Schedule and Room Assignments

Classes meet on Wednesdays in Oakton, VA, with some classes also meeting on Fridays.  Filter by subject or grade below.

Quarter beginning January 10, 2018

Art / Music Science / Technology History / Humanities Language Arts
Extracurricular Math Foreign Language (Full Classes)
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Wednesday Classes (Click here for Friday Classes)

9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00
Outdoors

Nature Quest: Adventurers Nature Quest: Adventurers - Hooray for winter! It's a great time of year for active outdoor games and exploration, to make fires and enjoy the cozy warmth of our earth shelter. Bundle up and look for signs of how animals live in the winter- wth a little luck we will have snow to track in. Many students consider this their favorite session of the year! Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has led for several years. Students will follow the paths or create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing winter season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world! Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Sorry, but the explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

11:00 am-11:55 am

1st-3rd

Nature Quest: Explorers Nature Quest: Explorers - Hooray for winter! It's a great time of year for active outdoor games and exploration, to make fires and enjoy the cozy warmth of our earth shelter. Bundle up and look for signs of how animals live in the winter- wth a little luck we will have snow to track in. Many students consider this their favorite session of the year! Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has led for several years. Students will follow the paths or create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing winter season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world! Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Sorry, but the explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

PK-K

Nature Quest: Pathfinders Nature Quest: Pathfinders - Hooray for winter! It's a great time of year for active outdoor games and exploration, to make fires and enjoy the cozy warmth of our earth shelter. Bundle up and look for signs of how animals live in the winter- wth a little luck we will have snow to track in. Many students consider this their favorite session of the year! Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has led for several years. Students will follow the paths or create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing winter season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world! Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Sorry, but the explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

3rd-5th

Nature Quest: Adventurers Nature Quest: Adventurers - Hooray for winter! It's a great time of year for active outdoor games and exploration, to make fires and enjoy the cozy warmth of our earth shelter. Bundle up and look for signs of how animals live in the winter- wth a little luck we will have snow to track in. Many students consider this their favorite session of the year! Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has led for several years. Students will follow the paths or create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing winter season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world! Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Sorry, but the explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

1st-3rd

Other

Acting: Kids Theater: James & the Giant Peach Acting: Kids Theater: James & the Giant Peach - Students will not want to miss the chance to perform this set of scenes from Roald Dahl's hilarious book, James and the Giant Peach. Learning that a little magic can take you a long way," strange things start to happen to James in his new town. Grown from magic crystals, a peach the size of the house leads him to meeting oversized friends-Grasshopper, Centipede, Ladybug, and more. When the giant peach braks away, James' world is turned upside down and inside out! Students will have fun leaving their real identities and using their imaginations to become these crazy characters. Students will develop the tools needed to be a performer - body, voice, and imagination by playing their part in this twisted adventure. They will further their craft by working on characters, setting, and plot, as they develop a student production in which everyone has a role. Students will receive positive, constructive feedback which helps them develop acting skills, some of which are: facing the audience, projecting their voice, and dramatizing their character through their voice, body language, and movements. Students will benefit from experimenting with public speaking in this safe, supportive environment, and enjoy the satisfaction of working as a team. This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, can follow directions, can collaborate with others, do their best to memorize lines, and enjoy working in a group. The final class will showcase their process and performance of all they have learned. This course fee includes a $6.00 charge for the paperback edition of the script.

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

3rd-5th

MP Room
Room 1

Experimental Methods & Design: Microscopic Life Experimental Methods & Design: Microscopic Life - In this class, middle school students will learn to work as independent investigators using the scientific method. Students will observe the systems under investigation, choose a pattern or trend that interests them, and then develop a testable hypothesis. Students will learn how to: design a scientific experiment, choose appropriate controls, minimize investigator bias, correctly perform measurements and record and analyze data. The third quarter will focus on investigations of small and/or microscopic organisms such as Planaria, Euglena, brine shrimp and tardigrades (water bears). Students will spend time using microscopes, making slides, and learning to keep science journals/notebooks.  Our overall themes will be understanding processes that are important for organisms’ survival at the microscopic scale, and comparing these lifestyles and adaptations to those from macro-scale ecological communities with which students are more familiar. Students will learn how to locate peer-reviewed scientific literature to research their subject. By the end of the quarter, students will have completed their independent investigations, summarized their results, and will present their data to the class and families. There is a $10.00 lab fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Each quarter will focus on a different aspect of science with Botany (4th quarter).

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

7th-8th

Marine Biology: Biomes Marine Biology: Biomes - Earth is an ocean planet! Life began in the oceans, and they are the linchpin of the biological, chemical, and physical processes that allow our planet to support life. This class will give students a basic understanding of the chemistry, physics and biology of earth's oceans. We'll also learn how oceans are informing our search for life on other planets. The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in at least three demonstrations or experiments during each class. During our third quarter of marine biology, we will take the information we’ve learned about large-scale processes and oceanography and apply it to more detailed studies of specific marine biomes.  We’ll take a virtual tour of the world’s oceans as we focus on the diversity of marine habitats, including: open ocean, kelp forest, polar, coral reef, temperate intertidal, mangrove swamps, island, and estuarine habitats.  The geographic distribution, food webs, important primary producers and consumers, representative species, and notable species interactions for each biome will be discussed and compared to other marine and terrestrial biomes. Over the course of the quarter, students will assemble a “ship’s log” of our virtual expedition which will include a map of the ocean biomes of the earth, with detailed sections on each biome we investigate.  There is a $10.00 lab fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

5th-6th

Who Wants to Be a Scientist? Chemistry & the Medical Sciences Who Wants to Be a Scientist? Chemistry & the Medical Sciences - There are so many ways to do science! This class allows our youngest scientists to explore different careers in the sciences and shows them that science is fun, approachable, and that anyone can do it! Students will use real scientific equipment and learn actual science terminology to investigate questions in different fields. Try out SCUBA gear as a marine biologist, learn the basics for studying DNA, perform experiments in chemistry, and try your hand at operating an ROV (remote operated vehicle). The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in at least three demonstrations or experiments during each class. During our third quarter of science investigations, we’ll learn the basics of chemistry by doing our own acid-base reactions – including the ever-popular “volcano” eruption.  Students will learn about pH, make their own acid-base indicator solution, make thermochromic (color-changing) putty and learn the physics behind its color-change.  We’ll intersperse our chemistry experiments with studies of medical science.   We’ll learn the basics of how human bodies work and how to keep ourselves healthy.  We’ll discuss our circulatory, respiratory and immune systems and learn how germs make us sick.  Students will take samples from our classroom and other locations and culture them to see what bacteria we’re able to grow.  After that (sometimes alarming) experiment, we’ll learn proper hand-washing techniques and test our effectiveness with the same UV glow lotion hospitals use in their infection control programs. Look out germs! There is a $10.00 lab fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Future themes in this class series include: Physics, Astronomy, & Engineering (4th quarter).

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

1st-2nd

Who Wants to Be a Scientist? Chemistry and the Medical Sciences Who Wants to Be a Scientist? Chemistry and the Medical Sciences - There are so many ways to do science! This class allows our youngest scientists to explore different careers in the sciences and shows them that science is fun, approachable, and that anyone can do it! Students will use real scientific equipment and learn actual science terminology to investigate questions in different fields. Try out SCUBA gear as a marine biologist, learn the basics for studying DNA, perform experiments in chemistry, and try your hand at operating an ROV (remote operated vehicle). The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in at least three demonstrations or experiments during each class. During our third quarter of science investigations, we’ll learn the basics of chemistry by doing our own acid-base reactions – including the ever-popular “volcano” eruption.  Students will learn about pH, make their own acid-base indicator solution, make thermochromic (color-changing) putty and learn the physics behind its color-change.  We’ll intersperse our chemistry experiments with studies of medical science.   We’ll learn the basics of how human bodies work and how to keep ourselves healthy.  We’ll discuss our circulatory, respiratory and immune systems and learn how germs make us sick.  Students will take samples from our classroom and other locations and culture them to see what bacteria we’re able to grow.  After that (sometimes alarming) experiment, we’ll learn proper hand-washing techniques and test our effectiveness with the same UV glow lotion hospitals use in their infection control programs. Look out germs! There is a $10.00 lab fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Future themes in this class series include: Physics, Astronomy, & Engineering (4th quarter).

3:00 pm-3:55 pm

1st-2nd

Room 2

Money Matters: Entrepreneurship Money Matters: Entrepreneurship - Explore the real life "money matters" of entrepreneurship through fun, interactive activities! Middle schoolers will investigate aspects of what it takes to be an entrepreneur and how to take a great idea and turn it into a marketable new product. The class will explore facets of entrepreneurship and innovation such as pitching a new concept and attracting mock investors. Find out how you protect your new product or idea from copycats! Discover the difference among a patent, a trademark, a copyright, and how to get them. Students will work individually or with partners to conceptualize an all new product or an improvement to an existing one. Students will brainstorm how to get the word out about their innovation and will consider well known marketing techniques and ad campaigns. They will design a logo, slogan, and mock-up a marketing campaign of their own. The class will touch on the concepts of supply and demand, and students will define and research the potential market or end users. Student entrepreneurs will research prices of similar products, consider fixed and variable costs and mark-ups, and set a price point for their product. The class will culminate in a Shark Tank style presentation where student entrepreneurs will pitch their ideas to a parent audience. Students should expect to spend 1 hour each week investigating costs on the internet or other resources. On several weeks, students will be asked to bring a laptop or tablet device to look up information in class.

11:00 am-11:55 am

7th-8th

Magnificent Magic Lab Magnificent Magic Lab - Curious coins, baffling balls, confounding cards, and puzzling papers! Students will learn tricks of the trade from a professional magician! Each week, kids will receive a magic prop and learn how to perform a unique magic trick. Students will practice and perfect the illusion in class so they can come home and mystify their friends and family. Along with the actual magic, students will discuss a life skill each week that is essential to a good magician (and student) such as public speaking, presentation skills, practicing, being prepared, and reading your audience. Students will unlock the secrets to eight special magic tricks: Power Ring (a solid ring magically links onto a chain.); Hyrum the Haunted Hanky (an 18 inch handkerchief is folded an placed on a table and suddenly begins to move and dance!); Nickels to Dimes (a stack of nickels magically transforms into a stack of dimes.); Classic Chop Cup (a small ball disappears and reappears under an empty cup.); Card Fusion (a classic card trick that will confuse and confound your friends.); and Sponge Bunnies (sponge rabbits magically jump from hand to hand culminating with a surprise ending!) Note: These are all new tricks and lessons from those taught during fall 2017. Rather than coming from the Discover Magic curriculum, the tricks are coming directly from real-life performer and magician, the amazing Joe Romano. Prior magic classes are not a prerequisite, and new magicians may enroll. There is a $45.00 supply fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. This is a 7-week class that will not meet on February 21.

3:00 pm-3:55 pm

3rd-5th

Room 3

Junior Art Studio: French Artists Junior Art Studio: French Artists - This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week students will learn a few fun facts about a type of cultural art, view sample works of art, and then will create a project in the style of the cultural object using a wide variety of materials and representative colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors. In this session, we will study French Artists from the genres of Impressionism through Post Impressionism to include Rodin, Cezanne, Seurat, Degas, Renior, Monet, Matisse and Gauguin. These artists were sculptors, painters, draftsmen, and print makers. Each artist influenced the art world with style, color study and interpretation in their own personal way. Junior artist's projects will vary, from painting, to doing draft drawings, to sculpting, and color study. We will discuss which artist featured dancers in his subjects, who experimented in color, an learn which was multi talented artist using many mediums. There is a material/supply fee of $20.00 due payable to the instructor on the first day for special paper, tempra paints, and sculpting clay. Future themes in this series include History of Photography (4th quarter).

11:00 am-11:55 am

K-2nd

Dynamic Dioramas: Native Americans- Pueblo People of the Southwest Dynamic Dioramas: Native Americans- Pueblo People of the Southwest - American history began long before the arrival of Europeans! Discover native American Indian cultures from coast to coast with focus on the Puebloans this quarter. Pueblo comes from the Spanish word for town, which aptly describes the adobe and clay structures that made up a pueblo village. This quarter will teach students about Pueblo Indian architecture and agriculture. Each student will construct a Pueblo town diorama and receive set of miniatures to take home with them. Students will craft and hand-shape their scene on a 10 inch X 12 inch foam board using artistic, model-making techniques. They will customize their dioramas with landscape elements, waterways, structures of the time, and paint. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 miniature figures and combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to create a larger terrain. Using their diorama board and figures, students will learn to play a survival strategy game, competing with each other to gather resources and grow their town. Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $15.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Future topics in this series include the tribes of the Southeast (4th quarter).

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

2nd-4th

Modeling the Great Conquests: William the Conqueror 1066 Modeling the Great Conquests: William the Conqueror 1066 - In the year 1066, the last successful invasion of the British Isles would begin. The Saxons, who were themselves invaders centuries before, would be supplanted by ancestors of the Vikings, the Normans. These Vikings had settled in France 100 years earlier on land gifted to them by the Frankish King, in order to end their Viking ways and the threat they posed to Paris. For most of that 100 years, these Normans fought among themselves, until Duke William the Bastard unified them and with the Pope s permission, took the combined Norman force across the channel to carve out a brand new kingdom. Beset by enemies on all sides, the exhausted Saxon English stood little chance against the thundering Norman Knights, and in 1066 at the battle of Hastings, Norman conquest was finalized when Poor King Harry of the Saxons took and arrow to the eye and died. In the following decades William, no longer a Duke and a Bastard but now a King and a Conqueror. This class will focus on the society of feudal England, the medieval knight, as well as William's battles of the conquest. Students will craft diorama from the battle of Hastings, Fulford, or Stamford Bridge. Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will create a 12 X 18 diorama board, and populate it with dozens of 1:72 scale Carolingian knights for historical re-enactments. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate a larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how battles progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. Next quarter s conqueror will be Saladin, and the Crusades (4th quarter) Students in this class would benefit from taking the Siege Physics, Catapult class since it examines another aspect of warfare at the same time. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

5th-8th

Room 4

Macro Biology Lab Intensive Macro Biology Lab Intensive - Students will be introduced to the fascinating world of macro-biology through intensive laboratory work! Macrobiology is the study of larger organisms in the living world, and this lab intensive explores animals, animal systems, and human anatomy and physiology, from beaks to brains to bones! This full-year laboratory course makes biology come alive through hands-on activities, guided inquiry, and student projects. Each lab will feature a short discussion followed by active investigations, providing students with practical experience in laboratory techniques, data collection, scientific observations, and lab safety. In addition, students will develop their communication skills throughout the course by writing scientific papers, presenting individual projects, and delivering short oral presentations.
This lab intensive course covers topics not addressed in the general biology lab intensive taught in 2016-17, and the prior course is not a prerequisite. Students will begin with overview the animal kingdom through exploration of taxonomy (classification) and identification of characteristics among various phyla and classes. Taxonomy labs include microscope work and dissections of starfish and squid. Students will then explore evolution with in-class activities involving adaptation, competition for resources, and homologous body parts. The class will further address evolution through an overview of hominoid fossils and discussion of recent findings, and current theories in human evolution. With a background in the diversity found in the animal kingdom, students will transition into the examination of extraordinary range of animal systems (digestion, respiration, nervous) and behavior. Example labs in this unit include additional microscope work, dissection/observation of various gill vs lung tissues, nerve impulses in a frog's leg, and termite colonies!
During the second half of this lab intensive, students will focus on a detailed examination of human anatomy and physiology. Students will engage in a methodical overview of the primary body systems (digestive, excretory, nervous, skeletal, muscular, circulatory, integumentary, respiratory, endocrine, reproductive, and immune.) Example labs in anatomy and physiology include further microscope work, dissections of chicken wing and pig's heart, blood typing, and activities on the senses and spread of disease.
Duration: Year-long (30 weeks)/ Register for full year.
Effort: Students should expect to spend 2-3 outside of lab class each week on assigned reading, prelab questions, short assignments, and quarterly projects.
Grading: The instructor will provide qualitative feedback on the student's class participation, preparation, and understanding of the material for the parent to assign a grade in the context of the student's overall study of this and related topics.
Credit: This is a component course that will provide 45 hours of laboratory and lecture work. Coupled with independent study of the textbook including assigned readings, review questions, and projects, this may be counted by the homeschool parent as a full high school credit in a laboratory science (biology). Without the individual work, homeschool families should only consider this a component class for a partial science credit.
Materials/Supplies: The course progression, including assigned reading and questions, is meant to follow units 7 and 8 of the Miller & Levine Biology textbook. It is recommended that students rent or purchase the 2010 Student Edition (red macaw cover, ISBN # 978-0133669510). Alternatively, the homeschool family can select a different textbook to follow lab work, but they will need coordinate and make their own corresponding assignments based on the course syllabus. Students are expected to bring a lab notebook (graph ruled composition notebook is recommended) to every class. There is a year-long material and lab fee of $80.00 due to the instructor on the first day of class.

9:30 am-10:55 am

9th - 12th

Room 5

The Great American Novel: Revolution- Suffragists & Harlem Renaissance The Great American Novel: Revolution- Suffragists & Harlem Renaissance - Through the theme of “revolution”, this year-long course examines American Literature at four pivotal, turbulent times in our nation’s history: Fights for Religious Freedom and Political Independence: America’s Settlement & Revolutionary War (first quarter); Battles over Human Rights:  The Civil War (second quarter); Campaign for Equality: Suffragists & Harlem Renaissance (third quarter); and Struggles for Social Justice: Civil rights Era of 1950s-70s (fourth quarter). Each quarter’s study will be “anchored” by a novel important to the era and will also explore a variety of nonfiction and fiction that influenced revolutionary thinking, culture and action of the times:  essays, letters, speeches, historical documents, court decisions, short stories, campaign material, advertising, songs, poetry, scripts.  A natural outgrowth of this sampling of literature across eras will be an understanding of the development of form/genre through the development of media:  newspapers, magazines, mass-market novels, radio, film and television. During the third quarter, students will examine the concept of social justice and equality through the study of early twentieth century American literature. Using nonfiction genre such as letters, essays, speeches, articles, personal narratives and poetry, students will hear a variety of voices from diverse American perspectives, with an emphasis on voices struggling to be heard: women, African-Americans, middle & lower classes. Civil discourse and disobedience moved from the physical battlefield to a printed one, as Americans increasingly used literature—fiction and nonfiction—to champion civil rights. Students will analyze the speeches and writings of American suffragists such as: Sojourner Truth, Susan B. Anthony, Alice Stone Blackwell, Carrie Chapman Catt, Julia Ward Howe, Alice Paul, Elizabeth Cady Stanton—as well as the works of Harlem Renaissance writers such as: W.E. B. DuBois, Zora Neal Hurston, Nella Larsen, Wallace Thurman.   American literature of this period carries forward both the Civil War’s civil rights advocacy and the development of poetry—the perfect vehicle for activists to channel (and activate) emotions and advocacy for change. Students will explore the poetry of writers such as: Gwendolyn B. Bennett, Countee Cullen, Langston Hughes, Alice Duer Miller, Dorothy Parker, Anne Spencer. As a class we will read The Great Gatsby, as our “Great American Novel”.  While not a suffragist or Harlem Renaissance novel, it provides a backdrop of privilege and class of this period in American history that justifies voices for equality.  We will also look at sections of Zora Neal Hurston’s novel Their Eyes Were Watching God to provide an alternative view of American society of the period. Emphasis in this class will be on critiquing literature, forming a thesis statement, writing literary commentary, and citing examples to defend the opinion. Literary criticism is one of the forms of higher-level writing needed for a student to transition from a casual writer to an academic and ultimately college-level writer. Students will keep a reading journal and are expected to annotate and highlight passages in their personal copy of the novel as part of a college preparation experience.  They will have additional written assignments, some of which will be published as essays or presentations. Publishing is used to teach writing/revision and to share our learning with a wider audience beyond our class. Publishing allows students to develop polished writing and presentations that become part of their high school portfolio. In the process of creating portfolio pieces, students strengthen communication and organizational skills (writing, discussion, emailing, meeting deadlines, presenting) that have direct real world application. The student should expect to spend 2-3 hours of homework per week on reading, investigation, and writing for this class. The class will meet twice a week with Wednesdays introducing the concepts and vocabulary of the literature and authors, and Friday serving as a writing lab to explore the mechanics of writing criticism. Much of the literature we will be studying is accessible via public domain, but students will be encouraged to purchase the Scribner 2004 edition of The Great Gatsby so that everyone is “on the same page” for discussion.

10:00 am-10:55 am

11th-12th

Algebra II and Trigonometry Algebra II and Trigonometry - This is a full high school level Algebra II class. In it, we will reinforce the problem solving skills and mathematical knowledge developed in Algebra I. The core topic areas include: linear systems and matrices, polynomial functions, rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, conic sections, and trigonometry.
We will delve more deeply into linear systems, generalizing from two equations/two unknowns to linear systems of arbitrary dimension. We will learn to represent and solve such systems using matrices, with support of appropriate computational aids. We will develop facility with exponential functions and their inverses, logarithmic functions. We will tackle application specific problems drawn from multiple subject areas, including physics, chemistry, biology, finance, and everyday life. Our study of polynomials will begin with a review of quadratic equations. Specific skills developed will include addition, subtraction, multiplication, long division and synthetic division of polynomials. We will learn to identify all possible rational roots for polynomials of arbitrary order, and then test them to find all rational roots. We will also study rational functions, which are ratios of polynomials, learning to add, subtract, multiply and divide them. Although our primary focus throughout the year will be on functions, we will also develop an understanding of conic sections, including parabolas, circles, ellipses, and hyperbolas. We will graph equations in all our areas of study both by hand and on graphing calculators.
The student should expect to do a substantial number of exercises outside of class with 5-6 hours of homework each week. Prerequisites: Students must have completed Algebra I successfully. No knowledge of geometry beyond the Pythagorean theorem is assumed.
Supplies: The text for this class has not yet been selected, but it will be a College Algebra book available from amazon.com. Students should purchase a high quality quadrille notebook for homework assignments. A TI-84 calculator is required for this course.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

9th-12th

History Investigators: Gettysburg, Why Was It a Turning Point? History Investigators: Gettysburg, Why Was It a Turning Point? - When Confederate troops marched across Maryland and into Pennsylvania in late June of 1863, General Robert E. Lee hoped to undermine Union morale. If he could win a decisive battle on Union soil, it might cause the North to give up the fight. The two armies engaged outside the town of Gettysburg. The battle lasted for three brutal days. This DBQ asks the question: Why was the Battle of Gettysburg a turning point in the war? History Investigators is an interactive, multi disciplinary examination of some of most pivotal points in American History using sources from The DBQ Project. DBQs, or document based questions, are derived from AP History exams and help develop high school level critical thinking skills. Students will review an array of primary sources such as letters, journal entries, inventories, ship's manifestos, newspaper articles, period maps, and court documents along with selected secondary sources like excerpts, charts, and graphs. Students will be guided through analyzing the documents, interpreting the data, drawing inferences, and forming conclusions. In some historical scenarios, the class will consider conflicting perspectives and be able to defend and debate multiple sides of a key issue. To demonstrate comprehension and a deeper understanding of the class theme, students will use factual findings to develop a structured, evidence-based essay. Future themes in this series include North or South: Who Killed Reconstruction? (4th quarter).

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

7th-10th

Room 9

ASL (American Sign Langauge) for Everyone ASL (American Sign Langauge) for Everyone - ASL for Everyone is a fun, play-based sign language class for elementary students. Students will begin/continue to learn the language of the Deaf community by signing the alphabet and developing a vocabulary for greetings, everyday objects, common phrases and idioms. Students will continue to learn signs for people, questions, numbers, colors, animals, and opposites in an engaging setting. Students will watch short movie clips of a Deaf family demonstrating signs, learn handshape poems, and have familiar stories signed to them. This level will include a greater emphasis on the five elements of each sign; handshape, motion, location, palm orientation, and facial expression. For example, 'please' and 'sorry' have the same motion, location, and palm orientation, but differ in handshape. In this level, students will also be taught to fingerspell unique words and proper nouns and begin to learn about the grammar of ASL. We will also learn about the history and culture of the Deaf community. ASL is an excellent second language choice for children who are not ready for a foreign language with difficult writing, spelling, or challenging pronunciation. Penn State University research demonstrated that adding the visual and kinesthetic elements of ASL to verbal communication helped to enhance the vocabulary, spelling, and reading skills in hearing students. New themes and vocabulary are introduced every quarter, allowing students to join ASL for Everyone at any time throughout the year. Themes for future quarters will include weather, clothing, holidays, food, directions, manners, and more!

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

3rd-5th

Pre-Algebra Skill Builders (Computation): Exponents, Roots ... Pre-Algebra Skill Builders (Computation): Exponents, Roots & Order of Magnitude - Just exactly how far away is the sun? How small is an atom? Join us as we make sense of really small and really big numbers. We will cover exponents, roots, powers of ten, scientific notation and order of magnitude. We will learn different ways of expressing decimals. Each week, we will tackle real world challenges and put our skills to the test against multi-step word problems. Optional homework will be given each week to build fluency with basic skills. Pre-Algebra Skill Builders is a class series that is meant to "fill in the gaps" and strengthen a student's elementary and middle school math background. This series of pre-algebra topics will help ensure a solid foundation in key concepts before embarking on high school algebra. This class will also emphasize real world applications of the mathematical concept and word problems so students become comfortable switching between prose (written descriptions) and mathematical representation. Please note that there are two, distinct Pre-Algebra Skill Builders classes: the Wednesday series will focus on four computational themes, while the Friday series will examine conceptual topics. Registration is separate for each series (Wednesday and Friday) and each topic (by quarter), and students can take one, both, or mix-and-match each quarter based on the skill they need to review. As a baseline, students should have completed 7th grade math prior to taking this class. If a family is unsure about placement, the Instructor can suggest some 7th grade assessments to check a student's readiness and some resources to strengthen 7th grade skills. Future themes in this series include Factoring and Polynomials (4th quarter).

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

6th-8th

Room 10
Atrium A

American History Illuminated: The American Revolution American History Illuminated: The American Revolution - Students will be immersed in detail and fully engaged in this intensive history course led by well- known homeschool instructor and historian Hugh Gardner. This history class is unlike other high school American history courses. Instead of learning a sequential set of names, dates, and battles, students will learn how to analyze and interpret history. Much like a college seminar, this approach to American History incorporates historiography (the history of the history.) Mr. Gardner does not teach a narrow view from a single textbook or static set of prepared notes. Instead, he presents the back story and multiple interpretations for the "why" questions in American history. Class discussion considers interpretations from a wide array of scholars and is updated as new sources are published. Rather than running through a timeline of outcomes, students will evaluate contributing factors (the "how" questions) and will learn about the personalities, prejudices, and biases of the people involved ("who"). For example, instead of compartmentalizing the causes of the American Revolution into a list of taxes and legislative acts, students will dig deeper and go farther back to see that the rift was 150 years in the making.
Second semester will investigate will evaluate the final French and Indian War, the American Revolution, the leadership of George Washington, the new Republic, and if time permits, The War of 1812. The class will discuss the effects on the political, social, economic, and religious climate as well as influences on the arts, science, literature, and warfare. This is no ordinary history class as Mr. Gardner surrounds the students with vivid posters, maps, charts, primary sources, and artifacts to supplement his story-telling style. Students will be able to examine and handle period pieces such as antique and replica weapons and military accoutrements of the era while learning how these tools helped shape the battlefields and turning points in history. With an emphasis on primary sources, students will scrutinize historical atlases and original writings, all in a fun and interactive setting. Students will also play historical games and earn historical trading cards for class participation.
This class meets for 2.5 hours, one time per week on Wednesdays. Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours outside of class each week completing assigned reading. Students will be asked to purchase two books for class (approximately $30-$40). For those families who want to investigate the course themes at a deeper level, an optional reading list will be furnished. Based on the format and rich content of this class, homeschool families could count two semesters of this series as a full credit in American History for purposes of a high school transcript.

9:30 am-11:55 am

7th-12th

Atrium B

Smart Start: Thinking Fun for Young Learners Smart Start: Thinking Fun for Young Learners - Stretch your child's brain with this metacognitive class! In Smart Start, children will sharpen their critical and creative thinking skills to become more independent and effective learners. Using in-class readings of high quality literature, children will be introduced to a broad range of thinking strategies such as de Bono's Thinking Hats, SCAMPER, and FFOE (Fluency, Flexibility, Originality, and Elaboration). Through facilitated discussion and community inquiry, children will learn to ask their own questions and raise issues for discussion, explore and develop their own ideas and theories, and give creative reasons. Each week, students will complete engaging activities that require them to apply what they have learned. For example, the class might consider, What happens when Max returns to Where the Wild Things Are the next day? Next year? How about 10 years from now? (Green Hat Thinking). They may expand to discuss what would happen if another character from literature, like Curious George or Cinderella, visited Where the Wild Things Are? (SCAMPER approach "C" for combining two things that do not normally go together). Young learners will have fun on this engaging, creative class which will boost their ability to use higher order thinking skills, predict outcomes, and solve problems! New stories and activities are introduced each week and not repeated from previous sessions. Students must be able to think independently, work collaboratively, and enjoy a good challenge. Emerging readers and writers can be accommodated.

11:00 am-11:55 am

K-2nd

Atrium C
Music Room

Homeschool String Orchestra Homeschool String Orchestra - Students who play violin, viola, cello, or bass are invited to join this homeschool string orchestra! Musicians will have an opportunity to develop ensemble skills and enjoy the experience of practicing, playing, and performing as a group. The class will start with tuning and warm-ups such as playing musical scales and simple exercises. Then the class will work on 3-4 group songs each quarter where they will improve musical literacy, learn to follow the directions of the conductor, and learn to play in different keys- as a group. During the final class of the third quarter (week 8), parents will be invited to hear a working session of what the students have been learning. On the last day of the second quarter (week 16), a concert will be held for friends and family. This orchestra is intended for advanced beginners and intermediate strings students who are currently (or recently) enrolled in private lessons. At a minimum, a beginning student should be able to play a D major scale in two octaves on his/her instrument. Students are expected to be able to locate notes on the their instrument, read music and be able to identify all rhythmical patterns. For any new students interested in joining, we encourage you to contact Compass to set up a brief meeting with the instructor to demonstrate the student's skills. The instructor will provide the orchestral repertoires, and these arrangements will be specially composed to accommodate the range of abilities of all stringed players in the orchestra. Students will be asked to pay a fee $5.00 for their individual music which will be provided on the first day of class. Participants are expected to prepare and practice at home for at least 15 - 20 minutes per day.

10:00 am-10:55 am

3rd-8th

Acting FUNdamentals: Puppet Theater Acting FUNdamentals: Puppet Theater - Do you like stories? How about puppets? In Puppet Theater, students will learn to be a puppeteer from a professional, working puppet master! Each week students will develop a story and learn a different form of puppetry: hand puppets, moving mouth puppets, rod puppets, and even shadow puppets. The young performers will be adapting folk tales from around the world in a structured improv style: getting to know the story, characters, and sequence then creating original dialogue. Children will learn about puppet manipulation and tricks of the trade along with some new stories!
Students will practice fine motor skills as we manipulate the arms of traditional hand puppets and open and close moving mouth puppets. They will discover the similarities between shadow puppet and rod puppet forms: manipulating the puppets with a stick or rod. In Bunraku-style puppetry, our young performers will work together in groups of three to manipulate one puppet. Students are welcome to bring puppets from home to join in the fun at any time. Youngsters will practice the skills of improvisational theater by listening to, responding, and incorporating classmate's ideas. Students will work collaboratively with fellow puppeteers to reach a common goal and perform for each other in a risk-free, low-pressure environment. Reading skills are not required, but students must be age 6 by the start of this class. Families are invited to attend a puppetry workshop led by the students on March 7. This is a seven-week class that begins on January 17.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

1st-3rd

Kitchen

Cooking for Kids: Indulgent Italian Cooking for Kids: Indulgent Italian - Students will enjoy a culinary tour of the world continuing in Italy! The menu features Italian-inspired menus featuring a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients that are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: Goat Cheese Crostini (appetizer), Italian Wedding Soup, Antipasto Salad, Calzone (lunch), Eggplant Parmesan (entree), Mushroom Risotto (side), Chicken Puttanesca (entree), and Tartufo (dessert). Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week. Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. SUPPLIES: Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. MATERIAL FEE: There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day. Future topics in this series include: Chinese (4th quarter).

10:00 am-10:55 am

3rd-5th

Cooking for Tweens: Indulgent Italian Cooking for Tweens: Indulgent Italian - Students will enjoy a culinary tour of the world continuing in Italy! The menu features Italian-inspired menus featuring a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients that are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: Goat Cheese Crostini (appetizer), Italian Wedding Soup, Antipasto Salad, Calzone (lunch), Eggplant Parmesan (entree), Mushroom Risotto (side), Chicken Puttanesca (entree), and Tartufo (dessert). Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week. Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. SUPPLIES: Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. MATERIAL FEE: There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day. Future topics in this series include: Chinese (4th quarter).

11:00 am-11:55 am

6th-8th

Cooking for Little Kids: Indulgent Italian Cooking for Little Kids: Indulgent Italian - Students will enjoy a culinary tour of the world continuing in Italy! The menu features Italian-inspired menus featuring a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients that are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: Goat Cheese Crostini (appetizer), Italian Wedding Soup, Antipasto Salad, Calzone (lunch), Eggplant Parmesan (entree), Mushroom Risotto (side), Chicken Puttanesca (entree), and Tartufo (dessert). Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week. Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. SUPPLIES: Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. MATERIAL FEE: There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day. Future topics in this series include: Chinese (4th quarter).

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

1st-3rd

Cooking for Kids: Indulgent Italian Cooking for Kids: Indulgent Italian - Students will enjoy a culinary tour of the world continuing in Italy! The menu features Italian-inspired menus featuring a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients that are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: Goat Cheese Crostini (appetizer), Italian Wedding Soup, Antipasto Salad, Calzone (lunch), Eggplant Parmesan (entree), Mushroom Risotto (side), Chicken Puttanesca (entree), and Tartufo (dessert). Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week. Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. SUPPLIES: Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. MATERIAL FEE: There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day. Future topics in this series include: Chinese (4th quarter).

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

3rd-5th

Cooking for Tweens: Indulgent Italian Cooking for Tweens: Indulgent Italian - Students will enjoy a culinary tour of the world continuing in Italy! The menu features Italian-inspired menus featuring a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients that are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: Goat Cheese Crostini (appetizer),
Italian Wedding Soup, Antipasto Salad, Calzone (lunch),
Eggplant Parmesan (entree), Mushroom Risotto (side),
Chicken Puttanesca (entree), and Tartufo (dessert).
Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week. Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. SUPPLIES: Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. MATERIAL FEE: There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day. Future topics in this series include: Chinese (4th quarter).

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

6th-8th

Cooking for Little Kids: Indulgent Italian Cooking for Little Kids: Indulgent Italian - Students will enjoy a culinary tour of the world continuing in Italy! The menu features Italian-inspired menus featuring a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients that are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: Goat Cheese Crostini (appetizer), Italian Wedding Soup, Antipasto Salad, Calzone (lunch), Eggplant Parmesan (entree), Mushroom Risotto (side), Chicken Puttanesca (entree), and Tartufo (dessert). Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week. Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. SUPPLIES: Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. MATERIAL FEE: There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day. Future topics in this series include: Chinese (4th quarter).

3:00 pm-3:55 pm

1st-3rd



 

Friday Classes (Click here to jump back up to Wednesday classes)

9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00
Room 1

Chemistry Lab Intensive Chemistry Lab Intensive - Through the study of chemistry, high school students will learn the science behind things they observe everyday! Chemistry explains properties of the food we eat, the beverages we drink, the medicines we take, the fibers we wear, and fuels in the cars we drive. Chemistry is a foundation to understanding the world around us and fundamental to other sciences such as biology, physics, geology, and environmental science.
This full-year laboratory course makes chemistry come alive through hands-on activities, guided inquiry, and student projects. Each lab will feature a short discussion followed by active investigations, providing students with practical experience in laboratory techniques, data collection, scientific observations, and lab safety.
This lab intensive course provides the hands-on laboratory work to support the themes of: matter, atomic structure, subatomic particles, and isotopes (weeks 1-3); orbital notation, electron configuration, and trends in the periodic table (weeks 4-6); ionic and covalent bonding, polarity, acids/bases, and pH (weeks 7-10); solutions, molarity, dilution and equilibrium (weeks 11-14). Students lab work to explore the chemical reactions, synthesis, double replacement, and decomposition (weeks 15-18); stoichiometry (weeks 19-20); phase changes and thermodynamics (weeks 21-22), gas laws (weeks 23-24), electrochemistry (weeks 25-27), and introduction to organic chemistry (weeks 28-30). Example labs include experiments in molar mass, hydrates, chromatography, acid/base titration, distillation, reactants, polymers, heat of fusion, heat of vaporization, and work with metals and hydrolysis. Laboratory work, along with outside assignments, will cover approximately 20 of the textbook's 26 chapters and will provide the foundations for students to work through the remaining chapters if they chose to do so.
Duration: Year-long (30 weeks)/ Register for full year.
Effort: Students should expect to spend 2-3 outside of lab class each week on assigned reading, prelab questions, and short assignments.
Grading: The instructor will provide qualitative feedback on the student's class participation, preparation, and understanding of the material for the parent to assign a grade in the context of the student's overall study of this and related topics.
Credit: This is a component course that will provide 45 hours of laboratory and lecture work. Coupled with independent study of the textbook including assigned readings, review questions, and projects, this may be counted by the homeschool parent as a full high school credit in a laboratory science (chemistry). Without the individual book work, homeschool families should only consider this a component class for a partial science credit.
Materials/Supplies: The course progression, including assigned reading and questions, is meant to follow the McGraw-Hill "Chemistry: Matter and Change" textbook and laboratory manual. It is recommended that students rent or purchase the 2001 Student Edition (ISBN # 978-0028283784) and purchase the accompanying student lab manual (ISBN #9780078245244). Alternatively, the homeschool family can select a different textbook to follow lab work, but they will need coordinate and make their own corresponding assignments based on the course syllabus. Students are expected to bring a lab notebook (graph ruled composition notebook is recommended) to every class. There is a year-long material and lab fee of $110.00 due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

11:00 am-12:30 pm

9th-12th

Foundations of Physics Foundations of Physics - Physics is the study of how matter and energy interact and the investigation of how objects behave under various conditions. Learning Physics can answer questions you have asked all your life. Why is it easier to float in the ocean than in a lake? (It has to do with buoyancy!) Physics also explains why balls bounce, how musical instruments work, and why the lamp in your bedroom turns on when you flip a switch. From maintaining your balance, or center of gravity, while riding a bike to experiencing acceleration when a car, train, or airplane speeds up or slows down, Physics is part of your everyday life. This class features hands-on middle-school level physics and physical science concepts. The emphasis will be on inquiry-based labs and scientific investigation, setting up experiments, taking measurements, recording data, and maintaining a lab notebook. While some basic equations will be introduced and worked in class using data collected by students, the emphasis will not be on mathematics or solving lengthy problem sets. Major themes in this class include Mechanics, Temperature and Pressure, Properties of Matter, and Electricity and Magnetism. Each class will cover a different topic through hands-on labs, such as making an accelerometer, building a solar collector, constructing a simple generator, experimenting with electromagnets, and many more. In Mechanics, students will be introduced to friction, acceleration, momentum, and torque. In the study of Pressure and Temperature, students will examine expansion and contraction, the flow of heat, and solar energy. Topics in Properties of Matter include permeability, solubility, buoyancy, and surface tension. Finally, students’ exploration of Electricity and Magnets will include vibrations, electric current, generators, magnetic fields, and electromagnets. Students will be given a composition notebook to be used as a lab book. They should bring the notebook and an assortment of pens to class each week. There is a $30.00 lab material fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. This is a 16-week, semester long class.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

7th-9th

Veterinary Science: Medical Mysteries Veterinary Science: Medical Mysteries - Discover the science (and art) of small animal medicine! Find out how vets- and even human physicians and other medical professionals- use clues to form a diagnosis. Analyze actual cases and make predictions based on health history, exam findings, and diagnostics. See how anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, and biochemistry come together! The same symptoms can be the result of many disease processes, and in this class, students gain an appreciation of what being a medical professional is all about. Each week students become veterinarians for an hour." Using real veterinary cases, the group will work together to evaluate a patient s history, consider various diagnostic tests, interpret results, and form a treatment plan. Students will work with a practicing veterinarian and use deductive reasoning and logic to piece together the clues of the medical mystery. Will they be successful clinicians? This class is geared towards students interested in pursuing any career in the biological sciences, but will be interesting for anyone curious to learn more about the health of their furry friends. A basic understanding of biology and anatomy is recommended for this class. Students will receive a printed notebook with essential information to be reviewed before the first class. They will also be responsible for some research at home each week as they analyze their findings and formulate a diagnosis. There is a $20.00 material fee for the class notebook and in-class supplies for new students and a $5.00 fee for returning students. In first quarter, all animals present with the same owner complaint: seizures. In future quarters, all patients experience Weight Loss/Weight Gain (4th quarter). Homeschool families could count this course as a component, or partial credit, in science.

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

8th-12th

Room 2

DebateAble: Public Forum Debate DebateAble: Public Forum Debate - Desmond Tutu once stated, Don t raise your voice, improve your argument. Do you have what it takes to strategically win an argument? Effective debate is a life skill that incorporates logic, communication, and public speaking skills. Being able to debate helps teens improve reasoning, conflict resolution, and confidence. In this class, students will learn the fundamentals of debate including the three persuasive appeals, a brief history of debate, and different styles of debate. During the third quarter, we will be hosting our first team debates, known as Public Forum. Public Forum (PF) is a duo team style of debate that is the most popular format among high school students who compete in debate competitions across the country. Very similar to the television show Crossfire, debaters will strategically discuss their positions on current topics or events. During this course, teams consisting of two members will advocate or reject a position based upon the proposition. Students will develop arguments based upon the Art of Persuasion, rather than just using rhetoric. Debaters will learn how to structure an argument, build their evidence, and best practices for researching a topic. Students will learn techniques for quoting sources, presenting statistics, acknowledging opposing views, and incorporating visual aids in debate. The class will also practice stylistic elements of public speaking such as using transitional words, timing, gestures, and eye contact. In this class, students will learn how to really listen to their opponent and how to craft a rebuttal. At the same time, debaters will be taught to read their audience, hold their attention, and establish credibility. In each class, students will practice giving brief impromptu speeches, delivering prepared presentations, and debating classmates. Students will practice evaluating classmates and giving, receiving, and incorporating constructive feedback.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

7th-12th

Room 3

Introduction to Calligraphy: Foundational Majuscule (Capitals) Introduction to Calligraphy: Foundational Majuscule (Capitals) - Write elegant cards! Letter one-of-a-kind invitations! Pen your favorite saying! Gain an appreciation for the ancient art of manuscripts. In this introduction to calligraphy course, students will learn the language of the craft, how to use a broad-edge nib pen, and the miniscule and majuscule (upper and lower case) letters of Foundational hand. Foundational hand is a style that was developed in the early 1900s by Edward Johnston of England. This hand (calligraphers do not call it a font!) is similar based on to the Humanist hand used in the fifteenth century Renaissance for manuscript writing. Foundational is used universally to give beginning calligraphers a firm foundation in how letters are formed and provides a useful style of writing to the new calligrapher. While some hands are based on ovals or rectangles, Foundational is based on a circle and is considered the ideal alphabet to teach slope (are the letters vertical or at an angle?), weight (how big are the letters in relationship to the side of the broad nib?) and pen angle (how is the edge of the nib held in relation to the writing line?). While students work, the instructor will share some history on the art of calligraphy. Students will have the choice of a final project such as an accordion book, a greeting, or short quotation. If you are new to the class, there is a supply fee of $16 due payable to the instructor on the first day for the selected felt tip calligraphy pens, a pad of layout paper for practice, and a sheet of high quality paper for final projects. Returning students are asked to pay a $3.00 supply fee for project paper. This is a 7-week class that will not meet on 2/16/18 (Compass week off). The additional week off will be announced.

10:00 am-10:55 am

7th-Adult

Formula for Fiction: Prequels and Sequels Formula for Fiction: Prequels and Sequels - What happened to D'Artagnan decades after "The Three Muskateers"? You can find out in Dumas sequel, "Twenty Years After"! Did you know that Rudyard Kipling penned "The Second Jungle Book" with further adventures of Mowgli and his friends or that after his "Adventures," Mark Twain continued to tell the story of "Tom Sawyer Abroad" and "Tom Sawyer, Detective"? Did you know that some sequels are not written by the original author, such as Alexandra Ripley's sequel "Scarlett" to Margaret Mitchell's "Gone with the Wind"? Do you have a favorite tale that you always wanted to explore the beginning or further adventures of its characters, their ancestors, or their progeny?
Great fiction doesn't always begin "from scratch." Sometimes writers use a formula, or template storyline. Sometimes we love a character or story so much that we want it to keep going. In this class series, students will survey well-known prequels and sequels and will examine popular storylines as a possible "formula" for creating original fiction. Students will then continue a beloved story through the creation of a before or after --borrowing and elaborating on characters, setting and a few plot details. In the process of picking up where an author left off (or began), the student writer must delve deeper into story elements in order to remain true to the original concept. To do this requires knowledge and understanding of and commitment to (and respect for) an author s intent and work. Student writers will demonstrate this comprehension by: 1) further developing character motivation through early/later life experiences and factoring in additional characters who might enrich detail and deepen story, 2) enhancing setting by incorporating previous places, times or worlds, and 3) expanding the established plot by building credible preceeding/continuing events that mesh with the given storyline.
A portion of each class will be dedicated to sharing students' working drafts with collaboration and in-class feedback. Students will be expected to conduct some writing and reading at home each week. Literature selections will not be assigned in their entirety, but students may want to continue reading the complete work. The culmination of the students' work will be a bound class literary magazine.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

6th-8th

3D History: WWI Mud and Blood, Verdun and the Somme Offensive 3D History: WWI Mud and Blood, Verdun and the Somme Offensive - Why read about key military battles on maps or in books when you can learn about them hands-on, in three dimensions, using historical miniature gaming? In 3D History, pivotal engagements come alive for new and experienced students, as they navigate a table-top terrain, deploy hundreds of miniature soldiers, ships, and tanks... all while playing a military strategy game. Each student will have the opportunity to fight a battle from both sides, allowing them to test various strategies, try multiple scenarios, predict different outcomes, and rewrite history- an effective way to gain a deeper understanding of what actually happened and why! Students will learn why the First World War was exactly that, war spread to every corner of the globe, through a simulation and examination of key battles. This quarter will focus on the iconic trench warfare of the Great War with some of the deadliest battles in human history. Tens of thousands of men from all over the world would face each other across the No Man s Land and march into the face of certain death in a brutal war of attrition where the side who lost the most soldiers is slowly defeated. As a true world war, this also meant taking the fight to sea and air, and students will reenact the Great Naval Battle at Jutland with dozens of Dreadnaught battleships, as well as filling the skies with the first fighter planes to support their land battles. This quarter also builds a knowledge base for the final theme in the WWI series, Germany's last Gasp: WWI the Ludendorff Offensive and America's arrival 1918 (4th quarter). Course documents including period maps, photographs and recreations will be made available through a class Google Drive link emailed to parents, as well as a class YouTube playlist for any videos watched in class or assigned as homework.

1:00 pm-2:55 pm

7th-12th

Room 4

Human Geography (AP, Honors, or On-Level) Human Geography (AP, Honors, or On-Level) - Wish you could take anthropology, environmental science, and economics, but don't have enough space in your high school schedule? Human geography blends all these and adds a dose of pop culture and even sports. This is the classic interdisciplinary course for people interested in everything! Human geography explores questions like "how many pizza parlors can survive in Schenectady, NY?" and "why is French spoken in Madawaska, Maine?" and "how many teens are listening to K-Pop in Cairo?"
Human geography studies people, places, and cultures. It considers how and why humans and our activities are distributed across Earth's surface. Geographers have a special way of looking at topics using the broad questions of "where?" and "why there?" In human geography, "place" is more than map coordinates and location. Places have meaning. Consider a mountain: it might be described mathematically in terms of height or geologically in terms of plate tectonics. From the perspective of humans, however, the mountain may be a barrier between nations, a place of recreation, a site for toxic waste disposal, a national symbol, or a sacred sanctuary. Human geography maps the spread of world religions, monitors the movement of epidemics, explains the rapid expansion of new technologies, and can even investigate the death of little-known languages.
This year-long, multi-level, high school social science course studies how human activity and the surface of our planet interact. Seven themes, taken from the College Board's Advanced Placement (AP) Human Geography curriculum, will be covered: (1) the nature and perspectives of geography; (2) population and migration; (3) cultural patterns and processes; (4) political organization of space, (5) agriculture, food production, and rural land use, (6) industrialization and economic development, and (7) cities and urban land use.
This course offers a substantive, full-credit experience. The course is offered at three levels, which meet together: On-Level, Honors, and Advanced Placement (AP). Pick your desired workload. You can always do more if you like, but at any level you are expected to keep up with weekly readings and homework. This allows you to enjoy active, rich discussions with your peers a big advantage of taking a class with live, in-person meetings. Students will likely need 4-5 hours each week outside class meetings for reading and homework, regardless of level. All levels use materials written at an adult or college level, but the amount and type of homework varies. Brief summer assignments are due in August for those who elect to take the AP level.
There are two weekly meetings: (1) Friday in-person at Compass; and (2) Tuesday online (recorded for those who cannot attend live; time to be announced). This is a 27-week class which follows the Compass calendar, with a few exceptions. Check the course calendar for a few additional days off, assignments due on non-meeting days, early finish, etc.
All students will register online for the same course. Students must designate their intent to take the on-level, honors, or AP version before August 4. Once the course has begun, students may move down a level (from AP to honors, or from honors to on-level) at any time. However, once classes have begun, students may not "bump up" a level.
There is an additional tuition fee of $130 for students who are approved to take the AP level of this course. Those who take AP level will receive a separate invoice for this amount before the start of classes. The fee is not refundable if the student decides mid-year to change to honors or on-level work. The fee to take the AP Human Geography exam in May 2018 is not included; each family will be responsible for scheduling and paying for their student's AP exam. Students who have taken a prior course with this instructor can seek approval for the AP level through a conversation or e-mail with the instructor. For a student who is new to the instructor, a short questionnaire and brief written assignment about a sample textbook chapter is needed in order to get approval for the AP level.
All students should request the course information packet from Compass to receive the sample chapters, ISBN for required text(s), course calendar, projected weekly workload, and AP questionnaire. Registered students will have access to a detailed syllabus and other information on the instructor's Canvas website starting Friday, August 4.

9:30 am-10:55 am

9th - 12th

Shakespeare Off the Page: Much Ado About Nothing Shakespeare Off the Page: Much Ado About Nothing - Read it! Act it! Students will enjoy this two-hour, 10-week workshop with Shakespearian coach Heather Sanderson who hails from England and is known for instilling a love of Shakespeare into the hearts of students throughout the Greater DC area. The class will explore Shakespeare's timeless comedy, analyze its characters, plot, themes and motives. Students will read different roles, study and act out scenes, practice monologues, and work through the literature while having fun with fellow teens. Theatre games will be used to encourage collaboration, and specially designed improv exercises will be used to stretch teens' imaginations and help them get "in character". The class will use read-aloud and in-class dramatization to decipher the original language, word choices, and to identify humor, satire, mockery, betrayal, and rejection in this mixed-up comedic tale of mistaken identity. The class will work from complete texts (not redacted, abridged, or simplified school versions) to hear and practice Elizabethan lingo. (How did someone of Shakespeare's time hurl insults or woe a woman?) Students will learn how the Bard crafted scenes and conveyed the primary storyline and sub-plots in a comedy that has endured for over 400 years. Several scenes will be shared with parents on the last day of class as a way for students to demonstrate their appreciation and understanding of what they have learned about Shakespeare. Instructor Heather Sanderson shares a teaching style based on actions and interactions, developed from years of experience coaching Shakespeare in a way that appeals to students. Her approach brings abstract concepts, complex themes, and difficult language to the students' level, so that they can relate to and appreciate Shakespeare. This is a 10-week workshop that meets for two hours per week on the following dates: 1/19, 2/2, 2/9, 2/23, 3/2, 3/9, 3/23, 4/13, 4/20, 4/27. Homeschool families could count this course as a component, or partial credit, in British Literature or Fine Arts (drama). This course fee includes a $6.00 charge for the select paperback edition of the play.

11:00 am-12:55 pm

8th-12th

Compass Literarians Writing Board Compass Literarians Writing Board - This semester-long course is a home for literarians students who love to write, who love to read writing, and who love to share writing with others. Writing is a solitary act, but writers also need a community in which to grow. Mirroring the design of famous writing salons/groups like The Bloomsbury Group, The Algonquin Round Table, and The Inklings, students will create a Compass community that will encourage individual writers, promote literary collaboration and provide challenging feedback to boost creativity and artistic development. Students will use their own work and the works of professional authors to understand what makes good writing , to improve technique, to experiment with new forms/genre and to understand the drafting, editing and publishing process. The members of this class will form an editorial board of a student anthology, journal, or magazine that will provide a publishing opportunity for themselves and for other homeschooled student writers. As editors, students will design and build an anthology and/or website, advertise the publication, solicit manuscripts and artwork, develop selection criteria, review/select/edit material, and learn the principles of layout and design. Embedded in this process are real-world experiences, and students will improve their communication and organization skills through goal-setting, time management, meeting deadlines, emailing, confirmations, proofreading, etc. A portion of each class will be devoted to writing time, but students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week writing at home. Each student is expected to publish in the anthology. Some students might also publish submit works to other journals or contests. In addition to this published piece, each student will also develop a personal portfolio of writing that includes a variety of forms and genre and that provides samples from all phases of the writing process: brainstorming, drafting, revision, editing.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

8th-12th

Room 5

The Great American Novel: Revolution- Suffragists & Harlem Renaissance The Great American Novel: Revolution- Suffragists & Harlem Renaissance - Through the theme of “revolution”, this year-long course examines American Literature at four pivotal, turbulent times in our nation’s history: Fights for Religious Freedom and Political Independence: America’s Settlement & Revolutionary War (first quarter); Battles over Human Rights:  The Civil War (second quarter); Campaign for Equality: Suffragists & Harlem Renaissance (third quarter); and Struggles for Social Justice: Civil rights Era of 1950s-70s (fourth quarter). Each quarter’s study will be “anchored” by a novel important to the era and will also explore a variety of nonfiction and fiction that influenced revolutionary thinking, culture and action of the times:  essays, letters, speeches, historical documents, court decisions, short stories, campaign material, advertising, songs, poetry, scripts.  A natural outgrowth of this sampling of literature across eras will be an understanding of the development of form/genre through the development of media:  newspapers, magazines, mass-market novels, radio, film and television. During the third quarter, students will examine the concept of social justice and equality through the study of early twentieth century American literature. Using nonfiction genre such as letters, essays, speeches, articles, personal narratives and poetry, students will hear a variety of voices from diverse American perspectives, with an emphasis on voices struggling to be heard: women, African-Americans, middle & lower classes. Civil discourse and disobedience moved from the physical battlefield to a printed one, as Americans increasingly used literature—fiction and nonfiction—to champion civil rights. Students will analyze the speeches and writings of American suffragists such as: Sojourner Truth, Susan B. Anthony, Alice Stone Blackwell, Carrie Chapman Catt, Julia Ward Howe, Alice Paul, Elizabeth Cady Stanton—as well as the works of Harlem Renaissance writers such as: W.E. B. DuBois, Zora Neal Hurston, Nella Larsen, Wallace Thurman.   American literature of this period carries forward both the Civil War’s civil rights advocacy and the development of poetry—the perfect vehicle for activists to channel (and activate) emotions and advocacy for change. Students will explore the poetry of writers such as: Gwendolyn B. Bennett, Countee Cullen, Langston Hughes, Alice Duer Miller, Dorothy Parker, Anne Spencer. As a class we will read The Great Gatsby, as our “Great American Novel”.  While not a suffragist or Harlem Renaissance novel, it provides a backdrop of privilege and class of this period in American history that justifies voices for equality.  We will also look at sections of Zora Neal Hurston’s novel Their Eyes Were Watching God to provide an alternative view of American society of the period. Emphasis in this class will be on critiquing literature, forming a thesis statement, writing literary commentary, and citing examples to defend the opinion. Literary criticism is one of the forms of higher-level writing needed for a student to transition from a casual writer to an academic and ultimately college-level writer. Students will keep a reading journal and are expected to annotate and highlight passages in their personal copy of the novel as part of a college preparation experience.  They will have additional written assignments, some of which will be published as essays or presentations. Publishing is used to teach writing/revision and to share our learning with a wider audience beyond our class. Publishing allows students to develop polished writing and presentations that become part of their high school portfolio. In the process of creating portfolio pieces, students strengthen communication and organizational skills (writing, discussion, emailing, meeting deadlines, presenting) that have direct real world application. The student should expect to spend 2-3 hours of homework per week on reading, investigation, and writing for this class. The class will meet twice a week with Wednesdays introducing the concepts and vocabulary of the literature and authors, and Friday serving as a writing lab to explore the mechanics of writing criticism. Much of the literature we will be studying is accessible via public domain, but students will be encouraged to purchase the Scribner 2004 edition of The Great Gatsby so that everyone is “on the same page” for discussion.

10:00 am-10:55 am

11th-12th

Algebra II and Trigonometry Algebra II and Trigonometry - This is a full high school level Algebra II class. In it, we will reinforce the problem solving skills and mathematical knowledge developed in Algebra I. The core topic areas include: linear systems and matrices, polynomial functions, rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, conic sections, and trigonometry.
We will delve more deeply into linear systems, generalizing from two equations/two unknowns to linear systems of arbitrary dimension. We will learn to represent and solve such systems using matrices, with support of appropriate computational aids. We will develop facility with exponential functions and their inverses, logarithmic functions. We will tackle application specific problems drawn from multiple subject areas, including physics, chemistry, biology, finance, and everyday life. Our study of polynomials will begin with a review of quadratic equations. Specific skills developed will include addition, subtraction, multiplication, long division and synthetic division of polynomials. We will learn to identify all possible rational roots for polynomials of arbitrary order, and then test them to find all rational roots. We will also study rational functions, which are ratios of polynomials, learning to add, subtract, multiply and divide them. Although our primary focus throughout the year will be on functions, we will also develop an understanding of conic sections, including parabolas, circles, ellipses, and hyperbolas. We will graph equations in all our areas of study both by hand and on graphing calculators.
The student should expect to do a substantial number of exercises outside of class with 5-6 hours of homework each week. Prerequisites: Students must have completed Algebra I successfully. No knowledge of geometry beyond the Pythagorean theorem is assumed.
Supplies: The text for this class has not yet been selected, but it will be a College Algebra book available from amazon.com. Students should purchase a high quality quadrille notebook for homework assignments. A TI-84 calculator is required for this course.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

9th-12th

Room 9

Pre-Algebra Skill Builders (Concepts): Integers, Inequaliti... Pre-Algebra Skill Builders (Concepts): Integers, Inequalities & Number Lines - Below freezing temperatures, overdrawn bank accounts, and underground parking are all real world examples of integers. Learn how to think about positive and negative numbers in real world terms, and practice tactics, maneuvers, and strategies for adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing integers. We will cover integers, absolute value, inequalities, and number lines (or one dimensional graphing). Each week, we will tackle real world challenges and put our skills to the test against multi-step word problems. Optional homework will be given each week to build fluency with basic skills. Pre-Algebra Skill Builders is a class series that is meant to "fill in the gaps" and strengthen a student's elementary and middle school math background. This series of pre-algebra topics will help ensure a solid foundation in key concepts before embarking on high school algebra. This class will also emphasize real world applications of the mathematical concept and word problems so students become comfortable switching between prose (written descriptions) and mathematical representation. Please note that there are two, distinct Pre-Algebra Skill Builders classes: the Wednesday series will focus on four computational themes, while the Friday series will examine conceptual topics. Registration is separate for each series (Wednesday and Friday) and each topic (by quarter), and students can take one, both, or mix-and-match each quarter based on the skill they need to review. As a baseline, students should have completed 7th grade math prior to taking this class. If a family is unsure about placement, the Instructor can suggest some 7th grade assessments to check a student's readiness and some resources to strengthen 7th grade skills. Future themes in this series include: Solving for Variables and Graphing Linear Equations (4th quarter).

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

6th-8th

Music Room
Kitchen

Cooking for Teens: Indulgent Italian Cooking for Teens: Indulgent Italian - Students will enjoy a culinary tour of the world continuing in Italy! The menu features Italian-inspired menus featuring a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients that are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: Goat Cheese Crostini (appetizer), Italian Wedding Soup, Antipasto Salad, Calzone (lunch), Eggplant Parmesan (entree), Mushroom Risotto (side), Chicken Puttanesca (entree), and Tartufo (dessert). Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week. Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. SUPPLIES: Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. MATERIAL FEE: There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day. Future topics in this series include: Chinese (4th quarter).

10:00 am-10:55 am

7th-12th

Cooking for Teens: Indulgent Italian Cooking for Teens: Indulgent Italian - Students will enjoy a culinary tour of the world continuing in Italy! The menu features Italian-inspired menus featuring a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients that are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: Goat Cheese Crostini (appetizer), Italian Wedding Soup, Antipasto Salad, Calzone (lunch), Eggplant Parmesan (entree), Mushroom Risotto (side), Chicken Puttanesca (entree), and Tartufo (dessert). Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week. Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. SUPPLIES: Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. MATERIAL FEE: There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day. Future topics in this series include: Chinese (4th quarter).

11:00 am-11:55 am

7th-12th

Cooking for Teens: Indulgent Italian Cooking for Teens: Indulgent Italian - Students will enjoy a culinary tour of the world continuing in Italy! The menu features Italian-inspired menus featuring a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients that are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: Goat Cheese Crostini (appetizer), Italian Wedding Soup, Antipasto Salad, Calzone (lunch), Eggplant Parmesan (entree), Mushroom Risotto (side), Chicken Puttanesca (entree), and Tartufo (dessert). Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week. Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. SUPPLIES: Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. MATERIAL FEE: There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day. Future topics in this series include: Chinese (4th quarter).

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

7th-12th

Mosaic Masterpieces: Hidden in Plain Sight Mosaic Masterpieces: Hidden in Plain Sight - Taking inspiration from the world around us, new and experienced mosaic artists will create a mosaic featuring a place that they love, (think: beach, mountains, farm scene) and will accent their favorite part of the piece with special glass that glows in the dark. The second mosaic will be a night sky or outer space scene and will have glowing highlights that will create depth and add a sense of wonder to their mosaic. The final project composition will show motion with glass, and students will have the option to add hidden messages to their mosaics using glow-in-the-dark glass. Each project will expand student s learning to include use of a pattern, coordinating colors, glass cutting and fitting, and creating the illusion of something incredible. Students will be able to use their choice of glass tile colors to add individuality to each piece, and new for this quarter, students will be learning the score-and-pliers method of cutting larger pieces of glass. Students will choose from a selection of beautiful glass gems, millifiori and shells, which will become the focal point of their final mosaic piece. Students will follow their own creativity to create patterns or waves of color to complete a rich, 3D composition. This course will cover design, layout, basic glass cutting and as time allows students will learn grouting and finishing methods. The number of projects completed depends on the student's work speed and attendance in class. There is no prerequisite for this class. Students who are new to mosaics class this quarter, will begin with a quick, small, pattern project to learn the process of spacing and clean lines, before jumping into these projects. Compass parents are welcome to register for the class to work alongside their teens, or to work on their own, while their teen is in another Compass class. There is a $40.00 per student material and supply fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Homeschool families who are creating a high school transcript may want to count this class as a component, or partial, Fine Arts credit. The fourth quarter theme for mosaics will be, Painting with Glass."

1:00 pm-2:55 pm

7th-Adult