Schedule and Room Assignments

Classes meet on Wednesdays and Fridays in Oakton, VA. Filter by subject or grade below.

Quarter beginning September 6, 2019

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Wednesday Classes (Click here for Friday Classes)

9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00
Room 4

Writer's Workshop: Reading Classics, Writing New Endings Writer's Workshop: Reading Classics, Writing New Endings - Have you read a really good classic novel only to discover that the ending is not right for you? We plan to re-write endings by learning all about how to summarize events, strengthen characters, find new settings, and visualize new endings for the classics we choose to read. A list of over 100 books will be available to choose from. Examples titles include Kidnapped, The Three Musketeers, and Wind in the Willows. We will be writing new endings to some old favorites and publishing an anthology at the close of the class.
The Writers' Workshop gives students in grades 5-6 the skills they need for writing, reading, listening, and speaking that come from practicing by putting pen to paper. Sharing drafts and in-progress works enhances the understanding of language structure, encourages revision, and improves editing in story writing. Each quarter, students will review samples of literature and write about popular themes using the story elements of that theme.
Imagination and creativity come easily to most young writers, but acquiring technical skills is also important. Each quarter, students will focus on specific skills. The skills are a part of their Writer's Tool Kit that includes understanding parts and kinds of sentences, plurals, possessives, and punctuation. Learning how to use a dictionary and a thesaurus, as well as practical, higher, middle school level skills such as summarizing, outlining, note taking, writing a book report, or citing sources are included throughout the four sessions.
Topics in this Series: Reading Classics, Writing New Endings (Quarter 1); Finding Colorful Characters for our Fiction (Quarter 2); Writing from the Inside Out (Quarter 3); and Classics, Paintings, and Poetry- A Passport Adventure (Quarter 4).

11:00 am-11:55 am

5th-6th

Room 10

English: Modern Narratives in Nonfiction Work English: Modern Narratives in Nonfiction Work - Overview
Modern Narratives focuses on the incorporation of style, voice, and tone in literature and in writing. Viewing literature as "published writing", students will examine the products and processes of other writers in order to understand and refine their own. Through the analysis of professional and student works, students will explore what makes truly great writing.
Literature
First semester of Modern Narratives in Nonfictionwill examine the works of great essayists. Examples of some essays that may read in this course are those by Henry David Thoreau, George Orwell, Virginia Woolf, Robert Benchley, James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Annie Dillard, and Joyce Carol Oates. In addition, the class will use style manuals and classic writing texts such as Strunk & White's The Elements of Styleand William Zinsser's On Writing Well. The full reading list will be presented in the course syllabus at the beginning of the term. In addition, students will be asked to read several selections over the summer. Students may also need to do some supplemental, parallel personal reading on his/her own to support the semester project.
Composition
First semester Senior Composition, dovetailing with the college admissions season, will focus on "the personal essay", writing to prompts, writing with a deadline, and ruthless editing (a.k.a. "meeting a word count"). Going beyond the five-paragraph template that encourages "cookie cutter" essays, students will create a unique architecture embedded with personal style, voice, and narrative structure. In short, students will uncover not just who they are as individuals, but who they are as writers... and how to fuse these two identities into a creative, organized, clear, and elegant essay.
In the process, students will master their writing process and identify personal writing strengths. These strengths will be developed into a writing workshop that they will present to classmates and the Compass community. Portfolios (now a potential college resume addition) will be expanded to include essays, research papers, and extracurricular support (artwork, performances, powerpoints, etc.) .
This course is part of a custom curriculum developed and team-taught by Anne Sharp and Melanie Kosar. The courses are designed in a sequential program that complements the developmental skills of the adolescent learner. It is a seminar-style approach that mirrors university literature and writing classes. Mrs. Kosar will teach the literature components of the course on Wednesdays, and Mrs. Sharp will teach the writing portion of the class on Fridays.
Topics in this Series: Modern Narratives in Nonfiction Works (Semester 1) and Nobel and Pulitzer Prize Writings (Semester 2). Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at grade level. Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of classAssignments: will be posted on a Google Classroom. Assessments: are portfolio-based. Students will create a digital portfolio that incorporates annotated reading lists, reflects individual interests and accomplishments and showcases a variety of writing. Textbook: Students should purchase or borrow the assigned literature. In some cases, specific editions will be identified with ISBN numbers so students can be on the "same page" (literally!) What to Bring: Students should bring paper or notebook, pen or pencil, current literature selection, and personal writing journal to class each week. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

11:00 am-11:55 am

11th-12th

English: Introduction to Literary Analysis & Writing- Eleme... English: Introduction to Literary Analysis & Writing- Elements of Literature - Overview
The Introduction to Literary Analysis & Writing is a high school student's first look at the higher-level relationship between literature and personal writing. Literary analysis and critical writing move a teen from being merely a good reader- a middle school skill- to becoming a scholarly reader and diagnostic writer which are the foundations of high school and college level inquiry into all forms of written works.
In this course, literature is not restricted to a particular genre or form, and writing is not limited to a common five-paragraph composition. Instead, literature is presented as a survey, sampling many different types of works, and composition is approached as the development of a student's personal responses to what he reads. During the first semester, students will examine the basic elements of literature, and second semester will evaluate forms and genres to create a "big picture" of the development of literature.
Literature
First semester Literary Analysis will focus on the basic elements of literature- character, setting, theme, plot, and conflict- and how they interact to create story. These building blocks exist across all forms of literature, so the class may evaluate the plot in an epic poem, a character in a classic play, or the setting in a short story. Some well-known literature will be used to introduce students to the various literary elements, and new works will be studied to demonstrate the best examples of a vivid fictional universe, a strong narrator, beloved (or feared) characters, and other literary components. Examples of some literature that students may read in this course are The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho, Journey to the Center of Earth by Jules Verne, and Lord of the Flies by William Golding. The full reading list will be presented in the course syllabus at the beginning of the term. In addition, students will be asked to read several selections over the summer. Students may also need to do some supplemental, parallel personal reading on his/her own to support the semester project.
Composition
First semester Writing will focus on personal response to literature, with the core being a personal writing journal. The students' journals will be a place to record what they think and feel about what they are reading. Students will learn to annotate, to cite passages from text, and to format. Notes made in the journals will be used to develop short, informal written pieces about the literature read in the course. Observations from the student's journal will also be used to collect supporting, textural evidence to support the reader's opinions which will be formulated into a thesis (personal position). Written assignments will include summaries, compare/contrast analyses, and parallel structure writings that focus on character, setting, plot, conflict, etc., to further underscore and assess student's understanding of the building blocks of literature. First semester will conclude with a culminating project on a subgenre of the student's own choosing which will analyze works for character, plot, setting, and other literary elements studied.
Class Structure
This course is part of a custom curriculum developed and team-taught by Anne Sharp and Melanie Kosar. The courses are designed in a sequential program that complements the developmental skills of the adolescent learner. It is a seminar-style approach that mirrors university literature and writing classes. Mrs. Kosar will teach the literature components of the course on Wednesdays, and Mrs. Sharp will teach the writing portion of the class on Fridays.
Topics in this Series: Elements of Literature (Semester 1) and Forms of Literature (Semester 2). Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at grade level. Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class. In addition, students should complete the summer assignments consisting of the literature identified above and a hand-out of literary terminology to learn. Assignments: will be posted on a Google Classroom. Assessments: are portfolio-based. Students will create a digital portfolio that incorporates annotated reading lists, reflects individual interests and accomplishments and showcases a variety of writing. Textbook: Students should purchase or borrow the assigned literature. In some cases, specific editions will be identified with ISBN numbers so students can be on the "same page" (literally!) What to Bring: Students should bring paper or notebook, pen or pencil, current literature selection, and personal writing journal to class each week. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

9th-10th

English: Advanced Literary Criticism & Composition- Overvie... English: Advanced Literary Criticism & Composition- Overview of Literary Movements - Overview
Advanced Literary Criticism & Composition introduces the high school student to a deeper investigation into literary movements and literary themes throughout the ages. Like art, literature is a writer's response to his world and a reflection of his society and contemporary culture. Literary genres evolved in response to significant events, prevailing philosophies, and impactful innovations and discoveries in the writer's lifetime. Literary movements create a timeline that reflects those influences. In this course, students will read and evaluate selections from various literary movements: Romanticism, Dark Romanticism, Gothic, Transcendentalism, Realism, Naturalism, Magical Realism, Stream of Consciousness, Expressionism, Harlem Renaissance, Modernism, Beat, etc., and make connections to significant effects of the period.
Advanced composition in this course will move beyond personal interpretation of the work ("What do I think?") and transition into two Schools of Literary Criticism: Biographical Criticism, which views literature through the personal world of the writer ("What did the writer think?"), and Historical/Societal Criticism which views literature through the society/times of the writer ("What was going on around the writer?")
Literature
First semester of Advanced Literary Criticism will include a chronological grouping of literature in "movements" and a study of how movements combine to create genre. Students will discover how literature reflects the people, events, discoveries, and ideology of the time and how literary movements provide clues to the philosophical, scientific, and societal climate. The class will look at wars and conflict as a creative element that drives evolution in literary movements. The types of literature used to examine movements will span novels, short stories, poetry, letters, political writings, slave narratives and analytical essays. Examples of some literature that students may read in this course are Sophie's World by Jostein Gaarder, Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe, and Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse. The full reading list will be presented in the course syllabus at the beginning of the term. In addition, students will be asked to read several selections over the summer. Students may also need to do some supplemental, parallel personal reading on his/her own to support the semester project.
Composition
First semester Composition will apply the Schools of Literary Criticism to craft essays that demonstrate and understanding of movements in the broader context of literature- across eras, across genre/form, across writers and across the world. Teens will write a series of short essays that use different "filters" or "lenses" to view literary genres. Students will develop skills in notetaking, adding research to their literary essays, and managing their writing portfolios. They will also perform parallel, independent research in literature to develop a presentation on a movement or era culminating a semester project.
Class Structure
This course is part of a custom curriculum developed and team-taught by Anne Sharp and Melanie Kosar. The courses are designed in a sequential program that complements the developmental skills of the adolescent learner. It is a seminar-style approach that mirrors university literature and writing classes. Mrs. Kosar will teach the literature components of the course on Wednesdays, and Mrs. Sharp will teach the writing portion of the class on Fridays.
Topics in this Series: Overview of Literary Movements (Semester 1) and Survey of Themes in Literature (Semester 2). Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at grade level. Students should have had a prior course in literature to have established a firm foundation in basic literary elements and form. Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class. In addition, students should complete the summer assignments consisting of the literature identified above and a hand-out of literary terminology to learn. Assignments: will be posted on a Google Classroom. Assessments: are portfolio-based. Students will create a digital portfolio that incorporates annotated reading lists, reflects individual interests and accomplishments and showcases a variety of writing. Textbook: Students should purchase or borrow the assigned literature. In some cases, specific editions will be identified with ISBN numbers so students can be on the "same page" (literally!) What to Bring: Students should bring paper or notebook, pen or pencil, current literature selection, and personal writing journal to class each week. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

10th-11th

Writing Lab Writing Lab - Scriptophobia. Break the block. Get past the paralysis. Every student struggles with writing at some point. Fearful writers worry what others will think. Reluctant writers have trouble getting started. Even strong, prolific writers experience roadblocks in their writing. Every teen can benefit from Writing Lab, a safe, supportive writing workshop where an experienced writing coach facilitates peer revision groups. Writing Lab is based on the idea of revision, revision, revision; teaching teens that writing does not have to be perfect; sometimes they just need to put words on paper to get started.
Writing Lab will give students the opportunity to revise their own writing at their own pace. Writing Lab may be taken stand-alone or to complement other classes. Each class will include the opportunity to write to a prompt or on a topic of choice, to confer with classmates about writing, and to work on developing pieces. Each session will include dedicated writing time. Students may bring pieces of writing from another class or something they are working on at home-- history paper, English composition, lab report, short story, personal essay, etc. No two will be the same. If a student shows up with no in-progress writing, the instructor will provide sample prompts to get the writing process started. After writing, students will break up into groups of 3-4 students to share their work and receive feedback from peers. Writers will benefit from having an audience and receiving input on their drafts. That feedback will inspire further revision, refinement, and clarification of their writing as well as ideas for new pieces. Each week the writing coach will provide writing tips and guidance on everything from organizing big ideas and writing mechanics to how to give and receive constructive criticism.
Revision is a vital step in the writing process in which writers consider what they have accomplished and what they can do to make their work more effective. Having the opportunity to revise is helpful to reluctant writers, who learn to free themselves of high expectations of every word they put to paper, as well as prolific writers, who benefit from honing their craft. Having models written by peers in addition to a peer audience is inspiring, and it trains writers to be critical readers who can give constructive feedback. Students will improve as writers if they choose to work on their pieces in class only, but working independently will significantly amplify the benefits of the class.
Topics in this Series: Writing Lab will continue in Semester 2, and students may continue the course to further develop/improve their writing. Workload: Students should expect to spend time outside of class writing, however the time will vary based on the type of writing and students' goals for the writing. Assignments: Students should bring works-in-progress to lab. The number of assignments completed or advanced will depend on the amount of outside writing a student does and the length of his/her piece. Assessments: The writing coach will provide individual feedback on pieces that a student brings to work on in lab. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

3:00 pm-3:55 pm

7th-12th

Atrium B

Information Masters: Research Strategies in the Digital World Information Masters: Research Strategies in the Digital World - Information Masters: Research Strategies in the Digital World Information Masters transforms students into savvy consumers and producers of information capable of navigating today's intimidating infosphere. This class introduces the latest in electronic resources for research (sorry, no card catalogs here!). Each week students will develop new media literacy skills necessary for high school and college research writing.
Students will begin by exploring print and electronic resources while refining their ability to determine informational needs. Students will be introduced to a wide array of resources, including academic search engines, scholarly databases, and primary sources. In addition, students will learn how to select the best resource for their informational need and not merely the first one that pops up. Students will discuss the ethical use of information and create an accurate bibliography with MLA format through an online bibliography generator.
After learning about the wide variety of resources available to them, students will practice crafting effective questions to focus their research. They will learn how to extract information from various resources by skimming, scanning, and using abstracts. In order to spot and avoid plagiarism, students will learn note-taking skills and discuss how to summarize, paraphrase, and cite sources correctly.
Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Will be given in class and e-mailed to parents and students in the weekly update. Assessments: The instructor will provide feedback via detailed rubrics on all written assignments. What to Bring: Some weeks, students will need to bring a laptop or tablet device to class. All students are required to have a library card, preferably from Fairfax County Public Library. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

7th-12th



 

Friday Classes (Click here to jump back up to Wednesday classes)

9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00
Room 4

Public Speaking for Success Public Speaking for Success - Glossophobia is defined as the fear of public speaking", and in a recent survey conducted by Chapman University, public speaking was again defined as the #1 fear! Unfortunately, it is that fear that hinders many teens from becoming expressive, confident, and capable of speaking and being heard. Yet, public speaking is an invaluable skillset that we need throughout our lives! In this class, students will find their voice! Preparation is the key, so students will learn how to select and formulate a speech topic, get to know their audience, and develop a speech. The class will learn how to control the nerves, incorporate gestures, eye contact, and other nonverbal body language techniques, and how to enhance their presentations with vocal variety, props, and visual aids in addition to learning the Art of Engagement. Students will practice three speaking styles: Impromptu, Extemporaneous, and Original Oratory. Impromptu Speech is an off-the-cuff oral response to a question, statement, or phrase with minimal preparation. Participants will learn how to quickly think on their feet and deliver a two- minute speech. Extemporaneous Speech is prepared on short notice with thirty minutes to outline a position on an issue or theme given three prompts to consider. Original Oratory, a favorite in the National Forensics and Speech competition, can be an informative or persuasive speech that is composed, rehearsed, and delivered by the speaker on any topic they choose. At the end of the quarter, we will crown an Original Oratory Speech Champion...the first for Compass!
Topics in this Series: Public Speaking for Success (Semester 1) and Debate-Able (Semester 2). Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: will be sent by e-mail to parents and students. Assessments: will be provided in the form of score sheets/feedback from judges at the conclusion of final speech presentations. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English or Communications for purposes of a high school transcript.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

9th-12th

Room 10

Formula for Fiction: Mystery & Detective Stories Formula for Fiction: Mystery & Detective Stories - Unlock the clues to writing mystery and detective fiction! Find out why the "Whodunit" is already done. The literary elements of setting, character, and plot are often prescribed in popular mystery series such as Sherlock Holmes, Agatha Christie, and Nancy Drew. Students will focus on these literary elements to craft their own mystery or detective fiction.
Great writing doesn't always begin "from scratch." Sometimes writers use a formula, or template storyline, to create fiction. This class series examines different types of popular storylines to give the young writer a "formula" for creating original fiction. For each genre, the class will examine samples of literature and excerpts from well-known works that illustrate the story template. Each fiction formula includes a different mix of elements (characters, setting, plot) that change in the new story while others remain fixed to preserve the genre.
A portion of each class will be dedicated to sharing students' working drafts through collaboration and in-class feedback. Students will be expected to conduct some writing and reading at home each week. Literature selections will not be assigned in their entirety, but students may want to continue reading the complete work. The culmination of the students' work will be a bound class literary magazine. Topics in this Series: Mystery and Detective Stories (Quarter 1); Historical Fiction (Quarter 2); Prequels and Sequels (Quarter 3); and Revisioning a Classic (Quarter 4).

10:00 am-10:55 am

7th-8th

English: Modern Narratives in Nonfiction Work English: Modern Narratives in Nonfiction Work - Overview
Modern Narratives focuses on the incorporation of style, voice, and tone in literature and in writing. Viewing literature as "published writing", students will examine the products and processes of other writers in order to understand and refine their own. Through the analysis of professional and student works, students will explore what makes truly great writing.
Literature
First semester of Modern Narratives in Nonfictionwill examine the works of great essayists. Examples of some essays that may read in this course are those by Henry David Thoreau, George Orwell, Virginia Woolf, Robert Benchley, James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Annie Dillard, and Joyce Carol Oates. In addition, the class will use style manuals and classic writing texts such as Strunk & White's The Elements of Styleand William Zinsser's On Writing Well. The full reading list will be presented in the course syllabus at the beginning of the term. In addition, students will be asked to read several selections over the summer. Students may also need to do some supplemental, parallel personal reading on his/her own to support the semester project.
Composition
First semester Senior Composition, dovetailing with the college admissions season, will focus on "the personal essay", writing to prompts, writing with a deadline, and ruthless editing (a.k.a. "meeting a word count"). Going beyond the five-paragraph template that encourages "cookie cutter" essays, students will create a unique architecture embedded with personal style, voice, and narrative structure. In short, students will uncover not just who they are as individuals, but who they are as writers... and how to fuse these two identities into a creative, organized, clear, and elegant essay.
In the process, students will master their writing process and identify personal writing strengths. These strengths will be developed into a writing workshop that they will present to classmates and the Compass community. Portfolios (now a potential college resume addition) will be expanded to include essays, research papers, and extracurricular support (artwork, performances, powerpoints, etc.) .
This course is part of a custom curriculum developed and team-taught by Anne Sharp and Melanie Kosar. The courses are designed in a sequential program that complements the developmental skills of the adolescent learner. It is a seminar-style approach that mirrors university literature and writing classes. Mrs. Kosar will teach the literature components of the course on Wednesdays, and Mrs. Sharp will teach the writing portion of the class on Fridays.
Topics in this Series: Modern Narratives in Nonfiction Works (Semester 1) and Nobel and Pulitzer Prize Writings (Semester 2). Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at grade level. Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of classAssignments: will be posted on a Google Classroom. Assessments: are portfolio-based. Students will create a digital portfolio that incorporates annotated reading lists, reflects individual interests and accomplishments and showcases a variety of writing. Textbook: Students should purchase or borrow the assigned literature. In some cases, specific editions will be identified with ISBN numbers so students can be on the "same page" (literally!) What to Bring: Students should bring paper or notebook, pen or pencil, current literature selection, and personal writing journal to class each week. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

11:00 am-11:55 am

11th-12th

English: Introduction to Literary Analysis & Writing- Eleme... English: Introduction to Literary Analysis & Writing- Elements of Literature - Overview
The Introduction to Literary Analysis & Writing is a high school student's first look at the higher-level relationship between literature and personal writing. Literary analysis and critical writing move a teen from being merely a good reader- a middle school skill- to becoming a scholarly reader and diagnostic writer which are the foundations of high school and college level inquiry into all forms of written works.
In this course, literature is not restricted to a particular genre or form, and writing is not limited to a common five-paragraph composition. Instead, literature is presented as a survey, sampling many different types of works, and composition is approached as the development of a student's personal responses to what he reads. During the first semester, students will examine the basic elements of literature, and second semester will evaluate forms and genres to create a "big picture" of the development of literature.
Literature
First semester Literary Analysis will focus on the basic elements of literature- character, setting, theme, plot, and conflict- and how they interact to create story. These building blocks exist across all forms of literature, so the class may evaluate the plot in an epic poem, a character in a classic play, or the setting in a short story. Some well-known literature will be used to introduce students to the various literary elements, and new works will be studied to demonstrate the best examples of a vivid fictional universe, a strong narrator, beloved (or feared) characters, and other literary components. Examples of some literature that students may read in this course are The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho, Journey to the Center of Earth by Jules Verne, and Lord of the Flies by William Golding. The full reading list will be presented in the course syllabus at the beginning of the term. In addition, students will be asked to read several selections over the summer. Students may also need to do some supplemental, parallel personal reading on his/her own to support the semester project.
Composition
First semester Writing will focus on personal response to literature, with the core being a personal writing journal. The students' journals will be a place to record what they think and feel about what they are reading. Students will learn to annotate, to cite passages from text, and to format. Notes made in the journals will be used to develop short, informal written pieces about the literature read in the course. Observations from the student's journal will also be used to collect supporting, textural evidence to support the reader's opinions which will be formulated into a thesis (personal position). Written assignments will include summaries, compare/contrast analyses, and parallel structure writings that focus on character, setting, plot, conflict, etc., to further underscore and assess student's understanding of the building blocks of literature. First semester will conclude with a culminating project on a subgenre of the student's own choosing which will analyze works for character, plot, setting, and other literary elements studied.
Class Structure
This course is part of a custom curriculum developed and team-taught by Anne Sharp and Melanie Kosar. The courses are designed in a sequential program that complements the developmental skills of the adolescent learner. It is a seminar-style approach that mirrors university literature and writing classes. Mrs. Kosar will teach the literature components of the course on Wednesdays, and Mrs. Sharp will teach the writing portion of the class on Fridays.
Topics in this Series: Elements of Literature (Semester 1) and Forms of Literature (Semester 2). Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at grade level. Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class. In addition, students should complete the summer assignments consisting of the literature identified above and a hand-out of literary terminology to learn. Assignments: will be posted on a Google Classroom. Assessments: are portfolio-based. Students will create a digital portfolio that incorporates annotated reading lists, reflects individual interests and accomplishments and showcases a variety of writing. Textbook: Students should purchase or borrow the assigned literature. In some cases, specific editions will be identified with ISBN numbers so students can be on the "same page" (literally!) What to Bring: Students should bring paper or notebook, pen or pencil, current literature selection, and personal writing journal to class each week. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

9th-10th

English: Advanced Literary Criticism & Composition- Overvie... English: Advanced Literary Criticism & Composition- Overview of Literary Movements - Overview
Advanced Literary Criticism & Composition introduces the high school student to a deeper investigation into literary movements and literary themes throughout the ages. Like art, literature is a writer's response to his world and a reflection of his society and contemporary culture. Literary genres evolved in response to significant events, prevailing philosophies, and impactful innovations and discoveries in the writer's lifetime. Literary movements create a timeline that reflects those influences. In this course, students will read and evaluate selections from various literary movements: Romanticism, Dark Romanticism, Gothic, Transcendentalism, Realism, Naturalism, Magical Realism, Stream of Consciousness, Expressionism, Harlem Renaissance, Modernism, Beat, etc., and make connections to significant effects of the period.
Advanced composition in this course will move beyond personal interpretation of the work ("What do I think?") and transition into two Schools of Literary Criticism: Biographical Criticism, which views literature through the personal world of the writer ("What did the writer think?"), and Historical/Societal Criticism which views literature through the society/times of the writer ("What was going on around the writer?")
Literature
First semester of Advanced Literary Criticism will include a chronological grouping of literature in "movements" and a study of how movements combine to create genre. Students will discover how literature reflects the people, events, discoveries, and ideology of the time and how literary movements provide clues to the philosophical, scientific, and societal climate. The class will look at wars and conflict as a creative element that drives evolution in literary movements. The types of literature used to examine movements will span novels, short stories, poetry, letters, political writings, slave narratives and analytical essays. Examples of some literature that students may read in this course are Sophie's World by Jostein Gaarder, Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe, and Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse. The full reading list will be presented in the course syllabus at the beginning of the term. In addition, students will be asked to read several selections over the summer. Students may also need to do some supplemental, parallel personal reading on his/her own to support the semester project.
Composition
First semester Composition will apply the Schools of Literary Criticism to craft essays that demonstrate and understanding of movements in the broader context of literature- across eras, across genre/form, across writers and across the world. Teens will write a series of short essays that use different "filters" or "lenses" to view literary genres. Students will develop skills in notetaking, adding research to their literary essays, and managing their writing portfolios. They will also perform parallel, independent research in literature to develop a presentation on a movement or era culminating a semester project.
Class Structure
This course is part of a custom curriculum developed and team-taught by Anne Sharp and Melanie Kosar. The courses are designed in a sequential program that complements the developmental skills of the adolescent learner. It is a seminar-style approach that mirrors university literature and writing classes. Mrs. Kosar will teach the literature components of the course on Wednesdays, and Mrs. Sharp will teach the writing portion of the class on Fridays.
Topics in this Series: Overview of Literary Movements (Semester 1) and Survey of Themes in Literature (Semester 2). Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at grade level. Students should have had a prior course in literature to have established a firm foundation in basic literary elements and form. Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class. In addition, students should complete the summer assignments consisting of the literature identified above and a hand-out of literary terminology to learn. Assignments: will be posted on a Google Classroom. Assessments: are portfolio-based. Students will create a digital portfolio that incorporates annotated reading lists, reflects individual interests and accomplishments and showcases a variety of writing. Textbook: Students should purchase or borrow the assigned literature. In some cases, specific editions will be identified with ISBN numbers so students can be on the "same page" (literally!) What to Bring: Students should bring paper or notebook, pen or pencil, current literature selection, and personal writing journal to class each week. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

10th-11th

Compass Literarians: Creative Writing & Literary Magazine Board Compass Literarians: Creative Writing & Literary Magazine Board - This Literarians writing board is a home for students who love to write, who love to read writing, and who love to share writing with others. Writing is often a solitary act, but writers also need a community in which to grow. Mirroring the design of famous writing salons/groups like The Bloomsbury Group, The Algonquin Round Table, and The Inklings, this course fosters a Compass community that will encourage individual writers, promote literary collaboration and provide challenging feedback to boost creativity and artistic development.
Our first semester will focus on building a personal writing portfolio strengthening students' passions for genres and forms they are comfortable with as well as trying writing that is new to them. Using writing workshops to capitalize on what they already know and to encourage experimentation in unfamiliar areas, students can expect to grow as writers, editors and leaders in our Compass community.
Students will use their own work and the works of professional authors to understand what makes good writing, to improve technique, to experiment with new forms/genre and to understand the drafting, editing and publishing process. They will explore publishing options through online platforms and hardbound journals.
Our second semester will focus on editing and publishing. Students in this course will select writings from their portfolios and prepare them to submit to contests, anthologies and publications beyond our Compass campus. While continuing to draft and explore their own personal writing, students will assume editorial roles in the production of Pen Point, a beyond-our-classroom anthology. As editors, students will design and build an anthology, advertise the publication, solicit manuscripts and artwork, develop selection criteria, review/select/edit material, and learn the principles of layout and design. Embedded in this process are real-world experiences, and students will improve their communication and organization skills through goal-setting, time management, meeting deadlines, emailing, confirmations, proofreading, etc.
Topics in this Series: A Creative Writing and Literary Magazine Board (Semesters 1 and 2, with registration by semester.) Prerequisites: Advanced reading, writing, and analytical skills. Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class on investigation, writing, or editing for this class. Assignments: Writing and editing assignments will be delegated by the student board. Assessments: In lieu of a teacher-provided assessments, writers will receive peer feedback on their own work, and the finished product will be a printed anthology for their portfolio. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $20.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for publishing expenses. What to Bring: Students should bring laptops to class to work collaboratively and real-time on shared documents and the class portal. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

9th-12th

Music Room

Shakespeare Off the Page: The Winter's Tale Shakespeare Off the Page: The Winter's Tale - Read it! Act it! Students will enjoy this two-hour, semester-long workshop with Shakespearian coach Heather Sanderson who hails from England and is known for instilling a love of Shakespeare into the hearts of students throughout the Greater DC area. The class will explore Shakespeare's timeless romantic comedy, The Winter?s Tale, and analyze its characters, plot, themes and motives. Students will voyage to the shores of Sicilia to take on the personas of Kings Leontes and Polixenes, Queen Hermione, courtiers Camillo, Paulina, and Antigonus. A kindly shepherd, a wise oracle, a clown, and a young girl make up the cast of characters in this mixed-up tale of jealousy, intrigue, revenge, and redemption.
Students will read various roles, study and act out scenes, practice monologues, and work through the literature while having fun with fellow teens. Theatre games will be used to encourage collaboration, and specially designed improv exercises will be used to stretch teens' imaginations and help them get "in character". The class will use read-aloud and in-class dramatization to decipher the original language, word choices, and to identify humor, satire, mockery, betrayal, and rejection in this mixed-up comedic tale of mistaken identity. The class will work from complete texts (not redacted, abridged, or simplified school versions) to hear and practice Elizabethan lingo. (How did someone of Shakespeare's time hurl insults or woo a woman?) Students will learn how the Bard crafted scenes and conveyed the primary storyline and sub-plots in a dark tale that has endured for over 400 years.
Instructor Heather Sanderson shares a teaching style based on actions and interactions, developed from years of experience coaching Shakespeare in a way that appeals to students. Her approach brings abstract concepts, complex themes, and difficult language to the students' level, so that they can relate to and appreciate Shakespeare.
Topics in this Series: Shakespeare Off the Page: The Winter's Tale (Semester 1), Shakespeare Off the Page: Death by Shakespeare (Quarter 3), and Shakespeare's Famous Re-Writes of English History: Antony & Cleopatra (Quarter 4). Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hour per week outside of class reading sections. Assignments: Sections will be assigned in class and included in the weekly e-mail to parents/students. Assessments: Will not be given. Textbook: The cost of the class text is included in the course fee. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English Literature or Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

11:00 am-12:55 pm

8th-12th