Schedule and Room Assignments

Classes meet on Wednesdays in Oakton, VA, with some classes also meeting on Fridays.  Filter by subject or grade below.

Quarter beginning January 10, 2018

Art / Music Science / Technology History / Humanities Language Arts
Extracurricular Math Foreign Language (Full Classes)
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Wednesday Classes (Click here for Friday Classes)

9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00
Outdoors

Nature Quest: Adventurers Nature Quest: Adventurers - Hooray for winter! It's a great time of year for active outdoor games and exploration, to make fires and enjoy the cozy warmth of our earth shelter. Bundle up and look for signs of how animals live in the winter- wth a little luck we will have snow to track in. Many students consider this their favorite session of the year! Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has led for several years. Students will follow the paths or create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing winter season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world! Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Sorry, but the explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

11:00 am-11:55 am

1st-3rd

Nature Quest: Explorers Nature Quest: Explorers - Hooray for winter! It's a great time of year for active outdoor games and exploration, to make fires and enjoy the cozy warmth of our earth shelter. Bundle up and look for signs of how animals live in the winter- wth a little luck we will have snow to track in. Many students consider this their favorite session of the year! Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has led for several years. Students will follow the paths or create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing winter season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world! Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Sorry, but the explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

PK-K

Nature Quest: Pathfinders Nature Quest: Pathfinders - Hooray for winter! It's a great time of year for active outdoor games and exploration, to make fires and enjoy the cozy warmth of our earth shelter. Bundle up and look for signs of how animals live in the winter- wth a little luck we will have snow to track in. Many students consider this their favorite session of the year! Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has led for several years. Students will follow the paths or create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing winter season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world! Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Sorry, but the explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

3rd-5th

Nature Quest: Adventurers Nature Quest: Adventurers - Hooray for winter! It's a great time of year for active outdoor games and exploration, to make fires and enjoy the cozy warmth of our earth shelter. Bundle up and look for signs of how animals live in the winter- wth a little luck we will have snow to track in. Many students consider this their favorite session of the year! Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has led for several years. Students will follow the paths or create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing winter season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world! Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Sorry, but the explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

1st-3rd

Room 1

Experimental Methods & Design: Microscopic Life Experimental Methods & Design: Microscopic Life - In this class, middle school students will learn to work as independent investigators using the scientific method. Students will observe the systems under investigation, choose a pattern or trend that interests them, and then develop a testable hypothesis. Students will learn how to: design a scientific experiment, choose appropriate controls, minimize investigator bias, correctly perform measurements and record and analyze data. The third quarter will focus on investigations of small and/or microscopic organisms such as Planaria, Euglena, brine shrimp and tardigrades (water bears). Students will spend time using microscopes, making slides, and learning to keep science journals/notebooks.  Our overall themes will be understanding processes that are important for organisms’ survival at the microscopic scale, and comparing these lifestyles and adaptations to those from macro-scale ecological communities with which students are more familiar. Students will learn how to locate peer-reviewed scientific literature to research their subject. By the end of the quarter, students will have completed their independent investigations, summarized their results, and will present their data to the class and families. There is a $10.00 lab fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Each quarter will focus on a different aspect of science with Botany (4th quarter).

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

7th-8th

Marine Biology: Biomes Marine Biology: Biomes - Earth is an ocean planet! Life began in the oceans, and they are the linchpin of the biological, chemical, and physical processes that allow our planet to support life. This class will give students a basic understanding of the chemistry, physics and biology of earth's oceans. We'll also learn how oceans are informing our search for life on other planets. The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in at least three demonstrations or experiments during each class. During our third quarter of marine biology, we will take the information we’ve learned about large-scale processes and oceanography and apply it to more detailed studies of specific marine biomes.  We’ll take a virtual tour of the world’s oceans as we focus on the diversity of marine habitats, including: open ocean, kelp forest, polar, coral reef, temperate intertidal, mangrove swamps, island, and estuarine habitats.  The geographic distribution, food webs, important primary producers and consumers, representative species, and notable species interactions for each biome will be discussed and compared to other marine and terrestrial biomes. Over the course of the quarter, students will assemble a “ship’s log” of our virtual expedition which will include a map of the ocean biomes of the earth, with detailed sections on each biome we investigate.  There is a $10.00 lab fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

5th-6th

Who Wants to Be a Scientist? Chemistry & the Medical Sciences Who Wants to Be a Scientist? Chemistry & the Medical Sciences - There are so many ways to do science! This class allows our youngest scientists to explore different careers in the sciences and shows them that science is fun, approachable, and that anyone can do it! Students will use real scientific equipment and learn actual science terminology to investigate questions in different fields. Try out SCUBA gear as a marine biologist, learn the basics for studying DNA, perform experiments in chemistry, and try your hand at operating an ROV (remote operated vehicle). The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in at least three demonstrations or experiments during each class. During our third quarter of science investigations, we’ll learn the basics of chemistry by doing our own acid-base reactions – including the ever-popular “volcano” eruption.  Students will learn about pH, make their own acid-base indicator solution, make thermochromic (color-changing) putty and learn the physics behind its color-change.  We’ll intersperse our chemistry experiments with studies of medical science.   We’ll learn the basics of how human bodies work and how to keep ourselves healthy.  We’ll discuss our circulatory, respiratory and immune systems and learn how germs make us sick.  Students will take samples from our classroom and other locations and culture them to see what bacteria we’re able to grow.  After that (sometimes alarming) experiment, we’ll learn proper hand-washing techniques and test our effectiveness with the same UV glow lotion hospitals use in their infection control programs. Look out germs! There is a $10.00 lab fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Future themes in this class series include: Physics, Astronomy, & Engineering (4th quarter).

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

1st-2nd

Who Wants to Be a Scientist? Chemistry and the Medical Sciences Who Wants to Be a Scientist? Chemistry and the Medical Sciences - There are so many ways to do science! This class allows our youngest scientists to explore different careers in the sciences and shows them that science is fun, approachable, and that anyone can do it! Students will use real scientific equipment and learn actual science terminology to investigate questions in different fields. Try out SCUBA gear as a marine biologist, learn the basics for studying DNA, perform experiments in chemistry, and try your hand at operating an ROV (remote operated vehicle). The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in at least three demonstrations or experiments during each class. During our third quarter of science investigations, we’ll learn the basics of chemistry by doing our own acid-base reactions – including the ever-popular “volcano” eruption.  Students will learn about pH, make their own acid-base indicator solution, make thermochromic (color-changing) putty and learn the physics behind its color-change.  We’ll intersperse our chemistry experiments with studies of medical science.   We’ll learn the basics of how human bodies work and how to keep ourselves healthy.  We’ll discuss our circulatory, respiratory and immune systems and learn how germs make us sick.  Students will take samples from our classroom and other locations and culture them to see what bacteria we’re able to grow.  After that (sometimes alarming) experiment, we’ll learn proper hand-washing techniques and test our effectiveness with the same UV glow lotion hospitals use in their infection control programs. Look out germs! There is a $10.00 lab fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Future themes in this class series include: Physics, Astronomy, & Engineering (4th quarter).

3:00 pm-3:55 pm

1st-2nd

Room 3
Room 4

Macro Biology Lab Intensive Macro Biology Lab Intensive - Students will be introduced to the fascinating world of macro-biology through intensive laboratory work! Macrobiology is the study of larger organisms in the living world, and this lab intensive explores animals, animal systems, and human anatomy and physiology, from beaks to brains to bones! This full-year laboratory course makes biology come alive through hands-on activities, guided inquiry, and student projects. Each lab will feature a short discussion followed by active investigations, providing students with practical experience in laboratory techniques, data collection, scientific observations, and lab safety. In addition, students will develop their communication skills throughout the course by writing scientific papers, presenting individual projects, and delivering short oral presentations.
This lab intensive course covers topics not addressed in the general biology lab intensive taught in 2016-17, and the prior course is not a prerequisite. Students will begin with overview the animal kingdom through exploration of taxonomy (classification) and identification of characteristics among various phyla and classes. Taxonomy labs include microscope work and dissections of starfish and squid. Students will then explore evolution with in-class activities involving adaptation, competition for resources, and homologous body parts. The class will further address evolution through an overview of hominoid fossils and discussion of recent findings, and current theories in human evolution. With a background in the diversity found in the animal kingdom, students will transition into the examination of extraordinary range of animal systems (digestion, respiration, nervous) and behavior. Example labs in this unit include additional microscope work, dissection/observation of various gill vs lung tissues, nerve impulses in a frog's leg, and termite colonies!
During the second half of this lab intensive, students will focus on a detailed examination of human anatomy and physiology. Students will engage in a methodical overview of the primary body systems (digestive, excretory, nervous, skeletal, muscular, circulatory, integumentary, respiratory, endocrine, reproductive, and immune.) Example labs in anatomy and physiology include further microscope work, dissections of chicken wing and pig's heart, blood typing, and activities on the senses and spread of disease.
Duration: Year-long (30 weeks)/ Register for full year.
Effort: Students should expect to spend 2-3 outside of lab class each week on assigned reading, prelab questions, short assignments, and quarterly projects.
Grading: The instructor will provide qualitative feedback on the student's class participation, preparation, and understanding of the material for the parent to assign a grade in the context of the student's overall study of this and related topics.
Credit: This is a component course that will provide 45 hours of laboratory and lecture work. Coupled with independent study of the textbook including assigned readings, review questions, and projects, this may be counted by the homeschool parent as a full high school credit in a laboratory science (biology). Without the individual work, homeschool families should only consider this a component class for a partial science credit.
Materials/Supplies: The course progression, including assigned reading and questions, is meant to follow units 7 and 8 of the Miller & Levine Biology textbook. It is recommended that students rent or purchase the 2010 Student Edition (red macaw cover, ISBN # 978-0133669510). Alternatively, the homeschool family can select a different textbook to follow lab work, but they will need coordinate and make their own corresponding assignments based on the course syllabus. Students are expected to bring a lab notebook (graph ruled composition notebook is recommended) to every class. There is a year-long material and lab fee of $80.00 due to the instructor on the first day of class.

9:30 am-10:55 am

9th - 12th

Atrium C


 

Friday Classes (Click here to jump back up to Wednesday classes)

9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00
Room 1

Chemistry Lab Intensive Chemistry Lab Intensive - Through the study of chemistry, high school students will learn the science behind things they observe everyday! Chemistry explains properties of the food we eat, the beverages we drink, the medicines we take, the fibers we wear, and fuels in the cars we drive. Chemistry is a foundation to understanding the world around us and fundamental to other sciences such as biology, physics, geology, and environmental science.
This full-year laboratory course makes chemistry come alive through hands-on activities, guided inquiry, and student projects. Each lab will feature a short discussion followed by active investigations, providing students with practical experience in laboratory techniques, data collection, scientific observations, and lab safety.
This lab intensive course provides the hands-on laboratory work to support the themes of: matter, atomic structure, subatomic particles, and isotopes (weeks 1-3); orbital notation, electron configuration, and trends in the periodic table (weeks 4-6); ionic and covalent bonding, polarity, acids/bases, and pH (weeks 7-10); solutions, molarity, dilution and equilibrium (weeks 11-14). Students lab work to explore the chemical reactions, synthesis, double replacement, and decomposition (weeks 15-18); stoichiometry (weeks 19-20); phase changes and thermodynamics (weeks 21-22), gas laws (weeks 23-24), electrochemistry (weeks 25-27), and introduction to organic chemistry (weeks 28-30). Example labs include experiments in molar mass, hydrates, chromatography, acid/base titration, distillation, reactants, polymers, heat of fusion, heat of vaporization, and work with metals and hydrolysis. Laboratory work, along with outside assignments, will cover approximately 20 of the textbook's 26 chapters and will provide the foundations for students to work through the remaining chapters if they chose to do so.
Duration: Year-long (30 weeks)/ Register for full year.
Effort: Students should expect to spend 2-3 outside of lab class each week on assigned reading, prelab questions, and short assignments.
Grading: The instructor will provide qualitative feedback on the student's class participation, preparation, and understanding of the material for the parent to assign a grade in the context of the student's overall study of this and related topics.
Credit: This is a component course that will provide 45 hours of laboratory and lecture work. Coupled with independent study of the textbook including assigned readings, review questions, and projects, this may be counted by the homeschool parent as a full high school credit in a laboratory science (chemistry). Without the individual book work, homeschool families should only consider this a component class for a partial science credit.
Materials/Supplies: The course progression, including assigned reading and questions, is meant to follow the McGraw-Hill "Chemistry: Matter and Change" textbook and laboratory manual. It is recommended that students rent or purchase the 2001 Student Edition (ISBN # 978-0028283784) and purchase the accompanying student lab manual (ISBN #9780078245244). Alternatively, the homeschool family can select a different textbook to follow lab work, but they will need coordinate and make their own corresponding assignments based on the course syllabus. Students are expected to bring a lab notebook (graph ruled composition notebook is recommended) to every class. There is a year-long material and lab fee of $110.00 due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

11:00 am-12:30 pm

9th-12th

Foundations of Physics Foundations of Physics - Physics is the study of how matter and energy interact and the investigation of how objects behave under various conditions. Learning Physics can answer questions you have asked all your life. Why is it easier to float in the ocean than in a lake? (It has to do with buoyancy!) Physics also explains why balls bounce, how musical instruments work, and why the lamp in your bedroom turns on when you flip a switch. From maintaining your balance, or center of gravity, while riding a bike to experiencing acceleration when a car, train, or airplane speeds up or slows down, Physics is part of your everyday life. This class features hands-on middle-school level physics and physical science concepts. The emphasis will be on inquiry-based labs and scientific investigation, setting up experiments, taking measurements, recording data, and maintaining a lab notebook. While some basic equations will be introduced and worked in class using data collected by students, the emphasis will not be on mathematics or solving lengthy problem sets. Major themes in this class include Mechanics, Temperature and Pressure, Properties of Matter, and Electricity and Magnetism. Each class will cover a different topic through hands-on labs, such as making an accelerometer, building a solar collector, constructing a simple generator, experimenting with electromagnets, and many more. In Mechanics, students will be introduced to friction, acceleration, momentum, and torque. In the study of Pressure and Temperature, students will examine expansion and contraction, the flow of heat, and solar energy. Topics in Properties of Matter include permeability, solubility, buoyancy, and surface tension. Finally, students’ exploration of Electricity and Magnets will include vibrations, electric current, generators, magnetic fields, and electromagnets. Students will be given a composition notebook to be used as a lab book. They should bring the notebook and an assortment of pens to class each week. There is a $30.00 lab material fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. This is a 16-week, semester long class.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

7th-9th

Veterinary Science: Medical Mysteries Veterinary Science: Medical Mysteries - Discover the science (and art) of small animal medicine! Find out how vets- and even human physicians and other medical professionals- use clues to form a diagnosis. Analyze actual cases and make predictions based on health history, exam findings, and diagnostics. See how anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, and biochemistry come together! The same symptoms can be the result of many disease processes, and in this class, students gain an appreciation of what being a medical professional is all about. Each week students become veterinarians for an hour." Using real veterinary cases, the group will work together to evaluate a patient s history, consider various diagnostic tests, interpret results, and form a treatment plan. Students will work with a practicing veterinarian and use deductive reasoning and logic to piece together the clues of the medical mystery. Will they be successful clinicians? This class is geared towards students interested in pursuing any career in the biological sciences, but will be interesting for anyone curious to learn more about the health of their furry friends. A basic understanding of biology and anatomy is recommended for this class. Students will receive a printed notebook with essential information to be reviewed before the first class. They will also be responsible for some research at home each week as they analyze their findings and formulate a diagnosis. There is a $20.00 material fee for the class notebook and in-class supplies for new students and a $5.00 fee for returning students. In first quarter, all animals present with the same owner complaint: seizures. In future quarters, all patients experience Weight Loss/Weight Gain (4th quarter). Homeschool families could count this course as a component, or partial credit, in science.

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

8th-12th