Schedule and Room Assignments

Classes meet on Wednesdays and Fridays in Oakton, VA. Filter by subject or grade below.

Quarter beginning January 8, 2020

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Wednesday Classes (Click here for Friday Classes)

9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00
Room 3

Battle Strategies & Dioramas: WWII, D-Day Battle Strategies & Dioramas: WWII, D-Day - Students will engage in a hands-on 3D battle strategy game using the military dioramas that they make! We will be covering Operation Overlord, the famous amphibious invasion to liberate France from Nazi Germany. Then- Allied Supreme Commander Dwight D. Eisenhower described this massive operation as, “the destruction of the German war machine, the elimination of Nazi tyranny over the oppressed peoples of Europe, and security for ourselves in a free world.” Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will each form a 10 X 16 shaped, foam diorama with landscape elements (hills, beaches, rivers, ridges, vegetation, barbed wire, etc.) to represent a scene of a famous historical engagement. Students will each receive 1:72 scale miniature soldiers to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate the larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices. The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical background and circumstances leading up to the specific battle. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. Topics in this Series: WWI, Germany's Summer Offensive (Quarter 1); WWI, America's Arrival (Quarter 2): WWII, D-Day (Quarter 3); and WWII, The Battle of the Bulge (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $25.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

5th-8th

Dynamic Dioramas: Song of Roland & the Franks Dynamic Dioramas: Song of Roland & the Franks - In the eighth century CE Western Europe is beset by hostile enemies, taking advantage of hundreds of years of disunity and decay. One King would unify the disparate and petty barbarian fiefdoms and be crowned Emperor of a new Holy Roman Empire. This quarter will focus on how Charlemagne expertly won his way to Imperial glory on countless battlefields across all the corners of Europe. Even his greatest military defeat would be immortalized in The Song of Roland, which would join the legend of King Arthur in establishing the ideals of chivalry and knighthood.Each student will create an individual diorama of a scene from the Song of Roland. Students will craft and hand-shape their scene on a 10 x 16 inch foam board using artistic, model-making techniques. They will customize their dioramas with landscape elements, waterways, structures of the time, and paint. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature heroes and monsters, then combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to create larger terrain. Students will then compete in history-based survival strategy games. This will reinforce lessons about the culture, economy, warfare, and mythology of the time. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them. Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents.Topics in this Series: Beowulf & the Vikings (Quarter 1); King Arthur & the Saxons (Quarter 2); Song of Roland & the Franks (Quarter 3), and Saladin & the Third Crusade (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $20.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

2nd-4th

Modeling Renaissance Conquests: Pirates of the New World (1... Modeling Renaissance Conquests: Pirates of the New World (17th century) - While Europe was in a state of near constant warfare, a whole new world was being explored, expanded upon, exploited, and in many cases exterminated. The Spanish arrived from Europe first, with the Conquistadors and “settled” New Spain. Other maritime powers would soon follow, snapping up new colonie. After all, how could you call yourself an empire without colonies to oppress? This meant the wars of Europe spilled over and became the wars of the New World too. Large, expensive navies plied the seas and took the spoils of war to spite their rivals. When these wars ended, so too did the various Crowns’ willingness to pay for all these trained fighting sailors, who were left far from home, with only one valuable skill. Fighting at sea, this time for themselves as pirates!Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will create a 10 X 16 diorama board of a pirate hideout or other Caribbean port, and populate it with 1:72 scale invading armies and their adversaries for historical re-enactments. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate a larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the conquest while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war-gaming rule system for moving troops and siege equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how battles progressed and test different scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents.Topics in this Series: Barbarossa aka Pirate Redbeard, Europe, 16th century (Quarter 1); Suleiman the Magnificent, Europe, 16th century (Quarter 2); Pirates of the New World, 1650-1730 (Quarter 3); and Ivan the Terrible Russia, 16th century (4th quarter). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $25.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

3:00 pm-3:55 pm

5th-8th

Battle Strategies & Dioramas: WWII, D-Day Battle Strategies & Dioramas: WWII, D-Day - Students will engage in a hands-on 3D battle strategy game using the military dioramas that they make! We will be covering Operation Overlord, the famous amphibious invasion to liberate France from Nazi Germany. Then- Allied Supreme Commander Dwight D. Eisenhower described this massive operation as, “the destruction of the German war machine, the elimination of Nazi tyranny over the oppressed peoples of Europe, and security for ourselves in a free world.”
Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will each form a 10 X 16 shaped, foam diorama with landscape elements (hills, beaches, rivers, ridges, vegetation, barbed wire, etc.) to represent a scene of a famous historical engagement. Students will each receive 1:72 scale miniature soldiers to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate the larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices.
The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical background and circumstances leading up to the specific battle. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. Topics in this Series: WWI, Germany's Summer Offensive (Quarter 1); WWI, America's Arrival (Quarter 2): WWII, D-Day (Quarter 3); and WWII, The Battle of the Bulge (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $25.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

4:00 pm-4:55 pm

5th-8th

Room 10

Dig It! Classical Archaeology: Greece & Rome Dig It! Classical Archaeology: Greece & Rome - Archaeology is the field of study that unlocks the clues to past civilizations. In this class, students will explore key time periods and look at the archaeological evidence that tells us what was going on in different civilizations: what people ate, what they wore, who they worshipped, the art they created, the houses that they lived in, the wars they fought, and even what pets lived alongside them! This archaeological tour will be guided by a scholar of art and antiquity: Dr. Erica Hughes has traveled and participated in archaeological explorations throughout the ancient world. Students will "dig" her personal photos and stories and participate in class discussions, group activities, and individual hands-on experiences that are designed to help young people understand the creation and conservation of artifacts.
The third quarter will explore Hellenic, Hellenistic, Etruscan and Roman ideas and objects. Students will uncover the roots of these famous civilizations in the artifacts and myths of each other. How could the Colosseum have been flooded without plastic lining? Where did the Greeks get the idea for their statues? Which is the only god to have the same name in Greek, Latin and Etruscan? Example activities in this class include red-figure painting techniques, playing Roman board games, and designing a gladitorial spectacle.
Topics in this Series: Early Archaeology: Paleolithic to Mesopotamian (Quarter 1); Bronze Age Archaeology: Egypt, Anatolia, Myceneans (Quarter 2); Classical Archaeology: Greece & Rome (Quarter 3); and Forensic Archaeology: Piecing Together History (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

7th-8th

Atrium A

The History of WWI: From World at War to a Precarious Peace The History of WWI: From World at War to a Precarious Peace - Students will be immersed in detail and fully engaged in this intensive history course led by well- known homeschool instructor and historian Hugh Gardner. This history class is unlike other high school American history courses. Instead of learning a sequential set of names, dates, and battles, students will learn how to analyze and interpret history. Much like a college seminar, this approach to American History incorporates historiography (the history of the history.) Mr. Gardner does not teach a narrow view from a single textbook or static set of prepared notes. Instead, he presents the back story and multiple interpretations for the "why" questions in American history. Class discussion considers interpretations from a wide array of scholars and is updated as new sources are published. Rather than running through a timeline of outcomes, students will evaluate contributing factors (the "how" questions) and will learn about the personalities, prejudices, and biases of the people involved ("who").
Second semester will demonstrate exactly why World War One was truly a World War...war on the Oceans, in Europe, Africa, and Asia. The class will spend considerable time learning how WW1 shaped the modern Middle East and helped create the conflicts in and dynamics of the region today. Students will learn how the Allies unexpectedly were able to win the War in 1918. Lastly, the group will closely examine the Armistice and The Versailles Conference and their ramifications for the future. As the course unfolds, students will learn about the new weapons, technology, and tactics introduced on a large scale in the "war to end all wars." The class will study actions on the Western Front and how trenches warfare led to a stalemate between the Allies and the Central Powers. The class will discuss the effects on the political, social, and economic climate as well as influences on the arts, science, literature, religion, and warfare. This is no ordinary history class as Mr. Gardner surrounds the students with vivid posters, maps, charts, primary sources, and artifacts to supplement his story-telling style. Students will be able to examine and handle period pieces such as antique and replica weapons and military accoutrements of the era while learning how these tools helped shape the battlefields and turning points in history. With an emphasis on primary sources, students will scrutinize historical atlases and original writings, all in a collaborative and interactive setting. Just for fun, students earn historical trading cards for class participation.
This class meets for 2.5 hours, one time per week on Wednesdays. Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours outside of class each week completing assigned reading. For those families who want to investigate the course themes at a deeper level, an optional reading list will be furnished.
Topics in this Series: WWI: From Balkan Crisis to Stalemate of the Trenches (Semester 1), WWI: From World at War to a Precarious Peace (Semester 2). Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of classon assigned readings. Assignments: are given in class and e-mailed to parents and students. Assessments: Students will be given a short weekly quiz on an index card that will be graded in class and sent home each week for the parent's use in assigning a grade. Textbook: Students will use the same books as first semester:A Military Atlas of the First World War by Arthur Banks (softcover: ISBN# 978-0850527919 or hardcover: ISBN# 978-0850525632) and The Western Front Companion: The Complete Guide to How the Armies Fought for Four Devastating Years, 1914-1918 by Mark Adkin (ISBN# 978-0811713160). Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count two semesters of this course as a full credit in American or World History for purposes of a high school transcript.

9:30 am-11:55 am

8th-12th

Music Room

History Investigators: Industrialization, the Gilded Age & ... History Investigators: Industrialization, the Gilded Age & the Progressive Era - History Investigators will examine formative periods in American History through guided inquiry and evidence-based analysis. These topics are posed as a series of thought-provoking questions that students will research, debate, discuss, and form opinions about. Second semester will examine three big questions: The Philanthropy of Andrew Carnegie: Did It Make Him a Hero? Progressivism: Where Will You Put Your Million Dollars? and, Prohibition: Why Did America Change its Mind?
History Investigators is an interactive, multi-disciplinary examination of some of most significant events and turning points in American history using sources from The DBQ Project. DBQs, or document based questions, are derived from AP History exams and help develop high school level critical thinking skills. Students will review an array of primary sources such as letters, journal entries, inventories, ship's manifestos, newspaper articles, period maps, and court documents along with selected secondary sources like excerpts, charts, and graphs. Students will be guided through analyzing the documents, interpreting the data, drawing inferences, and forming conclusions. In some historical scenarios, the class will consider conflicting perspectives and be able to defend and debate multiple sides of a key issue. To demonstrate comprehension and a deeper understanding of the class themes, students will use factual findings to develop structured, evidence-based essays.
Topics in this Series: Westward Expansion in America (Semester 1) and Industrialization, The Gilded Age, & The Progressive Era in America (Semester 2). Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: are sent by e-mail to parents and students. Assessments: The instructor will assign completion points for homework assignments, % correct for quizzes/tests, and both quantitative and qualitative feedback on written papers for the parent's use in assigning a grade. Textbook: None. Lab/Supply Fee: The cost of class copies is included in the course fee. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in American History for purposes of a high school transcript. This is a 15-week class that will not meet one week in the winter quarter. The exact week off will be announced.

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

7th-10th



 

Friday Classes (Click here to jump back up to Wednesday classes)

9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00
Room 1

Modern World History (AP, Honors, or On-Level) Modern World History (AP, Honors, or On-Level) - This year-long, full credit, multilevel high school course offers an in-depth look at how the world we know came together between 1200 CE to today.
Long before jet travel and trans-Atlantic shipping, portions of the globe were much more connected than some realize. By the early 1200s, Persian historian Juvayni claimed that any unguarded traveler might walk safely from Southeast Asia to Eastern Europe - as long as an army unit of the massive Mongol Empire was posted nearby. The Silk Roads connected Moscow and Tibet, while a vibrant Indian Ocean trade circulated goods, people, and animals among China, Indonesia, and India, with linkages to East African coastal cities and the Arab world. In 200 more years, Muslim Admiral Zheng He would command China's gigantic treasure fleet.
Except for a brief visit to Canada by Leif Ericson's volatile family around 1000 CE, it seems the rest of the Old World remained ignorant of the land mass stretching from the Arctic Circle to the volcanic Tierra del Fuego until the end of the 1400s. Here, precursors to the Incan and Aztec empires built impressive city-states, while farther north, Cahokia's pyramids and Mesa Verde's cliffside apartments boomed, and the Iroquois League united five great nations. Millions of people had no knowledge of the world in the opposite hemisphere. At 1200 CE, when this course begins, two halves of the world had not yet collided - but would soon!
We will use the tools and perspectives of historians to see how this collision happened and what built the world we now know. Students will analyze primary and secondary sources, develop arguments, and make comparisons. They will apply reason to understand context, causation, and continuity and change over time. World history has it all! Five themes from the AP course curriculum will be covered to make connections among historical developments at different times and places: (1) interaction between humans and the environment; (2) development and interaction of cultures; (3) state building, expansion, and conflict; (4) creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems; and (4) development and transformation of social structures.
Levels:This course is offered at three levels, On-Level, Honors, and Advanced Placement (AP). They have different workloads, but meet together. AP level students will work at a university freshman level and have the potential to earn college credit or placement through the spring 2020 AP exam. AP students must be prepared to start class two weeks earlier, with online homework due in mid- and late August. Honors students will have assignments that engage higher-level analysis and historical thinking skills. On-level students will use the same primary textbook, but will have less homework. Schedule: There are two weekly meetings: (1) Friday in-person for all class members; and (2) Monday online (time to be announced). The latter is required for AP students, but open to all interested, and recorded for those who cannot attend live. For Honors and On-Level students, this is a 28-week course which follows the Compass calendar but ends two weeks early due to the timing of the AP exam on May 14. AP students have the equivalent of 31 weeks, as they begin two weeks before the regular Compass start date and will have an additional session for a mock exam. Workload: Honors and On-Level students should plan on 4-5 hours each week outside class meetings for reading and homework. AP students typically need 6 hours (or more, depending on reading speed). All levels use materials written at a college level, but the amount and type of homework varies. This allows students to enjoy active discussions with your peers, an advantage of live, in-person meetings.Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments; upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests; track grades; message instructor and classmates. Assessments: Points are assigned for class submissions and tests, and parents can view total points earned at any time through the Canvas site. Textbook: Registered students will receive an e-mail with the required textbook(s) over the summer. Registration. All students will register online for the same course. Students must designate their intent to take the On-Level, Honors, or AP version by emailing Compass before August 4. Once the course has begun, students may move down a level (from AP to honors, or from honors to on-level) at any time. However, once classes have begun, students may not "bump up" a level.
AP Fees: There is an additional tuition fee of $150 for students who are approved to take the AP level of this course because of the additional instructional time. Those families will receive a separate invoice for this amount before the start of classes. The fee is not refundable if the student decides mid-year to change to honors or on-level work. The fee to take the College Board's AP Modern World History exam in May 2020 is not included; each family will be responsible for scheduling and paying for their student's AP exam. AP Approval: Students who have taken a prior course with this instructor can seek approval for the AP level through a conversation or e-mail with her. For any student new to the instructor, a short questionnaire and brief written assignment about a sample textbook chapter are needed to get approval for the AP level. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a a full credit in World History for purposes of a high school transcript.

9:30 am-10:55 am

9th-12th

World History in the Making: Current Events & Courageous People World History in the Making: Current Events & Courageous People - The news is often full of doom and gloom, and not without reason. But everywhere people are also being kind, courageous, clever, and putting their talents to good use, sometimes at great risk to themselves. Whatever the problem, someone is working on solutions. History is being made each day, and we have some power to make it better.
This course will examine some complex and difficult realities -- after all, you can't fix a bike if you don't know its parts -- but then we will look at what is being done or could be done. Along the way, we will evaluate some of our own abilities and strengths.
One of our course themes is how we can deal with difficult knowledge. Course materials are drawn in part from current events. While we will not fixate on disturbing details, students will need maturity to handle some topics like genocide, discrimination, poverty, or environmental damage. Remember, though: we're looking at solutions and ways to help.
This course is a good fit for students who are not only interested in learning about positive responses to difficult problems, but who can consistently read and research during the week and come ready to plunge into active discussion on Fridays. This is NOT a lecture-based class. Strong, independent reading skills; internet access; and personal responsibility are a must.
Warning: Some mature themes. Topics in this Series: Comparative World Religions (Semester 1) and World History in the Making: Current Events & Courageous People (Semester 2) Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours outside of class each week to complete readings, watch videos, listen to podcasts, and other work. Homework is due on Canvas a full day before we meet, so discussion can proceed from some basis of knowledge, not mere opinion. Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload. Assessments: The instructor will provide numeric scores and narrative feedback for submitted homework, presentations, projects, and quizzes. Parents can view total points earned at any time through the Canvas site. Credit: This course will touch on social structure, politics, the environment, culture, economics, technology, and a bit of history. Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Humanities for purposes of a high school transcript.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

9th-12th

Room 2

Civics Critic: Exploring Elections Civics Critic: Exploring Elections - Civics Critics will explore specific queries related to elections and voter's rights through guided inquiry and evidence-based analysis. These topics are posed as a series of thought-provoking questions that students will research, debate, discuss, and form opinions about. Second semester will examine three big questions: Should Americans be Required to Vote? Campaign Propaganda: Which Strategies Would You Use? and Should the Electoral College Be Abolished?
Civics Critic is an interactive, multi-disciplinary examination of some of the key issues in American Government using sources from The DBQ Project. DBQs, or document based questions, are derived from AP History exams and help develop high school level critical thinking skills. Students will review an array of primary sources such as letters, journal entries, inventories, ship's manifestos, newspaper articles, period maps, and court documents along with selected secondary sources like excerpts, charts, and graphs. Students will be guided through analyzing the documents, interpreting the data, drawing inferences, and forming conclusions. In some historical scenarios, the class will consider conflicting perspectives and be able to defend and debate multiple sides of a key issue. To demonstrate comprehension and a deeper understanding of the class themes, students will use factual findings to develop structured, evidence-based essays.
Topics in this Series: Sizing Up Citizenship (Semester 1), Exploring Elections (Semester 2). Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: are sent by e-mail to parents and students. Assessments: The instructor will assign completion points for homework assignments, % correct for quizzes/tests, and both quantitative and qualitative feedback on written papers for the parent's use in assigning a grade. Textbook: None. Lab/Supply Fee: The cost of class copies is included in the course fee. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Civics or American Government for purposes of a high school transcript. This is a 15-week class that will not meet one week in the winter quarter. The exact week off will be announced.

11:00 am-11:55 am

9th-12th

Psychology: Case Studies in Human Development and Abnormal Psychology Psychology: Case Studies in Human Development and Abnormal Psychology - In this class, we will examine the nature, causes, and treatment of mental disorders. How do we define abnormality and classify mental disorders? How common are mental disorder and which disorders are most prevalent? How do mental disorders vary across cultures? Together, we will learn the answers to these questions and examine case studies by renowned psychologists including Dr. Mary Pipher. These readings will be at the core of this class, leading to ongoing, intellectually stimulating discussions. Topics covered will include phobias, PTSD, eating disorders, self-harm, addiction, schizophrenia, dementia and more. Students will learn how to analyze field work, evaluate theories, and think critically about how these studies apply to the world around them. They will also have an opportunity to share research on a personal topic of interest.
Cases will not be repeated from fall 2019 or the prior year's psychology course. Students who are new to psychology can use the Case Studies courses as an introduction to the field and to explore their interest in taking the AP Psychology course at Compass in 2020-2021!
Topics in this Series: Neuropsychology and Cognition (Semester 1) and Human Development and Abnormal Psychology (Semester 2)Workload: Students should expect to spend 2 hours per week outside of class on readings. Students will be expected to prepare for weekly discussions by reading the selected case study and answering questions. Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students can access assignments and upload homework. Extension assignments may include watching a short video clip, creating discussion questions, or suggesting a follow-up study. Assessments: The instructor will assign points for class participation and homework that the parents can use in assigning a grade. Lab/Supply Fee: The cost of class copies is included in the course fee. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Social Sciences for purposes of a high school transcript.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

9th-12th

Room 3
Room 5

Ancient Justice: Crime & Punishment- Roman Law, From Republ... Ancient Justice: Crime & Punishment- Roman Law, From Republic to Empire - This class will explore the judicial processes of the Roman Republic. Starting with the Regicide of the Tarquin King, followed by the first legal code, the Laws of the 12 Tables, all the way to the Codes of Emperor Justinian. This Semester will explore the foundation of the Roman Legal system that endures in some forms to this day. Like a traditional mock trial program, the class will hear cases, and students will defend themselves. Real historical cases will be studied and trial parts assigned to the class, which will be expected to debate from the perspective of Plebes and Senators of ancient Rome. The class will serve as the jury and, if necessary, select period-appropriate verdicts and explain how they arrived at their decisions, while striving for period accuracy.
Topics in this Series: Roman law, From Republic to Empire (Semester 2). Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Google Drive (period maps, photographs and recreations) and YouTube (videos) links will be e-mailed to parents/students for homework or supplemental investigation.Textbooks: None Assessments: Will not be given. Lab/Supply Fee: The cost of photocopied class documents is included in the course fee.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History or Civics for purposes of a high school transcript.

10:00 am-10:55 am

8th-12th

3D History: The Forgotten Fronts of WWII 3D History: The Forgotten Fronts of WWII - Why read about key military battles on maps or in books when you can learn about them hands-on, in three dimensions, using historical miniature gaming? In 3D History, pivotal engagements come alive for new and experienced students, as they deploy to simulated battlefronts across the world in a military strategy game. Each student will have the opportunity to fight a battle from both sides, allowing them to test various strategies, try multiple scenarios, predict different outcomes, and rewrite history- an effective way to gain a deeper understanding of what actually happened and why!
The Second World War was fought at every corner of the world map, but most people have only heard of the big famous battles in Europe and the Pacific. This semester we'll shed some light on the other pivotal battles of WWII, like the German paratroopers who invaded Crete, the Italian attacks in North Africa, and the Allied operations in Italy, which were overshadowed by the D-Day landings.
Topics in this Series: Naval Battles of WWII (Semester 1) and The Forgotten Fronts (Semester 2). Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Google Drive (period maps, photographs and recreations) and YouTube (videos) links will be e-mailed to parents/students for homework or supplemental investigation.Assessments: Will not be given.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript.

12:00 pm-1:55 pm

7th-12th

3D History: The Forgotten Fronts of WWII 3D History: The Forgotten Fronts of WWII - Why read about key military battles on maps or in books when you can learn about them hands-on, in three dimensions, using historical miniature gaming? In 3D History, pivotal engagements come alive for new and experienced students, as they deploy to simulated battlefronts across the world in a military strategy game. Each student will have the opportunity to fight a battle from both sides, allowing them to test various strategies, try multiple scenarios, predict different outcomes, and rewrite history- an effective way to gain a deeper understanding of what actually happened and why!
The Second World War was fought at every corner of the world map, but most people have only heard of the big famous battles in Europe and the Pacific. This semester we'll shed some light on the other pivotal battles of WWII, like the German paratroopers who invaded Crete, the Italian attacks in North Africa, and the Allied operations in Italy, which were overshadowed by the D-Day landings.
Topics in this Series: Naval Battles of WWII (Semester 1) and The Forgotten Fronts (Semester 2). Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Google Drive (period maps, photographs and recreations) and YouTube (videos) links will be e-mailed to parents/students for homework or supplemental investigation.Assessments: Will not be given.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript.

2:00 pm-3:55 pm

7th-12th