Class Registration

Classes for 3rd quarter are now online! Registration opens at 6:00 am on Thursday, November 30. 3rd quarter is an 8-week session (for most classes) that begins on January 10, 2018 (for Wednesday classes) and January 12, 2018, (for Friday classes). New families are welcome! Filter the class list below, or click any column heading to sort by that field.

  • Before Registering
    • Review the schedule grid to view class options hour-by-hour or filtered by grade level.Check the full class descriptions, times, recommended grade range, and prerequisites (for some)
    • Classes meet in Oakton. Read class descriptions carefully to see whether a class meets Wednesday only (most), Friday only (some), or Wednesday and Friday (few).
    • Review Compass policies regarding age/grade placement, class withdrawals and refunds.
    • For high school classes, read the Compass Program Approach.
    • Review the full Academic Calendar.
  • Full (Wait Listed) Classes
    Please note that as classes become full, a wait list is created. Please add your child’s name to the wait list if you are interested in the course, as openings sometimes become available. You will not be asked to pay anything to be on the wait list.  Closed classes with a wait list are displayed alphabetically on the list below after open classes. Read the FAQs about Wait Listed classes.
  • Notes:
    An administrative fee of $6.00 is added to each quarter-long class at check-out ($12.00 for semester-long classes, and $24.00 for year-long classes).

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Enter any text in the search box below to find classes quickly! Matches title, description, time, and instructor.

Term Start Date Start Time End Time Day Class Title Grade Range Open Spots Price Availability Description
Mylene Nyman

Students will enjoy a culinary tour of the world continuing in Italy! The menu features Italian-inspired menus featuring a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients that are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: Goat Cheese Crostini (appetizer), Italian Wedding Soup, Antipasto Salad, Calzone (lunch), Eggplant Parmesan (entree), Mushroom Risotto (side), Chicken Puttanesca (entree), and Tartufo (dessert). Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week. Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. SUPPLIES: Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. MATERIAL FEE: There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day. Future topics in this series include: Chinese (4th quarter).

Lisa Alonso

Hola amigos! How about learning Spanish by just hanging out with friends and... talking? This class is all about fun and relevant Spanish conversation that you can use every day whether you are traveling, shopping, or going around town. You can't talk to your online Spanish computer program, textbook or app! You need real people to practice speaking with! This class is designed to build your confidence as you practice a new language - out loud. Class discussions will be built around things that students want to discuss and will incorporate the vocabulary and enough essential grammar to get the conversation started. Third quarter will focus on talking about Clothing & Shopping with a focus on describing clothes (color, style, fit, etc.), discussing our tastes, and planning to shop around town. This class encourages students to use their Spanish even as brand-new speakers. This class should be used to complement or supplement a more traditional Spanish language curriculum for an emerging speaker. Students who come to the class with more knowledge will be offered challenge words and phrases related to the week's theme. The student should expect to spend 20 minutes per day on short written or brief technology-based assignments. Future topics in this series: Daily Routines & Healthy Living (4th quarter).

Gretchen Elson

Write elegant cards! Letter one-of-a-kind invitations! Pen your favorite saying! Gain an appreciation for the ancient art of manuscripts. In this introduction to calligraphy course, students will learn the language of the craft, how to use a broad-edge nib pen, and the miniscule and majuscule (upper and lower case) letters of Foundational hand. Foundational hand is a style that was developed in the early 1900s by Edward Johnston of England. This hand (calligraphers do not call it a font!) is similar based on to the Humanist hand used in the fifteenth century Renaissance for manuscript writing. Foundational is used universally to give beginning calligraphers a firm foundation in how letters are formed and provides a useful style of writing to the new calligrapher. While some hands are based on ovals or rectangles, Foundational is based on a circle and is considered the ideal alphabet to teach slope (are the letters vertical or at an angle?), weight (how big are the letters in relationship to the side of the broad nib?) and pen angle (how is the edge of the nib held in relation to the writing line?). While students work, the instructor will share some history on the art of calligraphy. Students will have the choice of a final project such as an accordion book, a greeting, or short quotation. If you are new to the class, there is a supply fee of $16 due payable to the instructor on the first day for the selected felt tip calligraphy pens, a pad of layout paper for practice, and a sheet of high quality paper for final projects. Returning students are asked to pay a $3.00 supply fee for project paper. This is a 7-week class that will not meet on 2/16/18 (Compass week off). The additional week off will be announced.

Mylene Nyman

Students will enjoy a culinary tour of the world continuing in Italy! The menu features Italian-inspired menus featuring a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients that are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: Goat Cheese Crostini (appetizer), Italian Wedding Soup, Antipasto Salad, Calzone (lunch), Eggplant Parmesan (entree), Mushroom Risotto (side), Chicken Puttanesca (entree), and Tartufo (dessert). Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week. Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. SUPPLIES: Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. MATERIAL FEE: There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day. Future topics in this series include: Chinese (4th quarter).

Lee Nathanson

Intermediate guitar students will continue to build on the fundamentals of playing the acoustic guitar! In this class, students will continue learn basic melodies to familiar songs and will add new chords and strum patterns each week. Students are encouraged to bring in music they are interested in learning. The class will continue to learn to read music, use tablature notations for guitar, and cover basic music theory. As an intermediate level class, most students will have had 20-40 hours of instruction through Compass, or equivalent. The pace of the class and material covered will be adapted by the instructor once he has assessed enrolled students. Students should plan to practice at home several times each week. Each student will need a least a beginner level acoustic guitar. There is a materials fee of $5.00 for new students payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a music notebook if the student does not have one. Compass parents are welcome to enroll in this class.

Angela Goodhart

This class will cover the art of photography, including photographic composition, portraits, black and white photography, and special projects. Students will have hands-on practice in every class. They will be encouraged to develop a special project of their own and share it with the class. On the last day, there will be an art show for the parents. Students are encouraged to bring SLR cameras, but any digital camera that is better than a phone camera will be adequate. There is a material fee of $10.00 payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a beautiful 12x18 frame-worthy, composite print of each student's favorite photographs from the quarter.

Anne Sharp

In this course students will learn to navigate the elements of literary criticism through a briefer, more abstract form of literature: poetry. Poems provide the critical thinking skills necessary to read between the lines. Their reduced language increases opportunities for interpretation and discussion. Diverging from chapters and paragraphs in a book, students will gain an appreciation for how literary elements are presented in verse. Through selected works from both well-known and less familiar poets, students will examine how similes, metaphors, and precise word choice convey voice, inference, and symbolism and reveal information on narrator, subject, setting, plot, tone, etc. The class will learn to analyze a poem s structure, rhyme, rhythm, and imagery, then use these newly acquired skills to write complex literary criticisms on poets and poetry. This class meets twice a week for 8 weeks with Wednesdays introducing the concepts and vocabulary of poetry, and Friday writing labs exploring the mechanics of writing criticism.

Heather Sanderson

Read it! Act it! Students will enjoy this two-hour, 10-week workshop with Shakespearian coach Heather Sanderson who hails from England and is known for instilling a love of Shakespeare into the hearts of students throughout the Greater DC area. The class will explore Shakespeare's timeless comedy, analyze its characters, plot, themes and motives. Students will read different roles, study and act out scenes, practice monologues, and work through the literature while having fun with fellow teens. Theatre games will be used to encourage collaboration, and specially designed improv exercises will be used to stretch teens' imaginations and help them get "in character". The class will use read-aloud and in-class dramatization to decipher the original language, word choices, and to identify humor, satire, mockery, betrayal, and rejection in this mixed-up comedic tale of mistaken identity. The class will work from complete texts (not redacted, abridged, or simplified school versions) to hear and practice Elizabethan lingo. (How did someone of Shakespeare's time hurl insults or woe a woman?) Students will learn how the Bard crafted scenes and conveyed the primary storyline and sub-plots in a comedy that has endured for over 400 years. Several scenes will be shared with parents on the last day of class as a way for students to demonstrate their appreciation and understanding of what they have learned about Shakespeare. Instructor Heather Sanderson shares a teaching style based on actions and interactions, developed from years of experience coaching Shakespeare in a way that appeals to students. Her approach brings abstract concepts, complex themes, and difficult language to the students' level, so that they can relate to and appreciate Shakespeare. This is a 10-week workshop that meets for two hours per week on the following dates: 1/19, 2/2, 2/9, 2/23, 3/2, 3/9, 3/23, 4/13, 4/20, 4/27. Homeschool families could count this course as a component, or partial credit, in British Literature or Fine Arts (drama). This course fee includes a $6.00 charge for the select paperback edition of the play.

Step back in time with American History Alive for a one-of-a-kind living history rendez vous with Clara Barton as portrayed by Mary Ann Jung of Arnold, MD, on Wednesday, January 24. Living history actors are the costumed scholars employed by museums, historical sites, and conferences. Presentation will be conversational in style, first person narrative, and conclude with spontaneous audience Q & A. Watch the historical actor answer 21st century questions in character with period replies! Students younger than third grade (or age 8) must be accompanied by a paid, registered parent or adult. This is a one-day admission for this performance only. One day tickets are $18.00 in advance or $20.00 at the door. Remember to bring a camera for photos with the historical figure after the presentation.

Prerequisites: None

Step back in time with American History Alive for a one-of-a-kind living history rendez vous with Harriet Tubman as portrayed by Larry and Connie Clowers of Getysburg, PA, on Wednesday, January 31. Living history actors are the costumed scholars employed by museums, historical sites, and conferences. Presentation will be conversational in style, first person narrative, and conclude with spontaneous audience Q & A. Watch the historical actor answer 21st century questions in character with period replies! Students younger than third grade (or age 8) must be accompanied by a paid, registered parent or adult. This is a one-day admission for this performance only. One day tickets are $18.00 in advance or $20.00 at the door. Remember to bring a camera for photos with the historical figure after the presentation.

Prerequisites: None

Step back in time with American History Alive for a one-of-a-kind living history rendez vous with Susan B Anthony as portrayed by Marjorie Goldman of Wynnewood, PA, on Wednesday, February 21. Living history actors are the costumed scholars employed by museums, historical sites, and conferences. Presentation will be conversational in style, first person narrative, and conclude with spontaneous audience Q & A. Watch the historical actor answer 21st century questions in character with period replies! Students younger than third grade (or age 8) must be accompanied by a paid, registered parent or adult. This is a one-day admission for this performance only. One day tickets are $18.00 in advance or $20.00 at the door. Remember to bring a camera for photos with the historical figure after the presentation.

Prerequisites: None

Step back in time with American History Alive for a one-of-a-kind living history rendez vous with Thomas Edison as portrayed by Bob Gleason of Philadelphia, PA, on Wednesday, February 28. Living history actors are the costumed scholars employed by museums, historical sites, and conferences. Presentation will be conversational in style, first person narrative, and conclude with spontaneous audience Q & A. Watch the historical actor answer 21st century questions in character with period replies! Students younger than third grade (or age 8) must be accompanied by a paid, registered parent or adult. This is a one-day admission for this performance only. One day tickets are $18.00 in advance or $20.00 at the door. Remember to bring a camera for photos with the historical figure after the presentation.

Prerequisites: None

Step back in time with American History Alive for a one-of-a-kind living history rendez vous with Abraham Lincoln as portrayed by James Hayney of Camp Hill, PA, on Wednesday, February 7. Living history actors are the costumed scholars employed by museums, historical sites, and conferences. Presentation will be conversational in style, first person narrative, and conclude with spontaneous audience Q & A. Watch the historical actor answer 21st century questions in character with period replies! Students younger than third grade (or age 8) must be accompanied by a paid, registered parent or adult. This is a one-day admission for this performance only. One day tickets are $18.00 in advance or $20.00 at the door. Remember to bring a camera for photos with the historical figure after the presentation.

Prerequisites: None

Step back in time with American History Alive for a one-of-a-kind living history rendez vous with Mark Twain as portrayed by Charles Kiernan of Schnecksville, PA, on Wednesday, March 7. Living history actors are the costumed scholars employed by museums, historical sites, and conferences. Presentation will be conversational in style, first person narrative, and conclude with spontaneous audience Q & A. Watch the historical actor answer 21st century questions in character with period replies! Students younger than third grade (or age 8) must be accompanied by a paid, registered parent or adult. This is a one-day admission for this performance only. One day tickets are $18.00 in advance or $20.00 at the door. Remember to bring a camera for photos with the historical figure after the presentation.

Prerequisites: None

Taliesin Knol

This class will explore the judicial processes of the ancient world, starting with Ancient Greece. Students will learn how justice was carried out in a time before codified written legal systems, prisons, lawyers, or even formal judges existed and where the facts of your case depended entirely on how well your rhetoric could convince hundreds of your fellow citizens that would serve on a jury. Like a traditional mock trial program, the class will hear cases, and students will defend themselves, but will be expected to do so as an Ancient Greek citizen would have, through open debate. Real historical cases will be studied and trial parts assigned to the class, which will be expected to debate from the perspective of both citizen and non-citizen residents of an ancient Polis. The class will serve as the jury and, if necessary, select period-appropriate verdicts and explain how they arrived at their decisions. Future quarters will examine the Ancient Justice systems of the Roman Republic (4th quarter), followed by the Roman Empire, Early Medieval, Late Medieval, and Common and Colonial English Law (2018-2019). This course fee includes a $5.00 charge for the cases studies and course materials.

Lee Nathanson

Students will continue to learn the fundamentals of playing the guitar! In this class, students will learn basic melodies, such as Ode to Joy, Happy Birthday, Jingle Bells, etc. Kids will learn to play chords and strumming patterns for familiar songs chosen by the instructor and students. Students are encouraged to bring in music they are interested in learning. New chords and new songs will be added each week as students also learn to read music and basic music theory. Students will also learn how to hold, tune, and care for their guitars. Students should be able to read at grade level for this class, and should plan to practice at home several times each week. Each student will need a least a beginner level acoustic guitar. There is a materials fee of $5.00 for new students payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a music notebook. Students who wish to enroll 3rd quarter should have at least 12-15 hours of prior instruction in order to match the pace of the enrolled students.

Mylene Nyman

Students will enjoy a culinary tour of the world continuing in Italy! The menu features Italian-inspired menus featuring a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients that are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: Goat Cheese Crostini (appetizer), Italian Wedding Soup, Antipasto Salad, Calzone (lunch), Eggplant Parmesan (entree), Mushroom Risotto (side), Chicken Puttanesca (entree), and Tartufo (dessert). Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week. Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. SUPPLIES: Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. MATERIAL FEE: There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day. Future topics in this series include: Chinese (4th quarter).

Monifa Hamilton

Desmond Tutu once stated, Don t raise your voice, improve your argument. Do you have what it takes to strategically win an argument? Effective debate is a life skill that incorporates logic, communication, and public speaking skills. Being able to debate helps teens improve reasoning, conflict resolution, and confidence. In this class, students will learn the fundamentals of debate including the three persuasive appeals, a brief history of debate, and different styles of debate. During the third quarter, we will be hosting our first team debates, known as Public Forum. Public Forum (PF) is a duo team style of debate that is the most popular format among high school students who compete in debate competitions across the country. Very similar to the television show Crossfire, debaters will strategically discuss their positions on current topics or events. During this course, teams consisting of two members will advocate or reject a position based upon the proposition. Students will develop arguments based upon the Art of Persuasion, rather than just using rhetoric. Debaters will learn how to structure an argument, build their evidence, and best practices for researching a topic. Students will learn techniques for quoting sources, presenting statistics, acknowledging opposing views, and incorporating visual aids in debate. The class will also practice stylistic elements of public speaking such as using transitional words, timing, gestures, and eye contact. In this class, students will learn how to really listen to their opponent and how to craft a rebuttal. At the same time, debaters will be taught to read their audience, hold their attention, and establish credibility. In each class, students will practice giving brief impromptu speeches, delivering prepared presentations, and debating classmates. Students will practice evaluating classmates and giving, receiving, and incorporating constructive feedback.

Anne Sharp

What happened to D'Artagnan decades after "The Three Muskateers"? You can find out in Dumas sequel, "Twenty Years After"! Did you know that Rudyard Kipling penned "The Second Jungle Book" with further adventures of Mowgli and his friends or that after his "Adventures," Mark Twain continued to tell the story of "Tom Sawyer Abroad" and "Tom Sawyer, Detective"? Did you know that some sequels are not written by the original author, such as Alexandra Ripley's sequel "Scarlett" to Margaret Mitchell's "Gone with the Wind"? Do you have a favorite tale that you always wanted to explore the beginning or further adventures of its characters, their ancestors, or their progeny?
Great fiction doesn't always begin "from scratch." Sometimes writers use a formula, or template storyline. Sometimes we love a character or story so much that we want it to keep going. In this class series, students will survey well-known prequels and sequels and will examine popular storylines as a possible "formula" for creating original fiction. Students will then continue a beloved story through the creation of a before or after --borrowing and elaborating on characters, setting and a few plot details. In the process of picking up where an author left off (or began), the student writer must delve deeper into story elements in order to remain true to the original concept. To do this requires knowledge and understanding of and commitment to (and respect for) an author s intent and work. Student writers will demonstrate this comprehension by: 1) further developing character motivation through early/later life experiences and factoring in additional characters who might enrich detail and deepen story, 2) enhancing setting by incorporating previous places, times or worlds, and 3) expanding the established plot by building credible preceeding/continuing events that mesh with the given storyline.
A portion of each class will be dedicated to sharing students' working drafts with collaboration and in-class feedback. Students will be expected to conduct some writing and reading at home each week. Literature selections will not be assigned in their entirety, but students may want to continue reading the complete work. The culmination of the students' work will be a bound class literary magazine.

Taliesin Knol

Why read about key military battles on maps or in books when you can learn about them hands-on, in three dimensions, using historical miniature gaming? In 3D History, pivotal engagements come alive for new and experienced students, as they navigate a table-top terrain, deploy hundreds of miniature soldiers, ships, and tanks... all while playing a military strategy game. Each student will have the opportunity to fight a battle from both sides, allowing them to test various strategies, try multiple scenarios, predict different outcomes, and rewrite history- an effective way to gain a deeper understanding of what actually happened and why! Students will learn why the First World War was exactly that, war spread to every corner of the globe, through a simulation and examination of key battles. This quarter will focus on the iconic trench warfare of the Great War with some of the deadliest battles in human history. Tens of thousands of men from all over the world would face each other across the No Man s Land and march into the face of certain death in a brutal war of attrition where the side who lost the most soldiers is slowly defeated. As a true world war, this also meant taking the fight to sea and air, and students will reenact the Great Naval Battle at Jutland with dozens of Dreadnaught battleships, as well as filling the skies with the first fighter planes to support their land battles. This quarter also builds a knowledge base for the final theme in the WWI series, Germany's last Gasp: WWI the Ludendorff Offensive and America's arrival 1918 (4th quarter). Course documents including period maps, photographs and recreations will be made available through a class Google Drive link emailed to parents, as well as a class YouTube playlist for any videos watched in class or assigned as homework.

Anne Sharp

This semester-long course is a home for literarians students who love to write, who love to read writing, and who love to share writing with others. Writing is a solitary act, but writers also need a community in which to grow. Mirroring the design of famous writing salons/groups like The Bloomsbury Group, The Algonquin Round Table, and The Inklings, students will create a Compass community that will encourage individual writers, promote literary collaboration and provide challenging feedback to boost creativity and artistic development. Students will use their own work and the works of professional authors to understand what makes good writing , to improve technique, to experiment with new forms/genre and to understand the drafting, editing and publishing process. The members of this class will form an editorial board of a student anthology, journal, or magazine that will provide a publishing opportunity for themselves and for other homeschooled student writers. As editors, students will design and build an anthology and/or website, advertise the publication, solicit manuscripts and artwork, develop selection criteria, review/select/edit material, and learn the principles of layout and design. Embedded in this process are real-world experiences, and students will improve their communication and organization skills through goal-setting, time management, meeting deadlines, emailing, confirmations, proofreading, etc. A portion of each class will be devoted to writing time, but students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week writing at home. Each student is expected to publish in the anthology. Some students might also publish submit works to other journals or contests. In addition to this published piece, each student will also develop a personal portfolio of writing that includes a variety of forms and genre and that provides samples from all phases of the writing process: brainstorming, drafting, revision, editing.

Katherine Hoeck

Physics is the study of how matter and energy interact and the investigation of how objects behave under various conditions. Learning Physics can answer questions you have asked all your life. Why is it easier to float in the ocean than in a lake? (It has to do with buoyancy!) Physics also explains why balls bounce, how musical instruments work, and why the lamp in your bedroom turns on when you flip a switch. From maintaining your balance, or center of gravity, while riding a bike to experiencing acceleration when a car, train, or airplane speeds up or slows down, Physics is part of your everyday life. This class features hands-on middle-school level physics and physical science concepts. The emphasis will be on inquiry-based labs and scientific investigation, setting up experiments, taking measurements, recording data, and maintaining a lab notebook. While some basic equations will be introduced and worked in class using data collected by students, the emphasis will not be on mathematics or solving lengthy problem sets. Major themes in this class include Mechanics, Temperature and Pressure, Properties of Matter, and Electricity and Magnetism. Each class will cover a different topic through hands-on labs, such as making an accelerometer, building a solar collector, constructing a simple generator, experimenting with electromagnets, and many more. In Mechanics, students will be introduced to friction, acceleration, momentum, and torque. In the study of Pressure and Temperature, students will examine expansion and contraction, the flow of heat, and solar energy. Topics in Properties of Matter include permeability, solubility, buoyancy, and surface tension. Finally, students’ exploration of Electricity and Magnets will include vibrations, electric current, generators, magnetic fields, and electromagnets. Students will be given a composition notebook to be used as a lab book. They should bring the notebook and an assortment of pens to class each week. There is a $30.00 lab material fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. This is a 16-week, semester long class.

Mylene Nyman

Taking inspiration from the world around us, new and experienced mosaic artists will create a mosaic featuring a place that they love, (think: beach, mountains, farm scene) and will accent their favorite part of the piece with special glass that glows in the dark. The second mosaic will be a night sky or outer space scene and will have glowing highlights that will create depth and add a sense of wonder to their mosaic. The final project composition will show motion with glass, and students will have the option to add hidden messages to their mosaics using glow-in-the-dark glass. Each project will expand student s learning to include use of a pattern, coordinating colors, glass cutting and fitting, and creating the illusion of something incredible. Students will be able to use their choice of glass tile colors to add individuality to each piece, and new for this quarter, students will be learning the score-and-pliers method of cutting larger pieces of glass. Students will choose from a selection of beautiful glass gems, millifiori and shells, which will become the focal point of their final mosaic piece. Students will follow their own creativity to create patterns or waves of color to complete a rich, 3D composition. This course will cover design, layout, basic glass cutting and as time allows students will learn grouting and finishing methods. The number of projects completed depends on the student's work speed and attendance in class. There is no prerequisite for this class. Students who are new to mosaics class this quarter, will begin with a quick, small, pattern project to learn the process of spacing and clean lines, before jumping into these projects. Compass parents are welcome to register for the class to work alongside their teens, or to work on their own, while their teen is in another Compass class. There is a $40.00 per student material and supply fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Homeschool families who are creating a high school transcript may want to count this class as a component, or partial, Fine Arts credit. The fourth quarter theme for mosaics will be, Painting with Glass."

Natalie Di Vietri

Would your behavior change if you suddenly found yourself working as a prison guard? Are your opinions influenced by others? If you were in distress, would it be better to have more people around you, or fewer? The answers to these questions and others like them may surprise you! This class will introduce students to the study of social interaction and human nature by reading, discussing and analyzing four influential cases that have shaped the way we understand social psychology today. Students will investigate factors that affect human behavior in different social settings and will learn about group behavior, the bystander effect, obedience to authority and more. Landmark studies conducted by renowned psychologists will be at the core of this class, leading to ongoing, thought-provoking and intellectually stimulating discussions. Students will learn how to read research, evaluate theories, and think critically about social phenomena. 4th quarter will examine four different case studies in the field of intelligence, cognition, and memory. This class is a great introduction to psychology and will allow you to explore your interest in taking the AP Psychology being offered at Compass in 2018-2019! This course fee includes a $5.00 charge for printed case studies and course mateials.

Various

Meet interesting, live animals up close each week as part of the Animal Kingdom Encounters program. This is a one-day pass to meet live Retiles including a boa constrictor, Burmese python, monitor lizard, black throat lizard, and giant tortoise on Wednesday, January 24. Find out about the habitat, diet, adaptations, threats, and fun facts about these animals. This program is available only to students in 2nd-5th grade. One day tickets are $18.00 in advance or $20.00 at the door.

Prerequisites: None

Various

Meet interesting, live animals up close each week as part of the Animal Kingdom Encounters program. This is a one-day pass to meet live Raptors including a hawk, falcon, and owls on Wednesday, January 31. Find out about the habitat, diet, adaptations, threats, and fun facts about these animals. This program is available only to students in 2nd-5th grade. One day tickets are $18.00 in advance or $20.00 at the door.

Prerequisites: None

Various

Meet interesting, live animals up close each week as part of the Animal Kingdom Encounters program. This is a one-day pass to meet live Ocean Invertebrates including a starfish, sea urchins, sponges, arthropods (crabs and shrimp), and molluscs on Wednesday, February 21. Find out about the habitat, diet, adaptations, threats, and fun facts about these animals. This program is available only to students in 2nd-5th grade. One day tickets are $18.00 in advance or $20.00 at the door.

Prerequisites: None

Various

Meet interesting, live animals up close each week as part of the Animal Kingdom Encounters program. This is a one-day pass to meet live Bats on Wednesday, February 28. Find out about the habitat, diet, adaptations, threats, and fun facts about these animals. This program is available only to students in 2nd-5th grade. One day tickets are $18.00 in advance or $20.00 at the door.

Prerequisites: None

Various

Meet interesting, live animals up close each week as part of the Animal Kingdom Encounters program. This is a one-day pass to meet live Ocean Vertebrates such as a Damesel fish, bamboo shark, dogfish, flounder, stingray, eel, or seahorse on Wednesday, March 7. Find out about the habitat, diet, adaptations, threats, and fun facts about these animals. This program is available only to students in 2nd-5th grade. One day tickets are $18.00 in advance or $20.00 at the door.

Prerequisites: None

Natalie Di Vietri

Below freezing temperatures, overdrawn bank accounts, and underground parking are all real world examples of integers. Learn how to think about positive and negative numbers in real world terms, and practice tactics, maneuvers, and strategies for adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing integers. We will cover integers, absolute value, inequalities, and number lines (or one dimensional graphing). Each week, we will tackle real world challenges and put our skills to the test against multi-step word problems. Optional homework will be given each week to build fluency with basic skills. Pre-Algebra Skill Builders is a class series that is meant to "fill in the gaps" and strengthen a student's elementary and middle school math background. This series of pre-algebra topics will help ensure a solid foundation in key concepts before embarking on high school algebra. This class will also emphasize real world applications of the mathematical concept and word problems so students become comfortable switching between prose (written descriptions) and mathematical representation. Please note that there are two, distinct Pre-Algebra Skill Builders classes: the Wednesday series will focus on four computational themes, while the Friday series will examine conceptual topics. Registration is separate for each series (Wednesday and Friday) and each topic (by quarter), and students can take one, both, or mix-and-match each quarter based on the skill they need to review. As a baseline, students should have completed 7th grade math prior to taking this class. If a family is unsure about placement, the Instructor can suggest some 7th grade assessments to check a student's readiness and some resources to strengthen 7th grade skills. Future themes in this series include: Solving for Variables and Graphing Linear Equations (4th quarter).

Dr. Kathleen Olsen

Discover the science (and art) of small animal medicine! Find out how vets- and even human physicians and other medical professionals- use clues to form a diagnosis. Analyze actual cases and make predictions based on health history, exam findings, and diagnostics. See how anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, and biochemistry come together! The same symptoms can be the result of many disease processes, and in this class, students gain an appreciation of what being a medical professional is all about. Each week students become veterinarians for an hour." Using real veterinary cases, the group will work together to evaluate a patient s history, consider various diagnostic tests, interpret results, and form a treatment plan. Students will work with a practicing veterinarian and use deductive reasoning and logic to piece together the clues of the medical mystery. Will they be successful clinicians? This class is geared towards students interested in pursuing any career in the biological sciences, but will be interesting for anyone curious to learn more about the health of their furry friends. A basic understanding of biology and anatomy is recommended for this class. Students will receive a printed notebook with essential information to be reviewed before the first class. They will also be responsible for some research at home each week as they analyze their findings and formulate a diagnosis. There is a $20.00 material fee for the class notebook and in-class supplies for new students and a $5.00 fee for returning students. In first quarter, all animals present with the same owner complaint: seizures. In future quarters, all patients experience Weight Loss/Weight Gain (4th quarter). Homeschool families could count this course as a component, or partial credit, in science.