History/Humanities Class Descriptions

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Intro to Economics: Choices, Decisions, People & Policy

Quarter 1, 2, 3, 4: Starts on September 11, 2020

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Dr. John Kornacki

Grade Range: 10th-12th

Prerequisites:

Where does the money come from for stimulus checks or a tax cut? How is a debt different than a deficit? These topics can be understood with a practical, everyday, concept-based approach to Economics. This course in applied economics spans key themes in micro-economics and macro-economics in a tangible, approachable way using cases and real examples from the community around us and avoids the traditional math-heavy, dull, and difficult study of the field.

Economics is all about choosing and then deciding. It involves the study of how and why these choices and decisions are made and then determining their outcomes for a person, a firm, or even a nation. Sometimes the study of economics is referred to as the study of the political economy because it involves public decisions. For this course, we start off with smaller units first--often called micro-economics--and stress practical or applied concepts. Later on, the course will examine the larger-scale implications for using the tools of economics to better understand public policy formation and to explore case studies on such issues as alleviating poverty, addressing climate change, and protecting public health.

In his classic text Economics, Paul Samuelson of MIT says economics is the study of how people choose and use limited resources having alternative uses. The material in this class incorporates his traditional often called neoclassical approach as well as the ideas from the so-called free-market Austrian-School economists like Henry Hazlitt and Milton Friedman. The course connects these concepts through the approachable books, Whatever Happened to Penny Candy? A Fast, Clear, and Fun Explanation of the Economics You Need For Success in Your Career, Business, and Investments and Economics in One Lesson

In short, this course aims to build a better understanding of a teen’s personal stake in using the concepts and tools of economics in daily life as well as offering a way to visualize how they are used to create the public policies. The course starts small and moves to larger subjects over time. It offers students a chance to explore ideas, evaluate case studies, discuss them in class, and then write about them. The course encourages the development of critical thinking skills using the basic terms and concepts of applied microeconomics.

Prerequisites: None

LevelsThe course provides a substantive, full-credit experience in either an Honors or On-Level track. All students complete the same assignments for Semester 1. Near the end of Semester 1, students may decide to differentiate their workload and continue On-Level or at an Honors level for Semester 2. Honors students will have more in-depth assignments with longer and additional readings, more practice of synthesis and analysis, and additional writing. Both tiers offer a sunstantial, full-credit experience. Students register online for the same course.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class on homework.

Assignments: Assignments will consist of readings, worksheets, individual and group projects. All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates.

Assessments: Points will be awarded for the competition of assignments, quizzes, and projects, and parents can assign a grade based on the number of points earned as compared to the number of points available.

Textbook/Materials: A class bundle consisting of two books and a packet of photocopied articles will be provided. Additional readings, if selected, will be identified by August 15.

Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $38.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as full credit in Economics for purposes of a high school transcript.

AP Exam Option: Students who take this course at the Honors level Semester 2 will have covered a substantial portion of the preparation for the AP exam in Microeconomics. The instructor will create a list of additional topics and analyses needed for any student who wishes to concurrently and independently study for the AP exam. Students who wish to take the AP exam must register and pay for on their own exam through the College Board in fall 2020 for the May 2021 exam.

7 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $780.00

Psychology (AP, Honors, On-Level)

Quarter 1, 2, 3, 4: Starts on September 11, 2020

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 115 min

Instructor: Natalie Di Vietri

Grade Range: 10th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Why do we dream? What happens to your brain when you are in love? Why do all babies like peek-a-boo? The course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of behavior and mental processes of human beings. Students are exposed to psychological facts, principles and phenomena associated with each of the sub fields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice. Students will be challenged to think like a psychologist as they analyze research and design future experiments.

This is a year-long, multi-level high school course. It will cover the nine major content areas covered on the College Board's AP Psychology Exam including: Scientific Foundations of Psychology; Biological Bases of Behavior; Sensation and Perception; Learning and Cognitive Psychology; Developmental Psychology; Motivation; Emotion and Personality; Clinical Psychology; and Social Psychology. Students will also learn to analyze data and psychological research studies. Themes in psychology are made tangible and approachable to students through rich, in-class discussion and debate, games, interactive models, and group work. Throughout the year, students will enjoy personalized surveys and assessments, such as those on learning style, parenting style, and personality type, and will complete individualized projects involving observations, case studies, interviews, or experiments.

The class offers a substantive, full-credit experience and will be a mixture of lecture, discussion, group work, and short videos. There is some mature content discussed in this course, especially as it pertains to abnormal psychology. A section on sexual motivation, including homosexuality, must be covered for the AP test. These topics will be discussed in a purely scientific manner, and students need to be prepared to have a respectful discussion about these subjects.

The course is offered at three levels, which meet together: Advanced Placement (AP), Honors, and On-Level. Students can pick their desired workload. Students can always do more if they would like, but at any level they are expected to keep up with weekly readings and homework which will prepare them for in-class discussions, assignments, and projects. Students who choose to take this class at the AP level will be prepared to take the AP Exam on Tuesday May, 11 2021.

All students will register online for the same course. Upon completion of the summer assignment, students must indicate which level they want to study by e-mail to the instructor on August 28. Once the course has begun, students may move down a level (from AP to honors, or from honors to on-level) at any time. However, once classes have started, students may not "bump up" a level.

Prerequisites: Students must be strong, independent readers at a high school or greater reading level. The text used is equivalent to a first year college textbook. Students can read a chapter excerpt here to confirm the reading level expected in the course.

Workload: All students must be prepared to read approximately 30 pages per week and should expect to spend 4-5 hours outside of class for reading and homework, regardless of level. The amount and type of homework varies for on-level, honors, and AP students.

Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message the instructor and classmates. Students will also have practice assignments in the Launchpad system from the publisher, and AP students will have work in the virtual AP classroom site through the College Board. Summer Assignment: Students will have two weeks of work to complete before classes begin. This will give students a feel for the different levels offered in the class. The summer assignment will cover Unit 1: Scientific Foundations of Psychology and will be due at the end of August. Successful completion of the summer assignment is a prerequisite take the course at the AP level.

Assessments: Points will be assigned for completed homework, projects, quizzes, and tests. A letter grade will not be assigned, but parents can use total points earned versus total points offered to assign a grade for purposes of a homeschool transcript. Parents can view total points earned at any time through the Canvas site.

Textbook: With their license fee, students will receive access to the electronic version of their textbook, Myers' Psychology for AP, Updated 3rd Edition. Hard copies of the textbook are available for separate purchase. Contact the course instructor for details on different editions of the textbook. AP students will also need to have an AP Classroom account through the College Board website.

Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $85.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for the access to the student Launchpad platform which includes the e-textbook and practice modules. The fee to take the AP exam in May 2021 is not included. Each family will be responsible for registering, scheduling, and paying for their student's AP exam.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete, full-year credit in Social Sciences for purposes of a high school transcript.

7 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $1099.00

US Government and Politics (Honors or On Level)

Quarter 1, 2, 3, 4: Starts on September 11, 2020

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Tia Murchie-Beyma

Grade Range: 10th-12th

Prerequisites: None

As Thomas Jefferson wrote to Richard Price in 1788, "wherever the people are well informed they can be trusted with their own government." That's what this course aims to do!

US Government and Politics is a year-long political science and civics course for high school students to build their knowledge of essential political structures and processes. Key themes in the course include Congress, Presidency, Bureaucracy, American Legal System and the Courts (30%); Constitutional Underpinnings of American Democracy (15%); Political Parties and Interest Groups (15%); Political Beliefs and Behavior (20%); and Civil Liberties and Civil Rights (15%).

Students will learn about the formal and informal machinery that "makes the system go" -– including the so-called "fourth branch of government," the bureaucracy we know so well here in the Washington, DC metropolitan area. By the end of the course, students will also be able to explain the development of civil rights and liberties from their constitutional roots and through several Supreme Court cases; how political parties and interest groups work; the structure of elections; and the means by which citizens learn about politics and form political beliefs. Students will understand enduring issues, including separation of powers, checks and balances, and then tension between majority rule and minority rights.

LevelsThe course provides a substantive, full-credit experience in either an Honors or On-Level track. Honors and On-Level students meet together and share core preparation each week, but assignments and assessments are differentiated, with longer readings, more practice of synthesis and analysis, and additional writing at the Honors level. Both tiers offer a serious, full-credit experience. A student who wishes to move up or down a level during the year may consult with the instructor. Students register online for the same course, but must indicate which level they wish to study via e-mail by August 15.

Schedule: There are two weekly meetings: Fridays in-person and Mondays online via Canvas Conference (time to be announced; recordings made for students with schedule conflicts).

Prerequisites: Students must be highly-skilled readers at the high school level or above; or else have very robust assistance at home with weekly reading assignments.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-5 hours per week outside class meetings for reading and homework, a range which may vary based on reading speed. Note that the core textbook is written at a basic college level, while other materials are targeted at either a high school audience or the news-reading public.

Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates. These are due by 10 AM on Thursdays before each Friday meeting to promote active, knowledgeable discussion in class. There will be a summer assignment that is due on September 10, before the first class meeting. The class Canvas site will open on August 3 with introductory information, a syllabus, and the initial assignment.

Assessments: Points will be assigned for completed homework, projects, quizzes, and tests. A letter grade will not be assigned, but parents can use total points earned versus total points offered to assign a grade for purposes of a homeschool transcript. Parents can view total points earned at any time through the Canvas site.

This course was structured to allow interested students to prepare for the College Boards' CLEP exam in American Government. Time spent on major course themes intentionally mirror the CLEP test's percentages. Students interested in taking the CLEP exam will have to register and pay for those exams individually. This course is not offered at an AP level, but the instructor is willing to advise experienced students who wish to independently prepare for the AP United States Government and Politics exam in May 2021. Additional preparation outside of class, particularly in essay-writing and analysis of Supreme Court cases, would be needed for AP.

https://clep.collegeboard.org/history-and-social-sciences/american-government
https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/courses/ap-united-states-government-and-politics/exam

Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase or rent Keeping the Republic: Power and Citizenship in American Politics, Brief 8th Edition by Christine Barbour and Gerald Wright (ISBN-13: 978-1544316215). Electronic versions are available. Be sure to purchase the EIGHTH (8th) edition that is also labeled "BRIEF." Other readings will be provided by the instructor.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component full year, one-credit course in US Government, Civics, or Humanities for purposes of a high school transcript

10 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $972.00

Around the World: Geography of North America

Quarter 1: Starts on September 9, 2020

Class Time: 12:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Kouthar Muttardy

Grade Range: 6th-8th

Prerequisites:

Around the World is a creative, interactive examination of world geography! Geography is much more than just maps and mountain ranges! Students will make an in-depth investigation of all aspects of geography region-by-region. First quarter will explore the geography of North America, from Newfoundland, Canada, to Nome, Alaska, and the Neovolcanica region in Mexico.

Students will engage in hands-on activities, such as games and scavenger hunts, to learn about the lands, features, inhabitants, and phenomena and five themes of geography (location, place, human and environment interaction, movements, and regions) for each area that they study. For each major region, the class will look at aspects of human geography: political boundaries, cities and communities, cultural, social, and economic themes (dominant languages, religions, ethnic groups, agriculture, and trade), along with aspects of physical geography such as landforms, waterways, climate zones, biomes, etc. The class will also touch on the geographic specialties of meteorology and hydrology to understand how these impact physical and human geography.

Note: Map basics, including reading maps, types of maps, latitude and longitude, and understanding representations on maps, will only be covered during the first quarter of each year. Any student enrolling in the course after the first quarter will be expected to review map basics from a class packet of map information.

Topics in this Series: North America (Quarter 1); Central and South America (Quarter 2); Middle East & North Africa (Quarter 3); Sub-Saharan Africa (Quarter 4). Second year (2021-22) Europe (Quarter 5); Russia & East Asia (Quarter 6); South & Southeast Asia (Quarter 7); and Oceania, Antarctica & Earth's Oceans (Quarter 8). Lab/Supply Fee: Included in the course fee.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $147.00

Battle Strategies & Dioramas: Modern Warfare- WWII from the Russian Perspective, Stalingrad/Berlin

Quarter 1: Starts on September 9, 2020

Class Time: 2:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 6th-8th

Prerequisites:

Students will engage in a hands-on 3D battle strategy game using the military dioramas that they make!

From Stalingrad to Berlin, the downfall of Nazi Germany. This quarter will cover the climactic urban battles of the Eastern Front in Europe, or as the Russians call it, The Great Patriotic War. The Eastern front is often sidelined in Western history, but it was quite possibly the most brutal theater of war in human history. The Germans invaded Eastern Europe to wage a war of extermination, and instead found themselves hunted like rats in the cities they destroyed. This is not the Blitzkrieg, where a modern German army used fancy new tactics to destroy larger armies. This is the rat warfare, brutal attrition more akin to the 1st World War, with the trenches swapped for bitter street fighting, where each side was literally fighting in their own homes, for everything they had.

Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will each form a 10" X 16" shaped, foam diorama with landscape elements (hills, buildings, rivers, bridges, vegetation, fences, etc) to represent a scene of a famous historical engagement. Students will each receive 1:72 scale miniature soldiers to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate the larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices.

The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical background and circumstances leading up to the specific battle. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include: WWII from the Russian Perspective, Stalingrad/Berlin (1st quarter), WWII The Battle of the Bulge, 1944 (2nd quarter), WWII The USMC at Guadalcanal, 1945 (3rd quarter), and Korean War, 1950-1953 (4th quarter).

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $141.00

Battle Strategies & Dioramas: Modern Warfare- WWII from the Russian Perspective, Stalingrad/Berlin

Quarter 1: Starts on September 9, 2020

Class Time: 4:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 6th-8th

Prerequisites:

Students will engage in a hands-on 3D battle strategy game using the military dioramas that they make!

From Stalingrad to Berlin, the downfall of Nazi Germany. This quarter will cover the climactic urban battles of the Eastern Front in Europe, or as the Russians call it, The Great Patriotic War. The Eastern front is often sidelined in Western history, but it was quite possibly the most brutal theater of war in human history. The Germans invaded Eastern Europe to wage a war of extermination, and instead found themselves hunted like rats in the cities they destroyed. This is not the Blitzkrieg, where a modern German army used fancy new tactics to destroy larger armies. This is the rat warfare, brutal attrition more akin to the 1st World War, with the trenches swapped for bitter street fighting, where each side was literally fighting in their own homes, for everything they had.

Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will each form a 10" X 16" shaped, foam diorama with landscape elements (hills, buildings, rivers, bridges, vegetation, fences, etc) to represent a scene of a famous historical engagement. Students will each receive 1:72 scale miniature soldiers to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate the larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices.

The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical background and circumstances leading up to the specific battle. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include: WWII from the Russian Perspective, Stalingrad/Berlin (1st quarter), WWII The Battle of the Bulge, 1944 (2nd quarter), WWII The USMC at Guadalcanal, 1945 (3rd quarter), and Korean War, 1950-1953 (4th quarter).

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $141.00

Dynamic Dioramas: Prehistoric Series- Ancient Seas Survival (billions to 250 million years ago)

Quarter 1: Starts on September 9, 2020

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 3rd-5th

Prerequisites:

Dive deep, back to the time of some of the first life on Earth, into prehistoric seas filled with monstrous and mysterious creatures that were the ancient ancestors of all life as we know it. This class will cover the early ocean life on Earth, from the darkest depths, where life exists because of geothermal vents, to the shallow inland sea that was the American Mid-West in the Jurassic age through the ancient seas as the dinosaurs swam them.

We will learn to play "Submarine Safari" to simulate cooperative oceanographic research, exploring and cataloging ocean life, and an aquatic version of Try-To-Survive-Asaurus, where students role play as a shark or prehistoric marine reptile in their very own food chain. Over the course of the class, students should be able to explain the differences in the types of marine life over time and depth, and how these differences are reflected in their very own marine habitat boards.

Each student will create an individual diorama. Students will craft and hand-shape their scene on a 10 x 16 inch foam board using artistic, model-making techniques. They will customize their dioramas with landscape elements, reefs, geothermal vents, and paint different ocean depths. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with miniature figures and combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to create a larger terrain. Students will then compete in a pre-history-based survival strategy game. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them. Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $15.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include Prehistoric Seas Survival (1st quarter), A Jurassic Survival Challenge (2nd quarter), Ice Age Survival (3rd quarter), and Sumerian Settlement (4th quarter).

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $141.00

Dynamic Dioramas: Virginia History- Jamestown and the Powhatan Confederacy, 1607

Quarter 1: Starts on September 9, 2020

Class Time: 3:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 3rd-5th

Prerequisites:

Explore the State of Virginia from its earliest colonial settlement 400 years ago. The class will discuss the driving factors for colonization of the "New World" by European powers, especially Great Britain and The Virginia Company which founded the colony. In counterpoint, the existing Powhatan Confederacy of Native Americans will also be studied, as well as several failed attempts at colonizing and how Jamestown narrowly escaped complete destruction!

Each student will create an individual diorama. Students will craft and hand-shape their scene on a 10 x 16 inch foam board using artistic, model-making techniques. They will customize their dioramas with landscape elements, waterways, structures of the time, and paint. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature figures and combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to create a larger terrain. Students will then compete in a history-based strategy game. This will reinforce lessons about the culture, economy, warfare, and politics of the time. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them. Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $15.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include Virginia History: Jamestown and the Powhatan Confederacy, 1607 (1st quarter), The American War of Independence (2nd quarter), The War of 1812 (3rd quarter), and The Civil War 1861-1865 (4th quarter).

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $141.00

Hands on History: River Valley Civilizations- Mesopotamia

Quarter 1: Starts on September 9, 2020

Class Time: 3:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Kouthar Muttardy

Grade Range: 3rd-5th

Prerequisites:

Discover the world's first civilization, Mesopotamia, and its contributions to the modern world in this vibrant hands-on history class! Learn about the cultural development and traditions of ancient Mesopotamia (such as homes, architecture, clothing, food, transportation, and beliefs) through weekly projects. Students will make cuneiform tablets, pottery, murals, and model ziggurats as they learn about life in ancient Mesopotamia! Students will identify inventions and contributions of the ancient Mesopotamians such as the first written language, wheel, plow, chariot, sailboat, and more! The class will also sample the literature of the period through weekly read-alouds of fables and folklore like "The Epic of Gilgamesh."

Students will be excited by history when approached through this engaging, multi-disciplinary exploration of historical connections and integrated concepts rather than memorizing dates and disconnected facts! Note: This is a 75-minute class that will end at 4:10 pm. Topics in this Series include the River Valley Civilizations of: Mesopotamia (Quarter 1), Ancient Egypt (Quarter 2), Ancient China (Quarter 3), and India (Quarter 4) Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $15.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $176.00

Civics Critics: Constitution Connection

Quarter 1, 2: Starts on September 9, 2020

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Kouthar Muttardy

Grade Range: 7th-9th

Prerequisites:

Civics Critics will explore themes related to the US Constitution through guided inquiry and evidence-based analysis. These topics are posed as a series of thought-provoking questions that students will research, debate, discuss, and form opinions about. First semester will examine themes such as the Articles of Confederation, branches of government, checks and balances, divided powers, the federal budget, and unalienable rights in a relevant, approachable, and interactive context. The class will apply this knowledge to analyze three big DBQ inquiries: The Ideals of the Declaration: Which is the Most Important? How Did the Constitution Guard Against Tyranny? and Should Schools Be Allowed to Limit Students' Online Speech?

Civics Critics is an interactive, multi-disciplinary examination of some of the key issues in American Government using sources from The DBQ Project. DBQs, or document based questions, are derived from AP History exams and help develop high school level critical thinking skills. Students will review an array of primary sources such as letters, journal entries, inventories, ship's manifestos, newspaper articles, period maps, and court documents along with selected secondary sources like excerpts, charts, and graphs. Students will be guided through analyzing the documents, interpreting the data, drawing inferences, and forming conclusions. In some historical scenarios, the class will consider conflicting perspectives and be able to defend and debate multiple sides of a key issue. To demonstrate comprehension and a deeper understanding of the class themes, students will use factual findings to develop structured, evidence-based essays. Students will also complete additional short and interactive assignments throughout the semester.

Topics in this Series: Constitution Connection (Semester 1) and Bill of Rights Battles (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Prerequisites: Students should be able to read and write at grade level.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week on homework, investigation, or reading for this class.

Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates.

Assessments: The instructor may offer parent conferences to provide feedback on the student's work and participation.

Lab/Supply Fee: The fee for a class notebook is included in the class tuition.

What to Bring: Class notebook, paper, and pen or pencil.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $288.00

The History of WWII: From Looming War through Stalingrad (In-Person)

Quarter 1, 2: Starts on September 9, 2020

Class Time: 9:30 am      Duration: 145 min

Instructor: Hugh Gardner

Grade Range: 8th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Students will be immersed in detail and fully engaged in this intensive history course led by well- known homeschool instructor and historian Hugh Gardner. This history class is unlike other high school history course. Instead of learning a sequential set of names, dates, and battles, students will learn how to analyze and interpret history. Much like a college seminar, this approach to American History incorporates historiography (the history of the history.) Mr. Gardner does not teach a narrow view from a single textbook or static set of prepared notes. Instead, he presents the back story and multiple interpretations for the "why" questions in American history. Class discussion considers interpretations from a wide array of scholars and is updated as new sources are published. Rather than running through a timeline of outcomes, students will evaluate contributing factors (the "how" questions) and will learn about the personalities, prejudices, and biases of the people involved ("who").

First semester will cover the background, events, and inter-war years leading up to the Second World War. The class will examine Hitler's rise to power, election in 1933, and his massive effort to rebuild the German war machine. They will discover Hitler's systematic takeover of eastern European countries before launching a blitzkrieg invasion of France. They will look at Britain acting alone to resist Germany through the deployment of commandos and special forces in targeted raids and the German threat to cross the Channel to invade Britain. The class will learn about military and naval engagements throughout the Mediterranean including north Africa, Sicily, and mainland Italy along with a fight in the Middle East to gain control of the oil supply. Finally, the class will study conflicts along the Eastern Front. The class will discuss the effects on the political, social, and economic climate as well as influences on the arts, science, literature, religion, and warfare. This is no ordinary history class as Mr. Gardner surrounds the students with vivid posters, maps, charts, primary sources, and artifacts to supplement his story-telling style. Students will be able to examine and handle period pieces such as antique and replica weapons and military accoutrements of the era while learning how these tools helped shape the battlefields and turning points in history. With an emphasis on primary sources, students will scrutinize historical atlases and original writings, all in a collaborative and interactive setting. Just for fun, students earn historical trading cards for class participation.

Topics in this Series: WWII: From Looming War through Stalingrad (Semester 1), WWI: The Defeat of Germany and the Wars Against Japan (Semester 2). Continuing students from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

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Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class on assigned readings.

Assignments: are given in class and e-mailed to parents and students.

Assessments: Will not be given

Textbook: Students should purchase two books: (1) Atlas of World War II by Richard Natkiel, published by The Military Press, 1985. (Note: hardback or paperback editions from the 1980s are preferred over more recent small format editions from 2011 -– on. Used copies available on Amazon.) (2) Collins Atlas of the Second World War, by John Keegan ed., published by HarperCollins, 2003. (Note: This is a very large format atlas in different editions with some titled Times instead of Collins; key is John Keegan as editor. Used copies available on Amazon.) For those families who want to investigate the course themes at a deeper level, an optional reading list will be furnished.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count two semesters of this course as a full credit in American or World History for purposes of a high school transcript.

10 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $329.00

The History of WWII: From Looming War through Stalingrad (Online)

Quarter 1, 2: Starts on September 9, 2020

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 145 min

Instructor: Hugh Gardner

Grade Range: 8th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Students will be immersed in detail and fully engaged in this intensive history course led by well- known homeschool instructor and historian Hugh Gardner. This history class is unlike other high school history course. Instead of learning a sequential set of names, dates, and battles, students will learn how to analyze and interpret history. Much like a college seminar, this approach to American History incorporates historiography (the history of the history.) Mr. Gardner does not teach a narrow view from a single textbook or static set of prepared notes. Instead, he presents the back story and multiple interpretations for the "why" questions in American history. Class discussion considers interpretations from a wide array of scholars and is updated as new sources are published. Rather than running through a timeline of outcomes, students will evaluate contributing factors (the "how" questions) and will learn about the personalities, prejudices, and biases of the people involved ("who").

First semester will cover the background, events, and inter-war years leading up to the Second World War. The class will examine Hitler's rise to power, election in 1933, and his massive effort to rebuild the German war machine. They will discover Hitler's systematic takeover of eastern European countries before launching a blitzkrieg invasion of France. They will look at Britain acting alone to resist Germany through the deployment of commandos and special forces in targeted raids and the German threat to cross the Channel to invade Britain. The class will learn about military and naval engagements throughout the Mediterranean including north Africa, Sicily, and mainland Italy along with a fight in the Middle East to gain control of the oil supply. Finally, the class will study conflicts along the Eastern Front. The class will discuss the effects on the political, social, and economic climate as well as influences on the arts, science, literature, religion, and warfare. This is no ordinary history class as Mr. Gardner surrounds the students with vivid posters, maps, charts, primary sources, and artifacts to supplement his story-telling style. Students will be able to examine and handle period pieces such as antique and replica weapons and military accoutrements of the era while learning how these tools helped shape the battlefields and turning points in history. With an emphasis on primary sources, students will scrutinize historical atlases and original writings, all in a collaborative and interactive setting. Just for fun, students earn historical trading cards for class participation.

Topics in this Series: WWII: From Looming War through Stalingrad (Semester 1), WWI: The Defeat of Germany and the Wars Against Japan (Semester 2). Continuing students from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

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Note: This is an online section of The History of WWII to accommodate the overflow from the in-person, morning class which will have a reduced enrollment capacity in the Fall of 2020. This course section will be re-taught/repeated and streamed for those who wish to follow the course remotely. This is not a pre-recording of the 9:30 am class. Students will be able to participate with the instructor in an online chat and through video/audio input. This session will be recorded each week to accommodate students who are absent or who must step out for another mid-day class.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class on assigned readings.

Assignments: are given in class and e-mailed to parents and students.

Assessments: Will not be given

Textbook: Students should purchase two books: (1) Atlas of World War II by Richard Natkiel, published by The Military Press, 1985. (Note: hardback or paperback editions from the 1980s are preferred over more recent small format editions from 2011 -– on. Used copies available on Amazon.) (2) Collins Atlas of the Second World War, by John Keegan ed., published by HarperCollins, 2003. (Note: This is a very large format atlas in different editions with some titled Times instead of Collins; key is John Keegan as editor. Used copies available on Amazon.) For those families who want to investigate the course themes at a deeper level, an optional reading list will be furnished.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count two semesters of this course as a full credit in American or World History for purposes of a high school transcript.

10 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $329.00

3D History: WWI- No Man's Land, 1914-1915

Quarter 1, 2: Starts on September 11, 2020

Class Time: 2:00 pm      Duration: 115 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 8th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Why read about key military battles on maps or in books when you can learn about them hands-on, in three dimensions, using historical miniature gaming? In 3D History, pivotal engagements come alive for new and experienced students, as they navigate a table-top terrain, deploy hundreds of miniature soldiers, ships, and tanks... all while playing a military strategy game. Each student will have the opportunity to fight a battle from both sides, allowing them to test various strategies, try multiple scenarios, predict different outcomes, and rewrite history- an effective way to gain a deeper understanding of what actually happened and why!

In 1914 the world was rocked by the Assassination of the Austro-Hungarian Archduke Franz Ferdinand. His death, and a tangled web of secret and public alliances would be the spark that dragged the whole world into a Great War. The Entente, the triple Alliance of France, Russia, and Great Britain would face off against the Central Powers of Imperial Germany and Austria Hungary, across "No Man's Land" the nightmare zone between the famous trenches of WWI, with all the world's industrialized militaries focused on them.

This semester, students will study the early years of WWI, and how it settled into the stalemate on the Western Front with its infamous trench warfare, as well as the vast Eastern Front.

Note: This is a 1 hour, 55 minute class with a 10-minute break part way through.

Topics in this Series: WWI- No Man's Land 1914-1915 (Semester 1) and WWI- Over the Top 1916-1918 (Semester 2).

Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.

Assignments: Period maps, photographs, and re-creations will be posted on a class Google Drive, and video links from YouTube will be e-mailed to parents and students for homework or supplemental investigation.

Assessments: Will not be given.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $312.00

3D History: WWI- No Man's Land, 1914-1915

Quarter 1, 2: Starts on September 11, 2020

Class Time: 12:00 pm      Duration: 115 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 8th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Why read about key military battles on maps or in books when you can learn about them hands-on, in three dimensions, using historical miniature gaming? In 3D History, pivotal engagements come alive for new and experienced students, as they navigate a table-top terrain, deploy hundreds of miniature soldiers, ships, and tanks... all while playing a military strategy game. Each student will have the opportunity to fight a battle from both sides, allowing them to test various strategies, try multiple scenarios, predict different outcomes, and rewrite history- an effective way to gain a deeper understanding of what actually happened and why!

In 1914 the world was rocked by the Assassination of the Austro-Hungarian Archduke Franz Ferdinand. His death, and a tangled web of secret and public alliances would be the spark that dragged the whole world into a Great War. The Entente, the triple Alliance of France, Russia, and Great Britain would face off against the Central Powers of Imperial Germany and Austria Hungary, across "No Man's Land" the nightmare zone between the famous trenches of WWI, with all the world's industrialized militaries focused on them.

This semester, students will study the early years of WWI, and how it settled into the stalemate on the Western Front with its infamous trench warfare, as well as the vast Eastern Front.

Note: This is a 1 hour, 55 minute class with a 10-minute break part way through.

Topics in this Series: WWI- No Man's Land 1914-1915 (Semester 1) and WWI- Over the Top 1916-1918 (Semester 2).

Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.

Assignments: Period maps, photographs, and re-creations will be posted on a class Google Drive, and video links from YouTube will be e-mailed to parents and students for homework or supplemental investigation.

Assessments: Will not be given.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $312.00

Ancient Justice: Crime & Punishment in Medieval Times

Quarter 1, 2: Starts on September 11, 2020

Class Time: 10:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 8th-12th

Prerequisites: None

This class will explore the judicial processes of Europe following the collapse of Rome. From witch trials and Viking blood feuds, then back again to the real barbarians, lawyers! Like a traditional mock trial program, the class will hear cases, and students will defend themselves. Real historical cases will be studied, and trial parts assigned to the class, which will be debated from the perspective of Royal Courts, Church Ordeals, or a Viking assembly they creatively called "a Thing." The class will serve as the jury and, if necessary, select period-appropriate verdicts and explain how they arrived at their decisions, while striving for period accuracy. Second semester will move to codified Renaissance legal systems, leading up to the direct Ancestor to American legal traditions, Common Law.

Topics in this Series: Crime & Punishment in Medieval Times (Semester 1), Crime and Punishment in the Early Modern Era (Semester 2).

Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.

Assignments: Period maps, photographs, and re-creations will be posted on a class Google Drive, and video links from YouTube will be e-mailed to parents and students for homework or supplemental investigation.

Assessments: A mid-term and final exam may be given.

Textbooks: None. Case documents are provided in class.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History or Civics for purposes of a high school transcript.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $282.00

History Investigators: Medieval Europe

Quarter 1, 2: Starts on September 11, 2020

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Kouthar Muttardy

Grade Range: 9th-12th

Prerequisites: None

History Investigators will examine formative periods in European History through guided inquiry and evidence-based analysis. These topics are posed as a series of thought-provoking questions that students will research, debate, discuss, and form opinions about. First semester will examine several big questions about Medieval Europe:

-What was the authority of the Catholic Church during the Middle Ages?

-How did manorialism and feudalism come to dominate Medieval Europe?

-What factors contributed to the spread of the Black Death in Medieval Europe?

-What were the varying roles for women in Medieval Europe?

History Investigators is an interactive, multi-disciplinary examination of some of most significant events and turning points in European history using sources from The DBQ Project. DBQs, or document- based questions, are derived from AP History exams and help develop high school level critical thinking skills. Students will review an array of primary sources such as letters, journal entries, inventories, ship's manifestos, newspaper articles, period maps, and court documents along with selected secondary sources like excerpts, charts, and graphs. Students will be guided through analyzing the documents, interpreting the data, drawing inferences, and forming conclusions. In some historical scenarios, the class will consider conflicting perspectives and be able to defend and debate multiple sides of a key issue. To demonstrate comprehension and a deeper understanding of the class themes, students will use factual findings to develop structured, evidence-based essays.

Topics in this Series: Medieval Europe (Semester 1) and Renaissance and Reformation (Semester 2). Students may register for either or both semesters independently. Continuing students from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. Students may register for either or both semesters independently. Continuing students from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.

Assignments: All assignments will posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates.

Assessments: Points will be assigned for completed homework, projects, quizzes, and tests. A letter grade will not be assigned, but parents can use total points earned versus total points offered to assign a grade for purposes of a homeschool transcript. Parents can view total points earned at any time through the Canvas site.

Textbook: None.

Lab/Supply Fee: The cost of class copies is included in the course fee.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in American History for purposes of a high school transcript.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $288.00

Media Literacy in the Age of Misinformation

Quarter 1, 2: Starts on September 11, 2020

Class Time: 12:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Tia Murchie-Beyma

Grade Range: 9th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Media Literacy in the Age of Misinformation is a two-semester high school course that looks at media literacy from both social science and journalism perspectives. Students will develop analytical skills, awareness of national and global current events, and an understanding of how news information is acquired and packaged for our consumption. You will read news each week and discuss current stories in our live meetings. We will examine arguments and evidence, considering reliability, verification, ethical standards, balance and bias, context, and more. We will study some logical fallacies, such as the Slippery Slope and Straw Man. By the end of this course, you will be a better-informed, smarter consumer of news -– and hopefully a more involved citizen, better able to take action on issues you care about.

Topics in this Series: Media Literacy in the Age of Misinformation (Semester 1 and Semester 2). Although both semesters have the same title, content will naturally be different because of changing events and circumstances in national and world news. Students may register for either or both semesters independently. Continuing students from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Strong independent reading skills (or robust home support) are necessary, as much news material aims for a reading level pegged at approximately tenth grade. Students must also be able to discuss sometimes difficult and mature themes

Workload: Students should plan for 2-3 hours per week outside class meetings for reading and homework, a range which may vary based on reading speed. Additional time may be needed to pursue individual news interests, as the student wishes.

Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post weekly assignments, such as readings, videos, podcasts, written work, and news quizzes, and scores. These are due by 10:00 AM each Thursday (the day before Friday in-person meetings) to promote active, knowledgeable discussion. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.

Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by checking that weekly homework sets are complete and giving periodic take-home tests; class participation is also strongly encouraged. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade.

Textbook/Materials: The cost of an individual subscription to New York Times Upfront, a high school current events magazine is included in the course fee. Families should budget approximately $30.00 for one additional paid news subscription (details to be provided in class). Other readings and materials will be provided by the instructor.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Social Science or Journalism for purposes of a high school transcript.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $317.00

Spy Games RPG, The History of Espionage inThe Civil War

Quarter 1, 2: Starts on September 11, 2020

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 8th-12th

Prerequisites: None

This class will re-enact the great unseen intelligence battles of the Civil War- and learn about far more than spying in the process- using an RPG (role playing game).

The Civil War was America's deadliest conflict and was fought on all the fronts that existed at the time- on land, at sea, and underground. Knowing your enemy is the surest way to defeat them, and in the Civil War everyone did their part. This class will focus on the clandestine activities of one of America's most successful spies, Elizabeth Van Lew, leader of the Richmond Underground, a Union spy ring which operated under the nose of the highest levels of the Confederate government. The class will role play as Richmond high society, simulating the wartime economy of the Capitol of the South, while working to either support the war effort or undermine it. (Or the third option, war profiteering by playing both sides.)

The class will use a Role-Playing Game system, designed by the instructor for the Spy Games series of classes, to allow for "Dungeons and Dragons" style game play. Students will attempt to bluff, sneak, and steal their way into positions of power, completing secret objectives while trying to avoid detection and capture. Missions and information will have to be passed via historic methods, such as shift ciphers and code wheels, and as such, part of class will include lessons on basic cryptography. This will of course culminate in the Siege of Richmond, as the Union Army grinds its way into the South, and our student spies will be able to see and affect the scale of the outcomes of this (and other) major Civil War battles.

Topics in this Series: Early American Spying in The Civil War (Semester 1), Modern American Spying in the Cold War (Semester 2)

Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.

Assignments: Period maps, photographs, and re-creations will be posted on a class Google Drive, and video links from YouTube will be e-mailed to parents and students for homework or supplemental investigation.

Assessments: Will not be given.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $282.00

Energy Economics: Strategy & Simulation RPG- The Industrial Revolution

Quarter 1, 2: Starts on September 14, 2020

Class Time: 10:00 am      Duration: 115 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 10th-12th

Prerequisites:

This class will study and simulate the revolution that built the modern world, from coal to oil!

For thousands of years, the most advanced feats of human engineering came about through brute labor of men and beasts. Armies, soldiers, and slaves built roads and temples, and cargo was transported on waterways or pulled on animal-drawn carts. Once humanity began the widespread use of mechanical engines, it kick-started a massive leap in technology and progress. The limits were no longer set by biology, but by technology. This took people out of fields and into factories, producing goods at superhuman rates and raising the standard of living for humanity to unimaginable levels. This class will study the early Energy Economy, how modern nations exploited new technology and energy sources in the Industrial Revolution.

The class will use a custom Role-Playing Game to simulate a transitional industrial economy. Students will role play as either industry or energy tycoons and attempt to dominate the market and rule the supply and demand, while balancing the construction and maintenance of a class energy grid. Economic systems, infrastructure, labor organization, all must be precariously balanced to keep civilization out of literal darkness. Will they be Carnegies and Rockefellers, or will they run out of steam? To accomplish this, students will create a business plan and run balance sheets week-by-week to justify their strategies. These strategies will have to account for decisions like, how much fuel to acquire versus how much energy/goods to produce and sell in the in-class economy. We will track this in a class ledger, updated weekly and posted online. The students' bookkeeping will reveal profit or loss and guide their choices for the next week's game. Players will learn to change their strategies and tactics based on what everyone else is doing so their businesses remain profitable. Will they avoid bankruptcy or achieve a monopoly -– true to history?

Each student's business plan and bookkeeping ledger will be updated on class Google Drive and will be developed with feedback from the instructor. At the end of the semester, students will add a reflection about what they learned and what they would have done differently in their business plan with their new knowledge and game experience.

Students are encouraged, but not required, to take both semesters of this class. First semester will use a simple energy and business model, while second semester will be more technical including more energy options and considerations, resulting in more complex business plans and game strategies. During the second semester, students will learn about the different types of jobs found in the energy industry.

Topics in this Series: The Industrial Revolution (Semester 1), The Oil Economy and Beyond (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Prerequisites: None

Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.

Assignments: Course documents including period plans, photographs and recreations will be made available through a class Google Drive link emailed to parents (and students who provide their email address), as well as a class reading list of articles/excerpts and YouTube playlist for any videos watched in class or assigned as homework.

Assessments: Informal assessments will be given at the instructor's discretion, but assignments will not be scored or graded. Each student's financial success in the game will be an indicator of their learning and participation for purposes of assigning a grade. Parents will also be given shared access to their student's business plan with instructor and ledger, with instructor comments at the conclusion of class.

Textbook/Materials: None

Lab/Supply Fee: None

What to Bring: Paper or notebook, pen or pencil

Credit: Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History, Economics, or Business for purposes of a high school transcript.

7 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $414.00

Around the World: Geography of Central & South America

Quarter 2: Starts on October 28, 2020

Class Time: 12:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Kouthar Muttardy

Grade Range: 6th-8th

Prerequisites:

Around the World is a creative, interactive examination of world geography! Geography is much more than just maps and mountain ranges! Students will make an in-depth investigation of all aspects of geography region-by-region. Second quarter will explore the geography of Central and South America, from Suriname to Santiago to the Sao Manuel River.

Students will engage in hands-on activities, such as games and scavenger hunts, to learn about the lands, features, inhabitants, and phenomena and five themes of geography (location, place, human and environment interaction, movements, and regions) for each area that they study. For each major region, the class will look at aspects of human geography: political boundaries, cities and communities, cultural, social, and economic themes (dominant languages, religions, ethnic groups, agriculture, and trade), along with aspects of physical geography such as landforms, waterways, climate zones, biomes, etc. The class will also touch on the geographic specialties of meteorology and hydrology to understand how these impact physical and human geography.

Note: Map basics, including reading maps, types of maps, latitude and longitude, and understanding representations on maps, will only be covered during the first quarter of each year. Any student enrolling in the course after the first quarter will be expected to review map basics from a class packet of map information.

Topics in this Series: North America (Quarter 1); Central and South America (Quarter 2); Middle East & North Africa (Quarter 3); Sub-Saharan Africa (Quarter 4). Second year (2021-22) Europe (Quarter 5); Russia & East Asia (Quarter 6); South & Southeast Asia (Quarter 7); and Oceania, Antarctica & Earth's Oceans (Quarter 8). Lab/Supply Fee: Included in the course fee.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $147.00

Battle Strategies & Dioramas: Modern Warfare- WWII The Battle of the Bulge, 1944

Quarter 2: Starts on October 28, 2020

Class Time: 2:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 6th-8th

Prerequisites:

Students will engage in a hands-on 3D battle strategy game using the military dioramas that they make!

In late 1944, the outcome of the Second World War wasn't in doubt to anyone but the most deluded of Nazis. That didn't make the fighting any less lethal, but did increase Hitler's desperation to pull off a miraculous victory in the West and buy time to deal with the encroaching Soviet Red Army. The focal point of this plan was the Ardennes, a "quiet" sector of the front in Luxembourg where the Allies had sent badly mauled units to recover from fierce fighting elsewhere. The logic being, nobody in their right mind would invade through the forest, in winter, especially given the dire circumstances the German army was facing literally everywhere else. This was a miscalculation. Hitler used this opportunity to ram the last functioning units at his disposal to "drive the Allies back into the sea" and try and take the port of Antwerp, the only major port not left in total ruin by the German retreat. A victory here would have potentially reset the clock all the way back to D-Day, six months earlier.

Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will each form a 10" X 16" shaped, foam diorama with landscape elements (hills, buildings, rivers, bridges, vegetation, fences, etc) to represent a scene of a famous historical engagement. Students will each receive 1:72 scale miniature soldiers to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate the larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices.

The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical background and circumstances leading up to the specific battle. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include: WWII from the Russian Perspective, Stalingrad/Berlin (1st quarter), WWII The Battle of the Bulge, 1944 (2nd quarter), WWII The USMC at Guadalcanal, 1945 (3rd quarter), and Korean War, 1950-1953 (4th quarter).

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $141.00

Battle Strategies & Dioramas: Modern Warfare- WWII The Battle of the Bulge, 1944

Quarter 2: Starts on October 28, 2020

Class Time: 4:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 6th-8th

Prerequisites:

Students will engage in a hands-on 3D battle strategy game using the military dioramas that they make!

In late 1944, the outcome of the Second World War wasn't in doubt to anyone but the most deluded of Nazis. That didn't make the fighting any less lethal, but did increase Hitler's desperation to pull off a miraculous victory in the West and buy time to deal with the encroaching Soviet Red Army. The focal point of this plan was the Ardennes, a "quiet" sector of the front in Luxembourg where the Allies had sent badly mauled units to recover from fierce fighting elsewhere. The logic being, nobody in their right mind would invade through the forest, in winter, especially given the dire circumstances the German army was facing literally everywhere else. This was a miscalculation. Hitler used this opportunity to ram the last functioning units at his disposal to "drive the Allies back into the sea" and try and take the port of Antwerp, the only major port not left in total ruin by the German retreat. A victory here would have potentially reset the clock all the way back to D-Day, six months earlier.

Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will each form a 10" X 16" shaped, foam diorama with landscape elements (hills, buildings, rivers, bridges, vegetation, fences, etc) to represent a scene of a famous historical engagement. Students will each receive 1:72 scale miniature soldiers to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate the larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices.

The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical background and circumstances leading up to the specific battle. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include: WWII from the Russian Perspective, Stalingrad/Berlin (1st quarter), WWII The Battle of the Bulge, 1944 (2nd quarter), WWII The USMC at Guadalcanal, 1945 (3rd quarter), and Korean War, 1950-1953 (4th quarter).

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $141.00

Dynamic Dioramas: Prehistoric Series- Jurassic Survival Challenge (255-66 million years ago)

Quarter 2: Starts on October 28, 2020

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 3rd-5th

Prerequisites:

Students will learn about the Mesozoic flora and fauna of the prehistoric world and be introduced to the ideas of plate tectonics, species variation, and the evolution of plants. This knowledge will be applied through several games in which the students will learn the characteristics of the various dinosaurs and other creatures that lived with them and how to cooperate in a group. In "Saurian Safari", students get to simulate a cooperative hunt through a Mesozoic game park using miniature figures of their own, and in "Try-To-Survive-Asaurus," students will try to survive in the harsh and changing environment of the dinosaurs while playing as their very own dinosaur with the options of cooperating with or eating their fellow classmates. Over the course of the class, students should be able to explain the differences in the types of dinosaurs and plants found during the period, be it Cretaceous, Jurassic, or Triassic and how these differences are reflected in their very own swamp, forest, or scrub terrain type boards.

Each student will create an individual diorama. Students will craft and hand-shape their scene on a 10 x 16 inch foam board using artistic, model-making techniques. They will customize their dioramas with landforms, waterways, plant life, and paint. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with miniature figures and combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to create a larger terrain. Students will then compete in a pre-history-based survival strategy game. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them. Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $15.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include Prehistoric Seas Survival (1st quarter), A Jurassic Survival Challenge (2nd quarter), Ice Age Survival (3rd quarter), and Sumerian Settlement (4th quarter).

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $141.00

Dynamic Dioramas: Virginia History- The American War of Independence

Quarter 2: Starts on October 28, 2020

Class Time: 3:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 3rd-5th

Prerequisites:

Before the founding of the America, there were thirteen original British colonies, and Virginia was the oldest, as well as one of the largest and most influential. Often called "The Birthplace of Presidents," Virginia gave us many of the country's Founding Fathers, like George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry, and James Madison. It was in Virginia, at Yorktown, that the American War of Independence would come to an end, and Virginians would be present at most major battles of the Revolution. Students will create a diorama board of a famous Revolutionary battle relevant to Virginia, choosing from the battle of the Great Bridge at Norfolk, the Battle of Vincennes with the Virginia militia in Indiana, or the Battle of Yorktown.

Each student will create an individual diorama. Students will craft and hand-shape their scene on a 10 x 16 inch foam board using artistic, model-making techniques. They will customize their dioramas with landscape elements, waterways, structures of the time, and paint. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature figures and combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to create a larger terrain. Students will then compete in a history-based strategy game. This will reinforce lessons about the culture, economy, warfare, and politics of the time. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them. Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $15.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include Virginia History: Jamestown and the Powhatan Confederacy, 1607 (1st quarter), The American War of Independence (2nd quarter), The War of 1812 (3rd quarter), and The Civil War 1861-1865 (4th quarter).

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $141.00

Hands on History: River Valley Civilizations- Ancient Egypt

Quarter 2: Starts on October 28, 2020

Class Time: 3:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Kouthar Muttardy

Grade Range: 3rd-5th

Prerequisites:

Discover Ancient Egypt, and its contributions to the modern world in this vibrant hands-on history class! Learn about the cultural development and traditions of ancient Egypt (such as homes, architecture, clothing, food, transportation, and beliefs) through weekly projects. Students will make canopic jars, scarab shabtis, jeweled necklaces and armbands, hieroglyphic cartouches, moveable mummies, and water clocks as they learn about life in ancient Egypt! Students will identify inventions and contributions of the ancient Egyptians such as papyrus paper, linen cloth, shipbuilding, toothpaste, mummification, pyramid building, and more! The class will also sample the literature of the period through read-alouds of fables and folklore, most of which recounted the stories of the gods.

Students will be excited by history when approached through this engaging, multi-disciplinary exploration of historical connections and integrated concepts rather than memorizing dates and disconnected facts! Note: This is a 75-minute class that will end at 4:10 pm Topics in this Series include the River Valley Civilizations of: Mesopotamia (Quarter 1), Ancient Egypt (Quarter 2), Ancient China (Quarter 3), and India (Quarter 4) Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $15.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $176.00

Around the World: Geography of the Middle East & North Africa

Quarter 3: Starts on January 13, 2021

Class Time: 12:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Kouthar Muttardy

Grade Range: 6th-8th

Prerequisites:

Around the World is a creative, interactive examination of world geography! Geography is much more than just maps and mountain ranges! Students will make an in-depth investigation of all aspects of geography region-by-region. Third quarter will explore the geography of the Middle East and North Africa, from Nazareth and the Nile to Marrakesh and Medina.

Students will engage in hands-on activities, such as games and scavenger hunts, to learn about the lands, features, inhabitants, and phenomena and five themes of geography (location, place, human and environment interaction, movements, and regions) for each area that they study. For each major region, the class will look at aspects of human geography: political boundaries, cities and communities, cultural, social, and economic themes (dominant languages, religions, ethnic groups, agriculture, and trade), along with aspects of physical geography such as landforms, waterways, climate zones, biomes, etc. The class will also touch on the geographic specialties of meteorology and hydrology to understand how these impact physical and human geography.

Note: Map basics, including reading maps, types of maps, latitude and longitude, and understanding representations on maps, will only be covered during the first quarter of each year. Any student enrolling in the course after the first quarter will be expected to review map basics from a class packet of map information.

Topics in this Series: North America (Quarter 1); Central and South America (Quarter 2); Middle East & North Africa (Quarter 3); Sub-Saharan Africa (Quarter 4). Second year (2021-22) Europe (Quarter 5); Russia & East Asia (Quarter 6); South & Southeast Asia (Quarter 7); and Oceania, Antarctica & Earth's Oceans (Quarter 8). Lab/Supply Fee: Included in the course fee. Non-Meeting Dates This is a 7-week class that does not meet on March 10.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $147.00

Battle Strategies & Dioramas: Modern Warfare- WWII The USMC at Guadalcanal, 1942

Quarter 3: Starts on January 13, 2021

Class Time: 2:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 6th-8th

Prerequisites:

Students will engage in a hands-on 3D battle strategy game using the military dioramas that they make!

The opening stage of the Pacific Theater of WWII was a painful lesson for the United States, especially the Navy. Starting with the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor that crippled much of the fleet, Japan continued with devastating and coordinated strikes across the whole Pacific that pushed the US and its allies back across thousands of miles of ocean. That changed at Midway, when the outnumbered US fleet ambushed and wrecked the Japanese on their way to take yet another isolated island. This opened the way for the US to go on the offensive and regain the initiative, starting between Hawaii and Allied Australia, in the Solomons at Guadalcanal. Rather than focus solely on the ground campaign, this class will also include a naval component, using models of the ships that fought the many naval battles of Guadalcanal at the infamous Iron Bottom Sound.

Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will each form a 10" X 16" shaped, foam diorama with landscape elements (hills, valleys, rivers, ridges, vegetation, airfields, etc) to represent a scene of a famous historical engagement. Students will each receive scale miniature naval ships to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate the larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Axis and Allies War at Sea gaming rule system for moving ships and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices.

The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical background and circumstances leading up to the specific battle. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include: WWII from the Russian Perspective, Stalingrad/Berlin (1st quarter), WWII The Battle of the Bulge, 1944 (2nd quarter), WWII The USMC at Guadalcanal, 1945 (3rd quarter), and Korean War, 1950-1953 (4th quarter).

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $161.00

Battle Strategies & Dioramas: Modern Warfare- WWII The USMC at Guadalcanal, 1942

Quarter 3: Starts on January 13, 2021

Class Time: 4:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 6th-8th

Prerequisites:

Students will engage in a hands-on 3D battle strategy game using the military dioramas that they make!

The opening stage of the Pacific Theater of WWII was a painful lesson for the United States, especially the Navy. Starting with the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor that crippled much of the fleet, Japan continued with devastating and coordinated strikes across the whole Pacific that pushed the US and its allies back across thousands of miles of ocean. That changed at Midway, when the outnumbered US fleet ambushed and wrecked the Japanese on their way to take yet another isolated island. This opened the way for the US to go on the offensive and regain the initiative, starting between Hawaii and Allied Australia, in the Solomons at Guadalcanal. Rather than focus solely on the ground campaign, this class will also include a naval component, using models of the ships that fought the many naval battles of Guadalcanal at the infamous Iron Bottom Sound.

Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will each form a 10" X 16" shaped, foam diorama with landscape elements (hills, valleys, rivers, ridges, vegetation, airfields, etc) to represent a scene of a famous historical engagement. Students will each receive scale miniature naval ships to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate the larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Axis and Allies War at Sea gaming rule system for moving ships and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices.

The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical background and circumstances leading up to the specific battle. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include: WWII from the Russian Perspective, Stalingrad/Berlin (1st quarter), WWII The Battle of the Bulge, 1944 (2nd quarter), WWII The USMC at Guadalcanal, 1945 (3rd quarter), and Korean War, 1950-1953 (4th quarter).

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $161.00

Dynamic Dioramas: Prehistoric Series- Ice Age Survival (2.6 million years ago -– 4000 BCE)

Quarter 3: Starts on January 13, 2021

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 3rd-5th

Prerequisites:

Brrrr, it's cold! Travel back to the Ice Age, a world filled with wilderness and wonder that began 2.6 million years ago. Learn about early man and the animals that were among the megafauna of the Pleistocene era through an Ice Age Safari, in which students will hunt Mammoths and other prehistoric beasts using their own miniature hunters simulating authentic prehistoric cooperative hunting tactics that allowed our ancestors to take down mighty mammoths with pointy sticks and rocks! Students will also make a miniature prehistoric human settlement complete with primitive huts, mega-fauna, people, and Ice Age animals, and play competitive games to hunt and gather food and grow their tribe. Over the course of the class, students should be able to explain the lifestyle of early man and the adaptations of the animals he lived with and the environment that necessitated them.

Each student will create an individual diorama. Students will craft and hand-shape their scene on a 10 x 16 inch foam board using artistic, model-making techniques. They will customize their dioramas with landforms, waterways, plant life, and paint. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature figures and combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to create a larger terrain. Students will then compete in a history-based survival strategy game. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them. Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $15.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include Prehistoric Seas Survival (1st quarter), A Jurassic Survival Challenge (2nd quarter), Ice Age Survival (3rd quarter), and Sumerian Settlement (4th quarter).

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $161.00

Dynamic Dioramas: Virginia History- The War of 1812

Quarter 3: Starts on January 13, 2021

Class Time: 3:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 3rd-5th

Prerequisites:

After the American war of Independence, the young nation of the United States struggled to gain its footing internationally, especially in the eyes of its former colonial masters, Great Britain. The class will discuss the lead-up to the War of 1812, from the perspectives of the young American nation and the British Empire, how America's first political parties opposed or supported the war, and the national consequences that would result. Once the diorama boards are completed, students will re-enact battles like the burning of Washington.

Each student will create an individual diorama. Students will craft and hand-shape their scene on a 10 x 16 inch foam board using artistic, model-making techniques. They will customize their dioramas with landscape elements, waterways, structures of the time, and paint. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature figures and combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to create a larger terrain. Students will then compete in a history-based strategy game. This will reinforce lessons about the culture, economy, warfare, and politics of the time. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them. Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $15.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include Virginia History: Jamestown and the Powhatan Confederacy, 1607 (1st quarter), The American War of Independence (2nd quarter), The War of 1812 (3rd quarter), and The Civil War 1861-1865 (4th quarter).

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $161.00

Hands on History: River Valley Civilizations- Ancient China

Quarter 3: Starts on January 13, 2021

Class Time: 3:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Kouthar Muttardy

Grade Range: 3rd-5th

Prerequisites:

Discover Ancient China and its contributions to the modern world in this vibrant, new, hands-on history class! Learn about the cultural development and traditions of ancient China (such as homes, architecture, clothing, food, transportation, and beliefs) through weekly projects. Students will make dragon puppets, wooden slat books, paper lanterns, coolie hats, and brew tea as they learn about life in ancient China! Students will identify inventions and contributions of the ancient Chinese such as the umbrella, wheelbarrow, compass, gun powder, silk, papers, kites, abacus, porcelain, and more! The class will also sample the literature of the period through weekly read-alouds of fables and folklore like "The Legend of the Milky Way" and "The River Dragon."

Students will be excited by history when approached through this engaging, multi-disciplinary exploration of historical connections and integrated concepts rather than memorizing dates and disconnected facts! Note: This is a 75-minute class that will end at 4:10 pm. This is also a 7-week class that will not meet on 3/10/21. Topics in this Series include the River Valley Civilizations of: Mesopotamia (Quarter 1), Ancient Egypt (Quarter 2), Ancient China (Quarter 3), and India (Quarter 4) Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $15.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $176.00

Civics Critics: Know Your Rights

Quarter 3, 4: Starts on January 13, 2021

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Kouthar Muttardy

Grade Range: 7th-9th

Prerequisites:

Civics Critics will explore themes related to the US Bill of Rights through guided inquiry and evidence-based analysis. These topics are posed as a series of thought-provoking questions that students will research, debate, discuss, and form opinions about. Second semester will examine themes such as the first ten amendments, the justice system, and Supreme Court cases in a relevant, approachable, and interactive context. The class will apply this knowledge to analyze three big DBQ inquiries: Should Schools Be Allowed to Limit Students' Online Speech? Search and Seizure: Did the Government Go Too Far? Is the American Jury System Still a Good Idea?

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $308.00

3D History: WWI- Over the Top, 1916-1918

Quarter 3, 4: Starts on January 15, 2021

Class Time: 12:00 pm      Duration: 115 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 8th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Why read about key military battles on maps or in books when you can learn about them hands-on, in three dimensions, using historical miniature gaming? In 3D History, pivotal engagements come alive for new and experienced students, as they navigate a table-top terrain, deploy hundreds of miniature soldiers, ships, and tanks... all while playing a military strategy game. Each student will have the opportunity to fight a battle from both sides, allowing them to test various strategies, try multiple scenarios, predict different outcomes, and rewrite history- an effective way to gain a deeper understanding of what actually happened and why!

In 1916 The Great War had been churning through men and material for two years. Something had to be done- warring countries were driving deep into debt and losing entire generations of young men at the front. The armies had to go "Over the Top." Great Battle Plans were drawn up for massive, simultaneous attacks across the whole of Western Europe. In secret, the British built new technological horrors to drive through the German lines: land battleships bristling with guns, covered in armor and belching smoke and fire. The gears of war reached as far as Gallipoli in Turkey and the deserts of the Middle East. In the West, an untapped American giant slowly stirred to war. Provoked by unrestricted submarine warfare, diplomatic intrigue, and a righteous desire to defend democracy, would America arrive in time to decide the outcome of the Great War?

This semester will study later years of WWI, the major battles of the Western Front, where tens of thousands of men went "over the top" of their trenches to near certain death, as well as the desperate attempts to break the stalemate in other theaters of war with new technologies.

Note: This is a 1 hour, 55 minute class with a 10-minute break part way through.

Topics in this Series: WWI- No Man's Land 1914-1915 (Semester 1) and WWI- Over the Top 1916-1918 (Semester 2).

Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.

Assignments: Period maps, photographs, and re-creations will be posted on a class Google Drive, and video links from YouTube will be e-mailed to parents and students for homework or supplemental investigation.

Assessments: Will not be given.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $356.00

3D History: WWI- Over the Top, 1916-1918

Quarter 3, 4: Starts on January 15, 2021

Class Time: 2:00 pm      Duration: 115 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 8th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Why read about key military battles on maps or in books when you can learn about them hands-on, in three dimensions, using historical miniature gaming? In 3D History, pivotal engagements come alive for new and experienced students, as they navigate a table-top terrain, deploy hundreds of miniature soldiers, ships, and tanks... all while playing a military strategy game. Each student will have the opportunity to fight a battle from both sides, allowing them to test various strategies, try multiple scenarios, predict different outcomes, and rewrite history- an effective way to gain a deeper understanding of what actually happened and why!

In 1916 The Great War had been churning through men and material for two years. Something had to be done- warring countries were driving deep into debt and losing entire generations of young men at the front. The armies had to go "Over the Top." Great Battle Plans were drawn up for massive, simultaneous attacks across the whole of Western Europe. In secret, the British built new technological horrors to drive through the German lines: land battleships bristling with guns, covered in armor and belching smoke and fire. The gears of war reached as far as Gallipoli in Turkey and the deserts of the Middle East. In the West, an untapped American giant slowly stirred to war. Provoked by unrestricted submarine warfare, diplomatic intrigue, and a righteous desire to defend democracy, would America arrive in time to decide the outcome of the Great War?

This semester will study later years of WWI, the major battles of the Western Front, where tens of thousands of men went "over the top" of their trenches to near certain death, as well as the desperate attempts to break the stalemate in other theaters of war with new technologies.

Note: This is a 1 hour, 55 minute class with a 10-minute break part way through.

Topics in this Series: WWI- No Man's Land 1914-1915 (Semester 1) and WWI- Over the Top 1916-1918 (Semester 2).

Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.

Assignments: Period maps, photographs, and re-creations will be posted on a class Google Drive, and video links from YouTube will be e-mailed to parents and students for homework or supplemental investigation.

Assessments: Will not be given.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $356.00

Ancient Justice: Crime & Punishment in the Early Modern Era

Quarter 3, 4: Starts on January 15, 2021

Class Time: 10:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 8th-12th

Prerequisites: None

This class will explore the judicial processes of mainland Europe and their divergence from English
Common Law. Like a traditional mock trial program, the class will hear cases, and students will defend themselves. Real historical cases will be studied, and trial parts assigned to the class, which will be
debated from the perspective of Englishmen, from commoners to nobility, and Europeans in both
criminal and church courts. The class will serve as the jury and, if necessary, select period-appropriate
verdicts and explain how they arrived at their decisions, while striving for period accuracy. This semester
will examine the Justice systems of Renaissance Europe up to Colonial Britain.

Topics in this Series: Crime & Punishment in Medieval Times (Semester 1), Crime and Punishment in the Early Modern Era (Semester 2).

Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.

Assignments: Period maps, photographs, and re-creations will be posted on a class Google Drive, and video links from YouTube will be e-mailed to parents and students for homework or supplemental investigation.

Assessments: A mid-term and final exam may be given.

Textbooks: None. Case documents are provided in class.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History or Civics for purposes of a high school transcript.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $322.00

History Investigators: The Renaissance and Reformation

Quarter 3, 4: Starts on January 15, 2021

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Kouthar Muttardy

Grade Range: 9th-12th

Prerequisites: None

History Investigators will examine formative periods in European History through guided inquiry and evidence-based analysis. These topics are posed as a series of thought-provoking questions that students will research, debate, discuss, and form opinions about. Second semester will examine several big questions surrounding the Renaissance and Reformation:

- Is the Renaissance a mischaracterization of an age?

-How did the Renaissance change man's view of man?

-How did the Northern Renaissance differ from the Italian Renaissance?

-Between Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo, who was the more representative example of a Renaissance man?

-How did the Protestant Reformation change Christianity?

-What were Martin Luther's arguments against the Catholic Church?

-How did the Catholic Church respond to the Reformation?

History Investigators is an interactive, multi-disciplinary examination of some of most significant events and turning points in European history using sources from The DBQ Project. DBQs, or document- based questions, are derived from AP History exams and help develop high school level critical thinking skills. Students will review an array of primary sources such as letters, journal entries, inventories, ship's manifestos, newspaper articles, period maps, and court documents along with selected secondary sources like excerpts, charts, and graphs. Students will be guided through analyzing the documents, interpreting the data, drawing inferences, and forming conclusions. In some historical scenarios, the class will consider conflicting perspectives and be able to defend and debate multiple sides of a key issue. To demonstrate comprehension and a deeper understanding of the class themes, students will use factual findings to develop structured, evidence-based essays.

Topics in this Series: Medieval Europe (Semester 1) and Renaissance and Reformation (Semester 2). Students may register for either or both semesters independently. Continuing students from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. Students may register for either or both semesters independently. Continuing students from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.

Assignments: All assignments will posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates.

Assessments: Points will be assigned for completed homework, projects, quizzes, and tests. A letter grade will not be assigned, but parents can use total points earned versus total points offered to assign a grade for purposes of a homeschool transcript. Parents can view total points earned at any time through the Canvas site.

Textbook: None.

Lab/Supply Fee: The cost of class copies is included in the course fee.

Non-Meeting Days: In addition to the scheduled days-off on the published Compass schedule, this class does not meet on March 12.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in American History for purposes of a high school transcript.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $308.00

Media Literacy in the Age of Misinformation

Quarter 3, 4: Starts on January 15, 2021

Class Time: 12:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Tia Murchie-Beyma

Grade Range: 9th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Media Literacy in the Age of Misinformation is a two-semester high school course that looks at media literacy from both social science and journalism perspectives. Students will develop analytical skills, awareness of national and global current events, and an understanding of how news information is acquired and packaged for our consumption. You will read news each week and discuss current stories in our live meetings. We will examine arguments and evidence, considering reliability, verification, ethical standards, balance and bias, context, and more. We will study some logical fallacies, such as the Slippery Slope and Straw Man. By the end of this course, you will be a better-informed, smarter consumer of news -– and hopefully a more involved citizen, better able to take action on issues you care about.

Topics in this Series: Media Literacy in the Age of Misinformation (Semester 1 and Semester 2). Although both semesters have the same title, content will naturally be different because of changing events and circumstances in national and world news. Students may register for either or both semesters independently.

Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Strong independent reading skills (or robust home support) are necessary, as much news material aims for a reading level pegged at approximately tenth grade. Students must also be able to discuss sometimes difficult and mature themes

Workload: Students should plan for 2-3 hours per week outside class meetings for reading and homework, a range which may vary based on reading speed. Additional time may be needed to pursue individual news interests, as the student wishes.

Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post weekly assignments, such as readings, videos, podcasts, written work, and news quizzes, and scores. These are due by 10:00 AM each Thursday (the day before Friday in-person meetings) to promote active, knowledgeable discussion. Students should have their own e-mail address in order to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload.

Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by checking that weekly homework sets are complete and giving periodic take-home tests; class participation is also strongly encouraged. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for the purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade.

Textbook/Materials: The cost of an individual subscription to New York Times Upfront, a high school current events magazine is included in the course fee. Families should budget approximately $30.00 for one additional paid news subscription (details to be provided in class). Other readings and materials will be provided by the instructor.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Social Science or Journalism for purposes of a high school transcript.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $359.00

Spy Games RPG, The History of Espionage inThe Cold War

Quarter 3, 4: Starts on January 15, 2021

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 8th-12th

Prerequisites: None

This class will pull aside the Iron Curtain, and uncover the secrets of spying during the Cold War, learning about far more than spying in the process- using an RPG (role playing game).

When the world's last two superpowers faced off for fifty years, the intelligence battle had to go incognito. It was the USA vs the USSR, and any advantage could mean the difference between life and nuclear annihilation. No expense was spared as spying went Space Age. The real stories of espionage were just as interesting as James Bond and Q, and the stakes just as high. Computers worked on large scale to obscure secrets from invasion plans and to nuclear codes and knowing just who is really on your side. Field agents subtly advised potential allies and sometimes outright topples whole regimes with well (or poorly) placed assassinations.

The class will use a Role-Playing Game system, designed by the instructor for the Spy Games series of classes, to allow for "Dungeons and Dragons" style game play. The class will examine the lives and techniques of real Cold War spies, adopt their methods and replicate them for ourselves, pitting one half of the class against the other. Once students have the enemy's secrets, they will attempt to make use of this stolen information and learn just how much power there is in knowledge.

Topics in this Series: Early American Spying in The Civil War (Semester 1), Modern American Spying in the Cold War (Semester 2)

Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.

Assignments: Period maps, photographs, and re-creations will be posted on a class Google Drive, and video links from YouTube will be e-mailed to parents and students for homework or supplemental investigation.

Assessments: Will not be given.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $322.00

The History of WWII: The Defeat of Germany and Wars Against Japan

Quarter 3,4: Starts on January 13, 2021

Class Time: 9:30 am      Duration: 145 min

Instructor: Hugh Gardner

Grade Range: 8th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Students will be immersed in detail and fully engaged in this intensive history course led by well- known homeschool instructor and historian Hugh Gardner. This history class is unlike other high school history course. Instead of learning a sequential set of names, dates, and battles, students will learn how to analyze and interpret history. Much like a college seminar, this approach to American History incorporates historiography (the history of the history.) Mr. Gardner does not teach a narrow view from a single textbook or static set of prepared notes. Instead, he presents the back story and multiple interpretations for the "why" questions in American history. Class discussion considers interpretations from a wide array of scholars and is updated as new sources are published. Rather than running through a timeline of outcomes, students will evaluate contributing factors (the "how" questions) and will learn about the personalities, prejudices, and biases of the people involved ("who").

Second semester, students will continue to examine the Eastern Front in World War II and the match-up between Hilter and Stalin as the Germans attempted an invasion of Russia. Students will also learn about the Holocaust and the enslavement of Europe. The class will look at the US Army's involvement in the European Theater of Operations (ETO) and the progression from D-Day to VE Day with a special examination of strategic warfare and the weapons and machines of war. Next, the class will turn its attention to Asia and study Japan's long road to Pearl Harbor followed by the Japanese onslaught and wars against Japan in World War II. The class will discuss the effects on the political, social, and economic climate as well as influences on the arts, science, literature, religion, and warfare. This is no ordinary history class as Mr. Gardner surrounds the students with vivid posters, maps, charts, primary sources, and artifacts to supplement his story-telling style. Students will be able to examine and handle period pieces such as antique and replica weapons and military accoutrements of the era while learning how these tools helped shape the battlefields and turning points in history. With an emphasis on primary sources, students will scrutinize historical atlases and original writings, all in a collaborative and interactive setting. Just for fun, students earn historical trading cards for class participation.

Topics in this Series: WWII: From Looming War through Stalingrad (Semester 1), WWI: The Defeat of Germany and the Wars Against Japan (Semester 2). Continuing students from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

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Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class on assigned readings.

Assignments: are given in class and e-mailed to parents and students.

Assessments: Will not be given

Textbook: Continuing students will continue to use the atlases from first semester. New students should purchase: (1) Atlas of World War II by Richard Natkiel, published by The Military Press, 1985. (Note: hardback or paperback editions from the 1980s are preferred over more recent small format editions from 2011 -– on. Used copies available on Amazon.) (2) Collins Atlas of the Second World War, by John Keegan ed., published by HarperCollins, 2003. (Note: This is a very large format atlas in different editions with some titled Times instead of Collins; key is John Keegan as editor. Used copies available on Amazon.) For those families who want to investigate the course themes at a deeper level, an optional reading list will be furnished.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count two semesters of this course as a full credit in American or World History for purposes of a high school transcript.

10 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $376.00

Around the World: Geography of Sub-Saharan Africa

Quarter 4: Starts on March 24, 2021

Class Time: 12:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Kouthar Muttardy

Grade Range: 6th-8th

Prerequisites:

Around the World is a creative, interactive examination of world geography! Geography is much more than just maps and mountain ranges! Students will make an in-depth investigation of all aspects of geography region-by-region. Fourth quarter will explore the geography of Sub-Saharan Africa from Sudan to Soweto to the savannas.

Students will engage in hands-on activities, such as games and scavenger hunts, to learn about the lands, features, inhabitants, and phenomena and five themes of geography (location, place, human and environment interaction, movements, and regions) for each area that they study. For each major region, the class will look at aspects of human geography: political boundaries, cities and communities, cultural, social, and economic themes (dominant languages, religions, ethnic groups, agriculture, and trade), along with aspects of physical geography such as landforms, waterways, climate zones, biomes, etc. The class will also touch on the geographic specialties of meteorology and hydrology to understand how these impact physical and human geography.

Note: Map basics, including reading maps, types of maps, latitude and longitude, and understanding representations on maps, will only be covered during the first quarter of each year. Any student enrolling in the course after the first quarter will be expected to review map basics from a class packet of map information.

Topics in this Series: North America (Quarter 1); Central and South America (Quarter 2); Middle East & North Africa (Quarter 3); Sub-Saharan Africa (Quarter 4). Second year (2021-22) Europe (Quarter 5); Russia & East Asia (Quarter 6); South & Southeast Asia (Quarter 7); and Oceania, Antarctica & Earth's Oceans (Quarter 8). Lab/Supply Fee: Included in the course fee.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $167.00

Battle Strategies & Dioramas: Modern Warfare- Korean War, 1950-1953

Quarter 4: Starts on March 24, 2021

Class Time: 2:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 6th-8th

Prerequisites:

Students will engage in a hands-on 3D battle strategy game using the military dioramas that they make!

At the end of WWII, the World was divided into a bi-polar power structure. The two dominant forces, the United States and its Allies, versus the Soviet Union and its puppets. In the final months of WWII, the Soviets occupied large swaths of territory with the goal of creating buffer states. In many cases, they would run up against US or Allied forces there. This would set the stage for the next 50 years of proxy conflicts, known as the Cold War. The first such place was Korea in the 1950s. The Government of North Korea, made up of hand-picked Communist loyalists, rolled into a weakly defended South Korea to forcibly unify the country. The US found this unacceptable and led a United Nations army to beat back the North Korean armies to the border of China. This prompted the Communist North Koreans to launch a second invasion. The UN forces were pushed all the way back to the original 1950 border, which to this day is the most heavily militarized zone on Earth. In both countries, the Koreans and their respective allies wait for conflict to arise again, as the ceasefire signed in the 50s was not technically an end to the state of war.

Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will each form a 10" X 16" shaped, foam diorama with landscape elements (hills, buildings, rivers, bridges, vegetation, fences, etc) to represent a scene of a famous historical engagement. Students will each receive 1:72 scale miniature soldiers to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate the larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices.

The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical background and circumstances leading up to the specific battle. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include: WWII from the Russian Perspective, Stalingrad/Berlin (1st quarter), WWII The Battle of the Bulge, 1944 (2nd quarter), WWII The USMC at Guadalcanal, 1945 (3rd quarter), and Korean War, 1950-1953 (4th quarter).

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $161.00

Battle Strategies & Dioramas: Modern Warfare- Korean War, 1950-1953

Quarter 4: Starts on March 24, 2021

Class Time: 4:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 6th-8th

Prerequisites:

Students will engage in a hands-on 3D battle strategy game using the military dioramas that they make!

At the end of WWII, the World was divided into a bi-polar power structure. The two dominant forces, the United States and its Allies, versus the Soviet Union and its puppets. In the final months of WWII, the Soviets occupied large swaths of territory with the goal of creating buffer states. In many cases, they would run up against US or Allied forces there. This would set the stage for the next 50 years of proxy conflicts, known as the Cold War. The first such place was Korea in the 1950s. The Government of North Korea, made up of hand-picked Communist loyalists, rolled into a weakly defended South Korea to forcibly unify the country. The US found this unacceptable and led a United Nations army to beat back the North Korean armies to the border of China. This prompted the Communist North Koreans to launch a second invasion. The UN forces were pushed all the way back to the original 1950 border, which to this day is the most heavily militarized zone on Earth. In both countries, the Koreans and their respective allies wait for conflict to arise again, as the ceasefire signed in the 50s was not technically an end to the state of war.

Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will each form a 10" X 16" shaped, foam diorama with landscape elements (hills, buildings, rivers, bridges, vegetation, fences, etc) to represent a scene of a famous historical engagement. Students will each receive 1:72 scale miniature soldiers to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate the larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices.

The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical background and circumstances leading up to the specific battle. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include: WWII from the Russian Perspective, Stalingrad/Berlin (1st quarter), WWII The Battle of the Bulge, 1944 (2nd quarter), WWII The USMC at Guadalcanal, 1945 (3rd quarter), and Korean War, 1950-1953 (4th quarter).

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $161.00

Dynamic Dioramas: Prehistoric Series- Sumerian Settlement (4000 BCE)

Quarter 4: Starts on March 24, 2021

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 3rd-5th

Prerequisites:

Travel back to the ancient Middle East and learn about the very first civilizations ever to exist! Discover the first major cities of Ur and Uruk, the first written language in Cuneiform, and the first story every written, The Epic of Gilgamesh. Each student will create an individual diorama of an ancient Sumerian city and play a cooperative survival strategy game. This will reinforce lessons about the culture, economy, warfare, and politics of the time.

Each student will create an individual diorama. Students will craft and hand-shape their scene on a 10 x 16 inch foam board using artistic, model-making techniques. They will customize their dioramas with landscape elements, waterways, structures of the time, and paint. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature figures and combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to create a larger terrain. Students will then compete in a history-based survival strategy game. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them. Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $15.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include Prehistoric Seas Survival (1st quarter), A Jurassic Survival Challenge (2nd quarter), Ice Age Survival (3rd quarter), and Sumerian Settlement (4th quarter).

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $161.00

Dynamic Dioramas: Virginia History- The Civil War, 1861-1865

Quarter 4: Starts on March 24, 2021

Class Time: 3:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 3rd-5th

Prerequisites:

There is Civil War history in every corner of Virginia! The Commonwealth saw fighting from the earliest days of the Civil War to its end at Appomattox Courthouse, following the Confederacy's loss of its capital in Richmond. Battles in Virginia took place in every type of setting, from the fields of Manassas to the mountains of the Shenandoah; and from the first ironclad battles around Hampton Roads to intense sieges never before seen around Petersburg. At the conclusion of the quarter, each student will understand Virginia's significance to the Civil War as a whole, why Richmond was chosen as the capital of the Confederacy, how battles were fought at the start of the Civil War, and what changed by the end of the war.

Each student will create an individual diorama. Students will craft and hand-shape their scene on a 10 x 16 inch foam board using artistic, model-making techniques. They will customize their dioramas with landscape elements, waterways, structures of the time, and paint. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature figures and combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to create a larger terrain. Students will then compete in a history-based strategy game. This will reinforce lessons about the culture, economy, warfare, and politics of the time. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them. Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $15.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include Virginia History: Jamestown and the Powhatan Confederacy, 1607 (1st quarter), The American War of Independence (2nd quarter), The War of 1812 (3rd quarter), and The Civil War 1861-1865 (4th quarter).

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $161.00

Hands on History: River Valley Civilizations- Ancient India

Quarter 4: Starts on March 24, 2021

Class Time: 3:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Kouthar Muttardy

Grade Range: 3rd-5th

Prerequisites:

Discover Ancient India and its contributions to the modern world in this vibrant, new, hands-on history class! Learn about the cultural development and traditions of ancient India (such as homes, architecture, clothing, food, transportation, and beliefs) through weekly projects. Students will decorate rangolis, try henna designs, make an Indian dessert and a lotus flower lantern, and reenact the caste system as they learn about life in Ancient India. Students will identify some of the inventions and contributions of the Ancient Indians including the "number" zero, rulers, shampoo, the flush toilet, yoga, cotton cultivation, buttons, and the games of chess, checkers, and snakes and ladders. The class will also sample the literature of the period through read-alouds of fables and folklore like the Jataka tales and The Birth of the Ganges.

Students will be excited by history when approached through this engaging, multi-disciplinary exploration of historical connections and integrated concepts rather than memorizing dates and disconnected facts! Note: This is a 75-minute class that will end at 4:10 pm Topics in this Series include the River Valley Civilizations of: Mesopotamia (Quarter 1), Ancient Egypt (Quarter 2), Ancient China (Quarter 3), and India (Quarter 4) Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $15.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $201.00

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