Schedule and Room Assignments

Classes meet on Wednesdays in Oakton, VA, with some classes also meeting on Fridays.  Filter by subject or grade below.

Quarter beginning January 10, 2018

Art / Music Science / Technology History / Humanities Language Arts
Extracurricular Math Foreign Language (Full Classes)
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Wednesday Classes (Click here for Friday Classes)

9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00
Room 5

The Great American Novel: Revolution- Suffragists & Harlem Renaissance The Great American Novel: Revolution- Suffragists & Harlem Renaissance - Through the theme of “revolution”, this year-long course examines American Literature at four pivotal, turbulent times in our nation’s history: Fights for Religious Freedom and Political Independence: America’s Settlement & Revolutionary War (first quarter); Battles over Human Rights:  The Civil War (second quarter); Campaign for Equality: Suffragists & Harlem Renaissance (third quarter); and Struggles for Social Justice: Civil rights Era of 1950s-70s (fourth quarter). Each quarter’s study will be “anchored” by a novel important to the era and will also explore a variety of nonfiction and fiction that influenced revolutionary thinking, culture and action of the times:  essays, letters, speeches, historical documents, court decisions, short stories, campaign material, advertising, songs, poetry, scripts.  A natural outgrowth of this sampling of literature across eras will be an understanding of the development of form/genre through the development of media:  newspapers, magazines, mass-market novels, radio, film and television. During the third quarter, students will examine the concept of social justice and equality through the study of early twentieth century American literature. Using nonfiction genre such as letters, essays, speeches, articles, personal narratives and poetry, students will hear a variety of voices from diverse American perspectives, with an emphasis on voices struggling to be heard: women, African-Americans, middle & lower classes. Civil discourse and disobedience moved from the physical battlefield to a printed one, as Americans increasingly used literature—fiction and nonfiction—to champion civil rights. Students will analyze the speeches and writings of American suffragists such as: Sojourner Truth, Susan B. Anthony, Alice Stone Blackwell, Carrie Chapman Catt, Julia Ward Howe, Alice Paul, Elizabeth Cady Stanton—as well as the works of Harlem Renaissance writers such as: W.E. B. DuBois, Zora Neal Hurston, Nella Larsen, Wallace Thurman.   American literature of this period carries forward both the Civil War’s civil rights advocacy and the development of poetry—the perfect vehicle for activists to channel (and activate) emotions and advocacy for change. Students will explore the poetry of writers such as: Gwendolyn B. Bennett, Countee Cullen, Langston Hughes, Alice Duer Miller, Dorothy Parker, Anne Spencer. As a class we will read The Great Gatsby, as our “Great American Novel”.  While not a suffragist or Harlem Renaissance novel, it provides a backdrop of privilege and class of this period in American history that justifies voices for equality.  We will also look at sections of Zora Neal Hurston’s novel Their Eyes Were Watching God to provide an alternative view of American society of the period. Emphasis in this class will be on critiquing literature, forming a thesis statement, writing literary commentary, and citing examples to defend the opinion. Literary criticism is one of the forms of higher-level writing needed for a student to transition from a casual writer to an academic and ultimately college-level writer. Students will keep a reading journal and are expected to annotate and highlight passages in their personal copy of the novel as part of a college preparation experience.  They will have additional written assignments, some of which will be published as essays or presentations. Publishing is used to teach writing/revision and to share our learning with a wider audience beyond our class. Publishing allows students to develop polished writing and presentations that become part of their high school portfolio. In the process of creating portfolio pieces, students strengthen communication and organizational skills (writing, discussion, emailing, meeting deadlines, presenting) that have direct real world application. The student should expect to spend 2-3 hours of homework per week on reading, investigation, and writing for this class. The class will meet twice a week with Wednesdays introducing the concepts and vocabulary of the literature and authors, and Friday serving as a writing lab to explore the mechanics of writing criticism. Much of the literature we will be studying is accessible via public domain, but students will be encouraged to purchase the Scribner 2004 edition of The Great Gatsby so that everyone is “on the same page” for discussion.

10:00 am-10:55 am

11th-12th

Atrium B

Smart Start: Thinking Fun for Young Learners Smart Start: Thinking Fun for Young Learners - Stretch your child's brain with this metacognitive class! In Smart Start, children will sharpen their critical and creative thinking skills to become more independent and effective learners. Using in-class readings of high quality literature, children will be introduced to a broad range of thinking strategies such as de Bono's Thinking Hats, SCAMPER, and FFOE (Fluency, Flexibility, Originality, and Elaboration). Through facilitated discussion and community inquiry, children will learn to ask their own questions and raise issues for discussion, explore and develop their own ideas and theories, and give creative reasons. Each week, students will complete engaging activities that require them to apply what they have learned. For example, the class might consider, What happens when Max returns to Where the Wild Things Are the next day? Next year? How about 10 years from now? (Green Hat Thinking). They may expand to discuss what would happen if another character from literature, like Curious George or Cinderella, visited Where the Wild Things Are? (SCAMPER approach "C" for combining two things that do not normally go together). Young learners will have fun on this engaging, creative class which will boost their ability to use higher order thinking skills, predict outcomes, and solve problems! New stories and activities are introduced each week and not repeated from previous sessions. Students must be able to think independently, work collaboratively, and enjoy a good challenge. Emerging readers and writers can be accommodated.

11:00 am-11:55 am

K-2nd



 

Friday Classes (Click here to jump back up to Wednesday classes)

9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00
Room 2

DebateAble: Public Forum Debate DebateAble: Public Forum Debate - Desmond Tutu once stated, Don t raise your voice, improve your argument. Do you have what it takes to strategically win an argument? Effective debate is a life skill that incorporates logic, communication, and public speaking skills. Being able to debate helps teens improve reasoning, conflict resolution, and confidence. In this class, students will learn the fundamentals of debate including the three persuasive appeals, a brief history of debate, and different styles of debate. During the third quarter, we will be hosting our first team debates, known as Public Forum. Public Forum (PF) is a duo team style of debate that is the most popular format among high school students who compete in debate competitions across the country. Very similar to the television show Crossfire, debaters will strategically discuss their positions on current topics or events. During this course, teams consisting of two members will advocate or reject a position based upon the proposition. Students will develop arguments based upon the Art of Persuasion, rather than just using rhetoric. Debaters will learn how to structure an argument, build their evidence, and best practices for researching a topic. Students will learn techniques for quoting sources, presenting statistics, acknowledging opposing views, and incorporating visual aids in debate. The class will also practice stylistic elements of public speaking such as using transitional words, timing, gestures, and eye contact. In this class, students will learn how to really listen to their opponent and how to craft a rebuttal. At the same time, debaters will be taught to read their audience, hold their attention, and establish credibility. In each class, students will practice giving brief impromptu speeches, delivering prepared presentations, and debating classmates. Students will practice evaluating classmates and giving, receiving, and incorporating constructive feedback.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

7th-12th

Room 3

Formula for Fiction: Prequels and Sequels Formula for Fiction: Prequels and Sequels - What happened to D'Artagnan decades after "The Three Muskateers"? You can find out in Dumas sequel, "Twenty Years After"! Did you know that Rudyard Kipling penned "The Second Jungle Book" with further adventures of Mowgli and his friends or that after his "Adventures," Mark Twain continued to tell the story of "Tom Sawyer Abroad" and "Tom Sawyer, Detective"? Did you know that some sequels are not written by the original author, such as Alexandra Ripley's sequel "Scarlett" to Margaret Mitchell's "Gone with the Wind"? Do you have a favorite tale that you always wanted to explore the beginning or further adventures of its characters, their ancestors, or their progeny?
Great fiction doesn't always begin "from scratch." Sometimes writers use a formula, or template storyline. Sometimes we love a character or story so much that we want it to keep going. In this class series, students will survey well-known prequels and sequels and will examine popular storylines as a possible "formula" for creating original fiction. Students will then continue a beloved story through the creation of a before or after --borrowing and elaborating on characters, setting and a few plot details. In the process of picking up where an author left off (or began), the student writer must delve deeper into story elements in order to remain true to the original concept. To do this requires knowledge and understanding of and commitment to (and respect for) an author s intent and work. Student writers will demonstrate this comprehension by: 1) further developing character motivation through early/later life experiences and factoring in additional characters who might enrich detail and deepen story, 2) enhancing setting by incorporating previous places, times or worlds, and 3) expanding the established plot by building credible preceeding/continuing events that mesh with the given storyline.
A portion of each class will be dedicated to sharing students' working drafts with collaboration and in-class feedback. Students will be expected to conduct some writing and reading at home each week. Literature selections will not be assigned in their entirety, but students may want to continue reading the complete work. The culmination of the students' work will be a bound class literary magazine.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

6th-8th

Room 4

Shakespeare Off the Page: Much Ado About Nothing Shakespeare Off the Page: Much Ado About Nothing - Read it! Act it! Students will enjoy this two-hour, 10-week workshop with Shakespearian coach Heather Sanderson who hails from England and is known for instilling a love of Shakespeare into the hearts of students throughout the Greater DC area. The class will explore Shakespeare's timeless comedy, analyze its characters, plot, themes and motives. Students will read different roles, study and act out scenes, practice monologues, and work through the literature while having fun with fellow teens. Theatre games will be used to encourage collaboration, and specially designed improv exercises will be used to stretch teens' imaginations and help them get "in character". The class will use read-aloud and in-class dramatization to decipher the original language, word choices, and to identify humor, satire, mockery, betrayal, and rejection in this mixed-up comedic tale of mistaken identity. The class will work from complete texts (not redacted, abridged, or simplified school versions) to hear and practice Elizabethan lingo. (How did someone of Shakespeare's time hurl insults or woe a woman?) Students will learn how the Bard crafted scenes and conveyed the primary storyline and sub-plots in a comedy that has endured for over 400 years. Several scenes will be shared with parents on the last day of class as a way for students to demonstrate their appreciation and understanding of what they have learned about Shakespeare. Instructor Heather Sanderson shares a teaching style based on actions and interactions, developed from years of experience coaching Shakespeare in a way that appeals to students. Her approach brings abstract concepts, complex themes, and difficult language to the students' level, so that they can relate to and appreciate Shakespeare. This is a 10-week workshop that meets for two hours per week on the following dates: 1/19, 2/2, 2/9, 2/23, 3/2, 3/9, 3/23, 4/13, 4/20, 4/27. Homeschool families could count this course as a component, or partial credit, in British Literature or Fine Arts (drama). This course fee includes a $6.00 charge for the select paperback edition of the play.

11:00 am-12:55 pm

8th-12th

Compass Literarians Writing Board Compass Literarians Writing Board - This semester-long course is a home for literarians students who love to write, who love to read writing, and who love to share writing with others. Writing is a solitary act, but writers also need a community in which to grow. Mirroring the design of famous writing salons/groups like The Bloomsbury Group, The Algonquin Round Table, and The Inklings, students will create a Compass community that will encourage individual writers, promote literary collaboration and provide challenging feedback to boost creativity and artistic development. Students will use their own work and the works of professional authors to understand what makes good writing , to improve technique, to experiment with new forms/genre and to understand the drafting, editing and publishing process. The members of this class will form an editorial board of a student anthology, journal, or magazine that will provide a publishing opportunity for themselves and for other homeschooled student writers. As editors, students will design and build an anthology and/or website, advertise the publication, solicit manuscripts and artwork, develop selection criteria, review/select/edit material, and learn the principles of layout and design. Embedded in this process are real-world experiences, and students will improve their communication and organization skills through goal-setting, time management, meeting deadlines, emailing, confirmations, proofreading, etc. A portion of each class will be devoted to writing time, but students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week writing at home. Each student is expected to publish in the anthology. Some students might also publish submit works to other journals or contests. In addition to this published piece, each student will also develop a personal portfolio of writing that includes a variety of forms and genre and that provides samples from all phases of the writing process: brainstorming, drafting, revision, editing.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

8th-12th

Room 5

The Great American Novel: Revolution- Suffragists & Harlem Renaissance The Great American Novel: Revolution- Suffragists & Harlem Renaissance - Through the theme of “revolution”, this year-long course examines American Literature at four pivotal, turbulent times in our nation’s history: Fights for Religious Freedom and Political Independence: America’s Settlement & Revolutionary War (first quarter); Battles over Human Rights:  The Civil War (second quarter); Campaign for Equality: Suffragists & Harlem Renaissance (third quarter); and Struggles for Social Justice: Civil rights Era of 1950s-70s (fourth quarter). Each quarter’s study will be “anchored” by a novel important to the era and will also explore a variety of nonfiction and fiction that influenced revolutionary thinking, culture and action of the times:  essays, letters, speeches, historical documents, court decisions, short stories, campaign material, advertising, songs, poetry, scripts.  A natural outgrowth of this sampling of literature across eras will be an understanding of the development of form/genre through the development of media:  newspapers, magazines, mass-market novels, radio, film and television. During the third quarter, students will examine the concept of social justice and equality through the study of early twentieth century American literature. Using nonfiction genre such as letters, essays, speeches, articles, personal narratives and poetry, students will hear a variety of voices from diverse American perspectives, with an emphasis on voices struggling to be heard: women, African-Americans, middle & lower classes. Civil discourse and disobedience moved from the physical battlefield to a printed one, as Americans increasingly used literature—fiction and nonfiction—to champion civil rights. Students will analyze the speeches and writings of American suffragists such as: Sojourner Truth, Susan B. Anthony, Alice Stone Blackwell, Carrie Chapman Catt, Julia Ward Howe, Alice Paul, Elizabeth Cady Stanton—as well as the works of Harlem Renaissance writers such as: W.E. B. DuBois, Zora Neal Hurston, Nella Larsen, Wallace Thurman.   American literature of this period carries forward both the Civil War’s civil rights advocacy and the development of poetry—the perfect vehicle for activists to channel (and activate) emotions and advocacy for change. Students will explore the poetry of writers such as: Gwendolyn B. Bennett, Countee Cullen, Langston Hughes, Alice Duer Miller, Dorothy Parker, Anne Spencer. As a class we will read The Great Gatsby, as our “Great American Novel”.  While not a suffragist or Harlem Renaissance novel, it provides a backdrop of privilege and class of this period in American history that justifies voices for equality.  We will also look at sections of Zora Neal Hurston’s novel Their Eyes Were Watching God to provide an alternative view of American society of the period. Emphasis in this class will be on critiquing literature, forming a thesis statement, writing literary commentary, and citing examples to defend the opinion. Literary criticism is one of the forms of higher-level writing needed for a student to transition from a casual writer to an academic and ultimately college-level writer. Students will keep a reading journal and are expected to annotate and highlight passages in their personal copy of the novel as part of a college preparation experience.  They will have additional written assignments, some of which will be published as essays or presentations. Publishing is used to teach writing/revision and to share our learning with a wider audience beyond our class. Publishing allows students to develop polished writing and presentations that become part of their high school portfolio. In the process of creating portfolio pieces, students strengthen communication and organizational skills (writing, discussion, emailing, meeting deadlines, presenting) that have direct real world application. The student should expect to spend 2-3 hours of homework per week on reading, investigation, and writing for this class. The class will meet twice a week with Wednesdays introducing the concepts and vocabulary of the literature and authors, and Friday serving as a writing lab to explore the mechanics of writing criticism. Much of the literature we will be studying is accessible via public domain, but students will be encouraged to purchase the Scribner 2004 edition of The Great Gatsby so that everyone is “on the same page” for discussion.

10:00 am-10:55 am

11th-12th