a marketable new product. The class will explore facets of entrepreneurship and innovation such as pitching a new concept and attracting mock investors. Find out how you protect your new product or idea from copycats! Discover the difference among a patent, a trademark, a copyright, and how to get them. Students will work individually or with partners to conceptualize an all new product or an improvement to an existing one. Students will brainstorm how to get the word out about their innovation and will consider well known marketing techniques and ad campaigns. They will design a logo, slogan, and mock-up a marketing campaign of their own. The class will touch on the concepts of supply and demand, and students will define and research the potential market or end users. Student entrepreneurs will research prices of similar products, consider fixed and variable costs and mark-ups, and set a price point for their product. The class will culminate in a Shark Tank style presentation where student entrepreneurs will pitch their ideas to a parent audience. Students should expect to spend 1 hour each week investigating costs on the internet or other resources. On several weeks, students will be asked to bring a laptop or tablet device to look up information in class.

10:00 am-10:55 am

7th-8th

Room 9

History Investigators: Ancient Eastern Civilizations History Investigators: Ancient Eastern Civilizations - History Investigators will examine formative events in Eastern Civilization through guided inquiry and evidence-based analysis. These topics are posed as a series of thought-provoking questions that students will research, debate, discuss, and form opinions about. Second semester will examine three big questions: Hammurabi's Code: Was It Just? How Did the Nile Shape Ancient Egypt? Asoka: Ruthless Conqueror or Enlightened Ruler?
History Investigators is an interactive, multi-disciplinary examination of some of most significant events in ancient history using sources from The DBQ Project. DBQs, or document based questions, are derived from AP History exams and help develop high school level critical thinking skills. Students will review an array of primary sources such as letters, journal entries, inventories, ship's manifestos, newspaper articles, period maps, and court documents along with selected secondary sources like excerpts, charts, and graphs. Students will be guided through analyzing the documents, interpreting the data, drawing inferences, and forming conclusions. In some historical scenarios, the class will consider conflicting perspectives and be able to defend and debate multiple sides of a key issue. To demonstrate comprehension and a deeper understanding of the class themes, students will use factual findings to develop structured, evidence-based essays. Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week on homework, investigation, or reading for this class. Topics in this year's class series include: Ancient Western Civilizations (first semester) and Ancient Eastern Civilizations (second quarter). Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component, or partial, credit in World History for purposes of a high school transcript.

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

7th-10th

Atrium A

American History Illuminated: The Complete Civil War American History Illuminated: The Complete Civil War - Students will be immersed in detail and fully engaged in this intensive history course led by well- known homeschool instructor and historian Hugh Gardner. This history class is unlike other high school American history courses. Instead of learning a sequential set of names, dates, and battles, students will learn how to analyze and interpret history. Much like a college seminar, this approach to American History incorporates historiography (the history of the history.) Mr. Gardner does not teach a narrow view from a single textbook or static set of prepared notes. Instead, he presents the back story and multiple interpretations for the "why" questions in American history. Class discussion considers interpretations from a wide array of scholars and is updated as new sources are published. Rather than running through a timeline of outcomes, students will evaluate contributing factors (the "how" questions) and will learn about the personalities, prejudices, and biases of the people involved ("who").
Second semester will cover the rise of Lincoln, the complete Civil War, and the aftermath of the Civil War. The class will discuss the effects on the political, social, economic, and religious climate as well as influences on the arts, science, literature, and warfare. This is no ordinary history class as Mr. Gardner surrounds the students with vivid posters, maps, charts, primary sources, and artifacts to supplement his story-telling style. Students will be able to examine and handle period pieces such as antique and replica weapons and military accoutrements of the era while learning how these tools helped shape the battlefields and turning points in history. With an emphasis on primary sources, students will scrutinize historical atlases and original writings, all in a fun and interactive setting. Just for fun, students earn historical trading cards for class participation.
This class meets for 2.5 hours, one time per week on Wednesdays. Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours outside of class each week completing assigned reading. For those families who want to investigate the course themes at a deeper level, an optional reading list will be furnished. Based on the format and rich content of this class, homeschool families could count two semesters of this series as a full credit in American History for purposes of a high school transcript.
The book list for the 2018-19 year is:
(1) The American Heritage Pictorial Atlas of American History
Hardcover 1966
by Hilde Heun, ed KAGAN
Publisher: American Heritage; First Edition edition (1966)
ASIN: B000ANASDG
Hardcover: 424 pages
(2) Illustrated Atlas of The Civil War (Echoes of Glory)
Paperback 1998
by Time-Life Books Editors
Paperback: 320 pages
Publisher: Time-Life Books (1998)
ISBN-13: 978-0737031607
(3) Arms and Equipment of the Civil War
Paperback April 2, 2004
by Jack Coggins
Paperback: 160 pages
Publisher: Dover Publications; Dover Ed edition (April 2, 2004)
ISBN-13: 978-0486433950
(4) Atlas of Slavery
1st Edition
by James Walvin (Author)
Paperback: 160 pages
Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (August 27, 2005)
ISBN-13: 978-0582437807
(5) Introduction to Civil War Photography
2nd Edition
by Ross J. Kelbaugh (Author)
Paperback: 48 pages
Publisher: Thomas Pubns; 2nd Edition edition (August 1, 1991)
ISBN-13: 978-0939631360

9:30 am-11:55 am

7th-12th

Your Future World: Spotlight on the Top 12 Nations of 2050 Your Future World: Spotlight on the Top 12 Nations of 2050 - Which country has more than 10X the linguistic diversity of all of Europe put together? Which country may pass the U.S. as the world’s 3rd most populous by 2050? On which continent will 1/3 of the people be over age 60 by 2050? Why does it matter? Your Future World focuses on the physical and human geography of the countries that the U.N. has forecasted to be the world's most populous in the year 2050. After all, that is the world in which our kids will live.
After the introductory week, students study a different country each week. We consider each country's physical geography, cultural geography, history, politics (including its relations with its neighbors), economics, and demographics. Each week, students read assigned articles, conduct research, and prepare a simple cultural assignment in advance of our in-class discussion. We conclude each week with a country-specific game to reinforce learning.
Each week, the instructor will provide an "international snack" such as guava wafers from Brazil, spicy chickpeas from India, and coconut cookies from Indonesia, subject to students dietary restrictions. Investigating where the week's snack is from and then sampling something that teens in another country might enjoy is favorite student activity.
For students who have taken a previous human geography class (including AP Human Geography), "Your Future World" builds on these themes through country-specific case studies. For those who have not, although prior geographic knowledge is helpful, it is not assumed.
For this class, students must have excellent reading skills (high school+ level) and the ability to work cooperatively. This class is taught at an advanced high school/college level, with content that may touch on potentially troubling topics (e.g., war, poverty, terrorism) and involves a fair amount of (interesting, fun!) homework weekly to support the discussion, games, and activities during the meeting time. Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week on the class. For purposes of a high school transcript, homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component, or partial credit, in geography or world humanities.

12:15 pm-1:55 pm

8th-12th



 

Friday Classes (Click here to jump back up to Wednesday classes)

9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00
Room 1

Cultural Anthropology Cultural Anthropology - The Mosuo in southwestern China are led by grandmothers who do not practice marriage; power, prestige, and property are passed through daughters, and children live with their mothers -- forever. Every seven years, some Malagasy of Madagascar exhume the bodies of loved ones, then dance with their perfumed and silk-wrapped remains. Tsimané infants in Amazonian Bolivia are not given names until after their first birthday. How do we know about these practices? Cultural anthropologists are experts who study and record such customs. However, anthropologists work not just in far-off, rural places, but also cities and suburbs, including here in the United States. Right now, they are studying the human hair trade, street food, health care, love, migration, garbage dumps, ghost stories, and graffiti. Cultural anthropology is a multi-disciplinary field that examines past and present societies and their cultures. A "society" is a group of people organized along such lines as gender, age, class, caste, and occupation. "Culture" means a way of life, including language, values, beliefs, and behaviors. Cultural anthropologists use “ethnography” to record and analyze the life ways of a group, often by living with and sharing the daily experiences of the people they observe; then publishing their findings as revealing case studies. In this semester-long high school course, students will explore culture and social structure, mainly through hands-on participant-observation and other tools of ethnography. Students will also read selections from classic ethnographies -- learning, for example, when is it socially acceptable to steal a hammock in the Amazon! What teens may remember most from this class will be the practical field methods they use to create a collaborative profile of a fascinating and sometimes mysterious group: homeschoolers! Students will sharpen their powers of perception and discernment to better understand others. They will employ fieldwork methods such as interviews, mapping and other spatial analysis, audio-visual recording, questionnaires, sketching, pedigree charts, linguistic analysis, time-use studies, and more. This is an interactive course in which participation is critical; it is not a lecture-based. Students are expected to come to class having already completed their readings and outside assignments and prepared to discuss challenging questions together. This is an academically rigorous course that would be a good fit for students who are strong, independent readers; able to follow through on group commitments; and both curious and respectful about cultural and social variation. There is no core textbook. Families might budget approximately $30 for research-related supplies and possibly a few readings the instructor might not be able to provide (those needs will be identified as the class ethnography evolves). Students should expect 3 hours per week to complete homework before class meetings. Students must have regular, reliable internet access, as weekly assignments and quizzes are posted and accessed in an online classroom management system. Cultural anthropology continues themes from the fall Physical Anthropology class, but the latter is not a prerequisite. Students may take Cultural Anthropology without having had Physical Anthropology. Homeschool families may wish to count this class as a component, or partial credit, in social sciences or humanities for purposes of a high school transcript.

11:00 am-11:55 am

9th-12th

Room 4

3D History: WWII Downfall 3D History: WWII Downfall - Why read about key military battles on maps or in books when you can learn about them hands-on, in three dimensions, using historical miniature gaming? In 3D History, pivotal engagements come alive for new and experienced students, as they navigate a table-top terrain, deploy hundreds of miniature soldiers, ships, and tanks... all while playing a military strategy game. Each student will have the opportunity to fight a battle from both sides, allowing them to test various strategies, try multiple scenarios, predict different outcomes, and rewrite history- an effective way to gain a deeper understanding of what actually happened and why!
After Germany s disaster at Stalingrad the Wehrmacht was being pushed back on all fronts. From Crimea to Poland, all the ground Germany had gained in two years of fighting was once again falling into Soviet hands. Their leadership knew they had just one chance to regain the initiative and do what they had done best: Attack. In 1943, with a re-armed and still formidably manned war machine, the Summer Germans would once again launch one of the largest offensive the world had ever seen, across a wide front of the Kursk salient. The Soviets knew they were coming. In an unmatched feat of military deception, they dug in more than a million men, thousands of tanks and guns and waited for the inevitable German attack. From the North and South, two armored German pincers struck the prepared lines of the Soviets, gaining ground slowly. They ground away at the Red Army, defeating massed counter attacks of T-34 tanks and infantry, but still they came, roaring Tiger and Panther tanks killing 5 tanks for every one of their own lost. The seemingly endless waves of Russian resistance proved too much, and with news of Allied landings in Sicily, Operation Citadel was called off. The rest of the war would be defensive, Soviets grinding away bitter Nazi strongholds until the final devastating battle of Berlin.
This semester will study the Eastern Front, from Kursk to Berlin. Course documents including period maps, photographs and recreations will be made available through a class Google Drive link emailed to parents (and students who provide their email address), as well as a class YouTube playlist for any videos watched in class or assigned as homework. Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component, or partial, credit in American or World History for purposes of a high school transcript.

1:00 pm-2:55 pm

7th-12th

3D History: WWII Downfall 3D History: WWII Downfall - Why read about key military battles on maps or in books when you can learn about them hands-on, in three dimensions, using historical miniature gaming? In 3D History, pivotal engagements come alive for new and experienced students, as they navigate a table-top terrain, deploy hundreds of miniature soldiers, ships, and tanks... all while playing a military strategy game. Each student will have the opportunity to fight a battle from both sides, allowing them to test various strategies, try multiple scenarios, predict different outcomes, and rewrite history- an effective way to gain a deeper understanding of what actually happened and why!
After Germany s disaster at Stalingrad the Wehrmacht was being pushed back on all fronts. From Crimea to Poland, all the ground Germany had gained in two years of fighting was once again falling into Soviet hands. Their leadership knew they had just one chance to regain the initiative and do what they had done best: Attack. In 1943, with a re-armed and still formidably manned war machine, the Summer Germans would once again launch one of the largest offensive the world had ever seen, across a wide front of the Kursk salient. The Soviets knew they were coming. In an unmatched feat of military deception, they dug in more than a million men, thousands of tanks and guns and waited for the inevitable German attack. From the North and South, two armored German pincers struck the prepared lines of the Soviets, gaining ground slowly. They ground away at the Red Army, defeating massed counter attacks of T-34 tanks and infantry, but still they came, roaring Tiger and Panther tanks killing 5 tanks for every one of their own lost. The seemingly endless waves of Russian resistance proved too much, and with news of Allied landings in Sicily, Operation Citadel was called off. The rest of the war would be defensive, Soviets grinding away bitter Nazi strongholds until the final devastating battle of Berlin.
This semester will study the Eastern Front, from Kursk to Berlin. Course documents including period maps, photographs and recreations will be made available through a class Google Drive link emailed to parents (and students who provide their email address), as well as a class YouTube playlist for any videos watched in class or assigned as homework. Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component, or partial, credit in American or World History for purposes of a high school transcript.

3:00 pm-4:30 pm

7th-12th

Room 9

Psychology (AP, Honors, or On-Level) Psychology (AP, Honors, or On-Level) - Why do we dream? What happens to your brain when you are in love? Why do all babies like peek-a-boo? The course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of behavior and mental processes of human beings. Students are exposed to psychological facts, principles and phenomena associated with each of the sub fields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice. Students will be challenged to think like a psychologist as they analyze research and design future experiments.
This is a year-long, multi-level high school course. It will cover the fourteen major content areas covered on the College Board s AP Psychology Exam including: history and approaches, research methods, biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, learning, cognition, motivation and emotion, developmental psychology, personality, testing and individual differences, abnormal behavior, treatment of abnormal behavior, and social psychology.
The class offers a substantive, full-credit experience and will be a mixture of lecture, discussion, group work, and short videos. There is some mature content discussed in this course, especially as it pertains to abnormal psychology. Also, there is a section on sexual motivation, including homosexuality, that needs to be covered for the AP test. These topics will be discussed in a purely scientific manner, and students need to be prepared to have a respectful discussion about these subjects.
The course is offered at three levels, which meet together: Advanced Placement (AP), Honors, and On-Level. Students can pick their desired workload. Students can always do more if they would like, but at any level they are expected to keep up with weekly readings and homework which will prepare them for in-class discussions, assignments, and projects. All students must be prepared to read about 30 pages of college level text per week and should expect to spend 4-5 hours outside of class for reading and homework, regardless of level. All levels use materials written at a college level, but the amount and type of homework varies. A brief summer assignment will be due in August for those who wish to take the AP level, and successful completion is a prerequisite take the course at the AP level.
All students will register online for the same course. Students must indicate which level they want to study by e-mail by August 15. Once the course has begun, students may move down a level (from AP to honors, or from honors to on-level) at any time. However, once classes have started, students may not "bump up" a level. This is a year-long class that meets on Fridays for two hours and will have an additional online component. All assessments, essays, and projects will be submitted online so that class time can be maximized.
Students will be asked to purchase or rent the select class textbook: Myers Psychology for the AP, 2nd Edition, (ISBN #978-1464113079). The fee to take the AP exam in May 2019 is not included; each family will be responsible for scheduling and paying for their student's AP exam.

11:00 am-12:55 pm

9th-12th

Room 10

Civics Critic: Current Controversies Civics Critic: Current Controversies - Civics Critics will explore specific queries related to the US Bill of Rights through guided inquiry and evidence-based analysis. These topics are posed as a series of thought-provoking questions that students will research, debate, discuss, and form opinions about. Second semester will examine three big questions: Should Schools Be Allowed to Limit Students' Online Speech? Search and Seizure: Did the Government Go Too Far? Is the American Jury System Still a Good Idea?
Civics Critic is an interactive, multi-disciplinary examination of some of the key issues in American Government using sources from The DBQ Project. DBQs, or document based questions, are derived from AP History exams and help develop high school level critical thinking skills. Students will review an array of primary sources such as letters, journal entries, inventories, ship's manifestos, newspaper articles, period maps, and court documents along with selected secondary sources like excerpts, charts, and graphs. Students will be guided through analyzing the documents, interpreting the data, drawing inferences, and forming conclusions. In some historical scenarios, the class will consider conflicting perspectives and be able to defend and debate multiple sides of a key issue. To demonstrate comprehension and a deeper understanding of the class themes, students will use factual findings to develop structured, evidence-based essays. Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week on homework, investigation, or reading for this class. Topics in this year's class series include: Constitutional Queries (first semester) and Current Controversies (second semester). Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component, or partial, credit in Civics or American Government for purposes of a high school transcript.

10:00 am-10:55 am

7th-10th