Showing 150 classes

Code for a Cause: Technovation Team for Girls

Quarter 1, 2, 3, 4: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 3:00 pm      Duration: 90 min

Instructor: Coder Kids

Grade Range: 6th-8th

Prerequisites: None

Imagine a phone app that could quickly reunite lost pets, connect the poor with resources that they need, or report a problem in the community! Code for a Cause is the Compass-based Technovation hub where middle school girls will participate in the "world's largest technology entrepreneurship program for girls." Each year, Technovation teams solve real world problems through technology that they develop!

Through Technovation, girls work with women mentors, identify a problem in their community, develop a mobile app, and launch a startup. Since 2010, 23,000 girls around the world have developed mobile apps and startups to solve problems around a diverse range of problems, including food waste, nutrition, women's safety, and much more. In this year-long program, girls will work in teams and learn the skills they need to change the world with technology.

Girls will beging with get-to-know-you and team building activities before breaking into teams of 3-4. Each team will brainstorm to identify a problem in the community. They will propose a mobile app solution to their problem and conduct market research to see if their idea is the best possible solution. Next, the girls will learn to program their unique application using a web-based software called MIT App Inventor. In class, girls will be coached step-by-step on the process and logic of creating an interactive application. Finally, girls will learn how to brand their app, create a business plan, and look at what it would take to bring the app to market.

Girls will work on laptops provided by the instructor to eliminate technology or connectivity problems in class. However, since the app inventor platform is web-based, girls may continue to code at home. The course tuition includes a technology use/access fee.

Participation in Technovation gives girls the confidence to pursue more computer science courses (70%), and give many the foundation to eventually major in computer science (26%). Technovation teams are in 100 countries, and the program is sponsored by Oracle, Google, 3M, Adobe Foundation, and others. The Compass Technovation facilitator/instructor will be a coding coach from Coder Kids. This is a year-long program that follows the Compass calendar.12.07.0809

8 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $869.00

Cooking for Teens (Fri): Fall Fare with Flair

Quarter 1: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 10:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Mimi Nyman

Grade Range: 7th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Students will enjoy making savory fall recipes and cool weather comfort foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Fall Favorites are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

-Fresh Herbed Brie Boule Appetizer

-Cream of Asparagus Soup

-Fall Twist Cobb Salad

-Penne with Ricotta, Eggs, and Autumn Veggies

-Roasted Chicken with Apples, Pears, and Cherries

-Pumpkin Trifle Dessert

-Chicken Posole

Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.
Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid.

Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Assessments: Will not be given. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: A clean apron and plastic storage container with a tight-fitting lid for leftovers. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and a bandana or have long hair tied back or braided. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Career/Technical for purposes of a high school transcript.

3 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $185.00

Cooking for Teens (Fri): Fall Fare with Flair

Quarter 1: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Mimi Nyman

Grade Range: 7th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Students will enjoy making savory fall recipes and cool weather comfort foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Fall Favorites are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

-Fresh Herbed Brie Boule Appetizer

-Cream of Asparagus Soup

-Fall Twist Cobb Salad

-Penne with Ricotta, Eggs, and Autumn Veggies

-Roasted Chicken with Apples, Pears, and Cherries

-Pumpkin Trifle Dessert

-Chicken Posole

Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.
Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid.

Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flare (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Assessments: Will not be given. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: A clean apron and plastic storage container with a tight-fitting lid for leftovers. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and a bandana or have long hair tied back or braided. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Career/Technical for purposes of a high school transcript.

3 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $185.00

Cooking for Teens (Fri): Fall Fare with Flair

Quarter 1: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 12:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Mimi Nyman

Grade Range: 7th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Students will enjoy making savory fall recipes and cool weather comfort foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Fall Favorites are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

-Fresh Herbed Brie Boule Appetizer

-Cream of Asparagus Soup

-Fall Twist Cobb Salad

-Penne with Ricotta, Eggs, and Autumn Veggies

-Roasted Chicken with Apples, Pears, and Cherries

-Pumpkin Trifle Dessert

-Chicken Posole

Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.
Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid.

Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flare (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Assessments: Will not be given. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: A clean apron and plastic storage container with a tight-fitting lid for leftovers. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and a bandana or have long hair tied back or braided. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Career/Technical for purposes of a high school transcript.

3 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $185.00

Creative Journaling for Teens

Quarter 1: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 10:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Michelle Dzema

Grade Range: 8th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Don't write poetry? Think you can't draw? Maybe not, but you may still want a creative way to record your thoughts, feelings, dreams, and ideas! Journaling is an ongoing process of discovery and exploration that allows one to be conscious of and connect with his/her thoughts, emotions and ideas. It is a form of expression that supports both academic and personal growth.

Creative journaling is not writing daily "Dear Diary" style entries on dated pages. Instead, students will explore various journaling methods, blending self-expression and self-discovery to guide them in learning new ways to problem-solve, achieve goals, and process emotions. Students will work with several writing techniques and a range of art media to develop a personal journal throughout the quarter, and will have the opportunity to expand on it in subsequent quarters. Techniques such as freeform writing, black-out poetry, stream-of-consciousness writing, and creative list making- in addition to experimenting with simple mixed media like collage and photography- will be explored. Weekly prompts will cover a range of topics such as choices, ambition, fear, and self-esteem as they relate to the students' personal lives and current events. Conversation around the prompts will complement the students' work in their individual journals.

Topics in this Series: Journal work is done in an open studio environment that allows students to join in any quarter throughout the year. Prerequisites: No formal writing or art experience is needed. All teens are welcome. Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-2 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: are given in class. Assessments: Not provided. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $20.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a spiral bound journal and a kit of supplies. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English, Fine Arts, or general Elective for purposes of a high school transcript.

5 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $142.00

Formula for Fiction: Mystery & Detective Stories

Quarter 1: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 10:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Anne Sharp

Grade Range: 7th-8th

Prerequisites: None

Unlock the clues to writing mystery and detective fiction! Find out why the "Whodunit" is already done. The literary elements of setting, character, and plot are often prescribed in popular mystery series such as Sherlock Holmes, Agatha Christie, and Nancy Drew. Students will focus on these literary elements to craft their own mystery or detective fiction.

Great writing doesn't always begin "from scratch." Sometimes writers use a formula, or template storyline, to create fiction. This class series examines different types of popular storylines to give the young writer a "formula" for creating original fiction. For each genre, the class will examine samples of literature and excerpts from well-known works that illustrate the story template. Each fiction formula includes a different mix of elements (characters, setting, plot) that change in the new story while others remain fixed to preserve the genre.

A portion of each class will be dedicated to sharing students' working drafts through collaboration and in-class feedback. Students will be expected to conduct some writing and reading at home each week. Literature selections will not be assigned in their entirety, but students may want to continue reading the complete work. The culmination of the students' work will be a bound class literary magazine. Topics in this Series: Mystery and Detective Stories (Quarter 1); Historical Fiction (Quarter 2); Prequels and Sequels (Quarter 3); and Revisioning a Classic (Quarter 4).12.09.0612

7 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $140.00

Krav Maga Self Defense for Teens: Red Stripe (Fri)

Quarter 1: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Sarah Reynolds

Grade Range: 7th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Krav Maga is the Israeli martial art which teaches self defense and fitness. Students of Krav Maga are taught a series of strategies to assess and respond to common situations, such as facing a bully. Teens are always taught first and foremost to get away, to get help, and to try to deescalate the situation. When that fails, students practice a technique that includes a warning strike followed by escape, and finally, they learn how to stand up for themselves and how to counterattack if a situation escalates and becomes threatening. Teens are empowered and gain confidence when they rehearse how to handle real-life situations. Exercises and in-class practice incorporate balance, coordination, energy, and other key elements of fitness along with life skills such as confidence, teamwork, respect, discipline, and respect.

Students may enroll in Krav Maga at any time, and everyone will begin as a white belt. Each quarter, students will practice the full range of skills, but there will be two "featured" moves that a student can earn a belt stripe for being able to demonstrate. Featured moves will include a combative strike and a defensive escape technique. No one stripe is a prerequisite for any other color, and color stripes can be earned in any order.

First quarter, students will have the chance to earn a Red Stripe. Featured moves include: cover defense and wrist locks (red stripe); straight punch defense and bear hugs (orange stripe); head movement defense and front 2-handed choke (yellow stripe); round kick defense and back 2-handed choke (green stripe); front kick defense and guillotine choke (blue stripe); clinch defense and rear choke (purple stripe); ground striking defense and head lock defense (brown stripe); and 360 defense and full Nelson (black stripe).

Students will be able to test for belt promotions to move through the ranks of white belt, yellow belt, orange belt, etc. On average, it is estimated that a student will be ready for a belt test after four quarters/four color stripes. Belt testing will be by coach approval.

Topics in this Series: Red Stripe (1st Quarter), Orange Stripe (2nd Quarter), Yellow Stripe (3rd Quarter) and Green Stripe (4th Quarter). Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-2 hours per week outside of class. Assessments: Belt testing for promotion will be by coach recommendation, but on average will take 4 quarters. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for the t-shirt and white belt (new students) or $5.00 for the white belt (returning students). An belt test fee of $25.00 is due payable to the instructor when a student is ready to test for promotion. What to Bring: Refillable water bottle. What to Wear: In lieu of a full martial arts uniform, students will be asked to wear a class t-shirt provided by the instructor. Students should also wear shorts, leggings, or loose, comfortable athletic pants, and comfortable athletic shoes or sneakers with their class t-shirt. Non-Meeting Days: In addition to the scheduled days-off on the published Compass schedule, this class does not meet on October 4. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Physical Education for purposes of a high school transcript.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $105.00

Mosaic Masterpieces: Open Studio

Quarter 1: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 115 min

Instructor: Mimi Nyman

Grade Range: 7th-Adult

Prerequisites: None

Mosaics is run as a studio art class where students create unique compositions and work at their own pace under the guidance of an experienced mosaic artist. Each quarter, students are taught new design, cutting, layout, and finishing techniques and are introduced to new mosaic materials which they can incorporate into inspired, original pieces. Throughout the quarter, the instructor will suggest possible themes for projects based on the featured materials, but students are always welcome to pursue a different direction.

Students who are new to mosaics will complete a quick checkerboard project (complete with wooden checkers) to teach pattern, layout, and lines before starting their specialized projects. For each project, students will be able to choose from a variety of substrates- rectangular, square, shaped, or circular backboards (typically first-year students), or special forms or 3D objects (experienced students). Each project will expand a student's understanding of color, pattern, rhythm, texture, and spacing as they complete rich, dimensioned compositions. Students will be able to incorporate other glass, ceramic, and porcelain tiles into their projects and may select feature elements such as beautiful glass gems, millifiori, sliced stone, metallic ornaments, mirrored bits, or shells, to serve as focal points in their mosaic piece. The mosaic can be monochromatic, complimentary, or contrasting colors. A broad pallet of colors is always available, and new colors are added each quarter to reflect the season.

Students will develop a skillset for mosaic artistry over multiple quarters or years. As each student demonstrates mastery of basic skills, safety, and artistic expression, that student will be taught advanced techniques, materials, tools, composition, and color theory. A typical progression in mosaics is:

-Flat, rectangular substrate, whole tiles, symmetric design, proper spacing and adhesion

-Flat, circular substrate, tile cutting with nippers, themed design and color choice

-Flat or curved substrate, cutting sheet glass with pistol grip, breaking pliers, and running pliers, composition and color design

-3D substrate, adhesion substances, and techniques

-Porcelain and ceramic cutting, special application, advanced design

There is no prerequisite for this class. The number of projects completed each quarter depends on the student s work speed and attendance in class. Compass parents are welcome to register for the class to work alongside their teens, or to work on their own, while their teen is in another Compass class.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.

Assessments: will not be given.
Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

What to Bring: In-progress project must be brought back to studio each week.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $158.00

Paint Studio I: Botanicals - Line, Color, Shape, and Texture

Quarter 1: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 10:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Luc Atangana

Grade Range: 7th-Adult

Prerequisites: None

Students will be introduced to painting with acrylics in a relaxed, informal studio setting under the guidance of a professional paint instructor

Students will work on framed canvas and easels and will learn elements of art and principles of design in addition to methods in painting. Painters will learn basic techniques such as shading, blending, stippling, and broad stroke. Each quarter, the instructor will demonstrate techniques by developing a sample painting. Students may elect to follow the class sample, or may apply the painting skills to an entirely unique composition. Students will complete one or two 16" X 20" canvases each quarter, depending on the level of detailing.

First quarter, students will begin painting botanicals such as flowers, plants, or leaves. Through the botanical study, painters will learn to represent different textures and effects in natural subjects. Elements of art introduced in the first quarter projects include line, shape, form, space, color, value, and texture.

This class is suitable for beginners who have never painted before, and for experienced art students who have worked in other mediums and are interested exploring acrylic painting. Compass parents are welcome to register for this class to work alongside their teens, or to work on their own, while their teen is in another Compass class. Painting can provide a relaxing, needed break from rigorous academic classes and over-scheduled lives in a fun, supportive environment.

Topics in this Series: Botanicals- Line, Color, Shape, and Texture (Quarter 1); Still Life- Values, Form, and Space (Quarter 2); Landscapes- Composition, Unity, and Repetition (Quarter 3) and Create Your Own- Balance, Emphasis, and Proportion (Quarter 4). Workload: Work outside of class is optional, however students who want to continue to practice their painting techniques might want to purchase a tabletop easel (approx. $10.00) and set of basic acrylic paints ($30.00+) for home use Assessments: Individual feedback is given in class. Formal assessments will not be given. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $20.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for two canvases, a sketchbook, and use of shared class supplies (desktop easels, paints, brushes, paper products, etc.). Returning students who are continuing in this class from a prior quarter can continue using their sketchpad, but there is still a $14.00 fee for the other materials. What to Wear: Students may wish to wear an apron, smock, or paint shirt when working acrylic paints.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.10.08.0612

5 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $120.00

Paint Studio II: Advanced Fundamentals I, Color Studies

Quarter 1: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 9:00 am      Duration: 115 min

Instructor: Luc Atangana

Grade Range: 8th-Adult

Prerequisites: Paint Studio I

In Paint Studio II, student artists will further develop their skills in acrylic painting in a relaxed, informal studio setting under the guidance of a professional paint instructor. Paint Studio II is a 2-hour session where a focused lesson is demonstrated and practiced in the first hour, and students may continue to paint in open studio (shared with Paint Studio I students) the second hour. The second hour of Paint Studio II is optional in the event that a student must attend a 10:00 am class.

Students will work on framed canvas and easels and will learn elements of art and principles of design in addition to methods in painting. Advanced painting techniques that will be taught include dry brush work, washing, splattering, dabbing, pallet knife, underpainting, glazing, and layering. Each quarter, the instructor will demonstrate techniques by developing a sample painting. Students may elect to follow the class sample, or may apply the painting skills to an entirely unique composition. Students will complete one or two 16" X 20" canvases each quarter, depending on the level of detailing.

First quarter's lessons will include color studies such as partial mixing of colors and creating a family of colors, to achieve a variety of effects and contrasting textures.

This class is suitable for returning teen students who have completed at least two quarters of Paint Studio I, or adult students. Compass parents are welcome to register for this class to work alongside their teens or to work on their own while their teen is another Compass class. Painting can provide a relaxing, needed break from rigorous academic classes and over-scheduled lives in a fun, supportive environment.

Topics in this Series: Advanced Fundamentals I, Color Studies (Quarter 1), Advanced Fundamentals II, Blending & Brush Techniques (Quarter 2), Advanced Perspective (Quarter 3), and Paint Your Own with Rhythm, Balance, Unity (Quarter 4). Prerequisites: at least 2 quarters of Paint Studio I Workload: Work outside of class is optional, however students who want to continue to practice their painting techniques might want to purchase a tabletop easel (approx. $10.00) and set of basic acrylic paints ($30.00+) for home use.Assessments: Individual feedback is given in class. Formal assessments will not be given. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for canvases, pallet, pallet knife, 12 piece paint brush set, a sketchbook, and use of shared class supplies (desktop easels, acrylic paint, brushes, paper products, etc.). What to Wear: Students may wish to wear an apron, smock, or paint shirt when working acrylic paints. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.06.04.0612

4 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $172.00

Sweets Shop- Delectable Desserts

Quarter 1: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Kati Andresen

Grade Range: 7th-12th

Prerequisites: None

The tantalizing aroma of cookies in the oven. A mouth-watering burst of mint. The silky feel of melted chocolate. The sticky sweet of fresh-made caramel. A subtle hint of lemon. Student bakers will enjoy these delicious sensations- and more- as they explore the world of baking homemade desserts.

Sweet Shop treats are scrumptious, fun, and simple to make. Compass bakers will learn to prepare a variety of desserts for friends and family, as an everyday treat or for holidays, birthdays, and other special occasions. Each quarter, students will create a range of desserts including a pie, a cake, a tray bake, cookies, a tart, a mousse or pudding, and a chocolate (plus, a frozen dessert in 8-week quarters). The class will include some icing, decorating, and garnishing techniques for completed desserts. This quarter, the Compass bakers' culinary adventures will include:

- Truffles

- Boston Cream Pie Trifle

- Preserves/Fillings

- Hand Pies

- Raspberry Danishes

- Chocolate Lace Cookie Sandwiches

- Vanilla Confetti Sheetcake

Students will be eating what they bake each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging baking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen and entertaining. They will learn important baking skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary is introduced each week. Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a small group.

Topics in this Series: Delectable Desserts (Quarter 1); Innovative Indulgences (Quarter 2), Decadent Delights (Quarter 3), and Casual Confections (Quarter 4).Assessments: Will not be given. Lab/Supply Fee:What to Bring: A clean apron and plastic storage container with a tight-fitting lid for leftovers. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and a bandana or have long hair tied back or braided. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Career/Technical for purposes of a high school transcript.

3 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $163.00

Sweets Shop- Delectable Desserts

Quarter 1: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 2:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Kati Andresen

Grade Range: 7th-12th

Prerequisites: None

The tantalizing aroma of cookies in the oven. A mouth-watering burst of mint. The silky feel of melted chocolate. The sticky sweet of fresh-made caramel. A subtle hint of lemon. Student bakers will enjoy these delicious sensations- and more- as they explore the world of baking homemade desserts.

Sweet Shop treats are scrumptious, fun, and simple to make. Compass bakers will learn to prepare a variety of desserts for friends and family, as an everyday treat or for holidays, birthdays, and other special occasions. Each quarter, students will create a range of desserts including a pie, a cake, a tray bake, cookies, a tart, a mousse or pudding, and a chocolate (plus, a frozen dessert in 8-week quarters). The class will include some icing, decorating, and garnishing techniques for completed desserts. This quarter, the Compass bakers' culinary adventures will include:

- Truffles

- Boston Cream Pie Trifle

- Preserves/Fillings

- Hand Pies

- Raspberry Danishes

- Chocolate Lace Cookie Sandwiches

- Vanilla Confetti Sheetcake

Students will be eating what they bake each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging baking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen and entertaining. They will learn important baking skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary is introduced each week. Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a small group.

Topics in this Series: Delectable Desserts (Quarter 1); Innovative Indulgences (Quarter 2), Decadent Delights (Quarter 3), and Casual Confections (Quarter 4).Assessments: Will not be given. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: A clean apron and plastic storage container with a tight-fitting lid for leftovers. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and a bandana or have long hair tied back or braided. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Career/Technical for purposes of a high school transcript.

3 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $163.00

Whole Health Yoga for Teens & Adults

Quarter 1: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 12:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Beloved Yoga

Grade Range: 7th-Adult

Prerequisites: None

Come in for a mid-day break! Transition from morning classes to afternoon classes and shake off the stress of the week! Refresh and refocus for the weekend with yoga! Whole Health Yoga is a health and fitness program for teens and adults of all fitness and experience levels -beginners are welcome. It is intended to reduce overall stress and tension, and improve flexibility, strength, and balance. Each class will begin with "centering", or a breathing exercise to calm, focus, and unwind (approx. 5 mins). Next, the class will do warm-up stretching with particular focus on the spine (approx. 10 mins). which will help loosen the joints. Each class will include a work-out comprised of stretches and poses for the whole body that touch on major muscle groups and body parts (approx. 35 mins). Each week will include focused work on a featured body part such as back, hips, or shoulders. This is not a yoga class that is based on holding the perfect pose. Instead, participants will learn gentle, adaptable poses that are accessible to all ages, body types, and fitness levels. There is no set, repetitive class sequence: no two sessions will be the same! Each class will conclude with a final relaxation, which is typically done lying down, and may include some visualization (approx. 10 mins). Yoga philosophy is not included in this course. All participants should wear comfortable clothing and bring a yoga mat to class.12.08.0617

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $99.00

Acting- Kids' Theater: Our Wacky Vacation

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 10:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Judith Harmon

Grade Range: 3rd-5th

Prerequisites: None

With fresh, fun vacation memories in mind, we'll twist up our super silly summer experiences into a a play about the weirdest, wackiest vacation we can think of!

Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other and to start to brainstorm about their original play. Through group activities and guided discussion, the actors will decide on characters, conflict, conclusion, and the story they want to tell. Students will pitch ideas to the group, and those concepts will be developed and blended to into a script that reflects the contributions of each student. The script will be customized for this class by the instructor with input from the students.

The class will learn the practical aspects of acting, as they work on script read-through, blocking, costume/prop design, and planning the show. Students will develop their own "actor's toolkit" of voice, body, and imagination in this creative process! Actors will grow in confidence and communication skills in preparation for a final sharing with parents on the final day of the quarter.

Students will work from a written script, and ideally, students would be able to read at grade level. Emerging readers can be accommodated if the parent is willing to do a little extra memorization work with the student at home including memorizing cues in the script. Parents will be emailed the script after the 3rd or 4th class and will be expected make sure their child learns his/her lines and assembles a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity. All actors must be at least age 8 to sign up for this class.

Topics in this Series: Our Wacky Vacation (Quarter 1), The Day We Woke Up in Oz (Quarter 2), Freaky Friday (Quarter 3), and The Craziest Dream Ever (Quarter 4)

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $99.00

Acting- Teen Scene: One Minute Plays

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: John Waldron

Grade Range: 9th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Imagine a scene on a long airplane flight, in a Chinese restaurant, at an awkward class reunion, a doctor's waiting room, a kooky family reunion, an English pub, a football game, or even the mall. Envision those scenarios all in one zany production, as a collection of one-minute plays! The class will race through at least twenty super-short scripts featuring a range of zany mini stories. The class will cast, practice, and perform them in a rapid-fire form called "tiny theater" and "flash fiction." One-minute plays are popular around the country in venues such as college theater, indie stage, and countless festivals such as the annual "Gone in 60 Seconds" event.

New and returning acting students will have fun and be challenged to think on their feet with the rapid-fire pace of these super-short plays as they connect with the audience, bring their character to life, and tell their story... in just one minute. Students will change characters and plots in quick succession and have to bring the audience along with them. If they forget a line, they ll improvise! From story to story, students will develop clever transitions and sequence the short scenes to a coherent class production.

In this class, actors will learn the art of a cold read in front of a director. If a student would like to write a script for the class, he/she should bring a hard copy to the first day of class to review and edit with the instructor before the script is offered to the class.

The students will perform for family and friends at the end of the quarter. This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, are flexible and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work in a collaborative group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class.

Topics in this Series: Wednesday Afternoon Live (Quarter 2); Long Form Improv (Quarter 3); and Mystery on Demand (Quarter 4). Taken these classes before? No problem, you can take them again as improv-based acting will be a new and different experience every time! Workload: Students should expect to spend 1 hour per week outside of class learning his/her lines. Assignments: Parts will be assigned in class. Assessments: Will not be given. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.12.08.0612

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $109.00

Acting- Tween Stage: Quick Scripts

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 12:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: John Waldron

Grade Range: 6th-8th

Prerequisites: None

Imagine a scene at a crazy concert, an awkward birthday party, the worst movie ever, a misunderstanding in a foreign country, or a close encounter with a celebrity!

Envision those scenarios all in one zany production, as a collection of one-minute plays! The class will race through at least twenty super-short scripts featuring a range of whacky mini stories. The class will cast, practice, and perform them in a rapid-fire form called tiny theater and flash fiction. One-minute plays are popular around the country in venues such as college theater, indie stage, and countless festivals such as the annual "Gone in 60 Seconds" event.

New and returning acting students will have fun and be challenged to think on their feet with the rapid-fire pace of these super-short plays as they connect with the audience, bring their character to life, and tell their story... in just one minute. Students will change characters and plots in quick succession and have to bring the audience along with them. If they forget a line, they'll improvise! From story to story, students will develop clever transitions and sequence the short scenes to a coherent class production.

In this class, actors will learn the art of a cold read in front of a director. If a student would like to write a script for the class, he/she should bring a hard copy to the first day of class to review and edit with the instructor before the script is offered to the class.

The students will perform for family and friends at the end of the quarter. This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, are flexible and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work in a collaborative group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class.

Topics in this Series: Quick Scripts (Quarter 1); Nutty News (Quarter 2); Improv Scenes (Quarter 3); and Mystery Busters (Quarter 4). Taken these classes before? No problem, you can take them again as improv-based acting will be a new and different experience every time!

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $109.00

Acting- Young Actor's Playhouse: Zany Zoo

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Judith Harmon

Grade Range: 1st-2nd

Prerequisites: None

Acting is an adventure! Young actors will find themselves in an creative Zany Zoo where they will create an imaginative storyline and unique characters for their very own original play about wacky animals, kooky caretakers, and their crazy escapades!

Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other and to begin to brainstorm about their original play. Through group activities and guided discussion, the young actors will decide on characters, conflict, and conclusion, and the story they want to tell. The script will be developed and customized for this class with input from the students.

Young actors will explore skills such as sensory awareness, listening, stage movement, character development, emotional expression, and observation/concentration while learning to portray their original character. Young actors will learn aspects of acting by script read-through, blocking, costume/prop discussion, and planning the show. Through individual and group activities, young actors build confidence in preparation for a final sharing for parents.

Students will work from a simple, written script, but emerging readers can be accommodated. Parents will be emailed the script after the 3rd or 4th class and will be expected to help their children memorize their lines and assemble a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity. All actors must be at least age 6 to sign up for this class.

Topics in this Series: Zany Zoo (Quarter 1), Cat & Dog Drama (Quarter 2), Our Arctic Adventure (Quarter 3), and Rainforest Rescue! (Quarter 4).

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $99.00

Art: Anyone Can Draw!

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Lori Goll

Grade Range: 3rd-4th

Prerequisites: None

Anyone can learn to draw! In this class, students will complete weekly projects which will build confidence and teach drawing fundamentals. This class will combine classical drawing techniques in pencil and charcoal, pen-and-ink, and colored pencils Although we will concentrate on black, white, and gray-scale values, we will introduce basic color theory.

The emphasis will be on learning how to draw what you see while still preserving and encouraging each students' individual style. Projects will incorporate drawing fundamentals such as perspective, composition, shading and blending, various drawing techniques (contour, continuous line, etc.) and styles (realistic, abstract, cubism, etc.). Subjects will range from basic still life shapes (vases, fruits, etc.) to human figure (hands, faces, and gestures) to landscape elements, observed both in-person and from photographs. Some curriculum will come from a new skill-based art trailed atelier called the Da Vinci Initiative. This class is suitable for beginners as well as returning art students who want to hone their skills. Topics in this Series: Anyone Can Draw! (Quarter 1); Wonders of Watercolor (Quarter 2); Drawing with Color & Texture (Quarter 3); and Painting with Pastels (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: All materials are furnished. A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Non-Meeting Days: This class does not meet on Sept. 11. The first day of class will be Sept. 18.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $95.00

Art: Anyone Can Draw!

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 2:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Lori Goll

Grade Range: 5th-6th

Prerequisites: None

Anyone can learn to draw! In this class, students will complete weekly projects which will build confidence and teach drawing fundamentals. This class will combine classical drawing techniques in pencil and charcoal, pen-and-ink, and colored pencils Although we will concentrate on black, white, and gray-scale values, we will introduce basic color theory.

The emphasis will be on learning how to draw what you see while still preserving and encouraging each students' individual style. Projects will incorporate drawing fundamentals such as perspective, composition, shading and blending, various drawing techniques (contour, continuous line, etc.) and styles (realistic, abstract, cubism, etc.). Subjects will range from basic still life shapes (vases, fruits, etc.) to human figure (hands, faces, and gestures) to landscape elements, observed both in-person and from photographs. Some curriculum will come from a new skill-based art trailed atelier called the Da Vinci Initiative. This class is suitable for beginners as well as returning art students who want to hone their skills. Topics in this Series: Anyone Can Draw! (Quarter 1); Wonders of Watercolor (Quarter 2); Drawing with Color & Texture (Quarter 3); and Painting with Pastels (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: All materials are furnished. A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Non-Meeting Days: This class does not meet on Sept. 11. The first day of class will be Sept. 18.10.08.0612

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $95.00

Art: Anyone Can Draw!

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 3:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Lori Goll

Grade Range: 7th-9th

Prerequisites: None

Anyone can learn to draw! In this class, students will complete weekly projects which will build confidence and teach drawing fundamentals. This class will combine classical drawing techniques in pencil and charcoal, pen-and-ink, and colored pencils Although we will concentrate on black, white, and gray-scale values, we will introduce basic color theory.

The emphasis will be on learning how to draw what you see while still preserving and encouraging each students' individual style. Projects will incorporate drawing fundamentals such as perspective, composition, shading and blending, various drawing techniques (contour, continuous line, etc.) and styles (realistic, abstract, cubism, etc.). Subjects will range from basic still life shapes (vases, fruits, etc.) to human figure (hands, faces, and gestures) to landscape elements, observed both in-person and from photographs. Some curriculum will come from a new skill-based art trailed atelier called the Da Vinci Initiative. This class is suitable for beginners as well as returning art students who want to hone their skills. Topics in this Series: Anyone Can Draw! (Quarter 1); Wonders of Watercolor (Quarter 2); Drawing with Color & Texture (Quarter 3); and Painting with Pastels (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: All materials are furnished. A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Non-Meeting Days: This class does not meet on Sept. 11. The first day of class will be Sept. 18. 10.06.0612

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $95.00

Battle Strategies & Dioramas: WWI, Germany's Last Offensive 1917

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 5th-8th

Prerequisites: None

Students will engage in a hands-on 3D battle strategy game using the military dioramas that they make! In 1917 the Allied powers of France and Great Britain were at the breaking point. Exhausted by the previous year's horrifyingly deadly battles of Verdun and the Somme, French units mutinied and refused orders to attack. The Imperial German army, immediately after defeating Tsarist Russia, was poised to gather all its resources for one final desperate attack. They had to end the war before millions of American reinforcements could make it to the front lines, or all was lost. This quarter covers this, the final German Summer Offensive of 1917.

Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will each form a 10 X 16 shaped, foam diorama with landscape elements (hills, trenches, rivers, ridges, vegetation, barbed wire, etc.) to represent a scene of a famous historical engagement. Students will each receive 1:72 scale miniature soldiers to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate the larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices.

The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical background and circumstances leading up to the specific battle. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. Topics in this Series: WWI, Germany's Summer Offensive (Quarter 1); WWI, America's Arrival (Quarter 2): WWII, D-Day (Quarter 3); and WWII, The Battle of the Bulge (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $25.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $140.00

Battle Strategies & Dioramas: WWI, Germany's Last Offensive 1917

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 4:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 5th-8th

Prerequisites: None

Students will engage in a hands-on 3D battle strategy game using the military dioramas that they make! In 1917 the Allied powers of France and Great Britain were at the breaking point. Exhausted by the previous year's horrifyingly deadly battles of Verdun and the Somme, French units mutinied and refused orders to attack. The Imperial German army, immediately after defeating Tsarist Russia, was poised to gather all its resources for one final desperate attack. They had to end the war before millions of American reinforcements could make it to the front lines, or all was lost. This quarter covers this, the final German Summer Offensive of 1917.

Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will each form a 10 X 16 shaped, foam diorama with landscape elements (hills, trenches, rivers, ridges, vegetation, barbed wire, etc.) to represent a scene of a famous historical engagement. Students will each receive 1:72 scale miniature soldiers to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate the larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices.

The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical background and circumstances leading up to the specific battle. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. Topics in this Series: WWI, Germany's Summer Offensive (Quarter 1); WWI, America's Arrival (Quarter 2): WWII, D-Day (Quarter 3); and WWII, The Battle of the Bulge (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $25.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. 10.06.0729

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $126.00

Bibliophiles Book Group: Identity

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Megan Reynolds

Grade Range: 7th-8th

Prerequisites: None

In the Bibliophiles Book Group, middle school-aged students will examine a different theme each quarter through high quality literature, poetry, songs, and art. Students will read, analyze, and compare two full-length novels that share similar themes through facilitated discussions and extension activities which encourage students to make personal connections to what is read. The group will evaluate literary and thematic elements, the author’s style, and how the author’s personal experiences shape his or her writing.

The first book of the first quarter will be Okay for Now by Gary D. Schmidt, which will be used to analyze the theme of Identity. A follow-up book will be voted on by the students from a list of titles which explore the same theme.

Assigned chapters from the books must be read at home, either as read-aloud, individual silent reading, or listening to the unabridged audiobook. Weekly written assignments require students to think critically about what they read. In addition, students will complete a final project to synthesize their learning each quarter. Topics in this Series: Identity (Quarter 1); Individuality (Quarter 2); Truth (Quarter 3); and Survival (Quarter 4).

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $126.00

Build It Better! Simple Machine Contraptions

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 10:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Dan Gallagher

Grade Range: 3rd-4th

Prerequisites: None

Young engineers will participate in a Lego "Great Ball Contraption" challenge! Lego Mindstorm components and motors are not just for building robots! These interconnecting pieces can be constructed into an infinite number of unique, mechanized machines- much like an erector set! Students will each be challenged with developing a unique, individual segment of a contraption that moves a ball from point A to point B, and each segment will link to a classmate's invention to keep the ball moving! A contraption is a series of simple machines and transitions that will automate the process of moving a small ball along, much like a Rube Goldberg innovation.

During first quarter, students will be challenged to incorporate as many simple machines as possible into their contraption. They will learn about levers, inclined planes, wheel and axle, wedges, screws, and pulleys while inventing. Can they move a ball through a maze with a ramp (inclined plane), a flipper (lever), or lowered bucket (pulley) without using their hands? Can they pass the ball to their neighbor without hitting the floor? Parents will be invited to the final class to see the demonstration of all of students' contraptions linked together. See http://greatballcontraption.com/ or You Tube videos for impressive examples of the Great Ball Contraption. Second quarter students will be challenged to build bigger, better, more complex contraptions with compound machines and more mechanization!

Topics in this Series: Simple Machine Contraptions (Quarter 1); Wacky Contraptions (Quarter 2): Gadgets & Gizmos (Quarter 3); and Widgets and Whatsits (Quarter 4).

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $148.00

Chess: Advanced Beginners 1

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Peter Snow

Grade Range: 3rd-6th

Prerequisites: Beginner Chess or equivalent

In Advanced Beginner Chess 1, students will learn skills and strategies that build upon each other, including a review of: castling, pawn promotion, and en pass ant rules; a notation lesson; a review of basic mates; strategies for using the draw rules for drawing a game when too far behind to win; using batteries to cause checkmates; back-rank checkmates; proper development of bishops; proper development of rooks (in the middlegame); advanced beginning overextended pieces; and other topics based on observed need. Experts suggest that the game of chess teaches analytical and disciplined thinking skills, while raising self esteem, teaching motivation and determination, and sportsmanship (Kasparov Foundation). Each class will be spent half on technique and half in practice matches with classmates while the instructor coaches. Students should have 15-20 hours of chess instruction prior to enrolling in Advanced Beginner Chess, or a working knowledge of most skills taught in the Compass Beginner Chess level.12.08.0612

8 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $99.00

Chess: Beginners 1

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 12:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Peter Snow

Grade Range: 2nd-5th

Prerequisites: None

In Beginning Chess 1, students will learn beginner basics such as: how all pieces move and capture; castling, pawn promotion, en pass ant; checks and how to get out of them; checkmate and stalemate; notation lesson and chess etiquette behavior; scholars mate & fools mate. Experts suggest that the game of chess teaches analytical and disciplined thinking skills, while raising self esteem, teaching motivation and determination, and sportsmanship (Kasparov Foundation). Each class will be spent half on technique and half in practice matches with classmates while the instructor coaches.

8 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $99.00

Chess: Intermediate Players 1

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 10:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Peter Snow

Grade Range: 4th-8th

Prerequisites: Advanced Beginner Chess or equivalent

In Intermediate Chess 1, students will learn skills that build upon each other such as, 8 Questions to ask before you move; mating nets; piece defenses against typical tactics; forcing combinations; king and pawn endings; offensive tactics used in the openings; and review of two move checkmates and two move tactics. Experts suggest that the game of chess teaches analytical and disciplined thinking skills, while raising self esteem, teaching motivation and determination, and sportsmanship (Kasparov Foundation). Each class will be spent half on technique and half in practice matches with classmates while the instructor coaches. Students should have 30+ hours of chess instruction prior to enrolling in Intermediate Chess, a working knowledge of most skills taught in the Compass Beginner and Advanced Beginner Chess levels, or instructor permission. Homework may be given.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $132.00

Coding Club: Animations & Games

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Coder Kids

Grade Range: 2nd-3rd

Prerequisites: None

In Coding Club, students will create interactive stories, games, and animations. Our youngest coders will use the simple drag-and-drop block programming from the new 3.0 version of Scratch, a visual coding language designed for kids. Kids will learn the logic and patterns behind coding and will be introduced to hardware integration- where outside devices can be controlled by the code they construct. They will learn to use add-ons called "extensions" to incorporate new and interesting features to their code. Kids will discover how to integrate text-to-speech to make more immersive and interactive stories, and they will learn how to integrate a camera into their project for a whole new twist!

Coding Club is a computer lab environment in which students work through the Coder Kids curriculum under the direction of computer science coaches. Work in the Programming Lab is self-paced which allows students to progress through skill-building activities and instructional coding modules at their own rate of learning. The Lab environment allows students to enroll at any quarter, fosters brand new coders, and encourages those with prior coding experience. Coder Kids coaches work with small pull-out groups, pairs, or individuals to provide additional instruction and support on the skillset each needs each week.

Coder Kids proprietary curriculum is designed to meet and exceed the standards of the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA). Students work on modern MacBook Air laptops. Students may enroll in a Coding course at any quarter, as they can start with initial lessons at any time. Coaches send prompts for parents in the weekly e-mail updates to encourage discussion and reflection about what the student learned in class each week. The class tuition includes a student technology fee that covers repair/maintenance of hardware, software, and licenses. Coding Club continues all quarters. Students can continue from one quarter to the next with no repeat or overlap; instead they will just keep building and enhancing their ongoing projects.

8 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $187.00

Coding Lab: Video Game Design

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 3:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Coder Kids

Grade Range: 6th-8th

Prerequisites: None

In Coding Lab, middle school students will learn to code what they love to play- video games! Students will learn how to code more sophisticated game interface by combining data input and output. They will learn how to connect and code external hardware and collect data from sensors, such as gyroscopes, to function as hand-held game controllers. They will experiment with combining LEDs (small lights) to provide feedback, such as when a point is earned or enemy eliminated, and they will discover how to make their games more interactive and interesting by allowing multiple players, keeping score, and integrating music or sound effects. Never programmed a video game? No problem, beginners are welcome.

Coding Lab is a computer lab environment in which students work through the Coder Kids curriculum under the direction of computer science coaches. Work in the Programming Lab is self-paced which allows students to progress through skill-building activities and instructional coding modules at their own rate of learning. The Lab environment allows students to enroll at any quarter, fosters brand new coders, and encourages those with prior coding experience. Coder Kids coaches work with small pull-out groups, pairs, or individuals to provide additional instruction and support on the skillset each needs each week.

Coder Kids proprietary curriculum is designed to meet and exceed the standards of the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA). Students work on modern MacBook Air laptops. Students may enroll in a Coding course at any quarter, as they can start with initial lessons at any time. Coaches send prompts for parents in the weekly e-mail updates to encourage discussion and reflection about what the student learned in class each week. The class tuition includes a student technology fee that covers repair/maintenance of hardware, software, and licenses. Students can continue from one quarter to the next with no repeat or overlap; instead they will just keep building and enhancing their ongoing projects.

8 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $187.00

Coding Studio: Interactive Electronics

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 2:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Coder Kids

Grade Range: 4th-5th

Prerequisites: None

In Coding Studio, students will learn how to create coded instructions that make electronic devices come to life! Students will explore digital communications through interactive block programming in the new 3.0 version of Scratch, a visual coding language designed for kids. Coders will connect their programmed instructions to a micro:bit: a tiny, external, programmable circuit board (i.e. hardware). The micro:bit helps kids code with technology by providing responsive LEDs, buttons, and sensors which can be incorporated into creative projects. Students will begin by coding the micro:bit to respond as a digital musical instrument!

Coding Studio is a computer lab environment in which students work through the Coder Kids curriculum under the direction of computer science coaches. Work in the Programming Lab is self-paced which allows students to progress through skill-building activities and instructional coding modules at their own rate of learning. The Lab environment allows students to enroll at any quarter, fosters brand new coders, and encourages those with prior coding experience. Coder Kids coaches work with small pull-out groups, pairs, or individuals to provide additional instruction and support on the skillset each needs each week. /p>

Coder Kids proprietary curriculum is designed to meet and exceed the standards of the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA). Students work on modern MacBook Air laptops. Students may enroll in a Coding course at any quarter, as they can start with initial lessons at any time. Coaches send prompts for parents in the weekly e-mail updates to encourage discussion and reflection about what the student learned in class each week. The class tuition includes a student technology fee that covers repair/maintenance of hardware, software, and licenses. Coding Club continues all quarters. Students can continue from one quarter to the next with no repeat or overlap; instead they will just keep building and enhancing their ongoing projects.

8 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $187.00

Cooking for Kids: Fall Fare with Flair

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 10:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Mylene Nyman

Grade Range: 3rd-5th

Prerequisites: None

Students will enjoy making savory fall recipes and cool weather comfort foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Fall Favorites are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

-Fresh Herbed Brie Boule Appetizer

-Cream of Asparagus Soup

-Fall Twist Cobb Salad

-Penne with Ricotta, Eggs, and Autumn Veggies

-Roasted Chicken with Apples, Pears, and Cherries

-Pumpkin Trifle Dessert

-Chicken Posole

Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.

Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day.

Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: A clean apron and plastic storage container with a tight-fitting lid for leftovers. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and a bandana or have long hair tied back or braided

3 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $185.00

Cooking for Kids: Fall Fare with Flair

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Mylene Nyman

Grade Range: 3rd-5th

Prerequisites: None

Students will enjoy making savory fall recipes and cool weather comfort foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Fall Favorites are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

-Fresh Herbed Brie Boule Appetizer

-Cream of Asparagus Soup

-Fall Twist Cobb Salad

-Penne with Ricotta, Eggs, and Autumn Veggies

-Roasted Chicken with Apples, Pears, and Cherries

-Pumpkin Trifle Dessert

-Chicken Posole

Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.

Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day.

Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: A clean apron and plastic storage container with a tight-fitting lid for leftovers. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and a bandana or have long hair tied back or braided

3 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $185.00

Cooking for Little Kids: Fall Fare with Flair

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 12:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Mylene Nyman

Grade Range: 1st-3rd

Prerequisites: None

Students will enjoy making savory fall recipes and cool weather comfort foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Fall Favorites are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

-Fresh Herbed Brie Boule Appetizer

-Cream of Asparagus Soup

-Fall Twist Cobb Salad

-Penne with Ricotta, Eggs, and Autumn Veggies

-Roasted Chicken with Apples, Pears, and Cherries

-Pumpkin Trifle Dessert

-Chicken Posole

Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.

Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Students must be minimum age six (6) by the start of class. Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day.

Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: A clean apron and plastic storage container with a tight-fitting lid for leftovers. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and a bandana or have long hair tied back or braided

3 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $185.00

Cooking for Little Kids: Fall Fare with Flair

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 3:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Mylene Nyman

Grade Range: 1st-3rd

Prerequisites: None

Students will enjoy making savory fall recipes and cool weather comfort foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Fall Favorites are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

-Fresh Herbed Brie Boule Appetizer

-Cream of Asparagus Soup

-Fall Twist Cobb Salad

-Penne with Ricotta, Eggs, and Autumn Veggies

-Roasted Chicken with Apples, Pears, and Cherries

-Pumpkin Trifle Dessert

-Chicken Posole

Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.

Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Students must be minimum age six (6) by the start of class. Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day.

Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: A clean apron and plastic storage container with a tight-fitting lid for leftovers. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and a bandana or have long hair tied back or braided. 06.03.0612

3 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $185.00

Cooking for Tweens: Fall Fare with Flair (Wed.)

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Mylene Nyman

Grade Range: 6th-8th

Prerequisites: None

Students will enjoy making savory fall recipes and cool weather comfort foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Fall Favorites are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

-Fresh Herbed Brie Boule Appetizer

-Cream of Asparagus Soup

-Fall Twist Cobb Salad

-Penne with Ricotta, Eggs, and Autumn Veggies

-Roasted Chicken with Apples, Pears, and Cherries

-Pumpkin Trifle Dessert

-Chicken Posole

Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.

Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day.

Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: A clean apron and plastic storage container with a tight-fitting lid for leftovers. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and a bandana or have long hair tied back or braided

3 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $185.00

Cooking for Tweens: Fall Fare with Flair (Wed.)

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 2:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Mylene Nyman

Grade Range: 6th-8th

Prerequisites: None

Students will enjoy making savory fall recipes and cool weather comfort foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Fall Favorites are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

-Fresh Herbed Brie Boule Appetizer

-Cream of Asparagus Soup

-Fall Twist Cobb Salad

-Penne with Ricotta, Eggs, and Autumn Veggies

-Roasted Chicken with Apples, Pears, and Cherries

-Pumpkin Trifle Dessert

-Chicken Posole

Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.

Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day.

Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: A clean apron and plastic storage container with a tight-fitting lid for leftovers. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and a bandana or have long hair tied back or braided

3 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $185.00

Creating Comics: Marvel Characters

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: David Newbold

Grade Range: 7th-8th

Prerequisites: None

What makes those instantly recognizable comic heroes and cartoon characters so special? Do you recognize Spiderman, Wonder Woman, BB-8, or Pikachu every time you see them? Students will work with acclaimed comic artist David Newbold to learn the art of illustrating comic characters!

Each quarter, students will complete several character studies by following along as David breaks well-known characters down into elemental steps. Students will draw step-by-step following the artist's lead as they learn to visualize how a character's form is composed of basic geometric shapes. The class will discover the many ways artists can portray motion and feelings in these characters as well as what makes them so fun and interesting. In the process, students will learn about the world of comics and how comic books are created. p>

First quarter, students will learn to draw favorite Marvel characters. The first character study will be Spiderman. Students will vote in class on the other two Marvel characters that they will learn to draw. Students should expect to complete 3 characters each quarter with approximately two classes drawing each character in pencil. Students will outline in Sharpie and color their characters in during the final week of class. Students can use the techniques learned in class to create their own, unique comic characters.

Topics in this Series: Marvel Characters (Quarter 1); DC Characters (Quarter 2); Star Wars (Quarter 3); and Manga Characters (Quarter 4).Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a class kit that the students will need to bring every week.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $133.00

Creating Comics: Marvel Characters

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 12:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: David Newbold

Grade Range: 5th-6th

Prerequisites: None

What makes those instantly recognizable comic heroes and cartoon characters so special? Do you recognize Spiderman, Wonder Woman, BB-8, or Pikachu every time you see them? Students will work with acclaimed comic artist David Newbold to learn the art of illustrating comic characters!

Each quarter, students will complete several character studies by following along as David breaks well-known characters down into elemental steps. Students will draw step-by-step following the artist's lead as they learn to visualize how a character's form is composed of basic geometric shapes. The class will discover the many ways artists can portray motion and feelings in these characters as well as what makes them so fun and interesting. In the process, students will learn about the world of comics and how comic books are created. p>

First quarter, students will learn to draw favorite Marvel characters. The first character study will be Spiderman. Students will vote in class on the other two Marvel characters that they will learn to draw. Students should expect to complete 3 characters each quarter with approximately two classes drawing each character in pencil. Students will outline in Sharpie and color their characters in during the final week of class. Students can use the techniques learned in class to create their own, unique comic characters.

Topics in this Series: Marvel Characters (Quarter 1); DC Characters (Quarter 2); Star Wars (Quarter 3); and Manga Characters (Quarter 4).Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a class kit that the students will need to bring every week.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $133.00

Creative Movement: Contemporary Dance

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 12:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Velocity Dance

Grade Range: 2nd-5th

Prerequisites: None

Add some Creative Movement to your child's day! Break-up sit-down, quiet, or serious time with this creative, exploratory dance class. Creative Movement will incorporate Contemporary, Hip Hop, Jazz, Lyrical, and other dance styles. Each week, the class will focus on a different genre of dance, exploring the music and movement behind that style, choreography, and enjoying improv/free style dancing. Beginning and experienced dancers will learn a variety of styles while improving their own creativity, movement quality, and artistic expression. Creative Movement will also enhance body awareness, movement, and musicality. All dance will be to clean edits of popular music (rated E for everyone). The last class of the quarter, students will perform a group routine for parents. Creative Movement is a co-ed style that accommodates kids who have not danced before and those who don't want the structure of more traditional dance formats while providing a fun, creative work out. Creative Movement continues each quarter, and students may repeat the class to continue to improve skill. No two dance sessions are the same!

7 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $127.00

Dig It! Early Archaeology: Paleolithic to Mesopotamian

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 2:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Dr. Erica Hughes

Grade Range: 7th-8th

Prerequisites: None

Archeology is the field of study that unlocks the clues to past civilizations. In this class, students will explore key time periods and look at the archeological evidence that tells us what was going on in different civilizations: what people ate, what they wore, who they worshipped, the art they created, the houses that they lived in, the wars they fought, and even what pets lived alongside them! This archeological tour will be guided by a scholar of art and antiquity: Dr. Erica Hughes has traveled and participated in archaeological explorations throughout the ancient world. Students will "dig" her personal photos and stories and participate in class discussions, group activities, and individual hands-on experiences that are designed to help young people understand the creation and conservation of artifacts.

First quarter will examine paleolithic and neolithic archaeology and answer the questions, "What sticks around for 15,000 years?" and, "How do we know if a group was nomadic or settled?" Next, the class will consider the origins of writing and what makes the differences between history and prehistory. Students will look at how the written word evolved through Chinese letters, Cuneiform, and Mayan hieroglyphs. Finally, the group will journey to ancient Mesopotamia to look at the archeological evidence that demonstrates how the first complex societies formed and why irrigation was so important. Example activities in this class include making brushes and mixing natural pigment to create a wall painting; using a stylus to write cuneiform letters in clay, and acting out scenes from the Tale of Gilgamesh.

Topics in this Series: Early Archaeology: Paleolithic to Mesopotamian (Quarter 1); Bronze Age Archaeology: Egypt, Anatolia, Myceneans (Quarter 2); Classical Archaeology: Greece & Rome (Quarter 3); and Forensic Archaeology: Piecing Together History (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $15.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

7 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $127.00

Dissection Lab: Organs and Organ Systems

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Donna Shackelford

Grade Range: 7th-8th

Prerequisites: None

Students will investigate the physiological characteristics of major organ systems and will gain an understanding of the tissue types and structures through in-class dissections. Students will complete at least four individual dissections including a heart, a brain, and an eyeball. The class will cover lab safety, practice proper dissection techniques, and learn how to set up and maintain a lab journal with notes and drawings of cells and organs. To enhance each dissection lab, students will also use microscopes to look at tissue samples and study the cell structure of different organs. Students investigate the specific functions of each organ and how they operate to maintain homeostasis. Topics in this Series: Dissection Lab: Organs and Organ Systems (Quarter 1); Dessection Lab: Organisms (Quarter 2); CSI Forensic Science- Analysis (Quarter 3); and CSI Forensic Science- Investigation (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $30.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

7 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $171.00

Dynamic Dioramas: Beowulf & the Vikings

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 2:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 2nd-4th

Prerequisites: None

Learn about the fiercest warrior prince of the Viking age! Beowulf and followers were the most elite monster hunters ever to have a saga written about them! From diving into the depths of the ocean to slay sea monsters, to Hrothgar's hall, where Beowulf fought the monster Grendel unarmed. The story of Beowulf is a dungeon-crawling Viking epic for the ages, and serves as the roots for the modern fantasy genre. It is a Norse Odyssey, and here be monsters!

Each student will create an individual diorama of a scene from Beowulf's epic. Students will craft and hand-shape their scene on a 10 x 16 inch foam board using artistic, model-making techniques. They will customize their dioramas with landscape elements, waterways, structures of the time, and paint. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature heroes and monsters, then combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to create larger terrain. Students will then compete in history-based survival strategy games. This will reinforce lessons about the culture, economy, warfare, and mythology of the time. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them. Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents.

Topics in this Series: Beowulf & the Vikings (Quarter 1); King Arthur & the Saxons (Quarter 2); Song of Roland & the Franks (Quarter 3), and Saladin & the Norman Conquest & Crusades (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $15.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $140.00

Engineering Workshop: Electronics- Circuit Basics

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 12:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Dan Gallagher

Grade Range: 7th-8th

Prerequisites: None

Learn all about electricity and electronics in this practical, hands-on workshop! Electronics are fundamental to lots of things that kids want to build such as automated toys, robots, and computers. Student engineers will learn about the properties of electricity through experimentation and circuit building. They will learn the basics of electronic circuits symbolically and in working with actual components. The class will beging by assembling simple circuits on breadboards using real components such as resistors, transistors, relays, and LEDs before moving into soldering real circuit boards. Students will learn to work with Arduino microcontrollers where they will experiment with different inputs and outputs. Each student will assemble, wire, solder test, and take home numerous electronic circuit projects. Topics in this Series: Electronics- Circuit Basics (Quarter 1); Electronics + Programming (Quarter 2); Applied Electronics & Programming- Robotic Car (Quarter 3); and Applied Electronics & Programming- DIY AI (artificical intellienge) (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $65.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for an electronics kit, soldering iron, and take-home materials.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $148.00

Experimental Methods & Design: Animal Behavior

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 12:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Dr. Kareleen Boyle

Grade Range: 7th-8th

Prerequisites: None

In this class, middle school students will learn to work as independent investigators using the scientific method. Students will observe the systems under investigation, choose a pattern or trend that interests them, and then develop a testable hypothesis. Students will learn how to: design a scientific experiment for either a laboratory or field setting, choose appropriate controls, minimize investigator bias, correctly perform measurements and to record and analyze data.

During first quarter, students will design experiments relating to animal behavior. Possible areas of investigation include behavior at the individual level (such as substrate selection with pill bugs or millipedes); learned behavior with planaria; foraging and habitat preferences with hermit crabs; territoriality among betta fish or hissing cockroaches; or social behavior with ant colonies. Others may design experiments that test intraspecific interactions, predator-prey relationships, or animal competition.

Students will learn how to locate peer-reviewed scientific literature to research their subject. By the end of the quarter, students will have completed their independent investigations, summarized the results in a poster, and will present their data to the class and families. Each quarter will focus on a different aspect of science. Topics in this Series: Animal Behavior (Quarter 1), Chemistry (Quarter 2), Microscopic (Quarter 3), and Botany (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

8 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $161.00

Extreme Animal Kingdom: Extraordinary Organisms

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 2:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Donna Shackelford

Grade Range: 5th-6th

Prerequisites: None

Before delving into the fascinating and diverse world of animals, students will learn how scientists classify organisms in the science of taxonomy. The class will review highlights of the kingdoms of protozoan, bacteria, animals, plants, and fungi through labs and observations of their life cycles and characteristics. Weekly labs will include such studies as pond water analysis- what organisms can be observed, and how are their life cycles and food chains intertwined? The class will discover the crazy world of extremophiles including organisms that can live in extreme conditions and those that can pause their life cycles. Students will handle and observe two types of extremophiles- brine shrimp and tardigrades (water bears). Students will spend time using microscopes, making slides, and learning to keep science journals/notebooks.

Topics in for this Age/Grade: Extreme Animal Kingdom: Extraordinary Organisms (Quarter 1); Extreme Animal Kingdom: Fascinating Phyla (Quarter 2); Engineering Challenge Lab: Civil, Structural, Mechanical (Quarter 3); and Engineering Challenge Lab: Electrical, Chemical, BioMedical (Quarter 4).

7 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $171.00

Family Fun Yoga

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 10:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Beloved Yoga

Grade Range: K-Adult

Prerequisites: None

Kids can get the wiggles out and focus their thoughts for the day, and parents can refresh from the morning rush in Family Fun Yoga! Family yoga is a basic fitness class that will incorporate gentle stretching and simple, adapted poses that are accessible for all ages. It is intended to reduce stress and anxiety, improve flexibility and balance, and promote calm and focus in both kids and adults. Each class will begin with breathing and stretching exercises to help unwind and warm-up followed by a whole-body work-out comprised of stretches and poses that touch on major muscle groups and body parts. Some exercises will be introduced as games or partner activities to hold the attention of our youngest participants. Basic yoga poses will be introduced with fun, kid-friendly, recognizable names such as standing "like a tree", bending as though "planting flower seeds", or squatting "like a toad," but are still very appropriate for adults. This is not a yoga class that is based on holding the perfect pose. Instead, participants will be introduced to activities that that can accommodate all ages, body types, and fitness levels. There is no set, repetitive class sequence: no two sessions will be the same! Each session will end with a cool-down activity.
Children in kindergarten through 2nd grade (ages 5-8) must register for this class along with a registered (paid) parent. Students in 3rd-6th grade may register on their own, or with a parent. Siblings younger than age 5 cannot be accommodated as participants or observers in this class. Yoga philosophy is not included in this course. All participants should wear comfortable clothing and bring a yoga mat to class.12.06.0612

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $99.00

Fencing for Beginners & Advanced Beginners

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 3:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Fencing Sports Academy

Grade Range: 4th-8th

Prerequisites: None

Fencing is the clashing of steel and competitive spirit combined with the battle of the wits. Apply the rules of Olympic fencing, and you have a physically and mentally challenging game of strategy, often called, "physical chess." In Beginning Fencing, students will learn the rules of the sport as well as footwork, attacks, parries, responses, and how to judge matches. Beginning students will use the epee, a thin, lightweight sword with broad hand guard and will wear a wireless electronic scoring sensor over layers of protective gear. Returning students will work with both the epee and foil. The physical benefits of fencing are an increase in agility, balance and coordination. Fencing also provides mental benefits such as improved focus, strategy and confidence. Fencing is safety-oriented with blunt tip weapons, chest protectors, chest/sleeve pads, fencing jacket, gloves, and face mask. All equipment is provided by the instructor. Students are asked to wear comfortable athletic pants such as running pants or sweatpants (no jeans, no dresses), and low-heeled athletic shoes.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $128.00

French Foundations

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Edwige Pinover

Grade Range: 7th-8th

Prerequisites: None

Bonjour! French Foundations is an introductory class for middle school-aged students. The class will be taught in a predominantly immersion environment. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students or explain difficult concepts. French language instruction will be presented in a natural learning sequence beginning with nouns (such as colors, numbers, clothing, foods, animals, days/dates, etc), adjectives, greetings, and simple phrases. Students will learn beginning grammatical constructions such as noun-verb agreement, noun-adjective agreement, adjective placement, and the rules of regular verb conjugation. Students will be encouraged to speak aloud and converse with classmates, but also to learn to sound out, spell, and read beginning, written French. Aspects of Francophone culture such as holidays, foods, and traditions will be incorporated in the classes.
Each quarter introduces new themes and new vocabulary in French, so continuing students can continue to build their language basics. However, themes and units are non-sequential, so students may enroll in this level in any quarter. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, grammar, and usage while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Students should be at grade level in their reading. Fluency should not be expected at this level.10.06.0612

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $148.00

French with Friends

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 12:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Edwige Pinover

Grade Range: 3rd-5th

Prerequisites: None

Salut! French with Friends is an introductory class for elementary aged beginner. The class will be taught in a predominantly immersion environment. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students or explain difficult concepts. French language instruction will be presented in a natural learning sequence beginning with nouns (such as colors, numbers, clothing, foods, animals, family members, days/dates, etc), adjectives, beginning verbs, greetings, and simple phrases. Songs, games, stories, and hands-on activities will be used in class to review vocabulary and phrases. Emphasis will be on conversation, but students will be encouraged to learn to spell and sound out written French. Aspects of Francophone culture such as holidays, foods, and traditions will be incorporated in the classes.
Each quarter introduces new themes and new vocabulary in French, so continuing students can continue to build their language basics. However, themes and units are non-sequential, so students may enroll in this level in any quarter. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, and simple phrases while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Fluency should not be expected at this level.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $148.00

FUNctional Fitness: Conditioning and Cross-Training (Homeschool PE)

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Diane Mack

Grade Range: 2nd-6th

Prerequisites: None

FUNctional Fitness is a dynamic kids' homeschool PE program that incorporates well-rounded exercises to get kids up and moving mid-day! No two workouts are the same, but each day's activities incorporate exercises that target 10 areas: cardio-vascular endurance, stamina, strength, flexibility, power, speed, coordination, agility, balance, and accuracy. FUNctional Fitness focuses on functional movements that are fundamental to all aspects of play and exercise- pulling, pushing, running, throwing, climbing, lifting, and jumping. Work-outs are scalable and adaptable to different individual's own level, and the emphasis in on fun, safety, and personal accomplishment rather than competition among classmates. Kids will use a variety of small equipment and gear in their workouts such as mat, dumbbells, kettlebells, jump ropes, medicine balls, slam balls, rope ladders, and more. When the weather permits, some exercises may be taken outdoors. The physical challenges of FUNctional Fitness will foster self-confidence, focus, and help instill a foundation for a lifetime of fitness. All equipment is furnished. Students are asked to wear loose, comfortable clothing, such as running pants or sweatpants, and comfortable, supportive athletic shoes. FUNctional Fitness continues each quarter, and students may repeat the class to continue to improve fitness. No two workouts are the same!

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $122.00

Great Books for Girls Group

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Megan Reynolds

Grade Range: 4th-6th

Prerequisites: None

Great Books for Girls offers preteen students the opportunity to read high quality literature and expand their understanding of what they read through book discussion and hands-on extension activities. Through facilitated class discussion, students will analyze plot, theme, characters, genre, and setting by citing specific examples from the story. In addition, students will complete a wide range of extension activities, such as acting out or illustrating favorite scenes, writing alternate endings or prequels, or researching specific aspects of the story. Students will be asked to read assigned chapters from their books at home, either as read-aloud, individual silent reading, or listening to the unabridged audiobook. Readers will be encouraged to take notes on key passages or questions. All books selected for 2019-20 will feature the theme, "Perspective." The first book of Quarter 1 will be Half a Chance by Cynthia Lord. A second, follw-up book will be voted on by the students each quarter from A Mighty Girl suggested titles, Newbery Medalists and Honor Books, and the Capitol Choices book lists.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $126.00

Hands on History: Ancient Peoples- The Stone Age

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 3:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Kouthar Muttardy

Grade Range: 3rd-5th

Prerequisites: None

Discover life in the Stone Age in this vibrant hands-on history class! Travel back in time nearly 2 million years to learn about the world's early humans, including how they settled the continents, what dangers and challenges they faced, what they ate, and how they found shelter. Students will make cave art paintings, a model of a mammoth bone shelter, a replica Stone Age statuette, chipped flint spear heads, and a sabre-tooth necklace as they learn about life in the Stone Age! The class will examine artifacts found in the archaeological digs of sites from the period in order to discover what cultural traditions and beliefs formed the basis for later human societies.

Students will be excited by history when approached through this engaging, multi-disciplinary exploration of historical connections and integrated concepts rather than memorizing dates and disconnected facts! Topics in this Series: Stone Age (Quarter 1); Native North Americans (Quarter 2); The Mayans and Aztecs (Quarter 3); and the Incas (Quarter 4).Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $15.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $133.00

Jr. Engineering with LEGO: Super Structures

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 12:30 pm      Duration: 85 min

Instructor: PlayWell Teknologies

Grade Range: K-2nd

Prerequisites: None

Students will use LEGO to design and build simple engineering projects out of everyone's favoriate building toy! In this 90 minute class, students will explore concepts and vocabulary in physics, mechanical engineering, structural engineering, aerospace engineering, and architecture while playing with their creations.

First quarter, junior engineers will tackle Super Structures, using the Pyramids of Giza, the Great Wall of China, the Seattle Space Needed, Eiffel Tower, and the world's biggest bridges for their inspiration.

Each class begins with 10-minutes of free build from tubs of LEGO components followed by a short discussion and demonstration of the day's project and concepts. Students build individually or in groups. Instructors will provide individual assistance, facilitate challenges, performance testing, competitions, and modifications to projects. Some projects may have been introduced in prior year's sessions, but each new build is unique, and student's building skills and understanding will have grown. Students must be minimum age 5 and able to separate from their parents for this class. Topics in this Series: Super Structures (Quarter 1); Monster Machines (Quarter 2); Awesome Automobiles (Quarter 3); Fantastic Fliers & Space Race (Quarter 4).

8 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $173.00

Junior Art Studio: Mixed Media Makers

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 10:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Kerry Diederich

Grade Range: K-2nd

Prerequisites: None

This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art or artist, view sample works, and then will create a project in the style of the artist using a wide variety of materials and representative colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.

First quarter, junior artists will explore fun and unique art processes through a variety of mixed media projects such as tint/shade ice cream cones, cut paper art, Styrofoam animal painting, quilt and tile-inspired art, and illusion art, and samples from artists who worked in similar materials, themes, or styles.

Topics in this Series: Mixed Media Makers (Quarter 1); Whimsical Winter Works (Quarter 2); Art Around the World (Quarter 3); and Cultural Art Creations (Quarter 4) Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $20.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $111.00

Junior Art Studio: Mixed Media Makers

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Kerry Diederich

Grade Range: K-2nd

Prerequisites: None

This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art or artist, view sample works, and then will create a project in the style of the artist using a wide variety of materials and representative colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.

First quarter, junior artists will explore fun and unique art processes through a variety of mixed media projects such as tint/shade ice cream cones, cut paper art, Styrofoam animal painting, quilt and tile-inspired art, and illusion art, and samples from artists who worked in similar materials, themes, or styles.

Topics in this Series: Mixed Media Makers (Quarter 1); Whimsical Winter Works (Quarter 2); Art Around the World (Quarter 3); and Cultural Art Creations (Quarter 4) Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $20.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $111.00

Krav Maga Self Defense for Kids: Red Stripe

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Sarah Reynolds

Grade Range: 5th-8th

Prerequisites: None

Krav Maga is the Israeli martial art which teaches self defense and fitness. Students of Krav Maga are taught a series of strategies to assess and respond to common situations, such as facing a bully. Kids are always taught first and foremost to get away, to get help, and to try to deescalate the situation. When that fails, students practice a technique that includes a warning strike followed by escape, and finally, they learn how to stand up for themselves and how to counterattack if a situation escalates and becomes threatening. Kids are empowered and gain confidence when they rehearse how to handle real-life situations. Exercises and in-class practice incorporate balance, coordination, energy, and other key elements of fitness along with life skills such as confidence, teamwork, respect, discipline, and respect.

Students may enroll in Krav Maga at any time, and everyone will begin as a white belt. Each quarter, students will practice the full range of skills, but there will be two "featured" moves that a student can earn a belt stripe for being able to demonstrate. Featured moves will include a combative strike and a defensive escape technique. No one stripe is a prerequisite for any other color, and color stripes can be earned in any order.

First quarter, students will have the chance to earn a Red Stripe. Featured moves include: cover defense and wrist locks (red stripe); straight punch defense and bear hugs (orange stripe); head movement defense and front 2-handed choke (yellow stripe); round kick defense and back 2-handed choke (green stripe); front kick defense and guillotine choke (blue stripe); clinch defense and rear choke (purple stripe); ground striking defense and head lock defense (brown stripe); and 360 defense and full Nelson (black stripe).

Students will be able to test for belt promotions to move through the ranks of white belt, yellow belt, orange belt, etc. On average, it is estimated that a student will be ready for a belt test after four quarters/four color stripes. Belt testing will be by coach approval.

Topics in this Series: Red Stripe (1st Quarter), Orange Stripe (2nd Quarter), Yellow Stripe (3rd Quarter) and Green Stripe (4th Quarter). Assessments: Belt testing for promotion will be by coach recommendation, but on average will take 4 quarters. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for the t-shirt and white belt (new students) or $5.00 for the white belt (returning students). An belt test fee of $25.00 is due payable to the instructor when a student is ready to test for promotion. What to Bring: Refillable water bottle. What to Wear: In lieu of a full martial arts uniform, students will be asked to wear a class t-shirt provided by the instructor. Students should also wear shorts, leggings, or loose, comfortable athletic pants, and comfortable athletic shoes or sneakers with their class t-shirt. Non-Meeting Days: In addition to the scheduled days-off on the published Compass schedule, this class does not meet on October 4.15.10.0612

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $105.00

Learn to Sing: Songs from the Stage

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Wyndy Frederick

Grade Range: 4th-6th

Prerequisites: None

From The Sound of Music to Seussical or Mean Girls to Les Miserables, timeless songs come from the stage! Whether your music is more Hamilton or Harry Potter Cursed Child, you can learn to sing your favorite songs from theater!

The quarter's repertoire will include at least one chorus number from a major stage production. Students will work on other music as solos, duets, or small group numbers. This introduction to vocal performance will include posture, breathing, intonation, and the principles of blending vocal harmonies. Basic musical notation will be introduced as well as melodic and harmonic intervals. No previous musical experience is required just joy in singing! Prior to the start of class, the instructor will identify song book(s) and accompaniments for students to purchase. A performance will be held at the end of the quarter. Topics in this Series: Songs from the Stage (Quarter 1); Holidays Around the World (Quarter 2); Music from the Heart (Quarter 3); and Songs from the Silver Screen (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $15.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $111.00

Little Medical School: Doctor, Doctor

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 2:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Beth Ross

Grade Range: 2nd-3rd

Prerequisites: None

Little Doctors will learn about what physicians do, what tools they use, and key parts of the body! Students will learn about the major organs in the body and how they work such as the heart, lungs, eyes, and digestive system through role-playing and hands-on activities. Young doctors will learn about surgery and learn how to suture and tie surgical knots. They will also learn all about bone breaks and practice casting and splinting.

Topics in this Series: Doctor, Doctor (Quarter 1); Calling All Doctors (Quarter 2); Wilderness Medicine (Quarter 3); and Nutrition Science (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $43.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a set of high quality, take-home class materials including: a disposable lab coat, gloves, surgical mask, a real stethoscope, an eye model, and doctor's office diagrams and forms such as a human body chart and stickers, a physical exam chart, a heart worksheet, a broken bone assessment chart, suture supplies, and a class diploma.

7 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $165.00

Little Medical School: Doctor, Doctor

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 3:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Beth Ross

Grade Range: K-1st

Prerequisites: None

Little Doctors will learn about what physicians do, what tools they use, and key parts of the body! Students will learn about the major organs in the body and how they work such as the heart, lungs, eyes, and digestive system through role-playing and hands-on activities. Young doctors will learn about surgery and learn how to suture and tie surgical knots. They will also learn all about bone breaks and practice casting and splinting.

Topics in this Series: Doctor, Doctor (Quarter 1); Calling All Doctors (Quarter 2); Wilderness Medicine (Quarter 3); and Nutrition Science (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $43.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a set of high quality, take-home class materials including: a disposable lab coat, gloves, surgical mask, a real stethoscope, an eye model, and doctor's office diagrams and forms such as a human body chart and stickers, a physical exam chart, a heart worksheet, a broken bone assessment chart, suture supplies, and a class diploma.

7 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $165.00

Manipulating Math: Measurement Madness

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Natalie DiVietri

Grade Range: 3rd-4th

Prerequisites: None

Kids love real-life measurements and intuitively have a lot of questions about them: How high did I jump? How far did I run? How many gallons of water are in the bathtub? Measuring and estimating units of measure are practical, real life skills that can't be learned from pictures in a textbook! Measurement skills are best learned hands-on using real tools and common objects.

In this class, students will practice- and play- with different modes of measurement each week. Students will be able to visualize units of measure for length, weight, area, volume, and temperature. Students will work with everyday objects to be able to answer, which is greater- a pound or a kilogram- and approximately how much more, or which is smaller- a liter or a quart? Students can practice linear measurements with a ruler, yardstick, or tape measure, but how can they measure the length of a curved wall? They can learn length x width x height to find the volume of a shoebox, but how can they find the volume of a lump of playdoh? Kids will learn techniques for measuring non-standard objects along with strategies for converting measurements and shortcuts for estimating measures. Do you know which body part approximates a centimeter and what common sports toy is close to one cup? All work with measurements will be performed in both the English and metric systems so children will improve their fluency going back and forth between the two scales. Students will practice problem solving skills, reasoning, and basic math in this class.

Topics in this Series: Measurement Madness (Quarter 1); Fun with Fractions (Quarter 2); Geometry Games (Quarter 3); and Simple Statistics (Quarter 4)

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $133.00

Marine Biology: Oceanography

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Dr. Kareleen Boyle

Grade Range: 5th-6th

Prerequisites: None

Earth is an ocean planet! Life began in the oceans, and they are the linchpin of the biological, chemical, and physical processes that allow our planet to support life. This class will give students a basic understanding of the chemistry, physics and biology of earth's oceans. We'll also learn how oceans are informing our search for life on other planets. The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in at least three demonstrations or experiments during each class.

In first quarter Oceanography, students will examine physical processes such as the global ocean circulation and the role of oceans on the planet's weather patterns, temperatures, salinity, and major ocean currents. The class will discover the physics of the ocean including light and waves, along with some the oceans' primary chemistry processes like carbon dioxide sequestration and nitrogen cycling. Students will learn about the geography of the ocean basins, mid-ocean ridges, plate tectonics, and island formation, along with the habitable zones: wetlands, intertidal, sub-tidal nearshore, photic zone of the open ocean, and deep sea.

Topics in this Series: Oceanography (Quarter 1); Coastal Biomes (Quarter 2); Open Water Habitats (Quarter 3); and Marine Animal Close-Up (Quarter 4).Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

8 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $161.00

Math Fact Foundations: Addition

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 10:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Natalie DiVietri

Grade Range: 3rd-5th

Prerequisites: None

Does your child lack confidence in his or her mathematical ability? It might be because your child has not mastered basic math facts! Students who know their math facts can move confidently through other, higher levels of math. Basic math facts are to arithmetic as phonics are to reading! Math facts are the building blocks needed to be successful in multi-digit multiplication, long division, fractions, decimals, pre-algebra, and beyond! Fluent math facts help a student keep up in math and reduce frequent arithmetic errors.

Learning math facts for life does not have to be tedious drudgery! Flash cards and repetitive worksheets don't work for everyone, and a student won't always be able to use a calculator. This class will focus on strategies and introduce games that improve a student's number sense and fact fluency. Techniques such as counting up, tens partners, adding nine, and more will be explicitly modeled and reinforced in class. Students will play make-and-take math games in class like SLAP!, U-Know, and more that they will also be expected to practice at home. This class will provide an engaging, low-pressure environment and focus on individual skill development.

Topics in this Series: Addition (Quarter 1); Subtraction (Quarter 2); Multiplication (Quarter 3), and Division (Quarter 4).Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $5.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for the make-and-take games and materials. 12.09.0819

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $133.00

Math Masterminds: Geometry Challenges

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 12:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Natalie DiVietri

Grade Range: 5th-6th

Prerequisites: None

Each week, students will tackle math puzzles, challenges, and learn new "tricks" and techniques to solve a variety of math problems, all while learning about the masterminds behind founding principles of modern mathematics. Students will learn about the life and times of a great mathematician and then explore key concepts, principles, and formulas introduced by the featured master. Students' problem solving skills will be honed as they examine the historical, cultural, and personal context for discoveries in mathematics. The class will work sample problems and use experiments and manipulatives to demonstrate the formulas, theories, short-cuts, or alternate approaches suggested by famous mathematicians.

First quarter, students will be exposed to a wide variety of math terms and concepts from the great "Geometers" including Euclid, Pythagoras, Heron, and Descartes.

Topics in this Series: Geometry (Quarter 1) featuring Euclid, Pythagoras, Heron, and Descartes; Patterns and Problem Solvers (Quarter 2) featuring Eratosthenes, Napier, Polya, and Babbage; Great Discoveries (Quarter 3) featuring Archimedes, Newton, Keplar, and Galileo; and Modern Challenges (Quarter 4) featruring Fermat, Euler, Galois, and Noether.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $137.00

Math Skill Builders: Investigate Integers (Negative Numbers)

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 3:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Natalie DiVietri

Grade Range: 6th-8th

Prerequisites: None

Below freezing temperatures, overdrawn bank accounts, and underground parking are all real world examples of negative numbers. Learn how to think about positive and negative numbers in real world terms, and learn tricks for adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing integers. We will cover integers, absolute value, inequalities, and number lines (or one dimensional graphing).

Math Skill Builders is a class series that is meant to "fill in the gaps" and strengthen a student's middle school math background. This series will help solidify key concepts before a student embarks on pre-algebra, algebra, and beyond. This class will also emphasize real world applications of the mathematical concepts and word problems so students become comfortable switching between prose (written descriptions) and mathematical representation (numbers, symbols).

Topics in this Series: Investigate Integers (Quarter 1); Figure Out Fractions, Rates & Ratios (Quarter 2), Decipher Decimals & Percentages (Quarter 3); and Organize Order of Operations (Quarter 4). For this course to have the most impact a student should be solid through upper elementary math (approx. 6th grade) and should be working at a 7th grade math level. If you are unsure if your child should take Math Skill Builders or is ready for Pre-Algebra, the instructor can provide a placement test. Homework will be given each week to build fluency with basic skills.12.06.0612

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $133.00

Modeling Renaissance Conquests: Barbarossa, aka Pirate Redbeard (1544)

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 3:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 5th-8th

Prerequisites: None

Europe in the 16th century was a mess. Using plundered loot from the Americas, the Spanish Empire dominated the military and politics of the "Old World" and installed their Hapsburg dynasty as rulers of united Spain and Germany. Sandwiched in the middle of this mega-empire was the Kingdom of France, which continued to struggle for the last part of Europe up for grabs- Italy. While the French army could compete with the Empire's, its navy could not, and France was forced to turn to help from the Ottoman Empire. The French would be rescued by the Admiral Hayrettin Barbarossa, the Red Bearded Corsair, a man the Spanish considered to be a pirate!

Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will create a 10 X 16 diorama board of a Renaissance Italian battlefield, and populate it with 1:72 scale invading armies and their adversaries for historical re-enactments. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate a larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the conquest while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and siege equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how battles progressed and test different scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents.

Topics in this Series: Barbarossa aka Pirate Redbeard, Europe, 16th century (Quarter 1); Suleiman the Magnificent, Europe, 16th century (Quarter 2); Pirates of the New World, 17th century (Quarter 3); and Ivan the Terrible Russia, 16th century (4th quarter). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $25.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $140.00

Music Makers: Rhythms

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 12:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Kathy Preisinger

Grade Range: K-2nd

Prerequisites: None

Music Makers explores many facets of the musical experience- singing, moving, dancing, listening, and playing instruments. The class will explore musical stories, famous composers, and different genres of music while playing a variety of percussion instruments (drums, sticks, triangles, woodblocks and more!). Students will learn to play a beginning pitched instrument on glockenspiels (a small barred instrument like the xylophone). Using an Orff-based approach, students will learn to read and write beginning musical notation and learn musical terminology all in the context of fun and play. Music Makers classes provide a fun, pressure-free environment to experience music and movement with the goal of general musicianship and excellent preparation for further, individual instrument lessons if desired. Music Makers helps every child acquire the essential building blocks for a future of musical learning! Students may join Music Makers at any quarter, and they may return again and again since new music, themes, and skills are constantly introduced.

8 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $122.00

Nature Quest: Adventurers

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Nick Grenier

Grade Range: 2nd-3rd

Prerequisites: None

Look up in that tree! Why is that robin alarming ? is there a hawk passing by? Is that a drey (a squirrel's nest)? What animal rubbed the bark off that sapling? Which plants are useful and which should be avoided?
Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has lead for several years. Students will follow the paths and create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing fall season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world!
Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Sorry, but the explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $111.00

Nature Quest: Adventurers

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 2:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Nick Grenier

Grade Range: 2nd-3rd

Prerequisites: None

Look up in that tree! Why is that robin alarming ? is there a hawk passing by? Is that a drey (a squirrel's nest)? What animal rubbed the bark off that sapling? Which plants are useful and which should be avoided?
Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has lead for several years. Students will follow the paths and create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing fall season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world!
Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Sorry, but the explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. 10.06.0612

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $111.00

Nature Quest: Explorers

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Nick Grenier

Grade Range: K-1st

Prerequisites: None

Look up in that tree! Why is that robin alarming ? is there a hawk passing by? Is that a drey (a squirrel's nest)? What animal rubbed the bark off that sapling? Which plants are useful and which should be avoided?
Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has lead for several years. Students will follow the paths and create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing fall season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world!
Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Sorry, but the explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 5 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the length of the class.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $111.00

Nature Quest: Path Finders

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 12:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Nick Grenier

Grade Range: 4th-5th

Prerequisites: None

Look up in that tree! Why is that robin alarming ? is there a hawk passing by? Is that a drey (a squirrel's nest)? What animal rubbed the bark off that sapling? Which plants are useful and which should be avoided?
Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has lead for several years. Students will follow the paths and create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing fall season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world!
Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Sorry, but the explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $111.00

Paleontology: Fossil Fieldwork

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 10:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Dr. Kristin Keenan

Grade Range: 5th-6th

Prerequisites: None

When you hear the term paleontology, you probably think of dinosaurs! Plant-tearing, earth-stomping creatures with strange-shaped heads and spiky plates down their backs. And you're right, but paleontology spans the entire history of life on this planet. Paleontology draws elements from physics, botany, ecology, chemistry, biology, and geology--and works to explain how all of these fields are intertwined in our planet's past.

In this class, students will work with a real life paleontologist! Dr. Kristin Keenan will help students understand how paleontologists use physical clues- fossils- to ask and answer questions about the evolution of ancient life and Earth history.

First quarter, students will find out how paleontologists prepare for fieldwork, what they do in the field, how they collect fossils, and what they do with their samples once they return to the lab. Students will explore topics such as ichnology (ancient track ways), ancient ecosystems and how they formed, evolved, and sometimes disappeared. They will learn about trace fossils, how to find fossils in the geologic record, types of fossils, how plants and animals have adapted to their environment, what happened when adaptation was unsuccessful, and what becomes of plants and animals when they die. The class will perform hands-on activities, observe demonstrations, and examine real fossils to learn all about paleontology!

Topics in this Series: Fossil Fieldwork (Quarter 1); Prehistoric Creatures (Quarter 2); Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $25.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $169.00

Psychology Sampler: My Brain

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Natalie DiVietri

Grade Range: 7th-8th

Prerequisites: None

Brain Anatomy 101! Let's learn about some key players in your brain like the mail carrier (Hippocampus), the palace guard (Amygdala), and the Brooklyn Bridge (Corpus Callosum). Do you know which side of your brain is responsible for facial recognition (right) and memory retrieval (right again!)? Learn about some brain chemicals that make you say "Uh-Oh" (cortisol), "Yikes!" (Adrenaline), "Ahhh..." (Serotonin) and "Yahoo!" (Dopamine). Finally we'll learn about some famous psychologists like Broca and Wernicke and read summaries of the research they did. The class will review exceprts of cases like Phineas Gage and the Split Brain to see how early understanding of brain anatomy was shaped.

Psychology Sampler is a great introduction to psychology and will have a hands-on, fun vibe which will allow students to access these challenge ideas in simple ways. Middle school students who enjoy Psychology Sampler may want to consider taking the high school Instroduction to Psychology at the AP or Honors level in 2020-21. Topics in this Series: My Brain (Quarter 1); How I Learn (Quarter 2). Me, Myself & Others (Quarterr 3), and When Brains are Wired Differently (Quarter 4).

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $136.00

Public Speaking: The Great Speeches

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 2:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Arthuretta Martin

Grade Range: 5th-8th

Prerequisites: None

"Four score and seven years ago.."
"Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country.."
"I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character."
What causes some phrases to be inked into history and some speeches to become a permanent part of our culture? What makes a speech memorable and quotable?
In this class students will work with a professional storyteller, keynote speaker, and Toastmasters authority to learn how to give great speeches by listening to great speakers and then practicing and presenting portions of someone else's great words. The pressure will be off student speakers to also be writers. Instead, they will hone public speaking skills such as timing, pauses, enunciation, eye contact, and gestures using familiar, well-known, time-tested and inspiring speeches. The class will listen to recordings and watch videos to critique some modern day speakers. Can you pronounce like FDR, persuade like Frederick Douglass, or proclaim like Patrick Henry? Students can select from among many genres of speakers- from history, entertainment, politics, commentary- even literature.

7 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $139.00

Robot Fab Lab: Lunar Lander Challenge

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Dan Gallagher

Grade Range: 5th-6th

Prerequisites: None

Student engineers will be given the challenge of designing, building and programming a robotic lander for a simulated lunar challenge. Once in the Compass moon environment, each student's lander must be able to maintain a course while driving over a bumpy terrain and will have to pick up and collect moon rocks.

Students will use the LEGO MINDSTORMS Education EV3 robotics sets. They will build with motors, wheels/axles, gears, levers, and special components. Students will have to install touch, sound, color, and infrared sensors while also learning to program sequences and commands that use input/output devices for controlled movements and precise turns. Using the drag-and-drop EV3 programming menu, students will learn to program their robots while experimenting with key concepts such as fixed values, variables, loops, and logic constructs.

This course integrates science, engineering and computational thinking while introducing physical constraints, units of measurement, and coordinate systems. But, don't worry, this is a beginning robotics class. Prior experience is not expected, but returning students are welcome. Each student will build his/her own robotic project, so students can progress and customize at their own pace. In general, in this class, students will spend two weeks assembling, three weeks programming, and two weeks testing and re-designing. Topics in this Series: Lunar Lander Challenge (Quarter 1); BattleBots (Quarter 2); Walking Humanoid (Quarter 3); and To Be Determined(Quarter 4).

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $148.00

Scientist for a Day: Chemist, Medical Scientist, Nutritionist

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 3:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Dr. Kareleen Boyle

Grade Range: 3rd-4th

Prerequisites: None

Find out what different scientists do! This class allows young scientists to explore different careers in the sciences and shows them that science is fun, approachable, and that anyone can do it! Students will use real scientific equipment and learn actual science terminology to investigate questions in different fields. Try out SCUBA gear as a marine biologist, learn the basics for studying DNA, perform experiments in chemistry, and try your hand at operating an ROV (remote operated vehicle). The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in at least three demonstrations or experiments during each class.

During the first quarter of science investigations, we'll learn the basics of chemistry by doing our own acid-base reactions -– including the ever-popular "volcano" eruption. Students will learn about pH, make their own acid-base indicator solution, make thermochromic (color-changing) putty and learn the physics behind its color-change. We'll intersperse our chemistry experiments with studies of medical science. We'll learn the basics of how human bodies work and how to keep ourselves healthy. We'll discuss our circulatory, respiratory and immune systems and learn how germs make us sick. Students will take samples from our classroom and other locations and culture them to see what bacteria we're able to grow. After that (sometimes alarming) experiment, we'll learn proper hand-washing techniques and test our effectiveness with the same UV glow lotion hospitals use in their infection control programs. Look out germs!

Topics in this Series: Chemist & Medical Scientist (Quarter 1); Physicist, Astronomer, & Engineer (Quarter 2)Paleontologist, Geologist & Field Biologist (Quarter 3), Entomologist, Marine Biologist (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

8 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $161.00

Spanish Amigos

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 2:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Jeanniffer Denmark

Grade Range: K-2nd

Prerequisites: None

Hola! Spanish Amigos is a fun, play-based, Spanish immersion class for young children. Much like learning their native language, children will be exposed to the sounds, vocabulary, and phrases in Spanish through songs, games, stories, interactive and hands-on activities. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students in the first few weeks. Spanish language instruction will be presented in a natural learning sequence beginning with themes about colors, numbers, clothing, foods, animals, family members, days/dates, parts of the house, common objects, body parts, etc. Greetings and simple phrases will be woven into the day's activities, as well as cultural traditions when applicable. Writing, spelling, and grammar will not be emphasized in this class. Each quarter introduces new themes and new vocabulary in Spanish, so continuing students can continue to build their language basics. However, themes and units are non-sequential, so students may enroll in this level in any quarter. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, and simple phrases while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Fluency should not be expected at this level. Students may join Spanish Amigos during any quarter.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $133.00

Spanish Conversation for Kids

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 3:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Jeanniffer Denmark

Grade Range: 3rd-5th

Prerequisites: None

Students will learn beginning Spanish through games, songs, stories, and skits in a predominantly immersion environment (limited cues in English). Each week students will work on the "basics" such as greetings, colors, numbers, adjectives and weather and will explore focused themes. First quarter's theme of "Fun Times" will examine Spanish and Latin American cultural traditions, sports, and holidays. Future themes include "Around Town" (2nd quarter), "Food" (3rd quarter), and "All About Me" (4th quarter). Through age-appropriate games and activities, students will learn and practice the vocabulary and simple phrases related to the week's theme. Basic, beginners-level spelling, reading, and grammar will be introduced. Since the class is taught in "themes", or units, students may join during any quarter. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, and simple phrases while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Fluency should not be expected at this level.10.06.0612

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $133.00

Stage Combat: Sword & Unarmed Fight Techniques

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 2:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Bette Cassatt

Grade Range: 5th-8th

Prerequisites: None

What do Superhero movies and Shakespeare plays have in common? How about the Musketeers and Greek myths? Science fiction and fantasy? Comedy and tragedy? Pirates and princesses? Heroes and villains? The answer is... they all have fight scenes! Sometimes they use weapons. And sometimes they just use their bare hands! We've all seen it. Fight scenes can be thrilling, heart-breaking, or hilarious.

How do actors learn to perform these fights...and not get hurt? They train in stage combat! Stage combat is the art of creating the illusion of violence for storytelling in theatre and film. With an emphasis on safety, students will learn the movements used to create great fight scenes. Students will learn footwork, weapons handing, and hand-to-hand techniques and well as some acting and choreogrpahy skills. Join us in stage combat to learn behind-the-scenes skilld from a rich theatrical and cinematic tradition performed by your favorite characters.

This class is for beginning and experienced students. This class is best suited for students who are focused and have self-discipline, can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Topics in this Series: Sword & Unarmed Fights (Quarter 1); Double-Handed Blades (Quarter 2); Dual Duels (Quarter 3); and Fight Scenes (Quarter 4).

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $140.00

Successful Social Skills for Tweens

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 10:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Elena Zaklis

Grade Range: 6th-8th

Prerequisites: None

Successful social skills can help tweens navigate almost every aspect of their lives. Building confidence in social settings can help improve self esteem and comfort in group settings, sports, new endeavors, with family, in public, or just hanging out with friends. Every adolescent can benefit from improved social skills, but some need a little more practice. In this class, tweens will work with a certified, licensed therapist (behavior analyst) to develop strategies for navigating different social challenges- from conversation skills and identifying feelings and emotions, to seeing perspective, handling stress, talking to parents, making friends, tolerating siblings, and more. The small group class will be highly interactive with games, role playing, videos, modelling behavior, and projects using a evidence-based social-emotional curriculum

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $163.00

Ulimate Magic Academy: Baffling Blue Wand (NEW)

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 3:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Joe Romano

Grade Range: 3rd-6th

Prerequisites: None

Curious coins, baffling balls, confounding cards, and puzzling papers! Students will learn tricks of the trade from a professional magician using the Discover Magic curriculum! This class will present tricks from the NEW BlueWand curriculum.

Each week, kids will learn how to perform a unique magic trick, and students will practice and perfect the illusion in class so they can come home and mystify their friends and family. Students will unlock the secrets to eight special magic tricks this quarter. For each trick, students will receive a custom magic prop and full color instructions, and at the end of each class, every magician will take home a Top Secret file folder with additional tricks they can practice. Student magicians will be given a secret password each week to gain access to an additional magic trick on the Discover Magic website (parents will need to work the magic to set up the child's online account.) Along with the actual magic, students will discuss a life skill each week that is essential to a good magician (and student) such as public speaking, presentation skills, practicing, being prepared, and reading your audience. Magicians who complete the class will receive a certificate and magic wand.

Topics in this Series: Baffling Blue Wand (Quarter 1)- New; Orange Wand Wonders (Quarter 2) last taught in Sept. 2018; Perplexing Purple Wand (Quarter 3) last taught in Oct. 2018; and Groovy Green Wand (Quarter 4) last taught in Mar. 2019. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

8 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $220.00

Up Close! Micro Investigator

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Donna Shackelford

Grade Range: 3rd-4th

Prerequisites: None

Students will learn all about the tools that scientists use to see microscopic world up close! Discover how different tools aid in microscopic observations- from magnifying glasses to microscopes- and learn what different magnifications can reveal about the microscopic universe. Students will learn the parts of a microscope and how to make slides. In labs, they will make slides using living and non-living organisms, stain an onion peel, and make a wet-mount slide to observe the nucleus. The class will examine microscopic plants (aquatic plant leaf) and animals (hydra and daphnia). Students will also practice keeping a lab notebook and making detailed observations and drawings of what they observe. Topics in this Series: Micro Investigator (Quarter 1); Macro Investigator (Quarter 2). Jr. Chemist in the Kitchen (Quarter 3). Jr. Chemist at Home (Quarter 4).

7 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $171.00

What's the Matter? Solids and Polymers

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 12:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Donna Shackelford

Grade Range: 1st-2nd

Prerequisites: None

Matter is everywhere! Students in this class will learn about phases of matter with hands-on labs and activities. Students will be able to answer, "What is a molecule?" and, "How can I arrange them?" Young scientists will practice measuring mass and volume and will learn correct scientific terms for the materials and techniques that they use. Experimenting with solids and polymers will help students understand the shape and arrangements of matter and discover how we these materials in every-day life. In learning about the properties of solids and polymers, students will make rubber balls, mix slime, blend quicksand (a non-Newtonian fluid), formulate elephant toothpaste, and build molecular models. Topics in for this Age/Grade: What's the Matter? Solids and Polymers (Quarter 1); What's the Matter?Liquids and Gases (Quarter 2), Fun with Physics: Electricity and Magentism (Quarter 3); and Fun with Physics: Forces and Fears (Quarter 4).

7 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $171.00

Who Wants to Be a Scientist? Chemist, Medical Scientist, Nutritionist

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 2:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Dr. Kareleen Boyle

Grade Range: 1st-2nd

Prerequisites: None

There are so many ways to do science! This class allows our youngest scientists to explore different careers in the sciences and shows them that science is fun, approachable, and that anyone can do it! Students will use real scientific equipment and learn actual science terminology to investigate questions in different fields. Try out SCUBA gear as a marine biologist, learn the basics for studying DNA, perform experiments in chemistry, and try your hand at operating an ROV (remote operated vehicle). The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in at least three demonstrations or experiments during each class.

During our first quarter of science investigations, we'll learn the basics of chemistry by doing our own acid-base reactions -– including the ever-popular "volcano" eruption. Students will learn about pH, make their own acid-base indicator solution, make thermochromic (color-changing) putty and learn the physics behind its color-change. We'll intersperse our chemistry experiments with studies of medical science. We'll learn the basics of how human bodies work and how to keep ourselves healthy. We'll discuss our circulatory, respiratory and immune systems and learn how germs make us sick. Students will take samples from our classroom and other locations and culture them to see what bacteria we're able to grow. After that (sometimes alarming) experiment, we'll learn proper hand-washing techniques and test our effectiveness with the same UV glow lotion hospitals use in their infection control programs. Look out germs!

Topics in this Series: Chemist & Medical Scientist (Quarter 1); Physicist, Astonomer, & Engineer (Quarter 2)Paleontologist, Geologist & Field Biologist (Quarter 3), Entomologist, Marine Biologist (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

8 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $161.00

Whole Health Yoga for Teens & Adults

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 10:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Beloved Yoga

Grade Range: 7th-Adult

Prerequisites: None

Come in out of the morning rush! Catch your breath, refresh and reset for the day ahead with yoga! Whole Health Yoga is a health and fitness program for teens and adults of all fitness and experience levels -beginners are welcome. It is intended to reduce overall stress and tension, and improve flexibility, strength, and balance. Each class will begin with "centering", or a breathing exercise to calm, focus, and unwind (approx. 5 mins). Next, the class will do warm-up stretching with particular focus on the spine (approx. 10 mins). which will help loosen the joints. Each class will include a work-out comprised of stretches and poses for the whole body that touch on major muscle groups and body parts (approx. 35 mins). Each week will include focused work on a featured body part such as back, hips, or shoulders. This is not a yoga class that is based on holding the perfect pose. Instead, participants will learn gentle, adaptable poses that are accessible to all ages, body types, and fitness levels. There is no set, repetitive class sequence: no two sessions will be the same! Each class will conclude with a final relaxation, which is typically done lying down, and may include some visualization (approx. 10 mins). Yoga philosophy is not included in this course. All participants should wear comfortable clothing and bring a yoga mat to class. 12.10.0612

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $99.00

Wizard's Workshop: Harry's Hogwarts Handicrafts, Best of Books 1-4 & More

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 3:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Bette Cassatt

Grade Range: 5th-8th

Prerequisites: None

Magicians and Muggles alike love Harry Potter! In this charming craft class, we celebrate the exquisite magical world J. K. Rowling created. This quarter's class is about imagination and inspiration. We will conjure, charm, and create items to wear, items to decorate our rooms, and items to celebrate our fandom! Students will create their own unique Ollivander-style wand, decorate witch or wizard hats like what they'd find at Madame Malkin's or extra fancy like the ones at Gladrags, as well as create their own Hogwarts painting and perhaps a golden snitch! Come exercise your creative magic as you work with paint, glue, paper, ribbon, beads, and other materials to bring the magical world to your home. Earn House Points for the House Cup by remembering to bring your supplies each week!

Topics in this Series: Best of Books 1-4 & More! (Quarter 1), Order of the Phoenix (Quarter 2), Half-Blood Prince (Quarter 3), Deathly Hallows (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $25.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: Students should bring good scissors for cutting paper/fabric and a (low temp) hot glue gun to class each week.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $140.00

Word Masters: Verbal Analogies and Vocab Challenges

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 10:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Megan Reynolds

Grade Range: 4th-6th

Prerequisites: None

Word Masters is a language challenge for students who enjoy word games, spelling, building their vocabulary, and verbal adventures. Why study lists of words if you can make a game of it? The best way to learn new words is to use them! This class is inspired by the annual Word Masters Challenge (www.wordmasterschallenge.com). Each week students will tackle new vocabulary words and practice them through analogies and critical thinking challenges. Students will examine word meanings, relationships, synonyms and antonyms with in-class activities and games such as Pictionary, Scategories, Charades, and Apples-to-Apples. Word Masters will improve a student's reading comprehension, verbal reasoning, logic skills, and the ability to think analytically and metaphorically. Word Masters introduce all new word lists, analogies, and activities each quarter.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $126.00

Writer's Workshop: Reading Classics, Writing New Endings

Quarter 1: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Karen Hickman

Grade Range: 5th-6th

Prerequisites: None

Have you read a really good classic novel only to discover that the ending is not right for you? We plan to re-write endings by learning all about how to summarize events, strengthen characters, find new settings, and visualize new endings for the classics we choose to read. A list of over 100 books will be available to choose from. Examples titles include Kidnapped, The Three Musketeers, and Wind in the Willows. We will be writing new endings to some old favorites and publishing an anthology at the close of the class.

The Writers' Workshop gives students in grades 5-6 the skills they need for writing, reading, listening, and speaking that come from practicing by putting pen to paper. Sharing drafts and in-progress works enhances the understanding of language structure, encourages revision, and improves editing in story writing. Each quarter, students will review samples of literature and write about popular themes using the story elements of that theme.

Imagination and creativity come easily to most young writers, but acquiring technical skills is also important. Each quarter, students will focus on specific skills. The skills are a part of their Writer's Tool Kit that includes understanding parts and kinds of sentences, plurals, possessives, and punctuation. Learning how to use a dictionary and a thesaurus, as well as practical, higher, middle school level skills such as summarizing, outlining, note taking, writing a book report, or citing sources are included throughout the four sessions.

Topics in this Series: Reading Classics, Writing New Endings (Quarter 1); Finding Colorful Characters for our Fiction (Quarter 2); Writing from the Inside Out (Quarter 3); and Classics, Paintings, and Poetry- A Passport Adventure (Quarter 4).12.10.0612

7 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $139.00

English: Modern Narratives in Nonfiction Work

Quarter 1, 2: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Anne Sharp/Melanie Kosar

Grade Range: 11th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Overview

Modern Narratives focuses on the incorporation of style, voice, and tone in literature and in writing. Viewing literature as "published writing", students will examine the products and processes of other writers in order to understand and refine their own. Through the analysis of professional and student works, students will explore what makes truly great writing.

Literature

First semester of Modern Narratives in Nonfictionwill examine the works of great essayists. Examples of some essays that may read in this course are those by Henry David Thoreau, George Orwell, Virginia Woolf, Robert Benchley, James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Annie Dillard, and Joyce Carol Oates. In addition, the class will use style manuals and classic writing texts such as Strunk & White's The Elements of Styleand William Zinsser's On Writing Well. The full reading list will be presented in the course syllabus at the beginning of the term. In addition, students will be asked to read several selections over the summer. Students may also need to do some supplemental, parallel personal reading on his/her own to support the semester project.

Composition

First semester Senior Composition, dovetailing with the college admissions season, will focus on "the personal essay", writing to prompts, writing with a deadline, and ruthless editing (a.k.a. "meeting a word count"). Going beyond the five-paragraph template that encourages "cookie cutter" essays, students will create a unique architecture embedded with personal style, voice, and narrative structure. In short, students will uncover not just who they are as individuals, but who they are as writers... and how to fuse these two identities into a creative, organized, clear, and elegant essay.

In the process, students will master their writing process and identify personal writing strengths. These strengths will be developed into a writing workshop that they will present to classmates and the Compass community. Portfolios (now a potential college resume addition) will be expanded to include essays, research papers, and extracurricular support (artwork, performances, powerpoints, etc.) .

This course is part of a custom curriculum developed and team-taught by Anne Sharp and Melanie Kosar. The courses are designed in a sequential program that complements the developmental skills of the adolescent learner. It is a seminar-style approach that mirrors university literature and writing classes. Mrs. Kosar will teach the literature components of the course on Wednesdays, and Mrs. Sharp will teach the writing portion of the class on Fridays.

Topics in this Series: Modern Narratives in Nonfiction Works (Semester 1) and Nobel and Pulitzer Prize Writings (Semester 2). Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at grade level. Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of classAssignments: will be posted on a Google Classroom. Assessments: are portfolio-based. Students will create a digital portfolio that incorporates annotated reading lists, reflects individual interests and accomplishments and showcases a variety of writing. Textbook: Students should purchase or borrow the assigned literature. In some cases, specific editions will be identified with ISBN numbers so students can be on the "same page" (literally!) What to Bring: Students should bring paper or notebook, pen or pencil, current literature selection, and personal writing journal to class each week. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.12.06.0612

7 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $583.00

Money-Savvy: Personal Finance Fundamentals

Quarter 1, 2: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: TBD

Grade Range: 9th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Teenagers will learn to be money savvy in this interactive course! The critical life skills of personal finance through budgeting and money management will be introduced through real-world, hands-on activities.

Students will begin with the discussion about different careers and the range of expected starting salaries for different fields. They will learn about cost of living indices and that not all salaries are created equal when locale is considered. Students will be given a simple career interest inventory and will examine jobs that are projected to be in high demand in the future. Students will then embark on a guided, multi-week project where they will learn about developing a personal budget that works with the salary for their dream job. Each week students will tackle a new piece of the budget pie. They will see the effects of tax withholdings from an imaginary paycheck and that take-home pay may not be what they thought. Students will research and make selections on housing and perform cost comparisons among apartments, condos, or buying or renting a house. They will uncover what the real cost of utilities and insurance could be. Kids will select a dream car and see what the cost of owning (and insuring, maintaining, and fueling it) would be. As the students make personal choices in their budget, they will learn about opportunity costs. If they chose to have a pet, will they have enough money left for a vacation? Teens will develop a one-week meal plan and calculate the cost of the associated groceries. They will develop a budget for clothing, personal items, and entertainment. When the project is complete, how will teens be prepared for the game of "Life"?

Once students gain an understanding of how much money they could earn with various career choices, they will learn about saving and investing! The class will learn the difference between stocks and bonds and discover how the Stock Market works. They will simulate an investment in the market by selecting and following the price of several stocks throughout the quarter. Students will explore loans and mortgages and how interest rates, credit scores, and down payments affect the costs of borrowing. They will evaluate the workings of credit cards, and how minimum payments, interest, and fees work against them. The class will learn about money and how it drives the economy and the basics of supply, demand, and price. Students will also learn the real life lessons of balancing a checkbook and what happens when you don't pay off your credit card debt!

Topics in this Series: Money Savvy: Personal Finance Fundamentals (Semester 1) and The Stock Market Game (Semester 2). Workload: Students should expect to spend 2 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: will be given in class and e-mailed to parents and students. Textbook: To be determined What to Bring: Some weeks students will be asked to bring tablets or laptops to class to research cost information. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Personal Finance for purposes of a high school transcript.12.07.0612

7 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $279.00

Website Development I: Visual Design

Quarter 1, 2: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 2:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Coder Kids

Grade Range: 8th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Website Development is a fun, tangible way to introduce teens to coding! Students will be coding for themselves- to create their very own website! In this project-based class, students will design and develop a website on a topic of their choice. Will their personal website showcase a hobby, a club, a home business, or will it be used as their digital portfolio for future college applications?

In Visual Design, Students will learn to set up a website that follows industry standards and best practices. They will discover how HTML, CSS, and JavaSript are integrated as the core internet technologies that make a website useful, intuitive, and appealing. In the vast industry of website development, HTML serves as a website's framework, controlling content such as photos, videos, and text, while CSS is used for styling choices such as font styles, sizes, colors, and backgrounds. JavaScript is the dynamic, industry language that controls not only functionality such as inputs, interface, and responses within websites, but is also used for app and game development.

Students will build their websites on protected development sites. They can take their in-progress work home on a thumb drive each week. All work will be done on instructor-furnished laptops to prevent connectivity and technology problems in class. In order to work at home, students should have a laptop or desktop with a minimum Intel 64 processor, Windows 7 or 8 operatins system, 256 MB of RAM, and 200 MB of available hard-disk space for installation.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.
Assignments: Will be given in class and noted in the weekly e-mails. Assessments: Will not be given. Topics in this Series: Visual Design (Semester 1) and Interactive Design (Semester 2) Lab/Supply Fee: The technology fee is included in the cost of the class. What to Bring: A thumbdrive Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Technology for purposes of a high school transcript.12.10.0703

8 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $304.00

Soccer Shots: Young Player's Fall Clinic

Quarter 1, 2: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Soccer Shots

Grade Range: PK-K

Prerequisites: None

Soccer Shots is a fun, engaging class for the youngest Compass students or their preschool-aged siblings! Soccer Shots is an outdoor skills class in which children learn basic mechanics of soccer such as passing, dribbling, and shooting through imaginative games in a fun, supportive, small-group experience with a dedicated coach. Equally as important, young athletes get to practice valuable life skills such as working with teammates, good sportsmanship, taking turns, cooperation, and communicating with their coach! Each week, young soccer players will be guided through warm-ups, skill-building games, and a scrimmage.
This program includes 30 minutes of structured coaching from 1:15 pm - 1:45 pm. Time before is for gathering, and the final 15 minutes are for cool-down and free play. This is a 9-week program that will meet weeks 1-9 with the 10th week of the fall reserved for an inclement weather make-up, if needed.
Students must be age 4 by the start of this program and must be able to separate from his/her parent and follow directions. There is an optional fee of $8.50 payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a high quality Adidas team jersey.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $137.00

3D History: Naval Battles of WWII

Quarter 1,2: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 12:00 pm      Duration: 115 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 8th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Why read about key military battles on maps or in books when you can learn about them hands-on, in three dimensions, using historical miniature gaming? In 3D History, pivotal engagements come alive for new and experienced students, as they navigate a table-top seas, deploy dozens of miniature ships and planes... all while playing a military strategy game. Each student will have the opportunity to fight a battle from both sides, allowing them to test various strategies, try multiple scenarios, predict different outcomes, and rewrite history- an effective way to gain a deeper understanding of what actually happened and why!

The Second World War was a titanic struggle across the entire planet, but our planet is 71% water which means that the fight happened there too! No real empire could hope to dominate the world without also controlling the seas, using massive steel castles with the largest guns ever made, in concert with airplanes hunting targets from hundreds of miles away and deadly submarines beneath the waves. This class will use scale warships to re-enact the key naval battles of WWII as they happened, scouting vast trackless ocean to find the enemy fleet before they find you! In doing so we will learn about the technology and economic drivers that allowed different nations? navies to operate and how that affected the war?s outcome from the immense shipyards of America to the submarine pens of Nazi occupied Europe.

Topics in this Series: Naval Battles of WWII (Semester 1) and The Forgotten Fronts (Semester 2). Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Google Drive (period maps, photographs and recreations) and YouTube (videos) links will be e-mailed to parents/students for homework or supplemental investigation.Assessments: Will not be given.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $310.00

3D History: Naval Battles of WWII

Quarter 1,2: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 2:00 pm      Duration: 115 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 8th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Why read about key military battles on maps or in books when you can learn about them hands-on, in three dimensions, using historical miniature gaming? In 3D History, pivotal engagements come alive for new and experienced students, as they navigate a table-top seas, deploy dozens of miniature ships and planes... all while playing a military strategy game. Each student will have the opportunity to fight a battle from both sides, allowing them to test various strategies, try multiple scenarios, predict different outcomes, and rewrite history- an effective way to gain a deeper understanding of what actually happened and why!

The Second World War was a titanic struggle across the entire planet, but our planet is 71% water which means that the fight happened there too! No real empire could hope to dominate the world without also controlling the seas, using massive steel castles with the largest guns ever made, in concert with airplanes hunting targets from hundreds of miles away and deadly submarines beneath the waves. This class will use scale warships to re-enact the key naval battles of WWII as they happened, scouting vast trackless ocean to find the enemy fleet before they find you! In doing so we will learn about the technology and economic drivers that allowed different nations? navies to operate and how that affected the war?s outcome from the immense shipyards of America to the submarine pens of Nazi occupied Europe.

Topics in this Series: Naval Battles of WWII (Semester 1) and The Forgotten Fronts (Semester 2). Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Google Drive (period maps, photographs and recreations) and YouTube (videos) links will be e-mailed to parents/students for homework or supplemental investigation.Assessments: Will not be given.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $310.00

Ace the ACT & SAT: Strategies for College Entrance Exams

Quarter 1,2: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 10:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Sarah Fraser

Grade Range: 9th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Whether college admissions tests (SAT, PSAT, or ACT) are right around the corner or down the road, this class will teach you how to tackle the tests, decode the questions, and boost your scores. While SAT/ACT test scores are not automatic ticket into the college of your choice, higher scores will get your application in the to-be-considered pile where admissions staff will take a closer look at all the other amazing things you have done.

This class will help you feel prepared to face standardized admissions tests and take away some of the worry and mystery that surround these assessments. Each week, students will spend time on strategies for math and English portions of the tests. Students will learn about test designs and the types and difficulty levels of reading, grammar, and math questions. The class will learn how to approach multiple choice questions, how to read passages for comprehension, and what to do when you don t know an answer. This class is not a crash course that preps you for one test sitting, but rather teaches you lasting techniques to get you ready for whenever you decide to take a standardized test. The instructor will lay out a study plan for test-ready students and be able to offer tips on many aspects of the college admissions process. When the class wraps up, students and parents will understand the process of SAT and ACT testing and feel prepared for the personal challenge of the test experience.

Topics in this Series: Success Skills for School: High School and Beyond (Semester 2). Prerequisites: For this class, students should be reading and have comprehension at or above grade level and have completed Algebra I. While geometry is included on the tests, completion of geometry is not assumed. Geometry formulas are provided within the tests, and the instructor will teach how to find and apply those formulas.Workload: Students should expect to spend one hour per week on homework for this class. Assignments: Prior to the start of class, each student should have taken a scored, practice SAT or ACT exam (found on the College Board or ACT website). All other assignments will be made in class and e-mailed to parents/students. Assessments: Students will take a variety of in-class and at-home time, practice test sections. The instructor will not provide additional assessments beyond the practice tests. Textbook: Students should purchase either The Official SAT Study Guide, 2019 Edition, published by the College Board (2018 ISBN # 978-1457309281), when published, or the The Official ACT Prep Guide, 2019-20 Edition (2018-19 ISBN #978-1119508069), when published. What to Bring: Students should bring their test book, notebook/paper, and a TI-83 or equivalent calculator to class to practice math questions that permit the use of a calculator. Phone calculators cannot be used. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) elective credit purposes of a high school transcript.

7 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $253.00

Ancient Justice: Crime & Punishment- Trials of Ancient Greece

Quarter 1,2: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 10:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 8th-12th

Prerequisites: None

This class will explore the judicial processes of the ancient world, starting with Ancient Greece. Students will learn how justice was carried out in a time before codified written legal systems, prisons, lawyers, or even formal judges existed and where the facts of your case depended entirely on how well your rhetoric could convince hundreds of your fellow citizens that would serve on a jury. Like a traditional mock trial program, the class will hear cases, and students will defend themselves, but will be expected to do so as an Ancient Greek citizen would have, through open debate. Real historical cases will be studied and trial parts assigned to the class, which will be expected to debate from the perspective of both citizen and non-citizen residents of an ancient Polis. The class will serve as the jury and, if necessary, select period-appropriate verdicts and explain how they arrived at their decisions.

Topics in this Series: Roman law, From Republic to Empire (Semester 2). Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Google Drive (period maps, photographs and recreations) and YouTube (videos) links will be e-mailed to parents/students for homework or supplemental investigation.Textbooks: Students should purchase a copy of: Select Orations of Lysias by James Morris Whiton (ISBN# 9780530892238 at Barnes & Noble online). Assessments: Will not be given. Lab/Supply Fee: The cost of photocopied class documents is included in the course fee.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History or Civics for purposes of a high school transcript.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $288.00

Architecture in 2D- Drafting and Drawing

Quarter 1,2: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 115 min

Instructor: Laura Albert

Grade Range: 9th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Students will get creative and design their own special use space using technical drawings and renderings to convey their building concepts. Students will learn not only the technical side of architectural design and construction techniques, but also how light, space, and material selections make great buildings.

Classes will begin with instruction on basic, two-dimensional architectural drawings (i.e., floor plans, elevations, sections, and details). Using tracing paper, grid paper, an architect's scale, pencil, and pen, students will develop graphic skills to draw like an architect and communicate room shapes, wall materials, window patterns, door swings, bathroom fixtures, etc. Later, using their drawing skills and relying on inspiration from favorite buildings and architects, students will begin working on the design of their own project. The design process will begin with site studies and programming before moving on to block diagrams, schematic design, design development, and construction drawings.

The student's design challenge will be to dream, draw, diagram, and detail a 2000 SF addition to an existing home that will house the student's ultimate hobby or hangout room. A student who is passionate about music might design a rehearsal studio with a recording room. A baseball enthusiast might design an indoor workout facility with a batting cage and a pitching bullpen. Student architect will use their own interests to guide their special use space: will it be a mega media room, an art studio, an indoor bowling area, a gourmet kitchen, a spa, or an arcade?

Completed projects consisting of drawings, renderings, and design boards will be presented at the final class for classmates and parents.

Topics in this Series: Architecture in 2D- Drafting and Drawing
(Semester 1) and Architecture in 3D- Modelling (Semester 2) Prerequisites: Students should be able to work with fractions for scaled drawing work.Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Will be given in class and e-mailed to parents and students. Assessments: Throughout the semester, the class will work as in a collaborative design studio atmosphere with frequent, informal reviews.Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a kit consisting of tracing paper, grid paper, pencils, architect's and engineer's scales, presentation boards, and printing architectural drawings. What to Bring: Students should bring their architectural kit materials to class each week.
Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts or Visual Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $429.00

Art History: Caves to Colosseum, Prehistoric to Ancient Art (On-Level or AP1)

Quarter 1,2: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 12:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Dr. Erica Hughes

Grade Range: 9th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Students will travel through time and around the world in this survey of the history of art! The class will look at images of art as religious icons, records of historical events, myths, portraits, propaganda, conveyors of power and authority, and fantasy to answer the big question, "What is the function of art aside from being aesthetically pleasing?" Students will be asked to predict how their definition of art will change throughout the course of the year.

This unique exploration of art history will be enlivened by rich class discussions, projects, visits to exhibits, and the instructor's own creative style and personal experience at significant historical sites throughout the ancient world. Following the AP syllabus for this course, students will learn about the people and concepts behind each type of art, considering that the conditions of the time influenced the art and architecture: physical location, settlement, innovation, warfare, politics, beliefs, religion, funerary practices, and interconnections to other, contemporary cultures.

This study of the history of art will begin with prehistoric art through Paleolithic examples (image making, cave painting, etc); Neolithic art, created as humans settled into communities such as Jericho and Catalhoyuk; and Megalithic remains like Stonehenge. The class will then move into Near Eastern art looking at examples from around the Fertile Crescent region: Sumerian, Akkadian, Neo-Sumerian, Babylonian, Hittite, Assyrian, Neo-Babylonian, and Sasanian. Next the study of art will take students to ancient Egypt where art was dominated for millennia by their religion, the ruling pharaohs, and a belief in the afterlife giving them embellish rock-cut tombs, elaborate pyramids, and intricate sarcophagi.

After Egypt, the students' exploration will move into Aegean art including the funeral Cycladic art, Minoan art with frescoes and palaces, and Mycenaean art with its bold fortresses and celebrated Cyclopean masonry. The class will survey the influential art and architecture of Ancient Greece covering the Greek Geometric, Orientalizing, Archaic, Classical, Late Classical, and Hellenistic periods with its emphasis on form, balance, harmony, and an idealized human form on vases, statues, temples, and monuments. Next, students will journey across the Mediterranean to examine Etruscan art and architecture in the Orientalizing and Archaic periods, recognized by terra-cottas, sarcophagi, and bronze sculpture. Finally, the class will reach ancient Rome to view its art and architecture across several periods including the Roman Republic, Early Empire, High Empire, and Late Empire, with emphasis on painting styles, mosaics, and architecture spanning the typical Roman home, triumphal arches, public arenas, and aqueducts.

Levels:This course is offered at two levels, On-Level and Advanced Placement (AP). They have different workloads, but meet together. AP level students will work at a university freshman level and have the potential to earn college credit or placement through the spring 2021 AP exam. On-level students will use the same textbook, but will have less homework. The AP Art History curriculum will be taught using an approved AP syllabus over the course of four semesters (two years) in order to appreciate the depth and complexities of the topic. AP Art History taught in a typical one-year course would compact and compress the study to not be a thorough, enjoyable exploration of art. In order to list AP Art History on the student's syllabus, all four (4) semesters would be needed. Otherwise, any student may enroll in any semester for a solid Art History (non-AP) experience.

Topics in this Series: Caves to Colosseum, Prehistoric to Ancient Art (Semester 1), Catacombs to Cathedrals, Western Art Part 1 (Semester 2), Renaissance to Recent, Western Art Part 2 (Semester 3), Asia to Africa, Non-Western Art (Semester 4) Workload: AP students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class; on-level students should expect to spend 1 hour outside of class. Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments, quizzes, and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload. For each chapter, there will be open book quizzes, and students should be able to describe their three favorite works. There will be a semester project based on the creation of one's own myth and culture. Image recognition is key to learning art history. Each semester, students will be assigned approximately 60 images to identify (25% of the AP's 250) on the midterm and final. On-level students should be able to identify the art or object by style. AP students are expected to learn the name, description and compare/contrast the images. Assessments: Points will be assigned for projects, quizzes, chapter summaries, and exams, and parents may use the total points earned to assign a class grade. Quizzes will be administered through Canvas. Textbook: Students should purchase or rent Gardner's Art through the Ages: A Global History, 15th Edition by Fred Kleiner (ISBN 13- 978-285754994). Registration. All students will register online for the same course. Students must designate their intent to take the On-Level or AP version by emailing Compass before August 16. Once the course has begun, students may move down a level (from AP to on-level) at any time. However, once classes have begun, students may not "bump up" a level. AP Fees: The fee to take the College Board's AP Art History exam in May 2021 is not included; each family will be responsible for scheduling and paying for their student's AP exam Credit:Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History or Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.12.07.0612

7 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $299.00

Civics Critic: Sizing Up Citizenship

Quarter 1,2: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Kouthar Muttardy

Grade Range: 9th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Civics Critics will explore specific queries related to Citizenship through guided inquiry and evidence-based analysis. These topics are posed as a series of thought-provoking questions that students will research, debate, discuss, and form opinions about. First semester will examine three big questions: What Types of Citizens Does a Democracy Need? How Can Citizens Peacefully Change a Nation? And How Patriotic is Protest?

Civics Critic is an interactive, multi-disciplinary examination of some of the key issues in American Government using sources from The DBQ Project. DBQs, or document based questions, are derived from AP History exams and help develop high school level critical thinking skills. Students will review an array of primary sources such as letters, journal entries, inventories, ship's manifestos, newspaper articles, period maps, and court documents along with selected secondary sources like excerpts, charts, and graphs. Students will be guided through analyzing the documents, interpreting the data, drawing inferences, and forming conclusions. In some historical scenarios, the class will consider conflicting perspectives and be able to defend and debate multiple sides of a key issue. To demonstrate comprehension and a deeper understanding of the class themes, students will use factual findings to develop structured, evidence-based essays.

Topics in this Series: Sizing Up Citizenship (Semester 1), Exploring Elections (Semester 2). Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: are sent by e-mail to parents and students. Assessments: The instructor will assign completion points for homework assignments, % correct for quizzes/tests, and both quantitative and qualitative feedback on written papers for the parent's use in assigning a grade. Textbook: None. Lab/Supply Fee: The cost of class copies is included in the course fee. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Civics or American Government for purposes of a high school transcript.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $272.00

Comic Art: Sketching Superheroes & Story Sequencing

Quarter 1,2: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 90 min

Instructor: David Newbold

Grade Range: 8th-12th

Prerequisites: None

How does a comic illustrator portray the Incredible Hulk thundering through a concrete wall or sketch Captain America escaping the clutches of an enemy? Students will work with renowned comic artist David Newbold (DC, Marvel, and Dark Horse Comics) to learn the art of comic illustration.

During the first semester, students will learn to how to illustrate figures by tracing, sketching, and modifying familiar comic characters to be able to visualize how their forms are composed of simple geometric shapes. Then, once a student can draw a static, standing figure, he/she will learn how to manipulate the character's form to portray running, crouching, falling, flying, or fighting, and how to draw the same character again with the familiar proportions and detailing each time. Students will also learn the art of looking at common objects and breaking them down into simple lines and shapes, to portray props and backgrounds. Students will work from a furnished script (yep, comics are scripted stories), and will practice "laying out", or rough-sketching, sequential scenes in multiple panels, to tell the story. The student?s product in the first semester will be a working portfolio of figure studies, practice character sketches, a refined, unique character (or re-envisioning a known, existing character), and rough sketch lay-outs for sequential scenes. All first semester work will be done in pencil on paper.

Topics in this Series: Comic Art: Sketching Superheroes & Story Sequencing (Semester 1) and Comic Art: Developiong Detail & Finishing Touches (Semester 2) Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-3 hours per week illustrating outside of class. Assessments: The assessment for this class will include an individual e-mail at the conclusion of the semester with the instructor's qualitative feedback on the student's work. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for pencils, paper, tracing paper, eraser, and portfolio. What to Bring: Students should bring their class supplies each week. Non-Meeting Days: This is a 13- week class that does not meet on October 18. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts or Visual Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $371.00

Comparative World Religions

Quarter 1,2: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Tia Murchie Beyma

Grade Range: 9th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Why is Easter, the most holy celebration of Christianity, named for an ancient European goddess? Why do Sufi dervishes "whirl?" Why do some people shave their hair, while others refuse to cut it, both in order to please God? How have nations, including the United States, been shaped by religion? Are all religions just different ways of saying the same thing, or do they have real differences as well as similarities? If you are curious about the history of religion and the beliefs and practices of different religions around the world, including those of your neighbors here in Northern Virginia, you will enjoy studying Comparative World Religions.

This course will examine the Eastern faiths of Hinduism and Buddhism and the western, Abrahamic faiths of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. What a rare opportunity! For most of human history, in nearly every society, neither religious diversity nor tolerance existed. Discussions about comparative religion were simply not possible. Only recently -- and still in just some parts of the world -- have we been able to enjoy calm, fruitful, and respectful conversations about religion that are not "catechism" (a term that means instruction in a particular faith). Those kinds of conversations are what students can expect in our study of comparative religion. This class will look at how and why religion plays such an important role in the lives of many ordinary people. Understanding our neighbors' belief systems and assumptions, even if we do not share them, can help everyone get along in a pluralistic world. Classes will include discussion, role play, and presentations. Once each quarter, the class will have a guest speaker to learn more about the values, beliefs, and practices of world religions.

Topics in this Series: Comparative World Religions (Semester 1) and World History in the Making: Current Events & Courageous People (Semester 2) Workload: Students should expect to spend 2 hours outside of class each week to complete readings, watch videos, and sometimes create a brief written assignment or artwork. For those interested in covering more, there will be additional, optional material suggested by the instructor. Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student s progress and workload. Assessments: Points are assigned for class submissions and tests, and parents can view total points earned at any time through the Canvas site. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Humanities for purposes of a high school transcript.12.10.0612

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $296.00

Compass Literarians: Creative Writing & Literary Magazine Board

Quarter 1,2: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 2:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Anne Sharp

Grade Range: 9th-12th

Prerequisites: None

This Literarians writing board is a home for students who love to write, who love to read writing, and who love to share writing with others. Writing is often a solitary act, but writers also need a community in which to grow. Mirroring the design of famous writing salons/groups like The Bloomsbury Group, The Algonquin Round Table, and The Inklings, this course fosters a Compass community that will encourage individual writers, promote literary collaboration and provide challenging feedback to boost creativity and artistic development.

Our first semester will focus on building a personal writing portfolio strengthening students' passions for genres and forms they are comfortable with as well as trying writing that is new to them. Using writing workshops to capitalize on what they already know and to encourage experimentation in unfamiliar areas, students can expect to grow as writers, editors and leaders in our Compass community.

Students will use their own work and the works of professional authors to understand what makes good writing, to improve technique, to experiment with new forms/genre and to understand the drafting, editing and publishing process. They will explore publishing options through online platforms and hardbound journals.

Our second semester will focus on editing and publishing. Students in this course will select writings from their portfolios and prepare them to submit to contests, anthologies and publications beyond our Compass campus. While continuing to draft and explore their own personal writing, students will assume editorial roles in the production of Pen Point, a beyond-our-classroom anthology. As editors, students will design and build an anthology, advertise the publication, solicit manuscripts and artwork, develop selection criteria, review/select/edit material, and learn the principles of layout and design. Embedded in this process are real-world experiences, and students will improve their communication and organization skills through goal-setting, time management, meeting deadlines, emailing, confirmations, proofreading, etc.

Topics in this Series: A Creative Writing and Literary Magazine Board (Semesters 1 and 2, with registration by semester.) Prerequisites: Advanced reading, writing, and analytical skills. Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class on investigation, writing, or editing for this class. Assignments: Writing and editing assignments will be delegated by the student board. Assessments: In lieu of a teacher-provided assessments, writers will receive peer feedback on their own work, and the finished product will be a printed anthology for their portfolio. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $20.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for publishing expenses. What to Bring: Students should bring laptops to class to work collaboratively and real-time on shared documents and the class portal. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $296.00

English: Advanced Literary Criticism & Composition- Overview of Literary Movements

Quarter 1,2: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Melanie Kosar/ Anne Sharp

Grade Range: 10th-11th

Prerequisites: None

Overview

Advanced Literary Criticism & Composition introduces the high school student to a deeper investigation into literary movements and literary themes throughout the ages. Like art, literature is a writer's response to his world and a reflection of his society and contemporary culture. Literary genres evolved in response to significant events, prevailing philosophies, and impactful innovations and discoveries in the writer's lifetime. Literary movements create a timeline that reflects those influences. In this course, students will read and evaluate selections from various literary movements: Romanticism, Dark Romanticism, Gothic, Transcendentalism, Realism, Naturalism, Magical Realism, Stream of Consciousness, Expressionism, Harlem Renaissance, Modernism, Beat, etc., and make connections to significant effects of the period.

Advanced composition in this course will move beyond personal interpretation of the work ("What do I think?") and transition into two Schools of Literary Criticism: Biographical Criticism, which views literature through the personal world of the writer ("What did the writer think?"), and Historical/Societal Criticism which views literature through the society/times of the writer ("What was going on around the writer?")

Literature

First semester of Advanced Literary Criticism will include a chronological grouping of literature in "movements" and a study of how movements combine to create genre. Students will discover how literature reflects the people, events, discoveries, and ideology of the time and how literary movements provide clues to the philosophical, scientific, and societal climate. The class will look at wars and conflict as a creative element that drives evolution in literary movements. The types of literature used to examine movements will span novels, short stories, poetry, letters, political writings, slave narratives and analytical essays. Examples of some literature that students may read in this course are Sophie's World by Jostein Gaarder, Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe, and Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse. The full reading list will be presented in the course syllabus at the beginning of the term. In addition, students will be asked to read several selections over the summer. Students may also need to do some supplemental, parallel personal reading on his/her own to support the semester project.

Composition

First semester Composition will apply the Schools of Literary Criticism to craft essays that demonstrate and understanding of movements in the broader context of literature- across eras, across genre/form, across writers and across the world. Teens will write a series of short essays that use different "filters" or "lenses" to view literary genres. Students will develop skills in notetaking, adding research to their literary essays, and managing their writing portfolios. They will also perform parallel, independent research in literature to develop a presentation on a movement or era culminating a semester project.

Class Structure

This course is part of a custom curriculum developed and team-taught by Anne Sharp and Melanie Kosar. The courses are designed in a sequential program that complements the developmental skills of the adolescent learner. It is a seminar-style approach that mirrors university literature and writing classes. Mrs. Kosar will teach the literature components of the course on Wednesdays, and Mrs. Sharp will teach the writing portion of the class on Fridays.

Topics in this Series: Overview of Literary Movements (Semester 1) and Survey of Themes in Literature (Semester 2). Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at grade level. Students should have had a prior course in literature to have established a firm foundation in basic literary elements and form. Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class. In addition, students should complete the summer assignments consisting of the literature identified above and a hand-out of literary terminology to learn. Assignments: will be posted on a Google Classroom. Assessments: are portfolio-based. Students will create a digital portfolio that incorporates annotated reading lists, reflects individual interests and accomplishments and showcases a variety of writing. Textbook: Students should purchase or borrow the assigned literature. In some cases, specific editions will be identified with ISBN numbers so students can be on the "same page" (literally!) What to Bring: Students should bring paper or notebook, pen or pencil, current literature selection, and personal writing journal to class each week. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

7 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $583.00

English: Introduction to Literary Analysis & Writing- Elements of Literature

Quarter 1,2: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 12:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Melanie Kosar/ Anne Sharp

Grade Range: 9th-10th

Prerequisites: None

Overview

The Introduction to Literary Analysis & Writing is a high school student's first look at the higher-level relationship between literature and personal writing. Literary analysis and critical writing move a teen from being merely a good reader- a middle school skill- to becoming a scholarly reader and diagnostic writer which are the foundations of high school and college level inquiry into all forms of written works.

In this course, literature is not restricted to a particular genre or form, and writing is not limited to a common five-paragraph composition. Instead, literature is presented as a survey, sampling many different types of works, and composition is approached as the development of a student's personal responses to what he reads. During the first semester, students will examine the basic elements of literature, and second semester will evaluate forms and genres to create a "big picture" of the development of literature.

Literature

First semester Literary Analysis will focus on the basic elements of literature- character, setting, theme, plot, and conflict- and how they interact to create story. These building blocks exist across all forms of literature, so the class may evaluate the plot in an epic poem, a character in a classic play, or the setting in a short story. Some well-known literature will be used to introduce students to the various literary elements, and new works will be studied to demonstrate the best examples of a vivid fictional universe, a strong narrator, beloved (or feared) characters, and other literary components. Examples of some literature that students may read in this course are The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho, Journey to the Center of Earth by Jules Verne, and Lord of the Flies by William Golding. The full reading list will be presented in the course syllabus at the beginning of the term. In addition, students will be asked to read several selections over the summer. Students may also need to do some supplemental, parallel personal reading on his/her own to support the semester project.

Composition

First semester Writing will focus on personal response to literature, with the core being a personal writing journal. The students' journals will be a place to record what they think and feel about what they are reading. Students will learn to annotate, to cite passages from text, and to format. Notes made in the journals will be used to develop short, informal written pieces about the literature read in the course. Observations from the student's journal will also be used to collect supporting, textural evidence to support the reader's opinions which will be formulated into a thesis (personal position). Written assignments will include summaries, compare/contrast analyses, and parallel structure writings that focus on character, setting, plot, conflict, etc., to further underscore and assess student's understanding of the building blocks of literature. First semester will conclude with a culminating project on a subgenre of the student's own choosing which will analyze works for character, plot, setting, and other literary elements studied.

Class Structure

This course is part of a custom curriculum developed and team-taught by Anne Sharp and Melanie Kosar. The courses are designed in a sequential program that complements the developmental skills of the adolescent learner. It is a seminar-style approach that mirrors university literature and writing classes. Mrs. Kosar will teach the literature components of the course on Wednesdays, and Mrs. Sharp will teach the writing portion of the class on Fridays.

Topics in this Series: Elements of Literature (Semester 1) and Forms of Literature (Semester 2). Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at grade level. Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class. In addition, students should complete the summer assignments consisting of the literature identified above and a hand-out of literary terminology to learn. Assignments: will be posted on a Google Classroom. Assessments: are portfolio-based. Students will create a digital portfolio that incorporates annotated reading lists, reflects individual interests and accomplishments and showcases a variety of writing. Textbook: Students should purchase or borrow the assigned literature. In some cases, specific editions will be identified with ISBN numbers so students can be on the "same page" (literally!) What to Bring: Students should bring paper or notebook, pen or pencil, current literature selection, and personal writing journal to class each week. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

7 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $583.00

Outbreak! The Microbiology of Disease: Bacteria & Prions (Honors or On-Level)

Quarter 1,2: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 2:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Dr. Kathy Olsen

Grade Range: 9th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Out of breath, sudden fever, rash! What could be wrong with this patient? This class is a case-based approach to the many infectious diseases that humans share and contract from domestic animals. Each week, students will be introduced to a new pathogen.

The class will integrate principles of microbiology, immunology, physiology, and pharmacology within the framework of each epidemic. We will also discuss the historical, economic, and societal impacts that plagues and pestilence resulting from these infectious agents have wrought over the course of recorded history.

The class will include laboratory activities in microbiologic techniques. Students will become familiar with principles of laboratory safety, light microscopy, biologic stains, culture techniques, and common immunologic tests.

First semester lectures and labs will introduce the basic microbiology and diseases caused by bacteria and prions, an introduction to the immune system, and antibiotic therapy/resistance. Cases will include zoonotic diseases such as Bubonic Plague, Lyme Disease, Mad Cow Disease, Anthrax, and many others!

This class will be offered on two levels: Honors and On-Level. All class members share core material and participate in the same labs. Honors students will be assigned additional readings, homework questions, and lab reports. Students register online for the same course, but must indicate which level they wish to study via e-mail by August 15. Students may move down a level (from Honors to On-Level) at any time. However, once classes have started, students may not "bump up" a level.

Topics in this Series: Bacteria & Prions (Semester 1), Viruses and Parasites (Semester 2), etc.Prerequisites: Although previous classwork in Biology and Chemistry will be helpful, they are not prerequisites. Workload: On-level students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week on assigned readings and lab reports. Honors students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week on work outside of the classroom. Assignments: All students will be expected to keep a lab manual for notetaking, lab reports, and assigned homework questions. Weekly readings will be documented in the course syllabus. Assessments: At the end of the semester, the instructor will review student notebooks and assign numerical scores to their notebooks, if requested, for the parents use in assigning letter grades. Textbook: Students should purchase or rent Microbiology: A Systems Approach, 5th Edition" by Marjorie Kelly Cowan (ISBN # 978-1259706615). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $100.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Equipment/Supplies: Students will be asked to bring microscopes to class some weeks. Students should have access to a compound microscope with 400X magnification and cool lighting. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Lab Science for purposes of a high school transcript.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $429.00

Psychology: Case Studies in Neuropsychology and Cognition

Quarter 1,2: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Natalie Di Vietri

Grade Range: 9th-12th

Prerequisites: None

How does the brain make decisions? How does brain damage in different areas present itself? How do people develop superstitions? Learn the answers to these questions and more!

This class will introduce students to the study of Neuropsychology and Cognition. Neuropsychologists study how psychological processes relate to the brain's structures and systems. Learn how your brain organizes sensory information to create your perceptions of the world and how this affects your body and your behavior. Students will investigate neurons, parts of the brain, and how split-brain surgery affects individuals.

Students will read, discuss, and analyze eight influential case studies that have shaped the way we think about the brain and how we learn. They will hear the story of Phineas P. Gage and how he changed after a devasting accident. They will also read about John Watson's notorious experiment with Little Albert, which demonstrated how emotions could be a product of the environment. Landmark studies conducted by renowned psychologists like Gazzaniga, Rosenzweig, Pavlov, Skinner and more will be at the core of this class, leading to ongoing, thought provoking and intellectually stimulating discussions and debates. Students will learn how to read research, evaluate theories, and think critically about how these studies apply to the world around them.

Students who took Psychology (AP, Honors, or On-Level) in 2018-19 can take this course for further study in the field. Cases will not be repeated from the full year course. Students who are new to psychology can use the Case Studies courses as an introduction to the field and to explore their interest in taking the AP Psychology course at Compass in 2020-2021!

Topics in this Series: Neuropsychology and Cognition (Semester 1) and Human Development and Abnormal Psychology (Semester 2)Workload: Students should expect to spend 2 hours per week outside of class on readings. Students will be expected to prepare for weekly discussions by reading the selected case study and answering questions. Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students can access assignments and upload homework. Extension assignments may include watching a short video clip, creating discussion questions, or suggesting a follow-up study. Assessments: The instructor will assign points for class participation and homework that the parents can use in assigning a grade. Lab/Supply Fee: The cost of class copies is included in the course fee. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Social Sciences for purposes of a high school transcript.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $299.00

Public Speaking for Success

Quarter 1,2: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 12:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Mo Hamilton

Grade Range: 9th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Glossophobia is defined as the fear of public speaking", and in a recent survey conducted by Chapman University, public speaking was again defined as the #1 fear! Unfortunately, it is that fear that hinders many teens from becoming expressive, confident, and capable of speaking and being heard. Yet, public speaking is an invaluable skillset that we need throughout our lives!

In this class, students will find their voice! Preparation is the key, so students will learn how to select and formulate a speech topic, get to know their audience, and develop a speech. The class will learn how to control the nerves, incorporate gestures, eye contact, and other nonverbal body language techniques, and how to enhance their presentations with vocal variety, props, and visual aids in addition to learning the Art of Engagement.

Students will practice three speaking styles: Impromptu, Extemporaneous, and Original Oratory. Impromptu Speech is an off-the-cuff oral response to a question, statement, or phrase with minimal preparation. Participants will learn how to quickly think on their feet and deliver a two- minute speech. Extemporaneous Speech is prepared on short notice with thirty minutes to outline a position on an issue or theme given three prompts to consider. Original Oratory, a favorite in the National Forensics and Speech competition, can be an informative or persuasive speech that is composed, rehearsed, and delivered by the speaker on any topic they choose. At the end of the quarter, we will crown an Original Oratory Speech Champion...the first for Compass!

Topics in this Series: Public Speaking for Success (Semester 1) and Debate-Able (Semester 2). Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: will be sent by e-mail to parents and students. Assessments: will be provided in the form of score sheets/feedback from judges at the conclusion of final speech presentations. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English or Communications for purposes of a high school transcript.

7 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $279.00

Robotics Tech Challenge: Mars Rover

Quarter 1,2: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 115 min

Instructor: Dan Gallagher

Grade Range: 8th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Following in the footsteps of NASA's Sojourner, Spirit, Opportunity, and Curiosity rovers, in the race to the red planet, students will build a robotic Mars rover prototype in this project-based class. Students will work in small teams to design, build, and program rovers that operate with multiple axles and independently powered wheels. Rovers will have cameras (to film the Martian surface) and will be constructed to collect samples, climb craters, traverse sandy and rocky terrain, and re-route around boulders and obstacles.

The class will focus on construction and programming, with heavy emphasis on design. The robots will be programmed to sense and react to the environment and to complete a series of missions on a pre-defined course. Students will build with Tetrix metal components, incorporate sensors, electronics, and motors from Tetrix Prizm, and will program using the Arduino IDE. Teams will conduct research, apply the engineering design process, follow the general rules and conventions of the engineering profession, including maintaining an engineering notebook. Please note that students do not get to keep finished projects.

Topics in this Series: Mars Rover (Semester 1) and Robo Ball Race (Semester 2). Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class researching rover design. All other work is done in class. Assessments: Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Technology for purposes of a high school transcript.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $510.00

Shakespeare Off the Page: The Winter's Tale

Quarter 1,2: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 115 min

Instructor: Heather Sanderson

Grade Range: 8th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Read it! Act it! Students will enjoy this two-hour, semester-long workshop with Shakespearian coach Heather Sanderson who hails from England and is known for instilling a love of Shakespeare into the hearts of students throughout the Greater DC area. The class will explore Shakespeare's timeless romantic comedy, The Winter?s Tale, and analyze its characters, plot, themes and motives. Students will voyage to the shores of Sicilia to take on the personas of Kings Leontes and Polixenes, Queen Hermione, courtiers Camillo, Paulina, and Antigonus. A kindly shepherd, a wise oracle, a clown, and a young girl make up the cast of characters in this mixed-up tale of jealousy, intrigue, revenge, and redemption.

Students will read various roles, study and act out scenes, practice monologues, and work through the literature while having fun with fellow teens. Theatre games will be used to encourage collaboration, and specially designed improv exercises will be used to stretch teens' imaginations and help them get "in character". The class will use read-aloud and in-class dramatization to decipher the original language, word choices, and to identify humor, satire, mockery, betrayal, and rejection in this mixed-up comedic tale of mistaken identity. The class will work from complete texts (not redacted, abridged, or simplified school versions) to hear and practice Elizabethan lingo. (How did someone of Shakespeare's time hurl insults or woo a woman?) Students will learn how the Bard crafted scenes and conveyed the primary storyline and sub-plots in a dark tale that has endured for over 400 years.

Instructor Heather Sanderson shares a teaching style based on actions and interactions, developed from years of experience coaching Shakespeare in a way that appeals to students. Her approach brings abstract concepts, complex themes, and difficult language to the students' level, so that they can relate to and appreciate Shakespeare.

Topics in this Series: Shakespeare Off the Page: The Winter's Tale (Semester 1), Shakespeare Off the Page: Death by Shakespeare (Quarter 3), and Shakespeare's Famous Re-Writes of English History: Antony & Cleopatra (Quarter 4). Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hour per week outside of class reading sections. Assignments: Sections will be assigned in class and included in the weekly e-mail to parents/students. Assessments: Will not be given. Textbook: The cost of the class text is included in the course fee. Non-Meeting Dates: This is a 13-week class, and the week off will be announced. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English Literature or Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

8 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $358.00

Spy Games RPG, The History of Espionage: America's First Spies

Quarter 1,2: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 8th-12th

Prerequisites: None

This class will re-enact the great unseen intelligence battles of early American history, from Washington's spies to Lincoln and Jefferson Davis's, using RPGs (role playing games similar to Dungeons and Dragons) custom designed by the instructor.

Real spying is less James Bond and more Sherlock Holmes. You follow clues and codes to lead you to secrets your enemies wish you didn?t know. Every country has secrets, and those must be defended, because knowing is half the battle. Students will be expected to learn about and practice code breaking, and try to encode messages to pass to their colleagues. Success will bring great advantage, failure could mean capture and death! We will examine the lives and techniques of real historical spies, adopt their methods and replicate them for ourselves, pitting one half of the class against the other using modified versions of the Pathfinder story-driven role playing system. Once you?ve uncovered the enemy?s secrets, we will attempt to make use of this stolen information and learn just how much power there is in knowledge.

Topics in this Series: American Espionage, from the Revolution to the Civil War (Semester 1) and Modern American Spying, WWII through the Cold War (Semester 2). Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Google Drive (period maps, photographs and recreations) and YouTube (videos) links will be e-mailed to parents/students for homework or supplemental investigation.Assessments: Will not be given.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $281.00

Stage Combat for Beginners & Masters: Acting in Action & Creative Choreography

Quarter 1,2: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 10:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Bette Cassatt

Grade Range: 8th-12th

Prerequisites: None

In this unique semester-long Stage Combat class, students will participate in one of two tracks as they work collaboratively to create an action scene from stage, cinema, or literature. In the Performance Track, students will participate as actor-combatants and will adopt a character, learn choreography, and work towards a performance of their fight within the context of the scene- not just doing moves in this class, but learning a role and exploring how the character fights and why. In the Choreography Track, students will take on the role of fight choreographer for a scene. Choreographers will analyze the chosen script, look for context clues as to why and how the characters fight, create choreography, teach it to their Performance Track actors, and make sure that everyone is safe and looks great.

Students who have previously taken Masters' level stage combat can take either the Performance Track or Choreography Track, depending on their preference to work as an actor-combatant or as a fight choreographer. Students who have had some stage combat experience may register for the class but will need the instructor's approval to take the more advanced Choreography track. Students who are all new to stage combat must take the Performance Track. All students will register for the same course online.

Topics in this Series: Acting in Action & Courageous Choreography (Semester 1) Close-Up Conflict (Semester 2)Prerequisites: Prior Master's level work or instructor approval for Choreography Track. Workload: Students should expect to spend 1 hour per week outside of class. Assignments: Will be made in class and repeated in the weekly e-mail to parents and students. Assessments: At the end of the first semester, students who have not previously taken Masters level stage combat will be evaluated by the instructor for safety and skills and given a recommendation for their next stage combat course. What to Wear: Students should wear clothes they are comfortable moving in and athletic shoes. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $281.00

Fundamentals of Graphic Design: Composition and Creativity

Quarter 1,2: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 10:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Lorrie Herman

Grade Range: 9th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Is there any mistaking McDonalds' "golden arches" or the Nike "swoosh"? Can you identify the Disney and Star Wars fonts or the specific shade of Barbie doll pink? Of course, because behind each of these strong, recognizable brands is the work of a graphic artist!

Students will be introduced the field of Graphic Design and learn what designers do: communicate visually while striving to achieve "intellectual and emotional responses" through simple, to-the-point messages and clear, memorable designs. Students will see how graphic designers use intentional, visual manipulation to create meaning through the careful selection, thoughtful layout, strategic placement of images, illustrations, and typography.

In this class, teen designers will learn about the elements of art- line, shape, color, and texture- and the principles of design. They will practice working with points, lines, and planes, and experiment with color theory. The class will learn to apply Gestalt theory to their compositions: that is, the natural human tendency to group pieces together to create a whole (in other words, all design elements work together to communicate the whole message.) They will also examine the power of words through typography including type choices that make text more readable and understandable. They will learn how to organize text for content, ease of use, and comprehension through the selection of fonts, font pairing, and font hierarchy.

Through in-class design exercises and homework projects, students will practice the skills of "design thinking" and the design process which includes identifying a need to generating ideas through implementation. Students will learn to express and develop their visual concepts through the building blocks of the design process: thumbnail sketches, rough sketches, and comprehensive design.

This course will help prepare high school students who are interested in pursuing graphic design or many other, related visual arts or design fields like advertising, marketing, illustrating, multimedia, digital design, and more. Some works created in this class may be used for a high school student's portfolio. The curriculum used in this class was developed by the American Institute of Graphic Arts (AIGA) and adheres to the National Visual Arts curriculum standards.

Topics in this Series: Fundamentals of Graphic Design: Composition and
Creativity (Semester 1), Fundamentals of Graphic Design: Computer Art Applications (Semester 2) Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: will be given in class and repeated in the weekly e-mail to parents and students. In order to complete some assignments, students should have access to and working knowledge of Microsoft Office, including PowerPoint. Students should also have access to a smart phone for taking and editing photos. Assessments: The instructor will use standardized rubrics that are part of the AIGA curriculum for assessing student projects. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $20.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for class handouts and supplies. What to Bring: Students will need to bring art supplies each week such as a sketch book, tracing paper, makers, sharpies, erasers, ruler, tape, pencils, and scissors. A final supply list with details will be provided mid-summer to registered students. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Visual Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

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6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $266.00

History Investigators: Westward Expansion in America

Quarter 1,2: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 2:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Kouthar Muttardy

Grade Range: 7th-10th

Prerequisites: None

History Investigators will examine formative periods in American History through guided inquiry and evidence-based analysis. These topics are posed as a series of thought-provoking questions that students will research, debate, discuss, and form opinions about. First semester will examine three big questions: Westward Expansion: Was It A Time of Development or Disaster? Manifest Destiny: Was It For God or For Greed? Was the Unites States Justified in Going to War With Mexico?

History Investigators is an interactive, multi-disciplinary examination of some of most significant events in ancient history using sources from The DBQ Project. DBQs, or document based questions, are derived from AP History exams and help develop high school level critical thinking skills. Students will review an array of primary sources such as letters, journal entries, inventories, ship's manifestos, newspaper articles, period maps, and court documents along with selected secondary sources like excerpts, charts, and graphs. Students will be guided through analyzing the documents, interpreting the data, drawing inferences, and forming conclusions. In some historical scenarios, the class will consider conflicting perspectives and be able to defend and debate multiple sides of a key issue. To demonstrate comprehension and a deeper understanding of the class themes, students will use factual findings to develop structured, evidence-based essays.

Topics in this Series: Westward Expansion in America (Semester 1) and Industrialization, The Gilded Age, & The Progressive Era in America (Semester 2). Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: are sent by e-mail to parents and students. Assessments: The instructor will assign completion points for homework assignments, % correct for quizzes/tests, and both quantitative and qualitative feedback on written papers for the parent's use in assigning a grade. Textbook: None. Lab/Supply Fee: The cost of class copies is included in the course fee. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in American History for purposes of a high school transcript.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $272.00

Homeschool String Ensemble

Quarter 1,2: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 10:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Monika Dorosheff

Grade Range: 6th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Students who play violin, viola, cello, or bass are invited to join this homeschool string ensemble! Musicians will have an opportunity to develop ensemble skills and enjoy the experience of practicing, playing, and performing as a group. The class will start each week with tuning and warm-ups such as playing musical scales and simple exercises. Then the class will work on several group songs each semester where they will improve musical literacy, learn to follow the directions from the conductor, and learn to play in different keys- as a group. During the final class of the semester, a concert will be held for friends and family.

This ensemble is intended for advanced beginners and intermediate strings students who are currently (or recently) enrolled in private lessons. As a guideline, a student should be able to play a D major scale in two octaves on his/her instrument. Students are expected to be able to locate notes on the their instruments, read music, and be able to identify all rhythmical patterns. Students with less experience will be asked to play for the conductor or to submit a brief video to help establish placement.

The instructor will provide the emsemble repertoires, and these arrangements will be specially composed to accommodate the range of abilities of all stringed players in the orchestra. Students will be asked to pay a fee $5.00 for their individual music which will be provided on the first day of class. Participants are expected to prepare and practice at home for at least 15 - 20 minutes per day. Five (5) students are needed for the ensemble, and if the group reaches 10-12 students, it will reorganize as a string orchestra. This is a 13-week semester program, and the week off will be announced by the instructor.12.08.0612

5 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $282.00

Information Masters: Research Strategies in the Digital World

Quarter 1,2: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 12:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Megan Reynolds

Grade Range: 7th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Information Masters: Research Strategies in the Digital World

Information Masters transforms students into savvy consumers and producers of information capable of navigating today's intimidating infosphere. This class introduces the latest in electronic resources for research (sorry, no card catalogs here!). Each week students will develop new media literacy skills necessary for high school and college research writing.

Students will begin by exploring print and electronic resources while refining their ability to determine informational needs. Students will be introduced to a wide array of resources, including academic search engines, scholarly databases, and primary sources. In addition, students will learn how to select the best resource for their informational need and not merely the first one that pops up. Students will discuss the ethical use of information and create an accurate bibliography with MLA format through an online bibliography generator.

After learning about the wide variety of resources available to them, students will practice crafting effective questions to focus their research. They will learn how to extract information from various resources by skimming, scanning, and using abstracts. In order to spot and avoid plagiarism, students will learn note-taking skills and discuss how to summarize, paraphrase, and cite sources correctly.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Will be given in class and e-mailed to parents and students in the weekly update. Assessments: The instructor will provide feedback via detailed rubrics on all written assignments. What to Bring: Some weeks, students will need to bring a laptop or tablet device to class. All students are required to have a library card, preferably from Fairfax County Public Library. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

7 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $295.00

Starting with Strings: Beginner Violin 1

Quarter 1,2: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 9:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Monika Dorosheff

Grade Range: 3rd-5th

Prerequisites: None

Learn to play the violin! Students will learn the fundamentals of playing the violin: how to hold the instrument, how to correctly hold the bow, parts of the instrument, and the names of the open strings. Techniques progress by adding one finger at a time to each string until the student can play a complete scale. The students will be taught to play in unison from a songbook of arranged works. Music education enhances teamwork skills and provides children with a path for self-expression. Scientific research has shown that music lessons not only improve organizational skills and executive functioning but that they also develop self-confidence. At the end of the semester, the class will be able to play several simple tunes and will perform for the parents.
Class Expectations: Students will be asked to bring their violin, bow, and case to every class. In order to fully benefit from each lesson, daily practice is required. A student violin can be purchased or rented from most music stores and should be set up professionally by a local music store or a string luthier. Parents may contact Compass for a list of recommended luthiers from the instructor. No sheet music purchase is required for this class. This is a 13-week semester class, and the week off will be announced by the instructor.

5 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $282.00

The History of WWI: From Balkan Crisis to Stalemate of the Trenches

Quarter 1,2: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 9:30 am      Duration: 145 min

Instructor: Hugh Gardner

Grade Range: 8th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Students will be immersed in detail and fully engaged in this intensive history course led by well- known homeschool instructor and historian Hugh Gardner. This history class is unlike other high school American history courses. Instead of learning a sequential set of names, dates, and battles, students will learn how to analyze and interpret history. Much like a college seminar, this approach to American History incorporates historiography (the history of the history.) Mr. Gardner does not teach a narrow view from a single textbook or static set of prepared notes. Instead, he presents the back story and multiple interpretations for the "why" questions in American history. Class discussion considers interpretations from a wide array of scholars and is updated as new sources are published. Rather than running through a timeline of outcomes, students will evaluate contributing factors (the "how" questions) and will learn about the personalities, prejudices, and biases of the people involved ("who").
First semester will cover the background and events leading up to the "Great War." The class will examine the events of 1914 and the beginning of hostilities across the European continent. As the course unfolds, students will learn about the new weapons, technology, and tactics introduced on a large scale in the "war to end all wars." The class will study actions on the Western Front and how trenches warfare led to a stalemate between the Allies and the Central Powers. The class will discuss the effects on the political, social, and economic climate as well as influences on the arts, science, literature, religion, and warfare. This is no ordinary history class as Mr. Gardner surrounds the students with vivid posters, maps, charts, primary sources, and artifacts to supplement his story-telling style. Students will be able to examine and handle period pieces such as antique and replica weapons and military accoutrements of the era while learning how these tools helped shape the battlefields and turning points in history. With an emphasis on primary sources, students will scrutinize historical atlases and original writings, all in a collaborative and interactive setting. Just for fun, students earn historical trading cards for class participation.
This class meets for 2.5 hours, one time per week on Wednesdays. Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours outside of class each week completing assigned reading. For those families who want to investigate the course themes at a deeper level, an optional reading list will be furnished.
Topics in this Series: WWI: From Balkan Crisis to Stalemate of the Trenches (Semester 1), WWI: From World at War to a Precarious Peace (Semester 2). Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of classon assigned readings. Assignments: are given in class and e-mailed to parents and students. Assessments: Students will be given a short weekly quiz on an index card that will be graded in class and sent home each week for the parent's use in assigning a grade. Textbook: Prior to the start of class, students should purchase two books:A Military Atlas of the First World War by Arthur Banks (softcover: ISBN# 978-0850527919 or hardcover: ISBN# 978-0850525632) and The Western Front Companion: The Complete Guide to How the Armies Fought for Four Devastating Years, 1914-1918 by Mark Adkin (ISBN# 978-0811713160). Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count two semesters of this course as a full credit in American or World History for purposes of a high school transcript.

10 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $329.00

Writing Lab

Quarter 1,2: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 3:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Shannon McClain

Grade Range: 7th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Scriptophobia. Break the block. Get past the paralysis. Every student struggles with writing at some point. Fearful writers worry what others will think. Reluctant writers have trouble getting started. Even strong, prolific writers experience roadblocks in their writing. Every teen can benefit from Writing Lab, a safe, supportive writing workshop where an experienced writing coach facilitates peer revision groups. Writing Lab is based on the idea of revision, revision, revision; teaching teens that writing does not have to be perfect; sometimes they just need to put words on paper to get started.

Writing Lab will give students the opportunity to revise their own writing at their own pace. Writing Lab may be taken stand-alone or to complement other classes. Each class will include the opportunity to write to a prompt or on a topic of choice, to confer with classmates about writing, and to work on developing pieces. Each session will include dedicated writing time. Students may bring pieces of writing from another class or something they are working on at home-- history paper, English composition, lab report, short story, personal essay, etc. No two will be the same. If a student shows up with no in-progress writing, the instructor will provide sample prompts to get the writing process started. After writing, students will break up into groups of 3-4 students to share their work and receive feedback from peers. Writers will benefit from having an audience and receiving input on their drafts. That feedback will inspire further revision, refinement, and clarification of their writing as well as ideas for new pieces. Each week the writing coach will provide writing tips and guidance on everything from organizing big ideas and writing mechanics to how to give and receive constructive criticism.

Revision is a vital step in the writing process in which writers consider what they have accomplished and what they can do to make their work more effective. Having the opportunity to revise is helpful to reluctant writers, who learn to free themselves of high expectations of every word they put to paper, as well as prolific writers, who benefit from honing their craft. Having models written by peers in addition to a peer audience is inspiring, and it trains writers to be critical readers who can give constructive feedback. Students will improve as writers if they choose to work on their pieces in class only, but working independently will significantly amplify the benefits of the class.

Topics in this Series: Writing Lab will continue in Semester 2, and students may continue the course to further develop/improve their writing. Workload: Students should expect to spend time outside of class writing, however the time will vary based on the type of writing and students' goals for the writing. Assignments: Students should bring works-in-progress to lab. The number of assignments completed or advanced will depend on the amount of outside writing a student does and the length of his/her piece. Assessments: The writing coach will provide individual feedback on pieces that a student brings to work on in lab. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $266.00

Algebra I

Quarter 1,2,3,4: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: David Chelf

Grade Range: 7th-10th

Prerequisites: Pre-Algebra

This is a complete course in Algebra I which will cover fundamental concepts in algebra and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. This course is designed to emphasize the study of algebraic problem-solving with the incorporation real world applications. Topics in Algebra I include number systems, linear systems, rational numbers, complex numbers, exponents, roots, radicals, quadratic equations, polynomials, factoring, absolute values, ratios, and proportions. In addition, the course will cover solving and graphing systems of functions, linear equations, and inequalities. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem solving.

Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation in pre-algebra topics in order to take this class. Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Friday (day 1), lecture on Wednesday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Friday (day 8), and homework due the next Wednesday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Wednesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work. Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student?s progress and workload. Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student?s progress by: checking that weekly homework sets are complete; spot-checking the full solution 1-2 select problems in class each week, and giving quarterly take-home tests. Points will also be awarded for class participation. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. Textbook: The required textbooks for this class are (1) Practical Algebra: A Self-Teaching Guide, 2nd edition paperback- new copy recommended- (ISBN-10 0471530123, ISBN-13 978-0471530121) and (2) A-Plus Notes for Beginning Algebra: Pre-Algebra and Algebra 1 (ISBN-10 0965435229, ISBN-13 978-0965435222). A calculator is not necessary for this course. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Algebra I for purposes of a high school transcript.12.10.0619

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $1050.00

Algebra II

Quarter 1,2,3,4: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: David Chelf

Grade Range: 9th-12th

Prerequisites: Algebra I

This is a complete course in Algebra II which will cover fundamental concepts and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. Topics in Algebra II include linear functions, systems of equations and inequalities, quadratic functions and complex numbers, exponential and logarithmic functions, rational and irrational algebraic functions, and quadratic relations and systems. In addition, this course will cover higher degree functions with complex numbers, sequences and series, probability, data analysis, and trigonometric and circular functions. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem solving.

Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation Algebra I in order to take this class. Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Friday (day 1), lecture on Wednesday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Friday (day 8), and homework due the next Wednesday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Wednesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work. Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student?s progress and workload. In lieu of a graphing calculator, students should have access to websites desmos.com and wolframalpha.com for graphing assignments.Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student?s progress by: checking that weekly homework sets are complete; spot-checking the full solution 1-2 select problems in class each week, and giving quarterly take-home tests. Points will also be awarded for class participation. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. Textbook: The required textbook for this class is Algebra and Trigonometry: Functions and Applications- Prentice Hall Classics (ISBN-10 0131657100, ISBN-13 978-0131657106). A scientific calculator similar to the TI-83 is required for this class. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Algebra II for purposes of a high school transcript. 12.06.0612

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $1050.00

American Sign Language (ASL) I

Quarter 1,2,3,4: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 12:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Daniel Frame

Grade Range: 7th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Are you interested in learning a new language that is used right here in America? Are you intrigued by a modern language that has no written form? Do you want to find out why American Sign Language is much more closely linked to French Sign Language than British Sign Language? If so, American Sign Language (ASL) is a great language for you! In this class, students will learn the basic skills in production and comprehension of ASL while covering thematic units such as personal and family life, school, social life, and community. Each unit will include presentations and readings on Deaf culture and Deaf history. Students will learn fingerspelling and numbers, developing conversational ability, culturally appropriate behaviors, and fundamental ASL grammar.

Class time will be dedicated to interactive ASL activities and signing practice. ASL is an excellent second language choice for teens who have difficulty with writing, spelling, or challenging pronunciation in English. Penn State University research demonstrated that the visual and kinesthetic elements of ASL helped to enhance the vocabulary, spelling, and reading skills in hearing students.

ASL students will have a Deaf instructor for the whole year. He regularly teaches all-hearing classes and will be an excellent role model for students to meet and interact with a native speaker of ASL and to lean natural facial expressions, gestures, and body language used in Deaf communications. ASL students will have more confidence learning from Deaf instructors in college or greeting speakers of ASL in social settings.

Because the instructor is Deaf, students are not permitted to speak aloud in class. This approach improves visual attention and encourages immersion in the language. Students will be able to ask questions of the instructor by writing on individual white boards, but they will be encouraged to sign in order to communicate with the instructor. Enrolled students are not expected to know any sign language prior to beginning ASL I.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours each week outside of class on required vocabulary exercises, readings, and signing practice. Assignments: Homework assignments will be posted online in the Canvas digital classroom platform. There will be only minor written assignments but there will be no written tests. Through Canvas, students will be asked to post short videos of themselves signing as homework. Assessments: The instructor will assign points using a class rubric for the parent's use in assigning a course grade. Course rubrics will evaluate students on their sign production, fingerspelling, ASL grammar, facial expressions including “above the nose” grammar (brows and body movement), and “below the nose” modifiers (lip expressions). Textbook: Students should purchase or rent "Signing Naturally Units 1-6 workbook" (ISBN# 978-1581212105) which includes a DVD or signing videos.
Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in World Languages for purposes of a high school transcript.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $635.00

American Sign Language (ASL) II

Quarter 1,2,3,4: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Daniel Frame

Grade Range: 8th-12th

Prerequisites: ASL I

Students of ASL will continue to improve their fluency in this 2nd year course. As students become more advanced signers, emphasis will be on focusing on the meaning of a conversation (whole) rather than individual signs (parts). In conversation, students will learn to confirm information by asking questions in context. Second year students will continue to build their vocabulary, apply ASL grammar, and will learn to make requests, ask for advice, give opinions, make comparisons and use superlatives, and narrate stories. Other skills covered in ASL II include expressing year, phone numbers, time, and currency in numbers, giving directions, and describing locations. Each unit will include presentations and readings on Deaf culture and Deaf history.

Class time will be dedicated to interactive ASL activities and signing practice. ASL is an excellent second language choice for teens who have difficulty with writing, spelling, or challenging pronunciation in English. Penn State University research demonstrated that the visual and kinesthetic elements of ASL helped to enhance the vocabulary, spelling, and reading skills in hearing students.

ASL students will have a Deaf instructor for the whole year. He regularly teaches all-hearing classes and will be an excellent role model for students to meet and interact with a native speaker of ASL and to lean natural facial expressions, gestures, and body language used in Deaf communications. ASL students will have more confidence learning from Deaf instructors in college or greeting speakers of ASL in social settings.

Because the instructor is Deaf, students are not permitted to speak aloud in class. This approach improves visual attention and encourages immersion in the language. Students will be able to ask questions of the instructor by writing on individual white boards, but they will be encouraged to sign in order to communicate with the instructor.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours each week outside of class on required vocabulary exercises, readings, and signing practice. Assignments: Homework assignments will be posted online in the Canvas digital classroom platform. Through Canvas, students will be asked to post short videos of themselves signing as homework. Enrolled students will be asked to review ASL 1 vocabulary, grammar, and facial expressions.
Assessments:
The instructor will assign points using a class rubric for the parent's use in assigning a course grade. Course rubrics will evaluate students on their sign production, fingerspelling, ASL grammar, facial expressions including “above the nose” grammar (brows and body movement), and “below the nose” modifiers (lip expressions). Textbook: Students should purchase or rent "Signing Naturally Units 7-12 Student Workbook" (ISBN# 978-1581212211) which includes a DVD of signing videos. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in World Languages for purposes of a high school transcript.10.06.0612

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $635.00

Applied Physics

Quarter 1,2,3,4: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 2:00 pm      Duration: 115 min

Instructor: Katherine Hoeck

Grade Range: 9th-12th

Prerequisites: Algebra I

Applied Physics is a hands-on, lab-based physics course which will help students explore everyday phenomena in the physical world. An understanding of physics will help teens appreciate the forces on a roller coaster, wave action at the beach, speakers for their music, batteries in electric cars, and the electronics that power all of their favorite devices.

Topics covered will include Newton's laws of motion, gravitation, energy, momentum, rotation, fluid dynamics, heat and kinetic theory, thermodynamics, harmonic motion, waves and sound, light and optics, and electricity and magnetism.

In general, 30-45 minutes of each class session will be dedicated to reviewing homework exercises, and the remainder of the time will be spent performing labs, taking measurements, and recording data. Students will develop a conceptual and analytical understanding of the principals of physics. This course will use algebra- and trigonometry- based mathematical models to describe physics concepts. The course is designed to emphasize scientific thinking and reasoning, problem solving, and experimentation. For students who have not had trigonometry in a math class, in-class explanations and out-of-class supplements will be provided.

Students will be expected to study independently, read, and take detailed notes on concepts before coming to class, complete various problem-solving activities, analyze data, and write formal lab reports.

Prerequisites: Algebra I Workload: Students should expect to spend 5-6 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload. Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by: checking that weekly homework sets are complete; spot-checking the full solution 1-2 select problems in class each week, and giving quarterly take-home tests. Points will also be awarded for class participation. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. Textbook: Students should purchase or rent Physics Fundamentals by Vincent Coletta, 2010 ed. (ISBN #978-0971313453) Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $125 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: Students will need a lab notebook with graph paper and a scientific calculator.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Lab Science for purposes of a high school transcript. 12.07.0612

7 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $1199.00

Earth Science (Honors or On-Level)

Quarter 1,2,3,4: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 9:30 am      Duration: 115 min

Instructor: Dr. Kristin Keenan

Grade Range: 9th-12th

Prerequisites: None

An earthquake rocks Irvine, CA; A cyclone hits the Solomon Islands; New fossils found in the Philippines; Volcanoes viewed on Venus. Aspects of Earth Science are in the news every single day! Earth Science is a study of the physical Earth and the universe- past and present- around us. It is a course that focuses on the study of space, geologic structures and forces, the waters on our planet, and the atmospheric forces above us, all of which shape our world. Students will explore the Earth's spheres including the geosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, and atmosphere, as well as the cycles of the Earth such as the water and carbon cycle.

In this course, students will use scientific practices to understand overarching concepts related to Earth and space science and to recognize unifying themes that integrate the major areas of study such as plate tectonics, weather, climate and climate change, water, ocean circulation, topography, natural resources, human impact on the environment, ecology, ice ages, and mass extinctions, among others. The curriculum integrates critical thinking and laboratory skills that stress the development of experimental design, detailed observation, accurate recording, data interpretation, and analysis. Ultimately, this course prepares students to be scientifically literate as well as prepare them for future courses in biology, physics, and environmental science.

An estimated 45 minutes of each class will be dedicated to delving into a specific, and the remainder of the time will be spent performing labs, observing demonstrations, reading and discussing articles, or using laptops for in-class investigation. Each student will do a long-term project that will incorporate research, data collection, a paper, and a year-end presentation. Ultimately, students will develop a conceptual and analytical understanding of the principals of Earth Science, with the design of this course being to introduce students to scientific thinking and reasoning, problem solving, and experimentation.

This class will be offered on two levels: Honors and On-Level. All class members share the core, weekly lesson and participate in the same in-class labs and activities. Honors students will be assigned supplemental articles, videos, and/or additional homework problems each week. Students register online for the same course, but must indicate which level they wish to study via e-mail by August 15. Students may move down a level (from Honors to On-Level) at any time. However, once classes have started, students may not "bump up" a level.

Students will be expected to take notes during class, study independently, read, and take detailed notes on concepts before coming to class, complete various problem-solving activities or handouts, analyze data, and write formal lab reports.

Pre- or co-requisite: Pre-algebra Workload: Students should expect to spend 5-6 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up as users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload. Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student's progress by: checking that weekly homework assignments are complete; spot-checking the full solution to 1-2 select problems in class each week, and giving quarterly take-home tests. Points will also be awarded for class participation. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. Textbook: Students should purchase or rent Earth Science by Tarbuck and Lutgens, 2015 ed. (ISBN-13: 978-0134543536)
Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $150 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: Students will need a class notebook, a lab notebook with graph paper, a scientific calculator, and a laptop.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Lab Science for purposes of a high school transcript.

7 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $1030.00

Geometry

Quarter 1,2,3,4: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 10:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: David Chelf

Grade Range: 8th-11th

Prerequisites: Algebra I

This is a complete course in high school Geometry which will cover fundamental concepts and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. Students will learn deductive reasoning, and logic by completing geometric proofs. Topics in geometry include: lines, angles, congruence, concurrence, inequalities, parallel lines, quadrilaterals, transformations, area, similarity, right triangles, circles, regular polygons, and geometric solids. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem solving.

Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation Algebra I in order to take this class. Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Friday (day 1), lecture on Wednesday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Friday (day 8), and homework due the next Wednesday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Wednesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work. Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student?s progress and workload. Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student?s progress by: checking that weekly homework sets are complete; spot-checking the full solution 1-2 select problems in class each week, and giving quarterly take-home tests. Points will also be awarded for class participation. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. Textbook: The required textbook for this class is Geometry: Seeing, Doing, Understanding, 3rd edition (ISBN-10 0716743612, ISBN-13 978-0716743613) A calculator is not necessary for this course. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Geometry for purposes of a high school transcript.12.08.0612

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $1050.00

Modern World History (AP, Honors, or On-Level)

Quarter 1,2,3,4: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 9:30 am      Duration: 115 min

Instructor: Tia Murchie Beyma

Grade Range: 9th-12th

Prerequisites: None

This year-long, full credit, multilevel high school course offers an in-depth look at how the world we know came together between 1200 CE to today.

Long before jet travel and trans-Atlantic shipping, portions of the globe were much more connected than some realize. By the early 1200s, Persian historian Juvayni claimed that any unguarded traveler might walk safely from Southeast Asia to Eastern Europe - as long as an army unit of the massive Mongol Empire was posted nearby. The Silk Roads connected Moscow and Tibet, while a vibrant Indian Ocean trade circulated goods, people, and animals among China, Indonesia, and India, with linkages to East African coastal cities and the Arab world. In 200 more years, Muslim Admiral Zheng He would command China's gigantic treasure fleet.

Except for a brief visit to Canada by Leif Ericson's volatile family around 1000 CE, it seems the rest of the Old World remained ignorant of the land mass stretching from the Arctic Circle to the volcanic Tierra del Fuego until the end of the 1400s. Here, precursors to the Incan and Aztec empires built impressive city-states, while farther north, Cahokia's pyramids and Mesa Verde's cliffside apartments boomed, and the Iroquois League united five great nations. Millions of people had no knowledge of the world in the opposite hemisphere. At 1200 CE, when this course begins, two halves of the world had not yet collided - but would soon!

We will use the tools and perspectives of historians to see how this collision happened and what built the world we now know. Students will analyze primary and secondary sources, develop arguments, and make comparisons. They will apply reason to understand context, causation, and continuity and change over time. World history has it all! Five themes from the AP course curriculum will be covered to make connections among historical developments at different times and places: (1) interaction between humans and the environment; (2) development and interaction of cultures; (3) state building, expansion, and conflict; (4) creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems; and (4) development and transformation of social structures.

Levels:This course is offered at three levels, On-Level, Honors, and Advanced Placement (AP). They have different workloads, but meet together. AP level students will work at a university freshman level and have the potential to earn college credit or placement through the spring 2020 AP exam. AP students must be prepared to start class two weeks earlier, with online homework due in mid- and late August. Honors students will have assignments that engage higher-level analysis and historical thinking skills. On-level students will use the same primary textbook, but will have less homework. Schedule: There are two weekly meetings: (1) Friday in-person for all class members; and (2) Monday online (time to be announced). The latter is required for AP students, but open to all interested, and recorded for those who cannot attend live. For Honors and On-Level students, this is a 28-week course which follows the Compass calendar but ends two weeks early due to the timing of the AP exam on May 14. AP students have the equivalent of 31 weeks, as they begin two weeks before the regular Compass start date and will have an additional session for a mock exam. Workload: Honors and On-Level students should plan on 4-5 hours each week outside class meetings for reading and homework. AP students typically need 6 hours (or more, depending on reading speed). All levels use materials written at a college level, but the amount and type of homework varies. This allows students to enjoy active discussions with your peers, an advantage of live, in-person meetings.Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments; upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests; track grades; message instructor and classmates. Assessments: Points are assigned for class submissions and tests, and parents can view total points earned at any time through the Canvas site. Textbook: Registered students will receive an e-mail with the required textbook(s) over the summer. Registration. All students will register online for the same course. Students must designate their intent to take the On-Level, Honors, or AP version by emailing Compass before August 4. Once the course has begun, students may move down a level (from AP to honors, or from honors to on-level) at any time. However, once classes have begun, students may not "bump up" a level.
AP Fees: There is an additional tuition fee of $150 for students who are approved to take the AP level of this course because of the additional instructional time. Those families will receive a separate invoice for this amount before the start of classes. The fee is not refundable if the student decides mid-year to change to honors or on-level work. The fee to take the College Board's AP Modern World History exam in May 2020 is not included; each family will be responsible for scheduling and paying for their student's AP exam. AP Approval: Students who have taken a prior course with this instructor can seek approval for the AP level through a conversation or e-mail with her. For any student new to the instructor, a short questionnaire and brief written assignment about a sample textbook chapter are needed to get approval for the AP level. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a a full credit in World History for purposes of a high school transcript.

10 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $895.00

Pre-Algebra

Quarter 1,2,3,4: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 2:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Natalie Di Vietri

Grade Range: 7th-9th

Prerequisites: None

This is a full year course in Pre-Algebra that will provide an introduction to basic algebra concepts and a review of arithmetic algorithms with an emphasis on problem solving. The major topics covered in this course are integers, order of operations, expressions, variables, equations, inequalities and polynomials. The course will also cover factors, fractions, exponents, and rational numbers. Students will learn to use formulas to solve a variety of math problems encompassing geometry, probability, and statistics. Students will also be applying their learning to real life scenarios to solve problems.

Prerequisites: Students must be fluent in the four basic operations- addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. They will need to show proficiency and have a thorough command of basic computation. In addition, a basic, introductory understanding and ability to work with fractions and decimals is required to solve equations and simplify expressions. If you are unsure about your child?s readiness for this class, the instructor will recommend one or more practice platforms and/or assessments to confirm placement. Workload: Students should expect to spend 3-4 hours per week outside of class to complete practice problems, homework, and assessments. Assignments: will be e-mailed to parents and students after each class. Assessments: All chapter tests will be taken outside of class with parental oversight to maximize in-class instructional time. Textbook: Students should purchase or rent McDougall Littell?s Pre-Algebra (ISBN #978-0618250035) and accompanying practice workbook (ISBN # 978-0618257522). As an alternative, parents can purchase the textbook on audio-CD for any student who struggles with reading (ISBN #978-0618478828). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $39.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for the student?s online subscription to IXL online math platform where additional practice assignments are made. Please note that this subscription is typically $79.99 per student if purchased individually. What to Bring: Students will need a 1-1/2 inch binder with lined paper, graph paper, and a set of (5) dividers, a 12 inch ruler, and a TI-34 calculator. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Mathematics for purposes of a high school transcript.12.06.0612

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $1050.00

PreCalculus

Quarter 1,2,3,4: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 12:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: David Chelf

Grade Range: 10th-12th

Prerequisites: Algebra I, II, Geometry

This is a complete course in PreCalculus which will cover fundamental concepts and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. Topics in Precalculs include functions: polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric (right angle and unit circle). In addition, the course will cover polar coordinates, parametric equations, analytic trigonometry, vectors, systems of equations/inequalities, conic sections, sequences, and series. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem solving.

Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry in order to take this class. Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Friday (day 1), lecture on Wednesday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Friday (day 8), and homework due the next Wednesday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Wednesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work. Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student?s progress and workload. In lieu of a graphing calculator, students should have access to websites desmos.com and wolframalpha.com for graphing assignments.Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student?s progress by: checking that weekly homework sets are complete; spot-checking the full solution 1-2 select problems in class each week, and giving quarterly take-home tests. Points will also be awarded for class participation. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. Textbook: The required textbooks for this class are Precalculus: Mathematics for Calculus, 6th edition by Stewart, Redlin, and Watson (ISBN-10 0840068077, ISBN-13 978-0840068071) and the downloadable Stitz-Zeager Precalculus, Preliminary 4th edition (www.stitz-zeager.com/Precalculus4.pdf) A scientific calculator similar to the TI-83 is required for this class. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Precalculus for purposes of a high school transcript.12.07.0612

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $1050.00

Principles of Biology (Honors or On-Level)

Quarter 1,2,3,4: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 90 min

Instructor: Tia Murchie Beyma

Grade Range: 9th-12th

Prerequisites: None

This full-year lab science course introduces classic biology topics updated for the 21st century. Biology studies living things and their relationships from microscopic to massive, ancient to modern, arctic to tropic. Our survey includes: (1) cellular and molecular biology, (2) ecology, (3) genetics, (4) biology of organisms (with selected human health and anatomy topics), and (5) evolution and diversity.

You will observe microscopic organisms and give monarch butterflies a health exam before tagging them for their 2,800 mile migration to Mexico. You will extract DNA, model its processes, and learn how scientists manipulate this magnificent molecule to make mice glow. You will observe animal behavior, test your heart rate, and practice identifying and debunking pseudo-science.

By the end of the course, students will be able to explain the nature of science as a system of knowing; cite evidence for foundational theories of modern biology; explain basic biological processes and functions; describe structures and relationships in living systems; outline systems of information, energy, and resources; demonstrate valid experimental design; discern ethical standards; relate their values and scientific ideas to decision-making; and apply biology knowledge to their own health.

In this flipped classroom, students are responsible for covering new material such as readings from the textbook and additional popular and scholarly sources, videos, and animations prior to class meetings. In-person sessions focus on active discussion, clarification, exploration of content, review, modeling, and hands-on activities.

Labs address not only technical skills and sequential operations, but also forming testable predictions, collecting data, applying math, drawing conclusions, and presenting findings. Hands-on dissection, always optional, is taught with preserved crayfish and fetal pigs.

Sensitive issues: human reproduction is not taught separately, but mentioned as students learn about other, related topics such as sperm, eggs, stem cells, genetic disease, hormones, fetal development, breast-feeding, adolescence, and HIV. While there may be some debate-style discussion of topics such as GMO, abortion will not be debated. Birth control and sexuality education are not covered, but distinctions between gender and biological sex are discussed in detail in the genetics unit. Dissections are optional. Evolution is embedded in every topic, from molecular to ecological, inseparably from other content. It is addressed in a scientific context, not from a faith standpoint.

The course provides a substantive, full-credit experience on either an Honors or On-Level track. All class members share core material and participate in the same labs. Honors has longer or additional readings, more analytical work, and more thorough and difficult assessments; it is appropriate for students who seek more challenge or plan to take the SAT Subject Test in Biology. Brief, required summer assignments are due in August for those who elect to take Honors. Students register online for the same course, but must indicate which level they wish to study via e-mail by August 15. Students may move down a level (from Honors to On-Level) at any time. However, once classes have started, students may not "bump up" a level.

Prerequisites: Students should be very strong, independent readers and able to understand graphs, tables, percentages, decimals, ratios, and averages. Workload: Homework includes term cards, brief written responses, weekly online quizzes, unit tests, occasional lab reports, and some creative assignments including sketching. Students will sometimes prepare short, in-class presentations, participate in group projects, run simulations, or conduct simple experiments at home. All students should expect to spend 4-6 hours outside of class reading and preparing homework.
Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments; upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests; track grades; message instructor and classmates; and participate in a weekly conference held in addition to the in-person meeting at Compass. That online session is conducted live but can be viewed asynchronously if a student has a conflict. Assessments: Points are assigned for class submissions, and parents can view total points earned at any time through the Canvas site. Textbook: Students must purchase or rent the textbook ?Biology? (2010 edition with baby alligator cover) by Stephen Nowicki, published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt/Holt McDougal (ISBN# 9780547219479) An e-book version is also available (ISBN# 9780547221069). By second semester, those who elect to take the SAT Subject Test will also need the College Board's "Official SAT Subject Test in Biology Study Guide" (ISBN# 978-1457309205) and a prep book of their choice, such as the latest '"Princeton Review's Cracking the SAT Subject Test in Biology E/M" or "Barron's SAT Subject Test Biology E/M." Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $130 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.
Supplies/Equipment: Students will need access to a computer/internet, compound microscope with 400X magnification and cool lighting, splash goggles, water-resistant/acid-resistant lab apron, kitchen or postal scale, 3-ring binder, at least 400, 3"x5" index cards, and plain, lined, and graph paper. Some of these supplies are used at home. Students should watch class announcements on Canvas to know when to bring items to class. Notes: The cost for the SAT Subject Test in Biology in spring or summer 2020 is not included. Each family is responsible for scheduling and paying for their student's exam through the College Board. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Lab Science for purposes of a high school transcript.

8 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $995.00

Spanish I (Honors or On-Level)

Quarter 1,2,3,4: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Lisa Alsono

Grade Range: 7th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Get ready for a full year of beginner level high school Spanish! This is a conversation-focused program in which students will build their vocabulary quickly and learn essential grammar skills in Spanish. Vocabulary will include the alphabet, numbers, time, dates, seasons, school, free time activities/hobbies, likes/dislikes, personal descriptions, family relationships, emotions, food/restaurants, places/locations in town, and shopping/clothing. There will be a strong emphasis on competency using regular and irregular present tense verbs and common grammar concepts such as articles, pronouns, adjectives, and comparative phrases.

Class will be conducted primarily in Spanish and will focus on listening and speaking skills, asking and answering questions, and correct use of grammar. At home, students will be responsible for memorizing vocabulary and grammar, completing worksheets and written assignments, and watching both grammar instruction and language immersion videos.

This class will be offered on two levels: Honors and On-Level. Spanish I offers a substantive, full-credit experience taught at either level. All class members share core material and participate in the same class activities, but honors students will be given homework that requires higher level reasoning and advanced application of various grammar skills. All students will register online for the same course. Students must indicate which level they want to study via e-mail by August 15. Once the course has begun, students may move down a level (from honors to on-level) at any time. However, once classes have started, students may not "bump up" a level.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 30-45 minutes per day, 4 days per week on homework outside of class. Assignments: Are sent by e-mail to parents and students. Students must have access to a computer and internet service for computer-based videos and practice tools that are assigned as homework and are essential to success in the class. Assessments: Quizzes, tests, and individual performance reviews will be given to all students at regular intervals to provide parents with sufficient feedback to assign a grade. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $30.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for class materials in lieu of a textbook.
Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Foreign Language for purposes of a high school transcript.

7 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $539.00

Spanish II (Honors or On-Level)

Quarter 1,2,3,4: Starts on September 6, 2019

Class Time: 10:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Lisa Alsono

Grade Range: 8th-12th

Prerequisites: Spanish I

Get ready for a full year of intermediate level high school Spanish! This is a conversation-focused program in which students will build their vocabulary quickly and learn essential grammar skills in Spanish. Vocabulary will include describing homes and chores; planning a party; health, body parts and sports; vacations, leisure time activities, fun events and places of interest; communicating via phone and computer; and daily routines. There will be a strong emphasis on competency using regular and irregular past tense verbs and common grammar concepts such as commands, direct and indiect object pronouns, reflexive verbs, and the differences between ser vs. estar and saber vs. conocer.

Class will be conducted primarily in Spanish and will focus on listening and speaking skills, asking and answering questions, and correct use of grammar. At home, students will be responsible for memorizing vocabulary and grammar, completing worksheets and written assignments, and watching both grammar instruction and language immersion videos.

This class will be offered on two levels: Honors and On-Level. Spanish I offers a substantive, full-credit experience taught at either level. All class members share core material and participate in the same class activities, but honors students will be given homework that requires higher level reasoning and advanced application of various grammar skills. All students will register online for the same course. Students must indicate which level they want to study via e-mail by August 15. Once the course has begun, students may move down a level (from honors to on-level) at any time. However, once classes have started, students may not "bump up" a level.

Prerequistes Spanish I Workload: Students should expect to spend 30-45 minutes per day, 4 days per week on homework outside of class. Assignments: Are sent by e-mail to parents and students. Students must have access to a computer and internet service for computer-based videos and practice tools that are assigned as homework and are essential to success in the class. Assessments: Quizzes, tests, and individual performance reviews will be given to all students at regular intervals to provide parents with sufficient feedback to assign a grade. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $30.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for class materials in lieu of a textbook. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Foreign Language for purposes of a high school transcript.10.07.0612

7 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $539.00

Integrated Science 2 (Honors)

Quarter 1,2,3,4: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 2:00 pm      Duration: 135 min

Instructor: Sudhita Kasturi

Grade Range: 8th-11th

Prerequisites: Integrated Science 1

This is year 2 of a two-year class in Integrated Science. Only students who completed Year 1 in 2018-19 may register for this course.

Biotechnology. Geophysics. Astrochemistry. These specialties evolved because scientific fields are interrelated, interdependent, and inseparable. Today's research and innovation take place across many disciplines demonstrating the chemistry, biology, physics, and geosystems work together and are not stand-alone subjects. This view, called Integrated Science, is how Princeton now teaches science as do Harvard, Northwestern, and locally, Virginia Tech.

Many of today's most pressing scientific problems and tomorrow's technological challenges will require an interdisciplinary understanding of science. The modern world's greatest scientific dilemmas, such as the global supply of clean water, alternative fuels, and prolonged space travel will require Integrated Science solutions.

In this course, students will learn how to think, discover logical connections, and come to scientifically sound conclusions based on multidisciplinary scientific facts. This approach will build knowledge and understanding in a systematic and interconnected manner. Integrated Science is intended to be a two-year course, that will prepare a student to pursue AP- level, higher-level, or dual enrollment biology, chemistry, or physics in high school. For students who will not be pursuing the sciences further, this course will give them a solid foundation in the basics for everyday application and will cover a general-education level high school biology, chemistry, and physics. However, because of the compact, accelerated approach to the material, this course is considered an honors level course.
Prerequisites: Integrated Science Year 1. In addition, students should be able to read and perform math at grade level for this class. Workload: Students should expect to spend 5-7 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: This class will have both lecture and laboratory components. Students will be expected to maintain a science notebook and write laboratory reports. Weekly homework will be assigned, along with occasional independent or collaborative projects or presentations. Assessments: Homework and assignments will be graded under the same metrics as Year 1. Textbook: Students should bring textbook and materials from Year 1 Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $50.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: Students should bring a snack for the 10-minute class break. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in Laboratory Science for purposes of a high school transcript.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $1500.00

Principles of High School Science

Quarter 1,2,3,4: Starts on September 11, 2019

Class Time: 9:30 am      Duration: 115 min

Instructor: Donna Shackelford

Grade Range: 8th-9th

Prerequisites: None

This year-long, lab-based course is a survey of key concepts in the fields of physical science, Earth science, and life science which will give students the foundational knowledge to succeed in high school level Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Environmental Science. Each class period will involve approximately 25 minutes of lecture and 60 minutes of lab time.

Weekly lab work will allow students to apply the scientific concepts studied, improve laboratory techniques, record observations, take a variety of measurements, use different lab equipment, record and interpret data, convert units of measure, and write lab reports. An effort is made to incorporate recent scientific discoveries and new technologies in class discussions. The background covered in this course will enable a teen to become an educated reader of scientific news and a more knowledgeable consumer.

The life science topics in this class are designed to give the student general knowledge in biology, zoology, botany, genetics and ecology. General themes in the class include life cycles, food webs, and an understanding that living things depend on each other. Microscope work will be used in life science labs. Students may want to dual register with this course and the 7th-8th grade fall Dissection Lab classes for a more robust introduction to biology and for even more lab experience. The physical science portion of the class will overview fundamentals of chemistry and physics such as the properties and classification of matter, the Periodic Table, basic chemical reactions, energy, forces, work, motion, simple and compound machines, waves, light, sound, and electricity. Earth science concepts include the water cycle, weather patterns, climates, and water/air quality.

This class is appropriate for a tween or teen who had limited middle school level science and who expects to pursue high school level Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Earth Science, or Environmental Science on a college-preparatory track. This class is also appropriate for a homeschooled teen who will likely pursue an arts- or vocational- focused path and for whom an overview of high school science concepts is sufficient.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: will be given in class and repeated in the weekly e-mail to parents and students. In addition, students will have some take-home labs to complete observations and measurements longer term at home. Assessments: The instructor will provide a quarterly student evaluation form which includes metrics on a student's class participation, homework, and general understanding of concepts for the parent's use in assigning a grade. Textbook: Students should purchase or rent Miller & Levine Biology, 2010 edition (red macaw cover, ISBN # 978-0133669510). Students should also purchase Everything You Need to Ace Science in One Big Fat Notebook: The Complete Middle School Study Guide by Workman Publishing (ISBN # 978-0761160953) Lab/Supply Fee: A lab fee of $125.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a full credit in general science for purposes of a high school transcript.

7 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $1075.00

Bio Chem Learning Labs

Quarter 1,2,3,4: Starts on October 8, 2019

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 240 min

Instructor: Towson University, Baltimore

Grade Range: 8th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Conduct biology, chemistry, and environmental science experiments in a university laboratory setting! Use advanced lab equipment, follow college-level lab protocols, and receive instruction from university lab staff. Lab activities are taken from AP curricula and the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS).

Bio-Chem Learning Labs is a series of 6 sessions, held off-site at Towson University's Center for STEM Excellence in downtown Baltimore (60 miles from Compass.) This lab series is a complement to and offers further hands-on experience for students taking Integrated Science, Environmental Science, Biology, Micro-Biology, or Principles of High School Science at Compass in 2019-20. Homeschool students following another curriculum, doing self-study, or taking an online class may take this series to add a lab component to their work.

Each session, students will complete a series of lab experiments around a central theme. Tentative activities include: measuring protein concentrations, quantifying absorbance, testing water quality, manipulating bioluminescent bacteria, and working with microbioassay, enzymes, blood smears, electrophoresis, and agarose gels. Each lab will emphasize the importance of control samples, dependent/ independent variables, recording and graphing data, and will demonstrate the process of identifying a problem, scientifically testing a hypothesis, interpreting results of an experiment, and supporting a scientific claim. All labs are 2.5-3.0 hours long with a snack break.

Lab dates are held on six Tuesdays: October 8, November 12, February 11, March 10, April 14, and May 12, 2020. A Compass science instructor will remain with the students throughout the labs and will send a post-lab summary to parents. Otherwise, the labs are led by Towson University staff. Students must wear long pants and closed toe shoes to the lab. A parental permission slip must be turned in before each lab. Any student wearing short pants/skits/dresses, open tow shoes, or failing to submit a permission slip will be denied entry to the lab. A class roster will be distributed before the first session to allow parents to form carpools. Families will be responsible for any parking fees incurred on site.

Prerequisite: For safety reasons, students must have turned 13 by the start of the labs (i.e. minimum age 13). Workload: Students will not have work outside of the lab sessions. Assessments: will not be provided. Lab/Supply Fee: Included. What to Bring: Paper or notebook, pen or pencil, bagged lunch What to Wear: Students must wear closed-toe shoes to labs.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this program as a component (partial) credit in Lab Science for purposes of a high school transcript.24.16.0619

12 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $220.00

Store Merchandise- Embroidered Patch

Quarter 1-4: Starts on September 6, 2017

Class Time: 9:00 am     

Grade Range:

Great for tote bags, backpacks, scouts, or as a keepsake. 3" diameter, full color embroidered patch with iron-on backing. Sold at the Compass Front Desk for $3.50. Purchase online for $5.00 to include shipping and handling.

  Price: $5.00

Store Merchandise- Compass Cooks! Cookbook

Quarter 1-4: Starts on June 1, 2019

Class Time: 9:00 am     

Grade Range:

This is a compilation of 14 quarters of recipes from the Compass cooking classes taught by Mimi Nyman. This is a collection of more than 130 recipes that are family friendly and kid-tested! This book makes a nice memento from your child's experience in cooking class or a thoughtful gift. All proceeds from the sale of these cookbooks will be donated to a local food bank to help feed others in our community. Sold at the Compass Front Desk for $9.00. Purchase online for $13.00 to include shipping and handling.

  Price: $13.00

Formula for Fiction: Historical Fiction

Quarter 2: Starts on October 25, 2019

Class Time: 10:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Anne Sharp

Grade Range: 7th-8th

Prerequisites: None

Find out how historical facts and creativity collide in writing historical fiction! Students will learn why the literary elements of time and place are prescribed in popular historical tales such as Gone with the Wind, A Tale of Two Cities, and Johnny Tremain. Sometimes details of real historical characters or events are woven in to bring credibility to this genre. Students will research a historical period or event in order to select appropriate details to weave into their historical fiction.

Great writing doesn't always begin "from scratch." Sometimes writers use a formula, or template storyline, to create fiction. This class series examines different types of popular storylines to give the young writer a "formula" for creating original fiction. For each genre, the class will examine samples of literature and excerpts from well-known works that illustrate the story template. Each fiction formula includes a different mix of elements (characters, setting, plot) that change in the new story while others remain fixed to preserve the genre.

A portion of each class will be dedicated to sharing students' working drafts through collaboration and in-class feedback. Students will be expected to conduct some writing and reading at home each week. Literature selections will not be assigned in their entirety, but students may want to continue reading the complete work. The culmination of the students' work will be a bound class literary magazine. Topics in this Series: Mystery and Detective Stories (Quarter 1); Historical Fiction (Quarter 2); Prequels and Sequels (Quarter 3); and Revisioning a Classic (Quarter 4).

7 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $140.00

Krav Maga Self Defense for Teens: Orange Stripe (Fri)

Quarter 2: Starts on October 25, 2019

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Sarah Reynolds

Grade Range: 7th-12th

Prerequisites: None

Krav Maga is the Israeli martial art which teaches self defense and fitness. Students of Krav Maga are taught a series of strategies to assess and respond to common situations, such as facing a bully. Teens are always taught first and foremost to get away, to get help, and to try to deescalate the situation. When that fails, students practice a technique that includes a warning strike followed by escape, and finally, they learn how to stand up for themselves and how to counterattack if a situation escalates and becomes threatening. Teens are empowered and gain confidence when they rehearse how to handle real-life situations. Exercises and in-class practice incorporate balance, coordination, energy, and other key elements of fitness along with life skills such as confidence, teamwork, respect, discipline, and respect.

Students may enroll in Krav Maga at any time, and everyone will begin as a white belt. Each quarter, students will practice the full range of skills, but there will be two "featured" moves that a student can earn a belt stripe for being able to demonstrate. Featured moves will include a combative strike and a defensive escape technique. No one stripe is a prerequisite for any other color, and color stripes can be earned in any order.

First quarter, students will have the chance to earn an Orange Stripe. Featured moves include: cover defense and wrist locks (red stripe); straight punch defense and bear hugs (orange stripe); head movement defense and front 2-handed choke (yellow stripe); round kick defense and back 2-handed choke (green stripe); front kick defense and guillotine choke (blue stripe); clinch defense and rear choke (purple stripe); ground striking defense and head lock defense (brown stripe); and 360 defense and full Nelson (black stripe).

Students will be able to test for belt promotions to move through the ranks of white belt, yellow belt, orange, etc. On average, it is estimated that a student will be ready for a belt test after four quarters/four color stripes. Belt testing will be by coach approval.

Topics in this Series: Red Stripe (1st Quarter), Orange Stripe (2nd Quarter), Yellow Stripe (3rd Quarter) and Green Stripe (4th Quarter). Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-2 hours per week outside of class. Assessments: Belt testing for promotion will be by coach recommendation, but on average will take 4 quarters. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for the t-shirt and white belt (new students) or $5.00 for the white belt (returning students). An belt test fee of $25.00 is due payable to the instructor when a student is ready to test for promotion. What to Bring: Refillable water bottle. What to Wear: In lieu of a full martial arts uniform, students will be asked to wear a class t-shirt provided by the instructor. Students should also wear shorts, leggings, or loose, comfortable athletic pants, and comfortable athletic shoes or sneakers with their class t-shirt. Non-Meeting Days: In addition to the scheduled days-off on the published Compass schedule, this class does not meet on October 4. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Physical Education for purposes of a high school transcript.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $118.00

Whole Health Yoga for Teens & Adults

Quarter 2: Starts on October 25, 2019

Class Time: 12:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Beloved Yoga

Grade Range: 7th-Adult

Prerequisites: None

Come in for a mid-day break! Transition from morning classes to afternoon classes and shake off the stress of the week! Refresh and refocus for the weekend with yoga! Whole Health Yoga is a health and fitness program for teens and adults of all fitness and experience levels -beginners are welcome. It is intended to reduce overall stress and tension, and improve flexibility, strength, and balance. Each class will begin with "centering", or a breathing exercise to calm, focus, and unwind (approx. 5 mins). Next, the class will do warm-up stretching with particular focus on the spine (approx. 10 mins). which will help loosen the joints. Each class will include a work-out comprised of stretches and poses for the whole body that touch on major muscle groups and body parts (approx. 35 mins). Each week will include focused work on a featured body part such as back, hips, or shoulders. This is not a yoga class that is based on holding the perfect pose. Instead, participants will learn gentle, adaptable poses that are accessible to all ages, body types, and fitness levels. There is no set, repetitive class sequence: no two sessions will be the same! Each class will conclude with a final relaxation, which is typically done lying down, and may include some visualization (approx. 10 mins). Yoga philosophy is not included in this course. All participants should wear comfortable clothing and bring a yoga mat to class.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $111.00

Acting- Kids' Theater: The Day We Woke Up in Oz

Quarter 2: Starts on October 30, 2019

Class Time: 10:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Judith Harmon

Grade Range: 3rd-5th

Prerequisites: None

Coming Soon

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $99.00

Acting- Teen Scene: Wednesday Afternoon Live!

Quarter 2: Starts on October 30, 2019

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: John Waldron

Grade Range: 9th-12th

Prerequisites: None

In the tradition of Saturday Night Live, students will work in small teams to develop a variety of comedy skits. Students can opt to write their own scripts, perform a classic comedy routine, or work from rated E (for everyone) scripts to perform hilarious scenes such as a game show gone awry, a goofy newscast, or a comedic misunderstanding between a server and a diner in a mixed-up restaurant!

In this class, actors will learn the art of a cold read in front of a director. If a student would like to write a script for the class, he/she should bring a hard copy to the first day of class to review and edit with the instructor before the script is offered to the class.

The students will perform for family and friends at the end of the quarter. This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, are flexible and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work in a collaborative group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class.

Topics in this Series: Wednesday Afternoon Live (Quarter 2); Long Form Improv (Quarter 3); and Mystery on Demand (Quarter 4). Taken these classes before? No problem, you can take them again as improv-based acting will be a new and different experience every time! Workload: Students should expect to spend 1 hour per week outside of class learning his/her lines. Assignments: Parts will be assigned in class. Assessments: Will not be given. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $109.00

Acting- Tween Stage: Nutty News

Quarter 2: Starts on October 30, 2019

Class Time: 12:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: John Waldron

Grade Range: 6th-8th

Prerequisites: None

Tweens will work in small teams to develop a variety of comedy skits which will combined to for the nightly newscast of utterly nutty news! Students can opt to write their own spoofs, perform a classic comedy routine, or work from rated E (for everyone) scripts to perform hilarious news scenes. Imagine an outlaw captured by grammar police, a wild wacky weather report, or a comedic mix-up between a reporter and his on-air guest!

In this class, actors will learn the art of a cold read in front of a director. If a student would like to write a script for the class, he/she should bring a hard copy to the first day of class to review and edit with the instructor before the script is offered to the class.

This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, are flexible and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work in a collaborative group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class. The students will perform for family and friends at the end of the quarter.

Topics in this Series: Quick Scripts (Quarter 1); Nutty News (Quarter 2); Improv Scenes (Quarter 3); and Mystery Busters (Quarter 4). Taken these classes before? No problem, you can take them again as improv-based acting will be a new and different experience every time!

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $109.00

Acting- Young Actor's Playhouse: Cat & Dog Drama

Quarter 2: Starts on October 30, 2019

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Judith Harmon

Grade Range: 1st-2nd

Prerequisites: None

Acting is an adventure! Young actors will find themselves in a mix-up among dogs and cats in an imaginative drama where they will create an original storyline and unique characters for their very own original play! Will someone let the "cat out of the bag" or will our pet friends find themselves "barking up the wrong tree" on this pet-venture? Join us for purr-fectly hair-raising fun!

Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other and to begin to brainstorm about their original play. Through group activities and guided discussion, the young actors will decide on characters, conflict, and conclusion, and the story they want to tell. The script will be developed and customized for this class with input from the students.

Young actors will explore skills such as sensory awareness, listening, stage movement, character development, emotional expression, and observation/concentration while learning to portray their original character. Young actors will learn aspects of acting by script read-through, blocking, costume/prop discussion, and planning the show. Through individual and group activities, young actors build confidence in preparation for a final sharing for parents.

Students will work from a simple, written script, but emerging readers can be accommodated. Parents will be emailed the script after the 3rd or 4th class and will be expected to help their children memorize their lines and assemble a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity. All actors must be at least age 6 to sign up for this class.

Topics in this Series: Zany Zoo (Quarter 1), Cat & Dog Drama (Quarter 2), Our Arctic Adventure (Quarter 3), and Rainforest Rescue! (Quarter 4).

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $99.00

Art: Wonders of Watercolor

Quarter 2: Starts on October 30, 2019

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Lori Goll

Grade Range: 3rd-4th

Prerequisites: None

Learn about the beauty, fun, and flexibility of watercolor paints! Students will learn techniques for mixing, shading, blending, and tweaking the opacity of watercolors as well as tricks with various papers and different brushes. They will experiment with a variety of water color techniques to create textures, patterns, and effects. Basic color theory will be introduced as students mix colors and experiment with saturation. Each week will be a different, themed project such as landscapes, florals, abstracts, animals, and still life subjects. We will paint from both real life and photographic references. Some curriculum will come from a new skill-based art trailed atelier called the Da Vinci Initiative. This class is suitable for beginners as well as returning art students who want to hone their skills. Topics in this Series: Anyone Can Draw! (Quarter 1); Wonders of Watercolor (Quarter 2); Drawing with Color & Texture (Quarter 3); and Painting with Pastels (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: All materials are furnished. A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $112.00

Art: Wonders of Watercolor

Quarter 2: Starts on October 30, 2019

Class Time: 2:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Lori Goll

Grade Range: 5th-6th

Prerequisites: None

Learn about the beauty, fun, and flexibility of watercolor paints! Students will learn techniques for mixing, shading, blending, and tweaking the opacity of watercolors as well as tricks with various papers and different brushes. They will experiment with a variety of water color techniques to create textures, patterns, and effects. Basic color theory will be introduced as students mix colors and experiment with saturation. Each week will be a different, themed project such as landscapes, florals, abstracts, animals, and still life subjects. We will paint from both real life and photographic references. Some curriculum will come from a new skill-based art trailed atelier called the Da Vinci Initiative. This class is suitable for beginners as well as returning art students who want to hone their skills. Topics in this Series: Anyone Can Draw! (Quarter 1); Wonders of Watercolor (Quarter 2); Drawing with Color & Texture (Quarter 3); and Painting with Pastels (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: All materials are furnished. A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $112.00

Art: Wonders of Watercolor

Quarter 2: Starts on October 30, 2019

Class Time: 3:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Lori Goll

Grade Range: 7th-9th

Prerequisites: None

Learn about the beauty, fun, and flexibility of watercolor paints! Students will learn techniques for mixing, shading, blending, and tweaking the opacity of watercolors as well as tricks with various papers and different brushes. They will experiment with a variety of water color techniques to create textures, patterns, and effects. Basic color theory will be introduced as students mix colors and experiment with saturation. Each week will be a different, themed project such as landscapes, florals, abstracts, animals, and still life subjects. We will paint from both real life and photographic references. Some curriculum will come from a new skill-based art trailed atelier called the Da Vinci Initiative. This class is suitable for beginners as well as returning art students who want to hone their skills. Topics in this Series: Anyone Can Draw! (Quarter 1); Wonders of Watercolor (Quarter 2); Drawing with Color & Texture (Quarter 3); and Painting with Pastels (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: All materials are furnished. A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $112.00

Battle Strategies & Dioramas: WWI, America's Arrival

Quarter 2: Starts on October 30, 2019

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Taliesin Knol

Grade Range: 5th-8th

Prerequisites: None

Coming Soon

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $140.00

Bibliophiles Book Group: Individuality

Quarter 2: Starts on October 30, 2019

Class Time: 1:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Megan Reynolds

Grade Range: 7th-8th

Prerequisites: None

The Bibliophiles Book Group offers middle school students the opportunity to read high quality literature and expand their understanding of what they read through book discussion and literary analysis. Through facilitated class discussion, students will do thematic analysis, comparing books with similar themes and examining how an author develops the selected theme. In addition, students will complete extension activities or projects, such as researching a specific aspects of the story. Students will be asked to read assigned chapters from their books at home. Listening to the unabridged audiobook can substitute for individual reading. Readers will be encouraged to take notes on key passages or questions. The first book of Quarter 2 will be The Outsiders by SE Hinton from the theme "individualtiy." A subsequent book(s) having the same theme will be voted on by the students each quarter from among Newbery Medalists and Honor Books, the Capitol Choices book lists, or other award-winning young adult literature.

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $126.00

Build It Better! Wacky Contraptions

Quarter 2: Starts on October 30, 2019

Class Time: 10:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Dan Gallagher

Grade Range: 3rd-4th

Prerequisites: None

Young engineers will participate in the Lego "Great Ball Contraption" challenge! Lego Mindstorm components and motors are not just for building robots! These interconnecting pieces can be constructed into an infinite number of unique, mechanized machines- much like an erector set! Students will each be challenged with developing a unique, individual segment of a contraption that moves a ball from point A to point B, and each segment will link to a classmate's invention to keep the ball moving! A contraption is a series of mechanized steps that will automate the process of moving a small ball along, much like a Rube Goldberg innovation.

Second quarter, students will discover what happens when simple machines are combined to work together. Engineers will use additional motors and more complex components to move the ball through a series of lifts, automated carts, moving gates, escalators, and more! Will each contraption transfer the ball to its neighbor without hitting the floor? Parents will be invited to the final class to see the demonstration of all of students' wacky contraptions linked together. See http://greatballcontraption.com/ or You Tube videos for impressive examples of the Great Ball Contraption.

Topics in this Series: Simple Machine Contraptions (Quarter 1); Wacky Contraptions (Quarter 2): Gadgets & Gizmos (Quarter 3); and Widgets and Whatsits (Quarter 4).

6 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $148.00

Chess: Advanced Beginners 2

Quarter 2: Starts on October 30, 2019

Class Time: 11:00 am      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Peter Snow

Grade Range: 3rd-6th

Prerequisites: Beginner Chess or equivalent

In Advanced Beginner Chess 2, students will learn skills and strategies that build upon each other, including: advanced beginning counting in chess; Double attack tactics; Using the center once you control it; Advanced beginning king and pawn endgames; Key positions in rook and pawn endgames; Principles of minor piece endgames; and Simple, pawn-less endgames. Experts suggest that the game of chess teaches analytical and disciplined thinking skills, while raising self esteem, teaching motivation and determination, and sportsmanship (Kasparov Foundation). Each class will be spent half on technique and half in practice matches with classmates while the instructor coaches. Students should have 15-20 hours of chess instruction prior to enrolling in Advanced Beginner Chess, or a working knowledge of most skills taught in the Compass Beginner Chess level.

8 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $99.00

Chess: Beginners 2

Quarter 2: Starts on October 30, 2019

Class Time: 12:00 pm      Duration: 55 min

Instructor: Peter Snow

Grade Range: 2nd-5th

Prerequisites: None

In Beginning Chess 2, students will learn introductory skills such as: back rank mates; draws, all 5 types; elementary checkmates 2Rs+K, K+Q vs. K, K+R vs. K; elementary opening principles 1, elementary opening principles 2, pawn structure 1, pawn structure 2. Experts suggest that the game of chess teaches analytical and disciplined thinking skills, while raising self esteem, teaching motivation and determination, and sportsmanship (Kasparov Foundation). Each class will be spent half on technique and half in practice matches with classmates while instructor coaches. A student can enroll in Beginning Chess 2 as his/her first class.

8 students must enroll in order for this class to be held. Price: $99.00

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