Schedule and Room Assignments

Classes meet on Mondays, Wednesdays, and/or Fridays in Oakton, VA. Filter by subject or grade below. You can see key dates in our Google calendar or view our Academic Calendar.

Quarter beginning September 9, 2020

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Sanctuary

Public Speaking: The Great Speeches (Oratorical)

Public Speaking: The Great Speeches (Oratorical)

Quarter(s):1

-"Four score and seven years ago.."

"Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country.."

"I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character."

What causes some phrases to be inked into history and some speeches to become a permanent part of our culture? What makes a speech memorable and quotable?

In this class, students will work with a professional storyteller, keynote speaker, coach and Toastmasters leader to learn how to give great speeches by listening to great speakers and then practicing and presenting portions of someone else's great words. The pressure will be off student speakers to also be writers. Instead, they will hone public speaking skills such as timing, pauses, enunciation, eye contact, and gestures using familiar, well-known, time-tested and inspiring speeches. The class will listen to recordings and watch videos to critique some modern day speakers. Can you pronounce like FDR, persuade like Frederick Douglass, or proclaim like Patrick Henry? Students can select from among many genres of speakers- from history, entertainment, politics, commentary- even literature.

This workshop is open to students new to public speaking or those with experience, and students may repeat the program to continue to refine their public speaking skills. Topics in this Series: The Great Speeches [Oratorical] (Quarter 1), Telling Your Story [Informative] (Quarter 2), Finding Your Voice [Expository] (Quarter 3), and Making Your Point [Persuasion] (Quarter 4)

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

6th-8th

Room 4

Writing Well: Sentences that Speak

Writing Well: Sentences that Speak

Quarter(s):1

Writing is one of the most essential communication skills, and it gives kids a voice! In this class, upper elementary-aged students will learn the FUN-damentals of Writing Well! Kids will learn the foundations of good writing, step-by-step, in manageable, weekly pieces. Students will start the year with learning to formulate strong sentences and eventually move to organized, cohesive paragraphs in this class series. Classes will consist of lessons on writing basics, reading great examples (and weak ones) from literature and publications, and in-class writing practice. The emphasis will be on varying sentence structures, word choice, and correct structure- all with fun, creative topics that will keep kids interested in writing!

Quarter one, students will learn all about sentences. The class will learn how to choose descriptive words from word lists and avoid dull, overused words (like good, bad, said) in their writing. They will learn about different sentence structures (simple, complex, and compound) and which one works best for different meanings. Each week, students will practice writing descriptive, informative, argumentative sentences in response to a variety of creative and non-fiction prompts in class. By the end of the quarter, students will feel confident writing three to four sentences cohesively and be prepared for constructing full paragraphs in Quarter two.

The goal for this course is for students to increase their writing fluency, gain confidence, and strengthen their abilities to write clear, cohesive, and grammatically correct sentences and paragraphs. The group will learn the stages of writing--prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing--and various approaches to each stage. Throughout the quarter, mini-lessons on vocabulary and grammar will be presented on topics such as correct capitalization, agreement, tenses, parts of speech, synonyms, etc. Each week, students will have brief homework assignments based on what was covered in class using creative and non-fiction free response prompts to practice techniques at home. Regular writing practice improves fluency and comfort level. Students should expect 45-60 minutes of writing at home throughout the week (3-4 days at 15 minutes per sitting.)

Topics in this Series: Sentences that Speak (Quarter 1); Planning Paragraphs (Quarter 2); Fascinating Fiction Paragraphs (Quarter 3); and Fun Factual Paragraphs (Quarter 4)

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

10:00 am-10:55 am

5th-6th

Bibiliophiles Books Group: Deception & Disguise

Bibiliophiles Books Group: Deception & Disguise

Quarter(s):1

In Bibliophiles Book Group, middle school-aged students will read renowned classics and award-winning juvenile literature. This book discussion group will examine a different theme each quarter to introduce students to literary analysis. Students will read, examine, and compare two full-length novels that share similar themes through facilitated discussions and extension activities which encourage students to make personal connections to what is read. The group will evaluate themes, characters, setting, and writing style.

First quarter, students will examine the themes of Deception and Disguise through The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin Prince and The Pauper by Mark Twain.

Assigned chapters are expected to be read at home, either as read-aloud, individual silent reading, or listening to the unabridged audiobook. Students should come to class prepared to discuss the reading. Classroom discussions will emphasize the use of textual evidence when explaining thoughts and opinions. Students will be assigned creative, short assignments to enhance and demonstrate their understanding of each novel such as quote explications, thematic questions, or imagining a conversation between characters from different books.

Topics in this Series: Deception and Disguise (Quarter 1); Greed (Quarter 2); Order and Chaos (Quarter 3); Power and Powerlessness (Quarter 4).

Textbook/Materials: Because students will need clean, inexpensive copies of each novel to mark in, and because they must be able to refer to the passages on the same page numbers, copies of mass market paperbacks will be pre-purchased and bundled for students. (See Supply Fee below).

Supply Fee: A class fee of $34.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class.

What to Bring: Students should bring the current novel, paper, pen or pencil and highlighter to class each week. Some students may wish to bring paper clips, adhesive flags or post-it notes for marking pages.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

11:00 am-11:55 am

7th-8th

Room 5

Building Better Readers: Thinking about Books

Building Better Readers: Thinking about Books

Quarter(s):1

Calling all young readers! Does your child love stories but seems to forget what she read or misses the moral of the story? Do you want to make sure your child is getting the most out of his independent reading time? This class will guide reluctant and enthusiastic readers alike through the wonderful world of reading through strategies to become better readers. Each student will create a Reader's Notebook to track individual reading progress and record weekly strategies. Each quarter will include award winning literature, poetry and non-fiction reading material. The work in this class will lay the foundation for reading success in all content areas.

First quarter, we will begin to develop awareness of our thoughts and build thinking strategies. The instructor will model thinking strategies to help students understand the process. Students will learn to differentiate between what they know and what they don't know about their reading. They will learn beginning annotating skills using symbols and a children's news article. The formal reading strategies introduced this quarter are Metacognition, Schema & Monitoring.

Students will love the stories and the fun, low pressure environment as they gain confidence by working with manageable chunks of text to isolate and practice their new skills. Students taking this class will receive a full-year's subscription to Scholastic News, 3rd grade level, which will be distributed in class and incorporated into in class reading activities.

Topics in this Series: Thinking about Books (Quarter 1), Connecting to Books (Quarter 2), Going Beyond the Book (Quarter 3), Finding the Big Picture in Books (Quarter 4)

What to Bring: Students need to bring a pack of Post-It Notes, 2 Highlighters, Colored Pencils, and their Reader's Notebook to each class

Material/Supply Fee: Included

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

3:00 pm-3:55 pm

2nd-4th

Room 10A

English: Introduction to Literary Analysis & Writing- Eleme...

English: Introduction to Literary Analysis & Writing- Elements of Literature (HYBRID)

Quarter(s):1, 2

Overview

The Introduction to Literary Analysis & Writing is a high school student's first look at the higher-level relationship between literature and personal writing. Literary analysis and critical writing move a teen from being merely a good reader- a middle school skill- to becoming a scholarly reader and diagnostic writer which are the foundations of high school and college level inquiry into all forms of written works.

In this seminar-style course, literature is not restricted to a particular genre or form, and writing is not limited to a common five-paragraph composition. Instead, literature is presented as a survey, sampling many different types of works, and composition is approached as the development of a student's personal responses to what he reads. During the first semester, students will examine the basic elements of literature, and second semester will evaluate forms and genres to create a "big picture" of the development of literature.

Literature

First semester Literary Analysis will focus on the basic elements of literature- character, setting, theme, plot, and conflict- and how they interact to create story. These building blocks exist across all forms of literature, so the class may evaluate the plot in an epic poem, a character in a classic play, or the setting in a short story. Some well-known literature will be used to introduce students to the various literary elements, and new works will be studied to demonstrate the best examples of a vivid fictional universe, a strong narrator, beloved (or feared) characters, and other literary components. Examples of some literature that students may read in this course are The Catcher in the Rye (J.D. Sallinger), Nation (Terry Pratchett), The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (Douglas Adams), A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (Betty Smith), Journey to the Center of Earth (Jules Verne), Fahrenheit 451 (Ray Bradbury), and a selection of short stories. The full reading list will be presented in the course syllabus at the beginning of the term. In addition, students may be asked to read several selections over the summer.

Composition

First semester Writing will focus on personal response to literature, with the core being a personal writing journal. The students' journals will be a place to record what they think and feel about what they are reading. Students will learn to annotate, to cite passages from text, and to format. Notes made in the journals will be used to develop short, informal written pieces about the literature read in the course. Observations from the student's journal will also be used to collect supporting, textural evidence to support the reader's opinions which will be formulated into a thesis (personal position). Written assignments will include summaries, compare/contrast analyses, and parallel structure writings that focus on character, setting, plot, conflict, etc., to further underscore and assess student's understanding of the building blocks of literature. First semester will conclude with a culminating project on a sub-genre of the student's own choosing which will analyze works for character, plot, setting, and other literary elements studied.

Class Structure This course is part of a custom curriculum developed and team-taught by Anne Sharp and Melanie Kosar. The courses are designed in a sequential program that complements the developmental skills of the adolescent learner. It is a seminar-style approach that mirrors university literature and writing classes. Note: This is a hybrid class with Mrs. Kosar teaching the literature components of the course in-person on Wednesdays. Mrs. Sharp will teach the writing portion of the class on Fridays. The Friday writing meetings will begin in the fall in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing—with the option to move to in-person instruction as COVID-19 scenarios improve.

Topics in this Series: Elements of Literature (Semester 1) and Forms of Literature (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at grade level, and it is recommended that students have had a middle school writing class.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class. In addition, students should complete the summer assignments consisting of the literature identified above and a hand-out of literary terminology to learn.

Assignments: will be posted on a Google Classroom.

Assessments: are portfolio-based. Students will create a digital portfolio that incorporates annotated reading lists, reflects individual interests and accomplishments and showcases a variety of writing. See the Compass memorandum for more information on assessments in Language Arts.

Textbook: Students should purchase or borrow the assigned literature. In some cases, specific editions will be identified with ISBN numbers so students can be on the "same page" (literally!)

What to Bring: Students should bring paper or notebook, pen or pencil, current literature selection, and personal writing journal to both class meetings each week.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

11:00 am-11:55 am

9th-10th

(Semester Long)

English: Advanced Literary Criticism & Composition- Overvie...

English: Advanced Literary Criticism & Composition- Overview of Literary Movements (HYBRID)

Quarter(s):1, 2

Overview

Advanced Literary Criticism & Composition is a seminar-style course that introduces the high school student to a deeper investigation into literary movements and literary themes throughout the ages. Like art, literature is a writer's response to his world and a reflection of his society and contemporary culture. Literary genres evolved in response to significant events, prevailing philosophies, and impactful innovations and discoveries in the writer's lifetime. Literary movements create a timeline that reflects those influences. In this course, students will read and evaluate selections from a number of literary movements such as: Romanticism, Dark Romanticism, Gothic, Transcendentalism, Realism, Naturalism, Magical Realism, Stream of Consciousness, Expressionism, Harlem Renaissance, Modernism, Beat, etc., and make connections to significant effects of the period.

Advanced composition in this course will move beyond personal interpretation of the work ("What do I think?") and transition into two Schools of Literary Criticism: Biographical Criticism, which views literature through the personal world of the writer ("What did the writer think?"), and Historical/Societal Criticism which views literature through the society/times of the writer ("What was going on around the writer?")

Literature

First semester of Advanced Literary Criticism will include a chronological grouping of literature in "movements" and a study of how movements combine to create genre. Students will be assigned brief, weekly mini-research assignments on history, geography (if applicable), music and art of the period, politics, religion, philosophy, author biography, etc, to establish a foundation and background information on the literary movement. Students will discover how literature reflects the people, events, discoveries, and ideology of the time and how literary movements provide clues to the philosophical, scientific, and societal climate. The class will look at wars and conflict as a creative element that drives evolution in literary movements. The types of literature used to examine movements will span novels, short stories, poetry, letters, political writings, slave narratives and analytical essays. Examples of literature that will be read first semester include selections from the Odyssey (Homer), Arabian Nights, Don Quixote, Jonathan Swift and poetry by Shakespeare. The full reading list will be presented in the course syllabus at the beginning of the term. In addition, students will be asked to read several selections over the summer.

Composition

First semester Composition will apply the Schools of Literary Criticism to craft essays that demonstrate and understanding of movements in the broader context of literature- across eras, across genre/form, across writers and across the world. Teens will write a series of short essays that use different "filters" or "lenses" to view literary genres. Students will develop skills in notetaking, adding research to their literary essays, and managing their writing portfolios. They will also perform parallel, independent research in literature to develop a presentation on a movement or era culminating a semester project.

Class Structure This course is part of a custom curriculum developed and team-taught by Anne Sharp and Melanie Kosar. The courses are designed in a sequential program that complements the developmental skills of the adolescent learner. It is a seminar-style approach that mirrors university literature and writing classes. Note:This is a hybrid class with Mrs. Kosar teaching the literature components of the course in-person on Wednesdays. Mrs. Sharp will teach the writing portion of the class on Fridays. The Friday writing meetings will begin in the fall in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing—with the option to move to in-person instruction as COVID-19 scenarios improve.

Topics in this Series: Overview of Literary Movements (Semester 1) and Survey of Themes in Literature (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at grade level. Students should have had a prior course in literature to have established a firm foundation in basic literary elements and form.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class. In addition, students should complete the summer assignments consisting of the literature identified above and a hand-out of literary terminology to learn.

Assignments: will be posted on a Google Classroom.

Assessments: are portfolio-based. Students will create a digital portfolio that incorporates annotated reading lists, reflects individual interests and accomplishments and showcases a variety of writing. See the Compass memorandum for more information on assessments in Language Arts.

Textbook: Students should purchase or borrow the assigned literature. In some cases, specific editions will be identified with ISBN numbers so students can be on the "same page" (literally!)

What to Bring: Students should bring paper or notebook, pen or pencil, current literature selection, and personal writing journal to both class meetings each week.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

10th-11th

(Semester Long)

English: Modern Narratives in Nonfiction Work (HYBRID)

English: Modern Narratives in Nonfiction Work (HYBRID)

Quarter(s):1, 2

Overview

Modern Narratives in Nonfiction Work is a seminar-style course that focuses on the incorporation of style, voice, and tone in literature and in writing. Viewing literature as "published writing", students will examine the products and processes of other writers in order to understand and refine their own. Through the analysis of professional and student works, students will explore what makes truly great writing.

Literature

First semester of Modern Narratives in Nonfiction will examine the works of great essayists. A partial list of reading selections includes I am Malala (Malala Yousafzai), I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (Maya Angelou), essays by Joan Didion and Ray Bradbury, speeches by Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, Martin Luther King, Abraham Lincoln, etc., Ted Talks, and an discussion of "real" versus "fake" news. In addition, the class will use style manuals and classic writing texts such as Strunk & White's The Elements of Style and William Zinsser's On Writing Well. The full reading list will be presented in the course syllabus at the beginning of the term. In addition, students will be asked to read several selections over the summer. Students will be assigned brief, individual research assignments and take turns leading the class discussion on topics related to the featured author or event.

Composition

First semester Senior Composition, dovetailing with the college admissions season, will focus on "the personal essay", writing to prompts, writing with a deadline, and ruthless editing (a.k.a. "meeting a word count"). Going beyond the five-paragraph template that encourages "cookie cutter" essays, students will create a unique architecture embedded with personal style, voice, and narrative structure. In short, students will uncover not just who they are as individuals, but who they are as writers... and how to fuse these two identities into a creative, organized, clear, and elegant essay.

In the process, students will master their writing process and identify personal writing strengths. These strengths will be developed into a writing workshop that they will present to classmates and the Compass community. Portfolios (now a potential college resume addition) will be expanded to include essays, research papers, and extracurricular support (artwork, performances, PowerPoints, etc.).

Class Structure This course is part of a custom curriculum developed and team-taught by Anne Sharp and Melanie Kosar. The courses are designed in a sequential program that complements the developmental skills of the adolescent learner. It is a seminar-style approach that mirrors university literature and writing classes. Note: This is a hybrid class with Mrs. Kosar teaching the literature components of the course in-person on Wednesdays. Mrs. Sharp will teach the writing portion of the class on Fridays. The Friday writing meetings will begin in the fall in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing—with the option to move to in-person instruction as COVID-19 scenarios improve.

Topics in this Series: Modern Narratives in Nonfiction Works (Semester 1) and Nobel and Pulitzer Prize Writings (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at grade level.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class

Assignments: will be posted on a Google Classroom.

Assessments: are portfolio-based. Students will create a digital portfolio that incorporates annotated reading lists, reflects individual interests and accomplishments and showcases a variety of writing. See the Compass memorandum for more information on assessments in Language Arts.

Textbook: Students should purchase or borrow the assigned literature. In some cases, specific editions will be identified with ISBN numbers so students can be on the "same page" (literally!)

What to Bring: Students should bring paper or notebook, pen or pencil, current literature selection, and personal writing journal to both class meetings each week.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

11th-12th

(Semester Long)

Writers @ Work: Paragraphs with Purpose

Writers @ Work: Paragraphs with Purpose

Quarter(s):1, 2

Writers @ Work is a fundamental writing class that will prepare seventh and eighth grade students for high school level composition. The class will progress from getting started on learning how to effectively structure purposeful paragraphs) (first semester) to multiple paragraphs linked into articulate and organized essays (second semester).

First semester will be all about paragraphs! Early in the term, the goal will be writing fluency- encouraging students to get ideas onto paper. The class will introduce not only sentence structure, paragraph structure, and effective language, but will also help students define the objective of their paragraph. Students will be given broad prompts and a variety of writing options to encourage them to write about things they care about. Over the course of the semester, writers will compose descriptive and informative paragraphs encompassing fiction and non-fiction themes.

Grammar concepts will be introduced throughout the year, and students will be encouraged to incorporate the technique in their next writing or revision. Grammar concepts will include a "toolbox" of writing techniques and rules such as sentence structure, complex and compound sentences, independent and dependent clauses, parts of speech, agreement, tense, use of dialogue and quotation marks, and correct use of punctuation. Students will also be taught techniques for brainstorming and outlining before beginning to write and will be given tips on choosing creative, interesting, and powerful words over mundane, vague, and over-used words.

In both semesters, there will be an emphasis on revision. Writing is seldom just the way the author hopes in the first draft. At times, students will be encouraged to use the same paragraph for several weeks to build-upon their first draft, incorporate feedback, apply writing and grammar techniques, in order for them to see the benefits of revision. They will learn to read their own writing from a reader's perspective and develop strategies for improving it. Students will give and receive feedback from class peers and receive regular feedback from the instructor. Time will be set aside in most classes for dedicated, in-class writing (8-10 minutes.)

Topics in this Series: Paragraphs with Purpose (Semester 1) and Papers with Pizzazz (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Prerequisites: None

Workload: Students should expect to spend 0.5-1 hour per week outside of class.

Assignments: will be discussed in class and sent by e-mail to parents each week.

Assessments: Informal instructor feedback will be given on papers.

What to Bring: Paper or notebook and pen or pencil

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

7th-8th

(Semester Long)

Writing Lab

Writing Lab

Quarter(s):1, 2

Scriptophobia. Break the block. Get past the paralysis. Every student struggles with writing at some point. Fearful writers worry what others will think. Reluctant writers have trouble getting started. Even strong, prolific writers experience roadblocks in their writing. Every teen can benefit from Writing Lab, a safe, supportive writing workshop where an experienced writing coach facilitates peer revision groups. Writing Lab is based on the idea of revision, revision, revision; teaching teens that writing does not have to be perfect; sometimes they just need to put words on paper to get started.

Writing Lab will give students the opportunity to revise their own writing at their own pace. Writing Lab may be taken stand-alone or to complement other classes. Each class will include the opportunity to write to a prompt or on a topic of choice, to confer with classmates about writing, and to work on developing pieces. Each session will include dedicated writing time. Students may bring pieces of writing from another class or something they are working on at home-- history paper, English composition, lab report, short story, personal essay, etc. No two will be the same. If a student shows up with no in-progress writing, the instructor will provide sample prompts to get the writing process started. After writing, students will break up into groups of 3-4 students to share their work and receive feedback from peers. Writers will benefit from having an audience and receiving input on their drafts. That feedback will inspire further revision, refinement, and clarification of their writing as well as ideas for new pieces. Each week the writing coach will provide writing tips and guidance on everything from organizing big ideas and writing mechanics to how to give and receive constructive criticism.

Revision is a vital step in the writing process in which writers consider what they have accomplished and what they can do to make their work more effective. Having the opportunity to revise is helpful to reluctant writers, who learn to free themselves of high expectations of every word they put to paper, as well as prolific writers, who benefit from honing their craft. Having models written by peers in addition to a peer audience is inspiring, and it trains writers to be critical readers who can give constructive feedback. Students will improve as writers if they choose to work on their pieces in class only, but working independently will significantly amplify the benefits of the class.

Topics in this Series: Writing Lab will continue in Semester 2, and students may continue the course to further develop/improve their writing. Continuing students from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Workload: Students should expect to spend time outside of class writing, however the time will vary based on the type of writing and students' goals for the writing.

Assignments: Students should bring works-in-progress to lab. The number of assignments completed or advanced will depend on the amount of outside writing a student does and the length of his/her piece.

Assessments: The writing coach will provide individual feedback on pieces that a student brings to work on in lab.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

3:00 pm-3:55 pm

8th-12th

(Semester Long)

Atrium B

Word Masters: Verbal Analogies & Vocab Challenges

Word Masters: Verbal Analogies & Vocab Challenges

Quarter(s):1

Word Masters is a language challenge for students who enjoy word games, spelling, building their vocabulary, and verbal adventures. Why study lists of words if you can make a game of it? The best way to learn new words is to use them! This class is inspired by the annual Word Masters Challenge (www.wordmasterschallenge.com). Each week students will tackle new vocabulary words and practice them through analogies and critical thinking challenges. Students will examine word meanings, relationships, synonyms and antonyms with in-class activities and games such as Pictionary, Scategories, Charades, and Apples-to-Apples. Word Masters will improve a student's reading comprehension, verbal reasoning, logic skills, and the ability to think analytically and metaphorically. Word Masters introduce all new word lists, analogies, and activities each quarter.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

10:00 am-10:55 am

4th-6th

Great Books for Girls Group

Great Books for Girls Group

Quarter(s):1

Great Books for Girls offers preteen students the opportunity to read high quality literature and expand their understanding of what they read through book discussion and hands-on extension activities. Through facilitated class discussion, students will analyze plot, theme, characters, genre, and setting by citing specific examples from the story. In addition, students will complete a wide range of extension activities, such as acting out or illustrating favorite scenes, writing alternate endings or prequels, or researching specific aspects of the story. Students will be asked to read assigned chapters from their books at home, either as read-aloud, individual silent reading, or listening to the unabridged audiobook. Readers will be encouraged to take notes on key passages or questions. All books selected for 2020-21 will feature the theme, "XXXX." The first book of Quarter 1 will be Front Desk by Kelly Yang. A second, follw-up book will be voted on by the students each quarter from A Mighty Girl suggested titles, Newbery Medalists and Honor Books, and the Capitol Choices book lists.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

11:00 am-11:55 am

5th-6th



Friday Classes (Click here to jump back up to Wednesday classes)

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Room 4

Spanish III (On-Level or Honors)

Spanish III (On-Level or Honors)

Quarter(s):

Get ready for a full year of advanced high school level Spanish! This is a conversation-based program in which students will continue to build their vocabulary quickly and learn essential grammar skills in Spanish. Vocabulary will include shopping for clothing and food; ancient civilizations; modern society; legends and stories; preparing and describing food; ordering meals in a restaurant; watching/making movies and attending movie premiers; reading and writing for newspapers and other publications; family and relationships; the environment and conservation; and careers and professions. There will be a strong emphasis on using regular and irregular preterit tense verbs; imperfect tense verbs; knowing the differences between and when to use preterit vs. imperfect; subjunctive tense verbs; regular and irregular future tense verbs and other common grammar concepts such as commands; direct object pronouns; indirect object pronouns; double object pronouns; when to use por vs. para; comparative phrases; superlative phrases; impersonal expressions and routine application of common spelling changes. Additionally, we will study culture through the lens of contemporary music genres and dances and will gain advanced grammar skills through the translation of popular song lyrics.

Class will be conducted almost exclusively in Spanish and will focus on listening and speaking skills, asking and answering questions, and correct use of grammar. At home, students will be responsible for memorizing vocabulary and grammar, completing worksheets and written assignments, and watching both grammar instruction and language immersion videos.

Level:This class will be offered on two levels: Honors and On-Level. Spanish III offers a substantive, full-credit experience taught at either level. All class members share core material and participate in the same class activities, but honors students will be given homework that requires higher level reasoning and advanced application of various grammar skills. All students will register online for the same course. Students must indicate which level they want to study via e-mail by August 15. Once the course has begun, students may move down a level (from honors to on-level) at any time. However, once classes have started, students may not "bump up" a level.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 30-45 per day, 4 days per week on homework outside of class.

Assignments: Are sent by e-mail to parents and students. Students must have access to a computer and internet service for computer-based videos and practice tools that are assigned as homework and are essential to success in the class.

Assessments: Quizzes, tests, and individual performance reviews will be given to all students at regular intervals to provide parents with sufficient feedback to assign a grade.

Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $30.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for class materials in lieu of a textbook.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Foreign Language for purposes of a high school transcript.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

9:00 am-9:55 am

9th-12th

Spanish II (On-Level or Honors)

Spanish II (On-Level or Honors)

Quarter(s):

Get ready for a full year of intermediate level high school Spanish! This is a conversation-focused program in which students will build their vocabulary quickly and learn essential grammar skills in Spanish. Vocabulary will include describing homes and chores; planning a party; health, body parts and sports; vacations, leisure time activities, fun events and places of interest; communicating via phone and computer; and daily routines. There will be a strong emphasis on competency using regular and irregular past tense verbs and common grammar concepts such as commands, direct and indiect object pronouns, reflexive verbs, and the differences between ser vs. estar and saber vs. conocer.

Class will be conducted primarily in Spanish and will focus on listening and speaking skills, asking and answering questions, and correct use of grammar. At home, students will be responsible for memorizing vocabulary and grammar, completing worksheets and written assignments, and watching both grammar instruction and language immersion videos.

Level:This class will be offered on two levels: Honors and On-Level. Spanish II offers a substantive, full-credit experience taught at either level. All class members share core material and participate in the same class activities, but honors students will be given homework that requires higher level reasoning and advanced application of various grammar skills. All students will register online for the same course. Students must indicate which level they want to study via e-mail by August 15. Once the course has begun, students may move down a level (from honors to on-level) at any time. However, once classes have started, students may not "bump up" a level.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 30-45 per day, 4 days per week on homework outside of class.

Assignments: Are sent by e-mail to parents and students. Students must have access to a computer and internet service for computer-based videos and practice tools that are assigned as homework and are essential to success in the class.

Assessments: Quizzes, tests, and individual performance reviews will be given to all students at regular intervals to provide parents with sufficient feedback to assign a grade.

Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $30.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for class materials in lieu of a textbook.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Foreign Language for purposes of a high school transcript.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

10:00 am-10:55 am

9th-12th

Spanish I (On-Level or Honors)

Spanish I (On-Level or Honors)

Quarter(s):

Get ready for a full year of beginner level high school Spanish! This is a conversation-focused program in which students will build their vocabulary quickly and learn essential grammar skills in Spanish. Vocabulary will include the alphabet, numbers, time, dates, seasons, school, free time activities/hobbies, likes/dislikes, personal descriptions, family relationships, emotions, food/restaurants, places/locations in town, and shopping/clothing. There will be a strong emphasis on competency using regular and irregular present tense verbs and common grammar concepts such as articles, pronouns, adjectives, and comparative phrases.

Class will be conducted primarily in Spanish and will focus on listening and speaking skills, asking and answering questions, and correct use of grammar. At home, students will be responsible for memorizing vocabulary and grammar, completing worksheets and written assignments, and watching both grammar instruction and language immersion videos.

Level:This class will be offered on two levels: Honors and On-Level. Spanish I offers a substantive, full-credit experience taught at either level. All class members share core material and participate in the same class activities, but honors students will be given homework that requires higher level reasoning and advanced application of various grammar skills. All students will register online for the same course. Students must indicate which level they want to study via e-mail by August 15. Once the course has begun, students may move down a level (from honors to on-level) at any time. However, once classes have started, students may not "bump up" a level.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 30-45 per day, 4 days per week on homework outside of class.

Assignments: Are sent by e-mail to parents and students. Students must have access to a computer and internet service for computer-based videos and practice tools that are assigned as homework and are essential to success in the class.

Assessments: Quizzes, tests, and individual performance reviews will be given to all students at regular intervals to provide parents with sufficient feedback to assign a grade.

Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $30.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for class materials in lieu of a textbook.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Foreign Language for purposes of a high school transcript.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

11:00 am-11:55 am

8th-12th

French I (On-Level or Honors)

French I (On-Level or Honors)

Quarter(s):

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

8th-12th

American Sign Language (ASL) I

American Sign Language (ASL) I

Quarter(s):

Are you interested in learning a new language that is used right here in America? Are you intrigued by a modern language that has no written form? Do you want to find out why American Sign Language is much more closely linked to French Sign Language than British Sign Language? If so, American Sign Language (ASL) is a great language for you! In this class, students will learn the basic skills in production and comprehension of ASL while covering thematic units such as personal and family life, school, social life, and community. Each unit will include presentations and readings on Deaf culture and Deaf history. Students will learn fingerspelling and numbers, developing conversational ability, culturally appropriate behaviors, and fundamental ASL grammar. Class time will be dedicated to interactive ASL activities and face-to-face signing practice with the instructor and partners.

ASL students will have a Deaf instructor. He regularly teaches all-hearing classes and is an excellent role model for students to meet and interact with a native speaker of ASL and to lean natural facial expressions, gestures, and body language used in Deaf communications. ASL students will have more confidence when they encounter Deaf instructors in college or greet speakers of ASL in social settings. Because the instructor is Deaf, students are not permitted to speak aloud in class. This approach improves visual attention and encourages immersion in the language. Students will be able to ask questions of the instructor by writing on individual white boards, but they will be encouraged to sign in order to communicate with the instructor. Lessons are facilitated with Power Point presentations, and a professional ASL interpreter will assist the class on the first day and in second semester for a Deaf culture lesson. Enrolled students are not expected to know any sign language prior to beginning ASL I.

Hundreds of colleges and universities, including all public institutions of higher learning in Virginia, accept ASL as a distinct foreign language. This allows hearing and Deaf students to fulfill foreign language requirements for admission to college. Teens who have difficulty writing, spelling, or have challenging pronunciation in English, can be successful with ASL as a second or foreign language choice. Penn State University research demonstrated that the visual and kinesthetic elements of ASL helped to enhance the vocabulary, spelling, and reading skills in hearing students.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours each week outside of class on required vocabulary exercises, readings, and signing practice.

Assignments: Homework assignments will be posted online in the Canvas digital classroom platform. There may be some brief written assignments, but for most homework assignments, students will be asked to post short videos of themselves signing. Students will need either a camera phone or webcam to complete these assignments.

Assessments: The instructor will assign points using a class rubric for the parent's use in assigning a course grade. Course rubrics will evaluate students on their sign production, fingerspelling, ASL grammar, facial expressions including “above the nose” grammar (brows and body movement), and “below the nose” modifiers (lip expressions).

Textbook: Students should purchase or rent "Signing Naturally Units 1-6 workbook" (ISBN# 978-1581212105) which includes a DVD or signing videos. This class will cover units 1-4.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in World Languages for purposes of a high school transcript.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

9th-12th

American Sign Language (ASL) II

American Sign Language (ASL) II

Quarter(s):

Students of ASL will continue to improve their fluency in this 2nd year course. As students become more advanced signers, emphasis will be on focusing on the meaning of a conversation (whole) rather than individual signs (parts). In conversation, students will learn to confirm information by asking questions in context. Second year students will continue to build their vocabulary, apply ASL grammar, and will learn to make requests, ask for advice, give opinions, make comparisons and use superlatives, and narrate stories. Other skills covered in ASL II include expressing year, phone numbers, time, and currency in numbers, appearance, clothing, giving directions, locations, etc. Each unit will include presentations and readings on Deaf culture and Deaf history. Class time will be dedicated to interactive ASL activities and signing practice.

ASL students will have a Deaf instructor. He regularly teaches all-hearing classes and is an excellent role model for students to meet and interact with a native speaker of ASL and to lean natural facial expressions, gestures, and body language used in Deaf communications. ASL students will have more confidence when they encounter Deaf instructors in college or greet speakers of ASL in social settings. Because the instructor is Deaf, students are not permitted to speak aloud in class. This approach improves visual attention and encourages immersion in the language. Students will be able to ask questions of the instructor by writing on individual white boards, but they will be encouraged to sign in order to communicate with the instructor. Lessons are facilitated with Power Point presentations, and a professional ASL interpreter will assist the class on the first day and in second semester for a Deaf culture lesson. Enrolled students are not expected to know any sign language prior to beginning ASL I.

Hundreds of colleges and universities, including all public institutions of higher learning in Virginia, accept ASL as a distinct foreign language. This allows hearing and Deaf students to fulfill foreign language requirements for admission to college. Teens who have difficulty writing, spelling, or have challenging pronunciation in English, can be successful with ASL as a second or foreign language choice. Penn State University research demonstrated that the visual and kinesthetic elements of ASL helped to enhance the vocabulary, spelling, and reading skills in hearing students.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours each week outside of class on required vocabulary exercises, readings, and signing practice.

Assignments: Homework assignments will be posted online in the Canvas digital classroom platform. Through Canvas, students will be asked to post short videos of themselves signing as homework. Enrolled students will be asked to review ASL 1 vocabulary, grammar, and facial expressions.

Assessments: The instructor will assign points using a class rubric for the parent's use in assigning a course grade. Course rubrics will evaluate students on their sign production, fingerspelling, ASL grammar, facial expressions including “above the nose” grammar (brows and body movement), and “below the nose” modifiers (lip expressions).

Textbook: Students should purchase or rent "Signing Naturally Units 1-6 workbook" (ISBN# 978-1581212105) and "Signing Naturally Units 7-12 Student Workbook" (ISBN# 978-1581212211) which includes a DVD of signing videos. This class will cover units 5-8.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in World Languages for purposes of a high school transcript.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

9th-12th

Room 10A

Roundtable Literature Seminar- Science Fiction

Roundtable Literature Seminar- Science Fiction

Quarter(s):1, 2

Roundtable is a seminar-style literature analysis and discussion class for high school students. Instead of a broad, general survey of literature, Roundtable students will examine a focused, "special topic" in literature through critical evaluation and rich discussion. Written works will be selected for their contribution to a specific genre and their influence on society.

First semester, the class will examine the Science Fiction genre with a critical eye on what elements are found in all science fiction works. The class will examine the role of identity and the individual in the strange, new worlds through a study of works such as: Blood Child (1995), a short story by Octavia Butler, Frankenstein (1818) by Mary Shelley, Invisible Man (1933) by HG Wells, and Ready Player One (2011) by Ernest Cline. Genre-aligned poetry and excerpts will be incorporated throughout the semester.

For this course, students should be engaged readers who come to class prepared to participate in intellectual discussion. Students are also expected to take part in in weekly class discussions by sharing their reflections and reactions to the readings and drawing conclusions and comparisons with other works. For each novel, the instructor will provide a guide with thoughtful questions and prompts on the reading that students must come to class prepared to discuss with textual evidence. The course instructor will serve as a facilitator-moderator to lead Socratic, "roundtable" discussions in addition to other in-class activities, such as partner and small group work, to further the class's understanding of the literature. This course will focus on comprehension and analysis through discussion rather than composition. Students will be assigned creative, short assignments to enhance and demonstrate their understanding of each novel such as re-writing a scene, imagining a conversation between characters from different books, developing a prequel or sequel scene, writing a review, etc.

When discussing written works, students will be expected to give textual references such as specific quotes and examples- a higher-order high school and college-level skill that will be needed in later courses which require written analysis of literature. A key skill that will be taught in this class is how to annotate texts. Students will begin by examining samples of the instructor's own annotated novels then move to annotating the first short story in class as a group. For each novel, students will be given specific details to search for and annotate such as major plot points, character traits, interesting word choice, setting details, quotations, or questions. Later, students will be prepared to annotate automatically as they read with their own questions and reactions, a skill that can also be applied to the readings in other courses.

Topics in this Series: Science Fiction (Semester 1) and Dystopian Literature (Semester 2). Continuing students from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Prerequisites: Students should be able to read and comprehend at a minimum 9th grade level for this course. Per Compass guidelines, accelerated 8th grade students may register for this course, however, in addition to the 9th+ grade reading level, they must posses the maturity to handle high school level topics and more mature discussion.

Workload: Students should expect to read approximately 100 pages per week. For students who have challenges with reading, audio books may be used, but students should still be prepared to follow along and annotate in the physical novel.

Assignments: Weekly assignments will be posted in the Canvas classroom management system. Students will need their own e-mail addresses to access the system, and parents may be set up as additional "observers" to their teen's Canvas account.

Assessments: Points will be assigned for preparation, participation, and short assignments, and parents may use the total points earned to calculate a grade.

Textbook/Materials: Because students will need clean, inexpensive copies of each novel to mark in, and because they must be able to refer to the passages on the same page numbers, a "class pack" of mass market paperbacks will be pre-purchased and bundled for students. (See Supply Fee below).

Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $34.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class.

What to Bring: Students should bring the current novel, paper, pen or pencil and highlighter to class each week. Some students may wish to bring paper clips, adhesive flags or post-it notes for marking pages.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript. For a full credit in English, families would need to "bundle" this course with additional coursework in composition.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

10:00 am-10:55 am

10th-12th

(Semester Long)

English: Introduction to Literary Analysis & Writing- Eleme...

English: Introduction to Literary Analysis & Writing- Elements of Literature (HYBRID)

Quarter(s):1, 2

Overview

The Introduction to Literary Analysis & Writing is a high school student's first look at the higher-level relationship between literature and personal writing. Literary analysis and critical writing move a teen from being merely a good reader- a middle school skill- to becoming a scholarly reader and diagnostic writer which are the foundations of high school and college level inquiry into all forms of written works.

In this seminar-style course, literature is not restricted to a particular genre or form, and writing is not limited to a common five-paragraph composition. Instead, literature is presented as a survey, sampling many different types of works, and composition is approached as the development of a student's personal responses to what he reads. During the first semester, students will examine the basic elements of literature, and second semester will evaluate forms and genres to create a "big picture" of the development of literature.

Literature

First semester Literary Analysis will focus on the basic elements of literature- character, setting, theme, plot, and conflict- and how they interact to create story. These building blocks exist across all forms of literature, so the class may evaluate the plot in an epic poem, a character in a classic play, or the setting in a short story. Some well-known literature will be used to introduce students to the various literary elements, and new works will be studied to demonstrate the best examples of a vivid fictional universe, a strong narrator, beloved (or feared) characters, and other literary components. Examples of some literature that students may read in this course are The Catcher in the Rye (J.D. Sallinger), Nation (Terry Pratchett), The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (Douglas Adams), A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (Betty Smith), Journey to the Center of Earth (Jules Verne), Fahrenheit 451 (Ray Bradbury), and a selection of short stories. The full reading list will be presented in the course syllabus at the beginning of the term. In addition, students may be asked to read several selections over the summer.

Composition

First semester Writing will focus on personal response to literature, with the core being a personal writing journal. The students' journals will be a place to record what they think and feel about what they are reading. Students will learn to annotate, to cite passages from text, and to format. Notes made in the journals will be used to develop short, informal written pieces about the literature read in the course. Observations from the student's journal will also be used to collect supporting, textural evidence to support the reader's opinions which will be formulated into a thesis (personal position). Written assignments will include summaries, compare/contrast analyses, and parallel structure writings that focus on character, setting, plot, conflict, etc., to further underscore and assess student's understanding of the building blocks of literature. First semester will conclude with a culminating project on a sub-genre of the student's own choosing which will analyze works for character, plot, setting, and other literary elements studied.

Class Structure This course is part of a custom curriculum developed and team-taught by Anne Sharp and Melanie Kosar. The courses are designed in a sequential program that complements the developmental skills of the adolescent learner. It is a seminar-style approach that mirrors university literature and writing classes. Note: This is a hybrid class with Mrs. Kosar teaching the literature components of the course in-person on Wednesdays. Mrs. Sharp will teach the writing portion of the class on Fridays. The Friday writing meetings will begin in the fall in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing—with the option to move to in-person instruction as COVID-19 scenarios improve.

Topics in this Series: Elements of Literature (Semester 1) and Forms of Literature (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at grade level, and it is recommended that students have had a middle school writing class.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class. In addition, students should complete the summer assignments consisting of the literature identified above and a hand-out of literary terminology to learn.

Assignments: will be posted on a Google Classroom.

Assessments: are portfolio-based. Students will create a digital portfolio that incorporates annotated reading lists, reflects individual interests and accomplishments and showcases a variety of writing. See the Compass memorandum for more information on assessments in Language Arts.

Textbook: Students should purchase or borrow the assigned literature. In some cases, specific editions will be identified with ISBN numbers so students can be on the "same page" (literally!)

What to Bring: Students should bring paper or notebook, pen or pencil, current literature selection, and personal writing journal to both class meetings each week.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

11:00 am-11:55 am

9th-10th

(Semester Long)

English: Advanced Literary Criticism & Composition- Overvie...

English: Advanced Literary Criticism & Composition- Overview of Literary Movements (HYBRID)

Quarter(s):1, 2

Overview

Advanced Literary Criticism & Composition is a seminar-style course that introduces the high school student to a deeper investigation into literary movements and literary themes throughout the ages. Like art, literature is a writer's response to his world and a reflection of his society and contemporary culture. Literary genres evolved in response to significant events, prevailing philosophies, and impactful innovations and discoveries in the writer's lifetime. Literary movements create a timeline that reflects those influences. In this course, students will read and evaluate selections from a number of literary movements such as: Romanticism, Dark Romanticism, Gothic, Transcendentalism, Realism, Naturalism, Magical Realism, Stream of Consciousness, Expressionism, Harlem Renaissance, Modernism, Beat, etc., and make connections to significant effects of the period.

Advanced composition in this course will move beyond personal interpretation of the work ("What do I think?") and transition into two Schools of Literary Criticism: Biographical Criticism, which views literature through the personal world of the writer ("What did the writer think?"), and Historical/Societal Criticism which views literature through the society/times of the writer ("What was going on around the writer?")

Literature

First semester of Advanced Literary Criticism will include a chronological grouping of literature in "movements" and a study of how movements combine to create genre. Students will be assigned brief, weekly mini-research assignments on history, geography (if applicable), music and art of the period, politics, religion, philosophy, author biography, etc, to establish a foundation and background information on the literary movement. Students will discover how literature reflects the people, events, discoveries, and ideology of the time and how literary movements provide clues to the philosophical, scientific, and societal climate. The class will look at wars and conflict as a creative element that drives evolution in literary movements. The types of literature used to examine movements will span novels, short stories, poetry, letters, political writings, slave narratives and analytical essays. Examples of literature that will be read first semester include selections from the Odyssey (Homer), Arabian Nights, Don Quixote, Jonathan Swift and poetry by Shakespeare. The full reading list will be presented in the course syllabus at the beginning of the term. In addition, students will be asked to read several selections over the summer.

Composition

First semester Composition will apply the Schools of Literary Criticism to craft essays that demonstrate and understanding of movements in the broader context of literature- across eras, across genre/form, across writers and across the world. Teens will write a series of short essays that use different "filters" or "lenses" to view literary genres. Students will develop skills in notetaking, adding research to their literary essays, and managing their writing portfolios. They will also perform parallel, independent research in literature to develop a presentation on a movement or era culminating a semester project.

Class Structure This course is part of a custom curriculum developed and team-taught by Anne Sharp and Melanie Kosar. The courses are designed in a sequential program that complements the developmental skills of the adolescent learner. It is a seminar-style approach that mirrors university literature and writing classes. Note:This is a hybrid class with Mrs. Kosar teaching the literature components of the course in-person on Wednesdays. Mrs. Sharp will teach the writing portion of the class on Fridays. The Friday writing meetings will begin in the fall in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing—with the option to move to in-person instruction as COVID-19 scenarios improve.

Topics in this Series: Overview of Literary Movements (Semester 1) and Survey of Themes in Literature (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at grade level. Students should have had a prior course in literature to have established a firm foundation in basic literary elements and form.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class. In addition, students should complete the summer assignments consisting of the literature identified above and a hand-out of literary terminology to learn.

Assignments: will be posted on a Google Classroom.

Assessments: are portfolio-based. Students will create a digital portfolio that incorporates annotated reading lists, reflects individual interests and accomplishments and showcases a variety of writing. See the Compass memorandum for more information on assessments in Language Arts.

Textbook: Students should purchase or borrow the assigned literature. In some cases, specific editions will be identified with ISBN numbers so students can be on the "same page" (literally!)

What to Bring: Students should bring paper or notebook, pen or pencil, current literature selection, and personal writing journal to both class meetings each week.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

10th-11th

(Semester Long)

English: Modern Narratives in Nonfiction Work (HYBRID)

English: Modern Narratives in Nonfiction Work (HYBRID)

Quarter(s):1, 2

Overview

Modern Narratives in Nonfiction Work is a seminar-style course that focuses on the incorporation of style, voice, and tone in literature and in writing. Viewing literature as "published writing", students will examine the products and processes of other writers in order to understand and refine their own. Through the analysis of professional and student works, students will explore what makes truly great writing.

Literature

First semester of Modern Narratives in Nonfiction will examine the works of great essayists. A partial list of reading selections includes I am Malala (Malala Yousafzai), I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (Maya Angelou), essays by Joan Didion and Ray Bradbury, speeches by Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, Martin Luther King, Abraham Lincoln, etc., Ted Talks, and an discussion of "real" versus "fake" news. In addition, the class will use style manuals and classic writing texts such as Strunk & White's The Elements of Style and William Zinsser's On Writing Well. The full reading list will be presented in the course syllabus at the beginning of the term. In addition, students will be asked to read several selections over the summer. Students will be assigned brief, individual research assignments and take turns leading the class discussion on topics related to the featured author or event.

Composition

First semester Senior Composition, dovetailing with the college admissions season, will focus on "the personal essay", writing to prompts, writing with a deadline, and ruthless editing (a.k.a. "meeting a word count"). Going beyond the five-paragraph template that encourages "cookie cutter" essays, students will create a unique architecture embedded with personal style, voice, and narrative structure. In short, students will uncover not just who they are as individuals, but who they are as writers... and how to fuse these two identities into a creative, organized, clear, and elegant essay.

In the process, students will master their writing process and identify personal writing strengths. These strengths will be developed into a writing workshop that they will present to classmates and the Compass community. Portfolios (now a potential college resume addition) will be expanded to include essays, research papers, and extracurricular support (artwork, performances, PowerPoints, etc.).

Class Structure This course is part of a custom curriculum developed and team-taught by Anne Sharp and Melanie Kosar. The courses are designed in a sequential program that complements the developmental skills of the adolescent learner. It is a seminar-style approach that mirrors university literature and writing classes. Note: This is a hybrid class with Mrs. Kosar teaching the literature components of the course in-person on Wednesdays. Mrs. Sharp will teach the writing portion of the class on Fridays. The Friday writing meetings will begin in the fall in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing—with the option to move to in-person instruction as COVID-19 scenarios improve.

Topics in this Series: Modern Narratives in Nonfiction Works (Semester 1) and Nobel and Pulitzer Prize Writings (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at grade level.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class

Assignments: will be posted on a Google Classroom.

Assessments: are portfolio-based. Students will create a digital portfolio that incorporates annotated reading lists, reflects individual interests and accomplishments and showcases a variety of writing. See the Compass memorandum for more information on assessments in Language Arts.

Textbook: Students should purchase or borrow the assigned literature. In some cases, specific editions will be identified with ISBN numbers so students can be on the "same page" (literally!)

What to Bring: Students should bring paper or notebook, pen or pencil, current literature selection, and personal writing journal to both class meetings each week.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

11th-12th

(Semester Long)

Compass Literarians: Creative Writing & Literary Magazine B...

Compass Literarians: Creative Writing & Literary Magazine Board (ONLINE)

Quarter(s):1, 2

This Literarians writing board is a home for students who love to write, who love to read writing, and who love to share writing with others. Writing is often a solitary act, but writers also need a community in which to grow. Mirroring the design of famous writing salons/groups like The Bloomsbury Group, The Algonquin Round Table, and The Inklings, this course fosters a Compass community that will encourage individual writers, promote literary collaboration and provide challenging feedback to boost creativity and artistic development.

First semester will focus on building a personal writing portfolio strengthening students' passions for genres and forms they are comfortable with as well as trying writing that is new to them. Using writing workshops to capitalize on what they already know and to encourage experimentation in unfamiliar areas, students can expect to grow as writers, editors and leaders in our Compass community.

Students will use their own work and the works of professional authors to understand what makes good writing, to improve technique, to experiment with new forms/genre and to understand the drafting, editing and publishing process. They will explore publishing options through online platforms and hardbound journals.

Note:Note: The literary magazine board will begin in the fall in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing—with the option to move to in-person instruction as COVID-19 scenarios improve.

Topics in this Series: A Creative Writing and Literary Magazine Board (Semesters 1 and 2, with registration by semester.) Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Prerequisites: Advanced reading, writing, and analytical skills.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class on investigation, writing, or editing for this class. Assignments: Writing and editing assignments will be delegated by the student board. Assessments: In lieu of a teacher-provided assessments, writers will receive peer feedback on their own work, and the finished product will be a printed anthology for their portfolio.

Lab/Supply Fee: None

What to Bring: Students should bring laptops to class to work collaboratively and real-time on shared documents and the class portal.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

9th-12th

(Semester Long)

Music Room

Shakespeare Off the Page: Henry IV Part One

Shakespeare Off the Page: Henry IV Part One

Quarter(s):1, 2

Read it! Act it! Students will enjoy this two-hour, semester-long workshop with Shakespearian coach Heather Sanderson who hails from England and is known for instilling a love of Shakespeare into the hearts of students throughout the Greater DC area. The class will explore a very popular play from Shakespeare's series of histories- Henry IV, Part 1, and analyze its characters, plot, themes and motives.
In this thrilling and poignant coming-of-age story, students will be introduced to a jocular knight, a troubled king, a hot-blooded warrior, a prodigal prince, and a whole host of lovable rabble-rousers.

Students will read various roles, study and act out scenes, practice monologues, and work through the literature while having fun with fellow teens. Theatre games will be used to encourage collaboration, and specially designed improv exercises will be used to stretch teens' imaginations and help them get "in character". The class will use read-aloud and in-class dramatization to decipher the original language, word choices, and to identify humor, mockery, and political intrigue, in this tale of power, honor and rebellion.

The class will work from complete texts (not redacted, abridged, or simplified school versions) to hear and practice Elizabethan lingo. (How did someone of Shakespeare's time hurl insults or woo a woman?) Students will learn how the Bard crafted scenes and conveyed the primary storyline and sub-plots in a tale that has endured for over 400 years.

Instructor Heather Sanderson shares a teaching style based on actions and interactions, developed from years of experience coaching Shakespeare in a way that appeals to students. Her approach brings abstract concepts, complex themes, and difficult language to the students' level, so that they can relate to and appreciate Shakespeare.

Topics in this Series: Henry IV, Part I (Semester 1), Hysterical Scenes and A Midsummer Night's Dream (Semester 2). Continuing students from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hour per week outside of class reading sections.

Assignments: Sections will be assigned in class and included in the weekly e-mail to parents/students.

Assessments: Will not be given.

Textbook: The cost of the class text is included in the course fee.

Non-Meeting Dates: This is a 13-week class, which follows the Compass first semester schedule with the exception of October 9th, when the class will not meet.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English Literature or Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

Opens Jun 1 6:00 am

10:00 am-11:55 am

8th-12th

(Semester Long)



Monday Classes (Click here to jump back up to Wednesday classes)

9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00