Schedule and Room Assignments

Classes meet on Wednesdays in Oakton, VA, with some classes also meeting on Fridays. Filter by subject or grade below.

Quarter beginning April 4, 2018

Art / Music Science / Technology History / Humanities Language Arts
Extracurricular Math Foreign Language (Full Classes)
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Wednesday Classes (Click here for Friday Classes)

9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00
Room 5

The Great American Novel: Revolution/ Struggle for Social J... The Great American Novel: Revolution/ Struggle for Social Justice: Civil Rights Era of the 1950s-70s - Through the theme of revolution , this year-long course examines American Literature at four pivotal, turbulent times in our nation s history. Each quarter s study will be anchored by a novel important to the era and will also explore a variety of nonfiction and fiction that influenced revolutionary thinking, culture and action of the times: essays, letters, speeches, historical documents, court decisions, short stories, campaign material, advertising, songs, poetry, scripts. A natural outgrowth of this sampling of literature across eras will be an understanding of the development of form/genre through the development of media: newspapers, magazines, mass-market novels, radio, film and television. During the fourth quarter, students will examine the concept of social justice and equality through the study of mid-twentieth century American literature. Using nonfiction genre such as letters, essays, speeches, articles, personal narratives, and poetry and new media such as magazines, film, television, advertising, and music--students will explore conflicts between genders, races and generations. The decades following World War II echoed some of the social turmoil of early twentieth century America. Women and African Americans continued to campaign for their equality. Counter-culture movements coalesced young Americans against the establishment , and The Beat Generation was born. Students will analyze the speeches and writings of American Civil Rights activists such as: John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, Jr, Nelson Mandela, Barbara Jordan, Malcolm X, James Baldwin, Muhammad Ali, Betty Friedan, Gloria Steinem, Shirley Chisholm. American literature of this period carries forward both the Civil War s and The Harlem Renaissance s civil rights advocacy and the development of poetry the perfect vehicle for activists to channel emotions and advocate for change. Students will explore the poetry of writers such as: Maya Angelou, Alice Walker, Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac as well as the lyrics and music of songwriters such as: Curtis Mayfield, John Lennon and Paul McCartney, Bob Dylan, Simon and Garfunkel, Nina Simone, Carole King, Joni Mitchell. As a class we will read To Kill a Mockingbird, as our Great American Novel . Students may also opt to read Go Set a Watchman for further insight into Harper Lee s editing and publishing. We ll cover the writing relationship between Lee and Truman Capote and touch on some of Capote s fiction as well. No study of these decades would be complete without examining the influence of other forms of pop culture media, so we will also skim the surface of contemporary artists who connected to writers and influenced literature, such as painters Andy Warhol, Peter Max, Roy Lichtenstein and film directors Billy Wilder, Blake Edwards, and Mike Nichols. We ll also look at how television reflected and impacted social change in America. Emphasis in this class will be on critiquing literature, forming a thesis statement, writing literary commentary, and citing examples to defend the opinion. Literary criticism is one of the forms of higher-level writing needed for a student to transition from a casual writer to an academic and ultimately college-level writer. Students will keep a reading journal and are expected to annotate and highlight passages in their personal copy of the novel as part of a college preparation experience. They will have additional written assignments, some of which will be published as essays or presentations. Publishing is used to teach writing/revision and to share our learning with a wider audience beyond our class. Publishing allows students to develop polished writing and presentations that become part of their high school portfolio. In the process of creating portfolio pieces, students strengthen communication and organizational skills (writing, discussion, emailing, meeting deadlines, presenting) that have direct real world application. The student should expect to spend 2-3 hours of homework per week on reading, investigation, and writing for this class. The class will meet twice a week with Wednesdays introducing the concepts and vocabulary of the literature and authors, and Friday serving as a writing lab to explore the mechanics of writing criticism. Much of the literature we will be studying is accessible via public domain, but students will be encouraged to purchase the Harper Perennial Modern Classics (2002) edition of To Kill a Mockingbird so that everyone is on the same page for discussion.

10:00 am-10:55 am

11th-12th

Learn to Write Literary Criticism: Critiquing the Arts Learn to Write Literary Criticism: Critiquing the Arts - In this course, students will apply the elements of criticism to the visual and performing arts. While no prerequisite is required, this is the final of a quartet of criticism courses that began with a multi-sensory medium (film), moved through imagery created by writing on a page (short stories & poetry), and now concludes with commentary on painting, sculpture, photography, music, etc. Students will become comfortable with academic vocabulary particular to a medium and will use it accurately in both class discussion and written response to images and sound. They will become art and music critics! Criticism follows an analytical structure that parallels the way scientists and mathematicians approach problem-solving. A critic researches a selected area of study, develops a thesis or theory, then supports it with evidence in this case, references to the art form (techniques, color choices, perspective, sound structure, rhythm, instrumentation used). There will be a presentation or report that shares findings and defends a thesis. Publishing is used to teach writing/revision and to share our learning with a wider audience beyond our class. Publishing allows students to develop polished writing and presentations that become part of their high school portfolio. In the process of creating portfolio pieces, students strengthen communication and organizational skills (writing, discussion, emailing, meeting deadlines, presenting) that have direct real world application. The class meets twice a week for 8 weeks with Wednesdays introducing the concepts and vocabulary of various art forms and artists, and Friday writing labs exploring the mechanics of writing criticism.

11:00 am-11:55 am

9th-10th

Atrium B

Smart Start: Thinking Fun for Young Learners Smart Start: Thinking Fun for Young Learners - Stretch your child's brain with this metacognitive class! In Smart Start, children will sharpen their critical and creative thinking skills to become more independent and effective learners. Using in-class readings of high quality literature, children will be introduced to a broad range of thinking strategies such as de Bono's Thinking Hats, SCAMPER, and FFOE (Fluency, Flexibility, Originality, and Elaboration). Through facilitated discussion and community inquiry, children will learn to ask their own questions and raise issues for discussion, explore and develop their own ideas and theories, and give creative reasons. Each week, students will complete engaging activities that require them to apply what they have learned. For example, the class might consider, What happens when Max returns to Where the Wild Things Are the next day? Next year? How about 10 years from now? (Green Hat Thinking). They may expand to discuss what would happen if another character from literature, like Curious George or Cinderella, visited Where the Wild Things Are? (SCAMPER approach "C" for combining two things that do not normally go together). Young learners will have fun on this engaging, creative class which will boost their ability to use higher order thinking skills, predict outcomes, and solve problems! New stories and activities are introduced each week and not repeated from previous sessions. Students must be able to think independently, work collaboratively, and enjoy a good challenge. Emerging readers and writers can be accommodated.

11:00 am-11:55 am

K-2nd



 

Friday Classes (Click here to jump back up to Wednesday classes)

9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00
Room 2

DebateAble: Public Policy Debate DebateAble: Public Policy Debate - Desmond Tutu once stated, Don t raise your voice, improve your argument. , while Margaret Heffernan, international businesswoman and author stated, For good ideas and true innovation, you need human interaction, conflict, argument, debate! Do you have what it takes to strategically win an argument? Effective debate is a life skill that incorporates logic, communication, and public speaking skills. Being able to debate helps teens improve reasoning, conflict resolution, and confidence. In this class, students will learn the fundamentals of debate including the persuasive appeals, a brief history of debate, and the public policy style of debate. We live in a world where our students will be challenged to think for themselves, defend opinions, and question conventions in society. Public Policy Debate will offer students the opportunity to become challenged, invigorated, and debate on current topics affecting the United States and their communities. This is a fun and interactive class! Great for all levels of interested debaters and will aide students at every level of their educational journey! Learn how to have an opinion that is challenged and respond with evidence and enthusiasm! Debaters will learn how to structure an argument, build their evidence, and best practices for researching a topic. Students will learn techniques for quoting sources, presenting statistics, acknowledging opposing views, and incorporating visual aids in debate. The class will also practice stylistic elements of public speaking such as using transitional words, timing, gestures, and eye contact. In this class, students will learn how to really listen to their opponent and how to craft a rebuttal. At the same time, debaters will be taught to read their audience, hold their attention, and establish credibility. In each class, students will practice giving brief impromptu speeches, delivering prepared presentations, and debating classmates. Students will practice evaluating classmates and giving, receiving, and incorporating constructive feedback.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

7th-12th

Room 4

Formula for Fiction: Revisioning a Classic Formula for Fiction: Revisioning a Classic - Great fiction doesn't always begin "from scratch!" Sometimes writers use a formula, or template storyline. Sometimes we are content to read a favorite story in its original form the classics are, after all classic. But sometimes we enjoy a modern perspective, an updated version, or a fresh telling of a familiar tale. Shakespeare based many of his plays on mythology, while more contemporary writers and filmmakers base their works on Shakespeare and other classic literature. Consequently, we have West Side Story, Animal Farm, Wicked, Ever After. In this class, students will borrow from the best that past literature has to offer and write a retelling, a reboot, or a parody of a favorite classic. While remaining faithful to the original concept (plot structure, events and characters) students will change perspective or setting place and/or time period to recreate a recognizable, yet revisioned fictional story. To do this requires knowledge and understanding of and commitment to (and respect for) an author s intent and work. Student writers will demonstrate this comprehension by: 1) maintaining prescribed character traits and motivation while factoring in additional characters who might enrich and modernize the story, 2) sticking to recognizable events and situations even though they might be happening in a different time and/or place, and 3) incorporating enough names, references and scenarios so that a reader harkens back to the original work. A portion of each class will be dedicated to sharing students' working drafts through collaboration and in-class feedback. Students will be expected to conduct some writing and reading at home each week. Literature selections will not be assigned in their entirety, but students may want to continue reading the complete work. The culmination of the students' work will be a bound class literary magazine.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

6th-8th

Compass Literarians Writing Board Compass Literarians Writing Board - This semester-long course is a home for literarians students who love to write, who love to read writing, and who love to share writing with others. Writing is a solitary act, but writers also need a community in which to grow. Mirroring the design of famous writing salons/groups like The Bloomsbury Group, The Algonquin Round Table, and The Inklings, students will create a Compass community that will encourage individual writers, promote literary collaboration and provide challenging feedback to boost creativity and artistic development.
Students will use their own work and the works of professional authors to understand what makes good writing , to improve technique, to experiment with new forms/genre and to understand the drafting, editing and publishing process.
The members of this class will form an editorial board of a student anthology, journal, or magazine that will provide a publishing opportunity for themselves and for other homeschooled student writers. As editors, students will design and build an anthology and/or website, advertise the publication, solicit manuscripts and artwork, develop selection criteria, review/select/edit material, and learn the principles of layout and design. Embedded in this process are real-world experiences, and students will improve their communication and organization skills through goal-setting, time management, meeting deadlines, emailing, confirmations, proofreading, etc.
A portion of each class will be devoted to writing time, but students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week writing at home. Each student is expected to publish in the anthology. Some students might also publish submit works to other journals or contests. In addition to this published piece, each student will also develop a personal portfolio of writing that includes a variety of forms and genre and that provides samples from all phases of the writing process: brainstorming, drafting, revision, editing.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

8th-12th

Room 5

The Great American Novel: Revolution/ Struggle for Social J... The Great American Novel: Revolution/ Struggle for Social Justice: Civil Rights Era of the 1950s-70s - Through the theme of revolution , this year-long course examines American Literature at four pivotal, turbulent times in our nation s history. Each quarter s study will be anchored by a novel important to the era and will also explore a variety of nonfiction and fiction that influenced revolutionary thinking, culture and action of the times: essays, letters, speeches, historical documents, court decisions, short stories, campaign material, advertising, songs, poetry, scripts. A natural outgrowth of this sampling of literature across eras will be an understanding of the development of form/genre through the development of media: newspapers, magazines, mass-market novels, radio, film and television. During the fourth quarter, students will examine the concept of social justice and equality through the study of mid-twentieth century American literature. Using nonfiction genre such as letters, essays, speeches, articles, personal narratives, and poetry and new media such as magazines, film, television, advertising, and music--students will explore conflicts between genders, races and generations. The decades following World War II echoed some of the social turmoil of early twentieth century America. Women and African Americans continued to campaign for their equality. Counter-culture movements coalesced young Americans against the establishment , and The Beat Generation was born. Students will analyze the speeches and writings of American Civil Rights activists such as: John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, Jr, Nelson Mandela, Barbara Jordan, Malcolm X, James Baldwin, Muhammad Ali, Betty Friedan, Gloria Steinem, Shirley Chisholm. American literature of this period carries forward both the Civil War s and The Harlem Renaissance s civil rights advocacy and the development of poetry the perfect vehicle for activists to channel emotions and advocate for change. Students will explore the poetry of writers such as: Maya Angelou, Alice Walker, Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac as well as the lyrics and music of songwriters such as: Curtis Mayfield, John Lennon and Paul McCartney, Bob Dylan, Simon and Garfunkel, Nina Simone, Carole King, Joni Mitchell. As a class we will read To Kill a Mockingbird, as our Great American Novel . Students may also opt to read Go Set a Watchman for further insight into Harper Lee s editing and publishing. We ll cover the writing relationship between Lee and Truman Capote and touch on some of Capote s fiction as well. No study of these decades would be complete without examining the influence of other forms of pop culture media, so we will also skim the surface of contemporary artists who connected to writers and influenced literature, such as painters Andy Warhol, Peter Max, Roy Lichtenstein and film directors Billy Wilder, Blake Edwards, and Mike Nichols. We ll also look at how television reflected and impacted social change in America. Emphasis in this class will be on critiquing literature, forming a thesis statement, writing literary commentary, and citing examples to defend the opinion. Literary criticism is one of the forms of higher-level writing needed for a student to transition from a casual writer to an academic and ultimately college-level writer. Students will keep a reading journal and are expected to annotate and highlight passages in their personal copy of the novel as part of a college preparation experience. They will have additional written assignments, some of which will be published as essays or presentations. Publishing is used to teach writing/revision and to share our learning with a wider audience beyond our class. Publishing allows students to develop polished writing and presentations that become part of their high school portfolio. In the process of creating portfolio pieces, students strengthen communication and organizational skills (writing, discussion, emailing, meeting deadlines, presenting) that have direct real world application. The student should expect to spend 2-3 hours of homework per week on reading, investigation, and writing for this class. The class will meet twice a week with Wednesdays introducing the concepts and vocabulary of the literature and authors, and Friday serving as a writing lab to explore the mechanics of writing criticism. Much of the literature we will be studying is accessible via public domain, but students will be encouraged to purchase the Harper Perennial Modern Classics (2002) edition of To Kill a Mockingbird so that everyone is on the same page for discussion.

10:00 am-10:55 am

11th-12th

Learn to Write Literary Criticism: Critiquing the Arts Learn to Write Literary Criticism: Critiquing the Arts - In this course, students will apply the elements of criticism to the visual and performing arts. While no prerequisite is required, this is the final of a quartet of criticism courses that began with a multi-sensory medium (film), moved through imagery created by writing on a page (short stories & poetry), and now concludes with commentary on painting, sculpture, photography, music, etc. Students will become comfortable with academic vocabulary particular to a medium and will use it accurately in both class discussion and written response to images and sound. They will become art and music critics! Criticism follows an analytical structure that parallels the way scientists and mathematicians approach problem-solving. A critic researches a selected area of study, develops a thesis or theory, then supports it with evidence in this case, references to the art form (techniques, color choices, perspective, sound structure, rhythm, instrumentation used). There will be a presentation or report that shares findings and defends a thesis. Publishing is used to teach writing/revision and to share our learning with a wider audience beyond our class. Publishing allows students to develop polished writing and presentations that become part of their high school portfolio. In the process of creating portfolio pieces, students strengthen communication and organizational skills (writing, discussion, emailing, meeting deadlines, presenting) that have direct real world application. The class meets twice a week for 8 weeks with Wednesdays introducing the concepts and vocabulary of various art forms and artists, and Friday writing labs exploring the mechanics of writing criticism.

11:00 am-11:55 am

9th-10th