Schedule and Room Assignments

Classes meet on Wednesdays in Oakton, VA, with some classes also meeting on Fridays.  Filter by subject or grade below.

Quarter beginning October 25, 2017

Art / Music Science / Technology History / Humanities Language Arts
Extracurricular Math Foreign Language (Full Classes)
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Wednesday Classes (Click here for Friday Classes)

9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00
Other
Outdoors

Nature Quest: Adventurers Nature Quest: Adventurers - Got shelter? Late fall is the best time of year to learn to build a debris-hut, the most life-saving survival skill for our region. It's also harvest time for wild nuts, and fruits like persimmons. Look around for evidence of animals getting ready for winter. Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has lead for several years. Students will follow the paths and create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing fall season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world! Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Sorry, but the explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. This is a 6-week class that will not meet on December 13.

11:00 am-11:55 am

1st-3rd

Nature Quest: Explorers Nature Quest: Explorers - Got shelter? Late fall is the best time of year to learn to build a debris-hut, the most life-saving survival skill for our region. It's also harvest time for wild nuts, and fruits like persimmons. Look around for evidence of animals getting ready for winter. Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has lead for several years. Students will follow the paths and create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing fall season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world! Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Sorry, but the explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. This is a 6-week class that will not meet on December 13.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

ages 4-5

Nature Quest: Pathfinders Nature Quest: Pathfinders - Got shelter? Late fall is the best time of year to learn to build a debris-hut, the most life-saving survival skill for our region. It's also harvest time for wild nuts, and fruits like persimmons. Look around for evidence of animals getting ready for winter. Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has lead for several years. Students will follow the paths and create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing fall season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world! Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Sorry, but the explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. This is a 6-week class that will not meet on December 13.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

4th-5th

Nature Quest: Adventurers Nature Quest: Adventurers - Got shelter? Late fall is the best time of year to learn to build a debris-hut, the most life-saving survival skill for our region. It's also harvest time for wild nuts, and fruits like persimmons. Look around for evidence of animals getting ready for winter. Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a seasoned naturalist, mentor and survivalist, Mr. Nick. This program will be run similar to a mini-version of Ancestral Knowledge program that the instructor has lead for several years. Students will follow the paths and create their own through the wooded campus at Compass while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under! A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found with the changing fall season. The class will also learn valuable outdoor skills such as constructing a temporary shelter, building a fire, or purifying water. Students will play games to practice skills like stillness, camouflage, agility, and stalking. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong grounding in, and connection to nature, to the real world! Students will get to know about native animals, and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. Sorry, but the explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. This is a 6-week class that will not meet on December 13.

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

1st-3rd

MP Room
Room 1

Experimental Methods & Design: Chemistry Experimental Methods & Design: Chemistry - In this class, middle school students will learn to work as independent investigators using the scientific method. Students will observe the systems under investigation, choose a pattern or trend that interests them, and then develop a testable hypothesis. Students will learn how to: design a scientific experiment, choose appropriate controls, minimize investigator bias, correctly perform measurements and to record and analyze data. During second quarter, students will design experiments relating to chemistry! Our focus will be on chemical reactions that we observe in everyday life and/or hear about in the news. Students will design experiments that test the chemistry of food, household products, or environmental agents. Possible areas of investigation include the effects of street runoff on water quality, how increasing levels of carbon dioxide change the acidity of freshwater and seawater, and the effects of acid rain on plant growth. Students will learn how to locate peer-reviewed scientific literature to research their subject. By the end of the quarter, students will have completed their independent investigations, summarized the results in a poster, and will present their data to the class and families. There is a $10.00 lab fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Each quarter will focus on a different aspect of science: Microscopic (3rd quarter), and Botany (4th quarter).

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

7th-8th

Who Wants to Be a Scientist? Biologist, Entomologist, Marine Biologist Who Wants to Be a Scientist? Biologist, Entomologist, Marine Biologist - There are so many ways to do science! This class allows our youngest scientists to explore different careers in the sciences and shows them that science is fun, approachable, and that anyone can do it! Students will use real scientific equipment and learn actual science terminology to investigate questions in different fields. Try out SCUBA gear as a marine biologist, learn the basics for studying DNA, perform experiments in chemistry, and try your hand at operating an ROV (remote operated vehicle). The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in at least three demonstrations or experiments during each class. During the second quarter, students will begin as biologists, using our powers of observation and digital microscopes to investigate plants and animals from the woods around us and learn the science of how they survive. As entomologists, we ll take an up close look at insects and discover the many important ecological functions that they perform from nutrient cycling to pollination. Guest insects will include pillbugs, millipedes, Madagascar hissing cockroaches and an ant farm. While we re on the topic of nutrient cycling, students will also make their own worm farms to take home to observe, and learn the basics of composting household waste. Then we ll journey into the field of marine biology, learn about the amazing diversity of ocean life, and try out underwater corers and mini-ROVs to investigate aquatic habitats. There is a $10.00 lab fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Future themes in this class series include: Chemist, Medical, Human Body, Nutrition (3rd quarter); and Physics, Astronomy, Engineering (4th quarter).

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

1st-2nd

Who Wants to Be a Scientist? Biologist, Entomologist, Marine Biologist Who Wants to Be a Scientist? Biologist, Entomologist, Marine Biologist - There are so many ways to do science! This class allows our youngest scientists to explore different careers in the sciences and shows them that science is fun, approachable, and that anyone can do it! Students will use real scientific equipment and learn actual science terminology to investigate questions in different fields. Try out SCUBA gear as a marine biologist, learn the basics for studying DNA, perform experiments in chemistry, and try your hand at operating an ROV (remote operated vehicle). The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in at least three demonstrations or experiments during each class. During the second quarter, students will begin as biologists, using our powers of observation and digital microscopes to investigate plants and animals from the woods around us and learn the science of how they survive. As entomologists, we ll take an up close look at insects and discover the many important ecological functions that they perform from nutrient cycling to pollination. Guest insects will include pillbugs, millipedes, Madagascar hissing cockroaches and an ant farm. While we re on the topic of nutrient cycling, students will also make their own worm farms to take home to observe, and learn the basics of composting household waste. Then we ll journey into the field of marine biology, learn about the amazing diversity of ocean life, and try out underwater corers and mini-ROVs to investigate aquatic habitats. There is a $10.00 lab fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Future themes in this class series include: Chemist, Medical, Human Body, Nutrition (3rd quarter); and Physics, Astronomy, Engineering (4th quarter).

3:00 pm-3:55 pm

1st-2nd

Room 2
Room 3

Junior Art Studio: Cultural Art Junior Art Studio: Cultural Art - This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week students will learn a few fun facts about a type of cultural art, view sample works of art, and then will create a project in the style of the cultural object using a wide variety of materials and representative colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors. In this session, students will learn about cultural arts from around the world. Students will examine photographs of African masks and learn about the different area and tribes they come from, and what different facial features stand for. Then the students will create paper masks with an applique technique. The class will learn about the Palaeolithic cave paintings of Lascaux, and will try draw animals in charcoal on crumbled paper cave walls. Students will discover sculptural Native American art and create personal totem poles with air dry clay. Finally, students will survey arts from the Indian subcontinent including India, Pakistan and Bangladesh and will create a representative weaving and jewelry item from the area. There is a material/supply fee of $25 due payable to the instructor on the first day. Future themes in this series include French Artists (3rd quarter), History of Photography (4th quarter).

11:00 am-11:55 am

K-2nd

Science of the Senses: Sound and Hearing- from Ear to Brain Science of the Senses: Sound and Hearing- from Ear to Brain - Students in this class will get to see and do a variety of fun experiments that illustrate the science of sound. What is sound, and what is the physical difference between musical notes like a B flat or F sharp? What properties of a note played on a clarinet allow you to tell that the sound is coming from a clarinet and not the same note played on a trumpet or violin? We will discuss these questions and other properties of sound, including its speed, which we will measure. You will learn how to electronically analyze vibrations caused by musical instruments or your own voice using a free computer program that produces pictures of different sounds. We will explore what physical properties of an object determine how fast it will tend to vibrate; then we ll use this knowledge to understand how musical instruments can play different notes. String players will learn about how their instruments work; and we will also examine some scientific principles of wind instruments. Is it possible for a soprano to break a glass by singing, or is that idea a myth? From this question we will move to a deep mystery: how can your ear and brain recognize different notes? We will learn how an understanding of the beautiful and complex structures of the inner ear can explain how we hear, what problems lead to deafness in some people, and how engineering can bypass these problems to provide hearing to some patients who were born deaf. You will be able to repeat almost all the fun demonstrations and experiments we do in this class at home.  There will be a $20.00 lab fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

5th-6th

Dynamic Dioramas: Native Americans- Nomadic Tribes of the Great Plains Dynamic Dioramas: Native Americans- Nomadic Tribes of the Great Plains - American history began long before the arrival of Europeans! This year, students will discover native American Indian cultures from coast to coast. This quarter, students will learn about nomadic Indian life on the Great Plains, which were once home to dozens of different native tribes and millions of buffalo. There s more to plains Indians than Hollywood westerns show! Studentes will learn about the nomadic hunters from tribes like the Cheyenne or mound building Siouan groups. Students will create a diorama of either a nomadic Plains Indian tipi village, or Siouan mound village. Students will craft and hand-shape their scene on a 10" x 12" foam board using artistic, model-making techniques. They will customize their dioramas with landscape elements, waterways, structures of the time, and paint. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 miniature figures and combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to create a larger terrain. Students will then compete in a history-based survival strategy game. This will reinforce lessons about native American culture, agriculture, warfare and tribal politics. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them. Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $15.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Future topics in this series include Southwestern Pueblo Indians (3rd quarter) and the tribes of the Southeast (4th quarter).

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

2nd-4th

Modeling the Great Conquests: Charlemagne, Rebuilding an Empire Modeling the Great Conquests: Charlemagne, Rebuilding an Empire - In the 8th century CE, Western Europe was beset by hostile enemies, taking advantage of hundreds of years of disunity and decay. One king would unify the disparate and petty barbarian fiefdoms and be crowned Emperor of a new Holy Roman Empire. This quarter will focus on how Charlemagne expertly won his way to Imperial glory through shrewd negotiation and skill on countless battlefields across all the corners of Europe. Even his greatest military defeat would be immortalized in The Song of Roland, which would join the legend of King Arthur in laying down the ideals of chivalry and knighthood. Beyond the achievements of Charlemagne s conquests, the Carolingian renaissance would revolutionize written Latin, introducing such conveniences as lower case letters, and punctuation thanks to the Emperor s demand for easier communication across his entire realm. Students will choose from among several options for their diorama: the battlefield at Pavia, Roncevaux Pass, or Sigiburg. Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will create a 12 X 18 diorama board, and populate it with dozens of 1:72 scale Carolingian knights for historical re-enactments. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate a larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how battles progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. Future themes in this series include William the Conqueror (3rd quarter) and the Crusades (4th quarter). There are no prerequisites for this class. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

5th-8th

Modeling the Great Conquests: Charlemagne, Rebuilding an Empire Modeling the Great Conquests: Charlemagne, Rebuilding an Empire - In the 8th century CE, Western Europe was beset by hostile enemies, taking advantage of hundreds of years of disunity and decay. One king would unify the disparate and petty barbarian fiefdoms and be crowned Emperor of a new Holy Roman Empire. This quarter will focus on how Charlemagne expertly won his way to Imperial glory through shrewd negotiation and skill on countless battlefields across all the corners of Europe. Even his greatest military defeat would be immortalized in The Song of Roland, which would join the legend of King Arthur in laying down the ideals of chivalry and knighthood. Beyond the achievements of Charlemagne s conquests, the Carolingian renaissance would revolutionize written Latin, introducing such conveniences as lower case letters, and punctuation thanks to the Emperor s demand for easier communication across his entire realm. Students will choose from among several options for their diorama: the battlefield at Pavia, Roncevaux Pass, or Sigiburg. Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will create a 12 X 18 diorama board, and populate it with dozens of 1:72 scale Carolingian knights for historical re-enactments. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate a larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how battles progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. Future themes in this series include William the Conqueror (3rd quarter) and the Crusades (4th quarter). There are no prerequisites for this class. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

3:00 pm-3:55 pm

5th-8th

Room 4

Macro Biology Lab Intensive Macro Biology Lab Intensive - Students will be introduced to the fascinating world of macro-biology through intensive laboratory work! Macrobiology is the study of larger organisms in the living world, and this lab intensive explores animals, animal systems, and human anatomy and physiology, from beaks to brains to bones! This full-year laboratory course makes biology come alive through hands-on activities, guided inquiry, and student projects. Each lab will feature a short discussion followed by active investigations, providing students with practical experience in laboratory techniques, data collection, scientific observations, and lab safety. In addition, students will develop their communication skills throughout the course by writing scientific papers, presenting individual projects, and delivering short oral presentations.
This lab intensive course covers topics not addressed in the general biology lab intensive taught in 2016-17, and the prior course is not a prerequisite. Students will begin with overview the animal kingdom through exploration of taxonomy (classification) and identification of characteristics among various phyla and classes. Taxonomy labs include microscope work and dissections of starfish and squid. Students will then explore evolution with in-class activities involving adaptation, competition for resources, and homologous body parts. The class will further address evolution through an overview of hominoid fossils and discussion of recent findings, and current theories in human evolution. With a background in the diversity found in the animal kingdom, students will transition into the examination of extraordinary range of animal systems (digestion, respiration, nervous) and behavior. Example labs in this unit include additional microscope work, dissection/observation of various gill vs lung tissues, nerve impulses in a frog's leg, and termite colonies!
During the second half of this lab intensive, students will focus on a detailed examination of human anatomy and physiology. Students will engage in a methodical overview of the primary body systems (digestive, excretory, nervous, skeletal, muscular, circulatory, integumentary, respiratory, endocrine, reproductive, and immune.) Example labs in anatomy and physiology include further microscope work, dissections of chicken wing and pig's heart, blood typing, and activities on the senses and spread of disease.
Duration: Year-long (30 weeks)/ Register for full year.
Effort: Students should expect to spend 2-3 outside of lab class each week on assigned reading, prelab questions, short assignments, and quarterly projects.
Grading: The instructor will provide qualitative feedback on the student's class participation, preparation, and understanding of the material for the parent to assign a grade in the context of the student's overall study of this and related topics.
Credit: This is a component course that will provide 45 hours of laboratory and lecture work. Coupled with independent study of the textbook including assigned readings, review questions, and projects, this may be counted by the homeschool parent as a full high school credit in a laboratory science (biology). Without the individual work, homeschool families should only consider this a component class for a partial science credit.
Materials/Supplies: The course progression, including assigned reading and questions, is meant to follow units 7 and 8 of the Miller & Levine Biology textbook. It is recommended that students rent or purchase the 2010 Student Edition (red macaw cover, ISBN # 978-0133669510). Alternatively, the homeschool family can select a different textbook to follow lab work, but they will need coordinate and make their own corresponding assignments based on the course syllabus. Students are expected to bring a lab notebook (graph ruled composition notebook is recommended) to every class. There is a year-long material and lab fee of $80.00 due to the instructor on the first day of class.

9:30 am-10:55 am

9th - 12th

Room 5

The Great American Novel: Revolution- Battle for Human Righ... The Great American Novel: Revolution- Battle for Human Rights and The Civil War - Through the theme of “revolution”, this year-long course examines American Literature at four pivotal, turbulent times in our nation’s history: Fights for Religious Freedom and Political Independence: America’s Settlement & Revolutionary War (first quarter); Battles over Human Rights:  The Civil War (second quarter); Campaign for Equality: Suffragists & Harlem Renaissance (third quarter); Struggles for Social Justice: Civil rights Era of 1950s-70s (fourth quarter)
Each quarter’s study will be “anchored” by a novel important to the era and will also explore a variety of nonfiction and fiction that influenced revolutionary thinking, culture and action of the times:  essays, letters, speeches, historical documents, court decisions, short stories, campaign material, advertising, songs, poetry, scripts. A natural outgrowth of this sampling of literature across eras will be an understanding of the development of form/genre through the development of media:  newspapers, magazines, mass-market novels, radio, film and television.
During the second quarter, students will examine the concept of civil rights through the study of Civil War Era American Literature. Using nonfiction genre such as letters, essays, speeches, articles, personal narratives and poetry, students will hear a variety of voices from diverse American perspectives:  presidents, slaves, men, women, soldiers, civilians.
Students will analyze the work of writers such as Harriet Tubman, Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Henry David Thoreau in order to understand civil discourse and civil disobedience.  As America’s emotions ran high, this era saw an emergence of poetic voices as well, and students will read Whitman, Dickinson, Longfellow, Whittier, Julia Ward Howe and other early American poets.
American literature of this period, as does most war-time literature, focused primarily on nonfiction.  As a class we will read The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain, published post-war in 1884, as our “Great American Novel”.
Emphasis in this class will be on critiquing literature, forming a thesis statement, writing literary commentary, and citing examples to defend the opinion. Literary criticism is one of the forms of higher-level writing needed for a student to transition from a casual writer to an academic and ultimately college-level writer. Criticism follows an analytical structure that parallels the way scientists approach problem-solving by selecting an area of study, developing a thesis or theory, and then supporting it with evidence.
Students will keep a reading journal and are expected to annotate and highlight passages in their personal copy of the novel as part of a college preparation experience.  They will have additional written assignments, some of which will be published as essays or presentations. Publishing is used to teach writing/revision and to share our learning with a wider audience beyond our class. Publishing allows students to develop polished writing and presentations that become part of their high school portfolio. In the process of creating portfolio pieces, students strengthen communication and organizational skills (writing, discussion, emailing, meeting deadlines, presenting) that have direct real world application.
The student should expect to spend 2-3 hours of homework per week on reading, investigation, and writing for this class. The class will meet twice a week with Wednesdays introducing the concepts and vocabulary of the literature and authors, and Friday serving as a writing lab to explore the mechanics of writing criticism.

10:00 am-10:55 am

11th-12th

Learning to Write Literary Criticism of Short Stories Learning to Write Literary Criticism of Short Stories - In this course series, students will learn to navigate the elements of literary criticism beginning with the more finite media of film (1st quarter) and transitioning through increasingly abstract media of short works (2nd quarter), poetry (3rd quarter), and art and music (4th quarter.) Short literary works are the next step in literary criticism. The visual story-telling experience of film is replaced by the written word. Critics transition from being watchers to readers, and students must pay more attention to chapter organization, paragraph development, sentence structure, word choice, narration, voice, inferences, and symbolism to grasp a similar understanding of characters, setting, plot, tone, etc. Students will use these newly acquired skills and vocabulary to write more complex literary criticisms. There will be a presentation or report that shares findings and defends a thesis. Publishing is used to teach writing/revision and to share our learning with a wider audience beyond our class. Publishing allows students to develop polished writing and presentations that become part of their high school portfolio. In the process of creating portfolio pieces, students strengthen communication and organizational skills (writing, discussion, emailing, meeting deadlines, presenting) that have direct, real world application. This class meets twice a week for 7 weeks with the Wednesday session focused on the concept and the Friday session serving as a writing lab format to explore the mechanics of writing criticism.

11:00 am-11:55 am

9th-10th

Algebra II and Trigonometry Algebra II and Trigonometry - This is a full high school level Algebra II class. In it, we will reinforce the problem solving skills and mathematical knowledge developed in Algebra I. The core topic areas include: linear systems and matrices, polynomial functions, rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, conic sections, and trigonometry.
We will delve more deeply into linear systems, generalizing from two equations/two unknowns to linear systems of arbitrary dimension. We will learn to represent and solve such systems using matrices, with support of appropriate computational aids. We will develop facility with exponential functions and their inverses, logarithmic functions. We will tackle application specific problems drawn from multiple subject areas, including physics, chemistry, biology, finance, and everyday life. Our study of polynomials will begin with a review of quadratic equations. Specific skills developed will include addition, subtraction, multiplication, long division and synthetic division of polynomials. We will learn to identify all possible rational roots for polynomials of arbitrary order, and then test them to find all rational roots. We will also study rational functions, which are ratios of polynomials, learning to add, subtract, multiply and divide them. Although our primary focus throughout the year will be on functions, we will also develop an understanding of conic sections, including parabolas, circles, ellipses, and hyperbolas. We will graph equations in all our areas of study both by hand and on graphing calculators.
The student should expect to do a substantial number of exercises outside of class with 5-6 hours of homework each week. Prerequisites: Students must have completed Algebra I successfully. No knowledge of geometry beyond the Pythagorean theorem is assumed.
Supplies: The text for this class has not yet been selected, but it will be a College Algebra book available from amazon.com. Students should purchase a high quality quadrille notebook for homework assignments. A TI-84 calculator is required for this course.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

9th-12th

Ultimate Magic Academy II Ultimate Magic Academy II - Curious coins, baffling balls, confounding cards, and puzzling papers! Learn how to give your friends apparent “super hero” powers and make invisible objects reappear! Students will learn tricks of the trade from a professional magician using the Discover Magic “green wand” curriculum! Each week, kids will learn how to perform a unique magic trick, and students will practice and perfect the illusion in class so they can come home and mystify their friends and family. Students will unlock the secrets to eight special magic tricks: Radical Ropes, Total Chaos, Money Maker, Picasso Pouch, Future Card, Trap Door, Gifted, and Luck Winner! For each trick, students will receive a custom magic prop and full color instructions, and at the end of each class, every magician will take home a Top Secret file folder with additional tricks they can practice. Student magicians will be given a secret password each week to gain access to an additional magic trick on the Discover Magic website (parents will need to work the magic to set up the child's online account.) Along with the actual magic, students will discuss a life skill each week that is essential to a good magician (and student) such as public speaking, presentation skills, practicing, being prepared, and reading your audience. Magicians who complete the class will receive a certificate and magic wand. Note: These are all new tricks and lessons from those taught during first quarter 2017. However, first quarter is not a prerequisite, and new magicians may enroll. There is a $45.00 supply fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

3:00 pm-3:55 pm

3rd-5th

Room 9

Manipulating Math: Fun with Fractions Manipulating Math: Fun with Fractions - Kids encounter fractions everyday but may not realize it! They intuitively understand half of a cookie, one quarter of cake, or a third of a pizza. Each week students will use real world examples to illustrate fraction concepts such as part of a whole, part of a set, number lines, comparing fractions, and more.  For example, have you ever wondered where music notes get their names? Explore fractions as part of a whole by examining a measure and how different notes make up the whole. Students will create rhythms and be able to explain the math behind the music. Enjoy games? Learn a new version of the game War and dazzle your friends with tricks to quickly compare fractions in your head. Do you like to cook? Fractions are found in recipes that kids like to bake. Explore what it means to buy three quarters of a pound of cheese at the deli, be half way to grandma’s house, and express that there were 72 red Legos in a package of 500. Fractions even pop up in telling time- half past ten or quarter ‘til one. Fractions can be learned through hands-on experiments with everyday objects. Students will cut, chop, slice, and separate to see that 2/6 is the same as 1/3. They will experiment with combining fractions, such as doubling or tripling a recipe. These activities will provide a real-life understanding of different denominators and equivalent fractions. Students will practice problem solving skills, reasoning, and basic math in this class. Demystify fractions and enjoy math in your daily life!  Future quarters in the Manipulating Math series will explore geometry (3rd quarter) and statistics (4th quarter).

11:00 am-11:55 am

3rd-4th

ASL (American Sign Langauge) for Everyone ASL (American Sign Langauge) for Everyone - ASL for Everyone is a fun, play-based sign language class for elementary students. Students will begin to learn the language of the Deaf community by signing the alphabet and developing a vocabulary for greetings, everyday objects, and common phrases and idioms. In Quarter One, children will learn signs for people, questions, numbers, colors, animals, and opposites in an engaging setting. Students will watch short movie clips of a Deaf family demonstrating signs, play games, work with partners, and have familiar stories signed to them. This level will include more emphasis on the five elements of each sign; handshape, motion, location, palm orientation, and facial expression. For example, 'please' and 'sorry' have the same motion, location, and palm orientation, but differ in handshape. In this level, students will also be taught to finger spell unique words and proper nouns and begin to learn about the grammar of ASL. We will also learn about the history and culture of the Deaf community. ASL is an excellent second language choice for children who are not ready for a foreign language with difficult writing, spelling, or challenging pronunciation. Penn State University research demonstrated that adding the visual and kinesthetic elements of ASL to verbal communication helped to enhance the vocabulary, spelling, and reading skills in hearing students. New themes and vocabulary will be introduced every quarter, but students may join ASL for Everyone at any time. Themes for future quarters will include weather, clothing, holidays, food, directions, manners, and more!

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

3rd-5th

Pre-Algebra Skill Builders (Computation): Decimals & Percentages Pre-Algebra Skill Builders (Computation): Decimals & Percentages - Pre-Algebra Skill Builders is a class series that is meant to "fill in the gaps" and strengthen a student's elementary and middle school math background. This series of pre-algebra topics will help ensure a solid foundation in key concepts before embarking on high school algebra. This class will also emphasize real world applications of the mathematical concept and word problems so students become comfortable switching between prose (written descriptions) and mathematical representation. Decimals and percentages are used everyday, in all aspects of "real" life! Students learn what decimals stand for and how they relate to fractions. The class will work with the conversion between fractions and decimals and use examples with money to ensure a solid understanding. Students will be able to tackle real-world challenges such as, "how much do you really save if you get an extra 15% off the already discounted 30% sale price?" or which is a better bargain, "Buy two, get one free" versus "50% off".  The class will work examples with sales tax, mileage, weights, and measures to visualize common scenarios where decimals and percentages are used in "real life." Future themes in this series include Geometry (3rd quarter), and Exponents/Orders of Magnitude (4th quarter). As a baseline, students should have completed 7th grade math prior to taking this class. If a family is unsure about placement, the Instructor can suggest some 7th grade assessments to check a student's readiness and some resources to strengthen 7th grade skills.

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

6th-8th

Room 10
Atrium A

American History Illuminated: European Discovery through the Revolution American History Illuminated: European Discovery through the Revolution - Students will be immersed in detail and fully engaged in this intensive history course led by well- known homeschool instructor and historian Hugh Gardner. This history class is unlike other high school American history courses. Instead of learning a sequential set of names, dates, and battles, students will learn how to analyze and interpret history. Much like a college seminar, this approach to American History incorporates historiography (the history of the history.) Mr. Gardner does not teach a narrow view from a single textbook or static set of prepared notes. Instead, he presents the back story and multiple interpretations for the "why" questions in American history. Class discussion considers interpretations from a wide array of scholars and is updated as new sources are published. Rather than running through a timeline of outcomes, students will evaluate contributing factors (the "how" questions) and will learn about the personalities, prejudices, and biases of the people involved ("who"). For example, instead of compartmentalizing the causes of the American Revolution into a list of taxes and legislative acts, students will dig deeper and go farther back to see that the rift was 150 years in the making.
First semester will investigate exploration, pirates, native Americans, colonization, and the early wars between the Europeans and the Indians as well as all of the French and Indian Wars. The class will discuss the effects on the political, social, economic, and religious climate as well as influences on the arts, science, literature, and warfare. This is no ordinary history class as Mr. Gardner surrounds the students with vivid posters, maps, charts, primary sources, and artifacts to supplement his story-telling style. Students will be able to examine and handle period pieces such as antique and replica weapons and military accoutrements of the era while learning how these tools helped shape the battlefields and turning points in history. With an emphasis on primary sources, students will scrutinize historical atlases and original writings, all in a fun and interactive setting. Students will also play historical games and earn historical trading cards for class participation.
This class meets for 2.5 hours, one time per week on Wednesdays. Registration is semester long (14 weeks). The second semester (16 weeks) will evaluate the final French and Indian War, the American Revolution, the leadership of George Washington, the new Republic, and if time permits, The War of 1812.
Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours outside of class each week completing assigned reading. Students will be asked to purchase two books for class (approximately $30-$40). For those families who want to investigate the course themes at a deeper level, an optional reading list will be furnished. Based on the format and rich content of this class, homeschool families could count two semesters of this series as a full credit in American History for purposes of a high school transcript.

9:30 am-11:55 am

7th - 12th

Historic Games of the Middle Ages Historic Games of the Middle Ages - Did you know that the Norse loved games of all kinds, and they especially favored families of games known as Tafl? Tafl means “table” and eventually would be used to refer to chess, but before chess reached Northern Europe, the Norse played games that originated from the ancient games of seega, petteia, and lutrunculi.  These games moved from Roman locales through the Celtic world to the Norse where the Norse made changes in keeping with their culture; they introduced unequal sides and pieces with special powers! Hnefatafl includes a variety of versions, and students will be able to play those found in Scandinavia, Ireland, Wales, Saxon England, Finland (Lappland), and the Faroe Islands. The boards and pieces vary greatly. One of the most intriguing complexities about these games is the ongoing controversy over rules! Every game comes with a set of rules, but the students will be able to compare (and play-test) these against many other sets of rules and variations collected from books and reputable. The students have the power to make the games as fun, playable, and challenging as they wish. Students will also play the simpler Tafl cousin of Hnefatafl, generally known today as Fox and Geese, in three different versions. There will be a variety of Nine Men's Morris games and of course checkers, or Draughts. But not plain old checkers...there will be rules for almost 20 regional/historical variations and a separate board and pieces for Alquerques. Other games will include Mancala, Fierges, and Rithomancy, the "philosophers game." The class will enjoy two medieval counting games and several recent wargames based on ancient game rules. Lastly, they will see a chess set based on the famous Isle of Lewis Chessmen (and other historic chess sets for those who want to try their hand at this true medieval classic.) Students will learn basics from the field of ludology, the study of games, while getting a unique glimpse into world cultures and history, the peoples and their pastimes. Find out how game pieces were carved from bone, antler, amber, stone and even walrus tusk, and boards ranged from wood to reindeer hide! Most importantly, learn how games have changed over the centuries as they pass from culture to culture. In this class, players will see and use games boards and pieces crafted in many styles. They will learn the basic types of board games and discuss what makes a fun and interesting game. Students will examine how the rules of ancient games are known or recreated. Historian Hugh Gardner has crafted homemade games, and will give students tips on how to develop and construct games at home. Future quarters will examine historic games from Asia (3rd quarter) and Colonial America/Native Americans (4th quarter).

12:30 pm-1:30 pm

4th-8th

Mobile Maker Lab Mobile Maker Lab - Calling all Compass inventors, tinkerers, crafters, and builders! Do you want to use a PVC cutter or learn to solder? Each Wednesday, the large atrium will be transformed into a Maker Space! Experienced maker coaches will be on hand to demonstrate new tools, to suggest possible materials, to assist with design or construction details, and to encourage creative problem solving. Instead of a structured lesson and prescribed project, each student has the opportunity to tinker, explore, design and build one or more projects of her/his own interest. The workshop will be stocked with essential tools and basic materials kids need to build what they dream up. Students will be coached to safely and effectively cut, shape, join, solder, drill, and modify wood, foam and plastic. They will have access to basic electronic components such as switches, LED lights, batteries and mini motors along with an array of fasteners, connectors, and adhesives. Students will be encouraged to research possible construction details or methods (How many ways can you build a potato launcher?) Time in the Maker Space will be free-build (but not free play). Students should bring materials in from home to incorporate into their project, and some ideas may require families to make a trip to the local hardware or craft supply store. Parents should be prepared to transport in-process projects home in a tote bag - in-progress projects will not be stored on site. Students who enjoy working longer, getting more detailed, or digging deeper into their projects may want to register for two hours of Maker Space. There is a $10.50 per student consumable material fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. ($21.00 if the student takes two hours).

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

4th-8th

Mobile Maker Lab Mobile Maker Lab - Calling all Compass inventors, tinkerers, crafters, and builders! Do you want to use a PVC cutter or learn to solder? Each Wednesday, the large atrium will be transformed into a Maker Space! Experienced maker coaches will be on hand to demonstrate new tools, to suggest possible materials, to assist with design or construction details, and to encourage creative problem solving. Instead of a structured lesson and prescribed project, each student has the opportunity to tinker, explore, design and build one or more projects of her/his own interest. The workshop will be stocked with essential tools and basic materials kids need to build what they dream up. Students will be coached to safely and effectively cut, shape, join, solder, drill, and modify wood, foam and plastic. They will have access to basic electronic components such as switches, LED lights, batteries and mini motors along with an array of fasteners, connectors, and adhesives. Students will be encouraged to research possible construction details or methods (How many ways can you build a potato launcher?) Time in the Maker Space will be free-build (but not free play). Students should bring materials in from home to incorporate into their project, and some ideas may require families to make a trip to the local hardware or craft supply store. Parents should be prepared to transport in-process projects home in a tote bag - in-progress projects will not be stored on site. Students who enjoy working longer, getting more detailed, or digging deeper into their projects may want to register for two hours of Maker Space. There is a $10.50 per student consumable material fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. ($21.00 if the student takes two hours).

3:00 pm-3:55 pm

4th-8th

Atrium B

Smart Start: Thinking Fun for Young Learners Smart Start: Thinking Fun for Young Learners - Stretch your child's brain with this metacognitive class! In Smart Start, children will sharpen their critical and creative thinking skills to become more independent and effective learners. Using in-class readings of high quality literature, children will be introduced to a broad range of thinking strategies such as de Bono's Thinking Hats, SCAMPER, and FFOE (Fluency, Flexibility, Originality, and Elaboration). Through facilitated discussion and community inquiry, children will learn to ask their own questions and raise issues for discussion, explore and develop their own ideas and theories, and give creative reasons. Each week, students will complete engaging activities that require them to apply what they have learned. For example, the class might consider, What happens when Max returns to Where the Wild Things Are the next day? Next year? How about 10 years from now? (Green Hat Thinking). They may expand to discuss what would happen if another character from literature, like Curious George or Cinderella, visited Where the Wild Things Are? (SCAMPER approach "C" for combining two things that do not normally go together). Young learners will have fun on this engaging, creative class which will boost their ability to use higher order thinking skills, predict outcomes, and solve problems! New stories and activities are introduced each week and not repeated from previous sessions. Students must be able to think independently, work collaboratively, and enjoy a good challenge. Emerging readers and writers can be accommodated.

11:00 am-11:55 am

K-2nd

History Investigators: What Was Harriet Tubman's Greatest Achievement? History Investigators: What Was Harriet Tubman's Greatest Achievement? - Harriet Tubman is one of America's better known heroes. What is not so well known is that Harriet's story is long and has a number of chapters. This DBQ presents several glimpses of the Tubman story and asks the student to determine her greatest achievement. Students will examine the historical evidence in order to understand that the story of Harriet Tubman does not begin and end with the Underground Railroad, but rather that her life boasted multiple achievements and contributions. History Investigators is an interactive, multi disciplinary examination of some of most pivotal points in American History using sources from The DBQ Project. DBQs, or document based questions, are derived from AP History exams and help develop high school level critical thinking skills. Students will review an array of primary sources such as letters, journal entries, inventories, ship's manifestos, newspaper articles, period maps, and court documents along with selected secondary sources like excerpts, charts, and graphs. Students will be guided through analyzing the documents, interpreting the data, drawing inferences, and forming conclusions. In some historical scenarios, the class will consider conflicting perspectives and be able to defend and debate multiple sides of a key issue. To demonstrate comprehension and a deeper understanding of the class theme, students will use factual findings to develop a structured, evidence-based essay. Future themes in this series include: The Battle of Gettysburg: Why Was It a Turning Point? (3rd quarter); and North or South: Who Killed Reconstruction? (4th quarter).

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

7th-10th

Atrium C

Minecraft Mod Masters: Medieval Times Minecraft Mod Masters: Medieval Times - Learn to build more realistic looking medieval fortresses in Minecraft with three new mods: “Medieval Mobs,” “Dungeons,” and “RapidForm.” Have you ever seen (or read about) medieval castles, stone fortresses, or feudal villages? The RapidForm mod offers wands for special construction in creative mode. With RapidForm, Minecrafters can add buildings, tunnels, roads, towers, walls and other interesting effects to their medieval towns. The Dungeons mod gives builders the power to add mazes, underground tunnels, and creepy corridors to their medieval developments. The Medieval Mobs mod enhances the medieval world by changing the costumes of many popular Minecraft mobs, such as dressing villagers to look like they are from the 15th century. These building and sculpting mods empower the virtual builder to enhance and refine their Minecraft structures. Beginners will be taught the basics of Minecraft along with these mods, and more advanced builders will be given individualized construction challenges. Students who ordinarily play Minecraft on a game console or tablet will expand their understanding with a different functionality in the keyboard-based PC version. Students will be using local installations of Minecraft 1.8 rather than having open internet access. Students will work in creative mode and refrain from survival mode to avoid violence, death, and loss of all virtual work. For parents who are not Minecrafters, "mods" are add-on software bundles that give expanded flexibility and enhanced functions in the Minecraft world.

11:00 am-11:55 am

4th-6th

Music Room

Homeschool String Orchestra Homeschool String Orchestra - Students who play violin, viola, cello, or bass are invited to join this homeschool string orchestra! Musicians will have an opportunity to develop ensemble skills and enjoy the experience of practicing, playing, and performing as a group. The class will consist of tuning and warm-ups such as playing musical scales and simple exercises. Then the class will work on 3-4 group songs each quarter where they will improve musical literacy, learn to follow the directions of the conductor, and learn to play in different keys- as a group. During the final class of the first quarter (week 7), parents will be invited to hear a working session of what the students have been learning. On the last day of the second quarter (week 14), a concert will be held for friends and family. This orchestra is for beginning and intermediate strings students who are currently (or recently) enrolled in private lessons on their instruments and have played for a minimum of one year or have participated, or plan to participate, in an intensive summer orchestra camp. At a minimum, a beginning student should be able to play a D major scale on his/her instrument. The instructor will provide the orchestral repertoires, and these arrangements will be specially composed to accommodate the range of abilities of all stringed players in the orchestra. Students will be asked to pay a fee $5.00 for their individual music which will be provided on the first day of class. Participants are expected to prepare and practice at home for at least 15 - 20 minutes per day.

10:00 am-10:55 am

3rd-8th

Acting: Kids Theater: The BFG (The Big Friendly Giant) Acting: Kids Theater: The BFG (The Big Friendly Giant) - Students will not want to miss the chance to perform a set of scenes from Roald Dahl's hilarious 1982 book about the BFG, a Big, Friendly Giant. The BFG is a gentle, sweet 24-foot-tall giant who has superhuman powers and who exists to provide happy dreams to children. Orphan Sophie joins the BFG in Dream Country and goes on a wild adventure meeting a crazy cast of other giants and and zany characters such as the Queen, Mr. Tibbs, and Mrs. Clonkers. Many children met the BFG in the 2016 film by produced by Walt Disney Pictures and directed by Steven Spielberg, but now they can act it! Young actors will further their theatrical skills and stretch their imaginations by working on characters, envisioning scenes, and exploring the plot as they develop several vignettes in which everyone has a role in this twisted adventure. Students will benefit from experimenting with public speaking through acting in a safe, supportive environment, and enjoy the satisfaction of working as a team. Students will be coached on acting basics such as facing the audience, projecting their voices, and dramatizing their character through body language and movements. The final class will showcase their process and performance of the scenes they have learned. This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, can follow directions, can collaborate with others, do their best to memorize lines, and enjoy working in a group. Students should be able to read on grade level in order to follow the script. There is a $7.00 script fee for this class.

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

3rd-5th

Kitchen

Cooking for Kids: Inspired Indian Cuisine Cooking for Kids: Inspired Indian Cuisine - Students will enjoy a culinary tour of the world continuing in India! The menu features Indian-inspired menus featuring a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients that are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:
The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: Samosa (appetizer) , Sweet Corn Soup (soup), Egg Curry (curry), Paneer Kathi (rolls), Butter Chicken (entree), Aloo Tikka (side), Gajar Ka Halwa (dessert).
Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week. Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. SUPPLIES: Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. MATERIAL FEE: There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day.
Future topics in this series include: Italian (3rd quarter) and Chinese (4th quarter).

10:00 am-10:55 am

3rd-5th

Cooking for Tweens: Inspired Indian Cuisine Cooking for Tweens: Inspired Indian Cuisine - Students will enjoy a culinary tour of the world continuing in India! The menu features Indian-inspired menus featuring a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients that are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: Samosa (appetizer) , Sweet Corn Soup (soup), Egg Curry (curry), Paneer Kathi (rolls), Butter Chicken (entree), Aloo Tikka (side), Gajar Ka Halwa (dessert). Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week. Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. SUPPLIES: Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. MATERIAL FEE: There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day. Future topics in this series include: Italian (3rd quarter) and Chinese (4th quarter).

11:00 am-11:55 am

6th-8th

Cooking for Little Kids: Inspired Indian Cuisine Cooking for Little Kids: Inspired Indian Cuisine - Students will enjoy a culinary tour of the world continuing in India! The menu features Indian-inspired menus featuring a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients that are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:
The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: Samosa (appetizer) , Sweet Corn Soup (soup), Egg Curry (curry), Paneer Kathi (rolls), Butter Chicken (entree), Aloo Tikka (side), Gajar Ka Halwa (dessert).
Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week. Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. SUPPLIES: Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. MATERIAL FEE: There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day.
Future topics in this series include: Italian (3rd quarter) and Chinese (4th quarter).

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

1st-3rd

Cooking for Kids: Inspired Indian Cuisine Cooking for Kids: Inspired Indian Cuisine - Students will enjoy a culinary tour of the world continuing in India! The menu features Indian-inspired menus featuring a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients that are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:
The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: Samosa (appetizer) , Sweet Corn Soup (soup), Egg Curry (curry), Paneer Kathi (rolls), Butter Chicken (entree), Aloo Tikka (side), Gajar Ka Halwa (dessert).
Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week. Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. SUPPLIES: Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. MATERIAL FEE: There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day.
Future topics in this series include: Italian (3rd quarter) and Chinese (4th quarter).

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

3rd-5th

Cooking for Tweens: Inspired Indian Cuisine Cooking for Tweens: Inspired Indian Cuisine - Students will enjoy a culinary tour of the world continuing in India! The menu features Indian-inspired menus featuring a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients that are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: Samosa (appetizer) , Sweet Corn Soup (soup), Egg Curry (curry), Paneer Kathi (rolls), Butter Chicken (entree), Aloo Tikka (side), Gajar Ka Halwa (dessert). Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week. Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. SUPPLIES: Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. MATERIAL FEE: There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day. Future topics in this series include: Italian (3rd quarter) and Chinese (4th quarter).

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

6th-8th

Cooking for Little Kids: Inspired Indian Cuisine Cooking for Little Kids: Inspired Indian Cuisine - Students will enjoy a culinary tour of the world continuing in India! The menu features Indian-inspired menus featuring a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients that are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:
The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: Samosa (appetizer) , Sweet Corn Soup (soup), Egg Curry (curry), Paneer Kathi (rolls), Butter Chicken (entree), Aloo Tikka (side), Gajar Ka Halwa (dessert).
Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week. Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. SUPPLIES: Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. MATERIAL FEE: There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day.
Future topics in this series include: Italian (3rd quarter) and Chinese (4th quarter).

3:00 pm-3:55 pm

1st-3rd



 

Friday Classes (Click here to jump back up to Wednesday classes)

9:00
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Room 1

Shakespeare Off the Page: Twelfth Night Shakespeare Off the Page: Twelfth Night - Read it! Act it! Students will enjoy this two-hour, 10-week workshop with Shakespearian coach Heather Sanderson who hails from England and is known for instilling a love of Shakespeare into the hearts of students throughout the Greater DC area.  The class will explore Shakespeare's timeless comedy, analyze its characters, plot, themes and motives.
Students will read different roles, study and act out scenes, practice monologues, and work through the literature while having fun with fellow teens.  Theatre games will be used to encourage collaboration, and specially designed improv exercises will be used to stretch teens' imaginations and help them get "in character".  The class will use read-aloud and in-class dramatization to decipher the original language, word choices, and to identify humor, satire, mockery, betrayal, and rejection in this mixed-up comedic tale of mistaken identity. The class will work from complete texts (not redacted, abridged, or simplified school versions) to hear and practice Elizabethan lingo. (How did someone of Shakespeare's time hurl insults or woe a woman?) Students will learn how the Bard crafted scenes and conveyed the primary storyline and sub-plots in a comedy that has endured for over 400 years.
Several scenes will be shared with parents on the last day of class as a way for students to demonstrate their appreciation and understanding of what they have learned about Shakespeare. Instructor Heather Sanderson shares a teaching style based on actions and interactions, developed from years of experience coaching Shakespeare in a way that appeals to students. Her approach brings abstract concepts, complex themes, and difficult language to the students' level, so that they can relate to and appreciate Shakespeare. There will be a $6.00 fee payable to Compass on the first day of class for the selected paperback edition of the play. Homeschool families could count this course as a component, or partial credit, in British Literature or Fine Arts (drama).
 
 
 

11:00 am-12:55 pm

8th-12th

Aviation Science: The Physics of Flight Aviation Science: The Physics of Flight - In this semester-long course, students will delve into the fascinating physics of flight and dynamics of aircraft. This class provides a real-world context for applied physics, technology, even meteorology and math, all within the exciting realm of aviation. Students will discover the forces of flight (lift, thrust, drag, and weight) and experiment with the principles of aerodynamics, Bernoulli s Laws of air pressure, and the physics of stalls and spins. In-class labs and activities will include constructing airfoils to compare and contrast wing design and building model aircraft from household materials to understand aerodynamics. As they grasp the principles of flight, students will begin to learn the practical skills of piloting an aircraft. Students will use laptop-based aviation simulators and aircraft controls. The class will learn piloting skills such as instrumentation, the proper maneuvering of aircraft around airports, how to determine compass headings, calculate speed, time, and distance, and how to plot a course using aviation maps. Students will learn about the process of weather and how to determine if conditions are appropriate for flight. After mastering the simulation software and flight preparation, students will plan and execute a virtual, multi-leg, cross-country flight. Emphasis will be on understanding the physics concepts and applied technologies in aviation. While some formulas may be demonstrated, the class does not include an intensive math component.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

7th-8th

Veterinary Science: Medical Mysteries- Weakness & Collapse Veterinary Science: Medical Mysteries- Weakness & Collapse - Discover the science (and art) of small animal medicine! Find out how vets- and even human physicians and other medical professionals- use clues to form a diagnosis. Analyze actual cases and make predictions based on health history, exam findings, and diagnostics. See how anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, and biochemistry come together! The same symptoms can be the result of many disease processes, and in this class, students gain an appreciation of what being a medical professional is all about. Each week students become veterinarians for an hour." Using real veterinary cases, the group will work together to evaluate a patient s history, consider various diagnostic tests, interpret results, and form a treatment plan. Students will work with a practicing veterinarian and use deductive reasoning and logic to piece together the clues of the medical mystery. Will they be successful clinicians? This class is geared towards students interested in pursuing any career in the biological sciences, but will be interesting for anyone curious to learn more about the health of their furry friends. A basic understanding of biology and anatomy is recommended for this class. Students will receive a printed notebook with essential information to be reviewed before the first class. They will also be responsible for some research at home each week as they analyze their findings and formulate a diagnosis. There is a $20.00 material fee for the class notebook and in-class supplies. In first quarter, all animals present with the same owner complaint difficulty breathing. In future sessions, students will tackle Seizures (3rd quarter) and Weight Loss/Weight Gain (4th quarter). Homeschool families could count this course as a component, or partial credit, in science.

2:00 pm-2:55 pm

8th-12th

Room 3

Introduction to Calligraphy Introduction to Calligraphy - Write elegant cards! Letter one-of-a-kind invitations! Pen your favorite saying! Gain an appreciation for the ancient art of manuscripts. In this introduction to calligraphy, students will learn the language of the craft, how to use a broad-edge nib pen, and the miniscule and majuscule (upper and lower case) letters of Foundational hand. Foundational hand is a style that was developed in the early 1900s by Edward Johnston of England. This hand (calligraphers do not call it a font!) is similar to the Humanist hand used in the fifteenth century Renaissance for manuscript writing. Foundational is used universally to give beginning calligraphers a firm foundation in how letters are formed. While some hands are based on ovals or rectangles, Foundational is based on a circle and is considered the ideal alphabet to teach slope (are the letters vertical or at an angle?), weight (how big are the letters in relationship to the side of the broad nib?) and pen angle (how is the edge of the nib held in relation to the writing line?) While students work, the instructor will share some history on the art of calligraphy. Students will have the choice of final project such as an accordion book, a greeting, or short quotation. There is a supply fee of $16.00 due payable to the instructor on the first day for the selected felt tip calligraphy pens, a pad of layout paper for practice, and a sheet of high quality paper for final projects.

10:00 am-10:55 am

7th-Adult

Fundamentals of Drawing for Teens: Cityscapes II Fundamentals of Drawing for Teens: Cityscapes II - Students will continue their study of cityscapes! First quarter students were introduced to the drawing techniques of perspective, vanishing point, and scale. Teen artists will continue to learn how to capture the drama of a panoramic skyline, the majesty of a modern high rise, or the symmetry in a block of brownstones through pencil and paper. Being able to draw what you see (or what you imagine) is an essential skill for architects, engineers, graphic artists, engineers, interior designers, product innovators, and even travelers and hobbyists. From houses and apartments to public buildings, places of worship, centers of art and commerce, and bustling markets, cities provide fascinating scenes to study and sketch. Cityscapes will be the theme as teens learn and practice the drawing fundamentals of form, composition, and depth. Students will learn to recognize, and represent, the patterns, symmetry, and repetition found in the built environment. How do you draw a shady urban alley or represent a sun-lit metal spire? Fundamentals such as value, shading, and contrast will be integrated into every lesson as students learn how to add texture, depth, and detail to the structures they draw. Students will work primarily with charcoal pencils, but some projects may incorporate pen and ink, or colored pencils. Students will be asked to purchase a basic pencil set kit through Compass for $6.00. Additional supplies for specific projects and large format paper will be furnished by the instructor. Future topics in this series include Landscapes (3rd quarter) and People/Animals (4th quarter).

11:00 am-11:55 am

7th-12th

Room 2

Debate 102: Extemporaneous Debate Debate 102: Extemporaneous Debate - Don't raise your voice, improve your argument." (Desmond Tutu, 2004) Do you have what it takes to strategically win an argument? Effective debate is a life skill that incorporates logic, communication, and public speaking skills. Being able to debate helps teens improve reasoning, conflict resolution, and confidence. In this class, students will learn the fundamentals of debate including the three persuasive appeals, a brief history of debate, and different styles of debate. Debaters will learn how to structure an argument, build their evidence, and best practices for researching a topic. Students will learn techniques for quoting sources, presenting statistics, acknowledging opposing views, and incorporating visual aids in debate. The class will also practice stylistic elements of public speaking such as using transitional words, timing, gestures, and eye contact. In this class, students will learn how to really listen to their opponent and how to craft a rebuttal. At the same time, debaters will be taught to read their audience, hold their attention, and establish credibility. Second quarter debate will focus on the on-your-feet style of extrenporaneous debate. In "extemp" debate, students are paired to argue a specified topic with limited preparation time. Within class time, students will be assigned a topic, notified if they are for or against the issue, and given a brief time to prepare their argument before facing their debate opponent. In each class, students will practice giving brief impromptu speeches, delivering prepared presentations, and debating classmates. Students will practice evaluating classmates and giving, receiving, and incorporating constructive feedback. First quarter will introduce Lincoln-Douglas, or prepared, one-on-one style debate. Future quarter debate focuses include Open Forum Debate (3rd quarter) and Parliamentary Debate (4th quarter). This is a 6-week class that will begin on November 3 (no class meeting on October 27).

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

7th-12th

Website Development: Coding with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript Website Development: Coding with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript - Website design and development is a fun, tangible way to introduce teens to coding! Rather than writing code for the sake of memorizing syntax and symbols, students will be coding for themselves- to create their very own website! In this project-based class, students will design and develop a website on a topic of their choice. Will their personal website showcase a hobby, a club, a home business, or will it be used as their digital portfolio for future college applications? Students will learn to set up a website that follows industry standards and best practices. They will discover how HTML, CSS, and JavaSript are integrated as the core internet technologies that make a website useful, intuitive, and appealing. In the vast industry of website development, HTML serves as a website's framework, controlling content such as photos, videos, and text, while CSS is used for styling choices such as font styles, sizes, colors, and backgrounds. JavaScript is the dynamic, industry language that controls not only functionality such as inputs, interface, and responses within websites, but is also used for app and game development. This is a 14 week, semester-long class that meets for 90 minutes on Fridays. AirMac laptops with all required software applications will be furnished in class by the instructor. Students will have links to protected development sites where they can continue to work on their websites during the week, between classes. As a follow-up to this class, a semester-long (16 weeks) class in Website Development II will be offered in winter/spring 2018.

1:00 pm-2:30 pm

7th - 12th

Room 3

Chemistry Lab Intensive Chemistry Lab Intensive - Through the study of chemistry, high school students will learn the science behind things they observe everyday! Chemistry explains properties of the food we eat, the beverages we drink, the medicines we take, the fibers we wear, and fuels in the cars we drive. Chemistry is a foundation to understanding the world around us and fundamental to other sciences such as biology, physics, geology, and environmental science.
This full-year laboratory course makes chemistry come alive through hands-on activities, guided inquiry, and student projects. Each lab will feature a short discussion followed by active investigations, providing students with practical experience in laboratory techniques, data collection, scientific observations, and lab safety.
This lab intensive course provides the hands-on laboratory work to support the themes of: matter, atomic structure, subatomic particles, and isotopes (weeks 1-3); orbital notation, electron configuration, and trends in the periodic table (weeks 4-6); ionic and covalent bonding, polarity, acids/bases, and pH (weeks 7-10); solutions, molarity, dilution and equilibrium (weeks 11-14). Students lab work to explore the chemical reactions, synthesis, double replacement, and decomposition (weeks 15-18); stoichiometry (weeks 19-20); phase changes and thermodynamics (weeks 21-22), gas laws (weeks 23-24), electrochemistry (weeks 25-27), and introduction to organic chemistry (weeks 28-30). Example labs include experiments in molar mass, hydrates, chromatography, acid/base titration, distillation, reactants, polymers, heat of fusion, heat of vaporization, and work with metals and hydrolysis. Laboratory work, along with outside assignments, will cover approximately 20 of the textbook's 26 chapters and will provide the foundations for students to work through the remaining chapters if they chose to do so.
Duration: Year-long (30 weeks)/ Register for full year.
Effort: Students should expect to spend 2-3 outside of lab class each week on assigned reading, prelab questions, and short assignments.
Grading: The instructor will provide qualitative feedback on the student's class participation, preparation, and understanding of the material for the parent to assign a grade in the context of the student's overall study of this and related topics.
Credit: This is a component course that will provide 45 hours of laboratory and lecture work. Coupled with independent study of the textbook including assigned readings, review questions, and projects, this may be counted by the homeschool parent as a full high school credit in a laboratory science (chemistry). Without the individual book work, homeschool families should only consider this a component class for a partial science credit.
Materials/Supplies: The course progression, including assigned reading and questions, is meant to follow the McGraw-Hill "Chemistry: Matter and Change" textbook and laboratory manual. It is recommended that students rent or purchase the 2001 Student Edition (ISBN # 978-0028283784) and purchase the accompanying student lab manual (ISBN #9780078245244). Alternatively, the homeschool family can select a different textbook to follow lab work, but they will need coordinate and make their own corresponding assignments based on the course syllabus. Students are expected to bring a lab notebook (graph ruled composition notebook is recommended) to every class. There is a year-long material and lab fee of $110.00 due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

11:00 am-12:30 pm

9th-12th

Room 5

3D History: WWI Gallipoli and Lawrence of Arabia in 1916, Breaking the Stalemate! 3D History: WWI Gallipoli and Lawrence of Arabia in 1916, Breaking the Stalemate! - Why read about key military battles on maps or in books when you can learn about them hands-on, in three dimensions, using historical miniature gaming? In 3D History, pivotal engagements come alive for students as they navigate a table-top terrain, deploy hundreds of miniature soldiers, ships, and tanks... all while playing a military strategy game. Each student will have the opportunity to fight a battle from both sides, allowing them to test various strategies, try multiple scenarios, predict different outcomes, and rewrite history- an effective way to gain a deeper understanding of what actually happened and why! Students will learn why the First World War was exactly that, war spread to every corner of the globe, through a simulation and examination of key battles. Beyond the horrors of the Western Front in Europe, was a multitude of other conflicts, fought by soldiers from almost every nation. Some of these conflicts go back to ancient times, like the Arab Revolt of Lawrence of Arabia fame in 1916. Others are entirely new match-ups, as in the case of the invasion of Gallipoli, which pitted the Australian and New Zealand contingent of Great Britain s colonial might against the even older Ottoman Empire. Driven by desperation in the face of unending and costly war in the West, Britain would flex the full might of her empire to strangle the central powers and end the war. These are the events that gave rise to heroes and nations alike; men like T.E. Lawrence, Winston Churchill, and Mustafa Kemal Ataturk. The events of 1916 would sow the seeds of destruction for some of the greatest empires in a thousand years. This quarter s learning will build a knowledge base for the following quarters of WWI Classes, which will include; WWI Verdun and The Somme offensive 1916 (3rd quarter), and Germany s last Gasp: WWI The Ludendorff Offensive and America s arrival 1918 (4th quarter). Course documents including period maps, photographs and recreations will be made available through a class Google Drive link emailed to parents, as well as a class YouTube playlist for any videos watched in class or assigned as homework.

1:00 pm-2:55 pm

7th-12th

Room 4

Human Geography (AP, Honors, or On-Level) Human Geography (AP, Honors, or On-Level) - Wish you could take anthropology, environmental science, and economics, but don't have enough space in your high school schedule? Human geography blends all these and adds a dose of pop culture and even sports. This is the classic interdisciplinary course for people interested in everything! Human geography explores questions like "how many pizza parlors can survive in Schenectady, NY?" and "why is French spoken in Madawaska, Maine?" and "how many teens are listening to K-Pop in Cairo?" Human geography studies people, places, and cultures. It considers how and why humans and our activities are distributed across Earth's surface. Geographers have a special way of looking at topics using the broad questions of "where?" and "why there?" In human geography, "place" is more than map coordinates and location. Places have meaning. Consider a mountain: it might be described mathematically in terms of height or geologically in terms of plate tectonics. From the perspective of humans, however, the mountain may be a barrier between nations, a place of recreation, a site for toxic waste disposal, a national symbol, or a sacred sanctuary. Human geography maps the spread of world religions, monitors the movement of epidemics, explains the rapid expansion of new technologies, and can even investigate the death of little-known languages. This year-long, multi-level, high school social science course studies how human activity and the surface of our planet interact. Seven themes, taken from the College Board's Advanced Placement (AP) Human Geography curriculum, will be covered: (1) the nature and perspectives of geography; (2) population and migration; (3) cultural patterns and processes; (4) political organization of space, (5) agriculture, food production, and rural land use, (6) industrialization and economic development, and (7) cities and urban land use. This course offers a substantive, full-credit experience. The course is offered at three levels, which meet together: On-Level, Honors, and Advanced Placement (AP). Pick your desired workload. You can always do more if you like, but at any level you are expected to keep up with weekly readings and homework. This allows you to enjoy active, rich discussions with your peers a big advantage of taking a class with live, in-person meetings. Students will likely need 4-5 hours each week outside class meetings for reading and homework, regardless of level. All levels use materials written at an adult or college level, but the amount and type of homework varies. Brief summer assignments are due in August for those who elect to take the AP level. There are two weekly meetings: (1) Friday in-person at Compass; and (2) Tuesday online (recorded for those who cannot attend live; time to be announced). This is a 27-week class which follows the Compass calendar, with a few exceptions. Check the course calendar for a few additional days off, assignments due on non-meeting days, early finish, etc. All students will register online for the same course. Students must designate their intent to take the on-level, honors, or AP version before August 4. Once the course has begun, students may move down a level (from AP to honors, or from honors to on-level) at any time. However, once classes have begun, students may not "bump up" a level. There is an additional tuition fee of $130 for students who are approved to take the AP level of this course. Those who take AP level will receive a separate invoice for this amount before the start of classes. The fee is not refundable if the student decides mid-year to change to honors or on-level work. The fee to take the AP Human Geography exam in May 2018 is not included; each family will be responsible for scheduling and paying for their student's AP exam. Students who have taken a prior course with this instructor can seek approval for the AP level through a conversation or e-mail with the instructor. For a student who is new to the instructor, a short questionnaire and brief written assignment about a sample textbook chapter is needed in order to get approval for the AP level. All students should request the course information packet from Compass to receive the sample chapters, ISBN for required text(s), course calendar, projected weekly workload, and AP questionnaire. Registered students will have access to a detailed syllabus and other information on the instructor's Canvas website starting Friday, August 4.

9:30 am-10:55 am

9th - 12th

Formula for Fiction: Writing Historical Fiction Formula for Fiction: Writing Historical Fiction - Writers will find out how historical facts and creativity collide in writing historical fiction! Writing doesn't always begin "from scratch." Sometimes writers use a formula, or template storyline, to create fiction. This class series examines different types of popular storylines to give the young writer a "formula" for creating original fiction. For each genre, the class will examine samples of literature and excerpts from well-know works that illustrate the story template. Each fiction formula includes a different mix of elements (characters, setting, plot) that change with the new story while others remain fixed to preserve the genre. In Historical fiction, students will learn why the literary elements of time and place are prescribed in popular tales such as Gone with the Wind, A Tale of Two Cities, or Johnny Tremain. Sometimes details of real historical characters or events are woven into this genre to add credibility. In this class, students will be asked to research a historical period or event in order to select appropriate details to include in their fiction. A portion of each class will be dedicated to sharing students' working drafts with collaboration and in-class feedback. Students will be expected to conduct some writing and reading at home each week. Literature selections will not be assigned in their entirety, but students may want to continue reading the complete work. The culmination of the students' work will be a bound class literary magazine.

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

7th-8th

Compass Literarians Writing Board Compass Literarians Writing Board - This semester-long course is a home for literarians students who love to write, who love to read writing, and who love to share writing with others. Writing is a solitary act, but writers also need a community in which to grow. Mirroring the design of famous writing salons/groups like The Bloomsbury Group, The Algonquin Round Table, and The Inklings, students will create a Compass community that will encourage individual writers, promote literary collaboration and provide challenging feedback to boost creativity and artistic development.
Students will use their own work and the works of professional authors to understand what makes good writing , to improve technique, to experiment with new forms/genre and to understand the drafting, editing and publishing process.
The members of this class will form an editorial board of a student anthology, journal, or magazine that will provide a publishing opportunity for themselves and for other homeschooled student writers. As editors, students will design and build an anthology and/or website, advertise the publication, solicit manuscripts and artwork, develop selection criteria, review/select/edit material, and learn the principles of layout and design. Embedded in this process are real-world experiences, and students will improve their communication and organization skills through goal-setting, time management, meeting deadlines, emailing, confirmations, proofreading, etc.
A portion of each class will be devoted to writing time, but students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week writing at home. Each student is expected to publish in the anthology. Some students might also publish submit works to other journals or contests. In addition to this published piece, each student will also develop a personal portfolio of writing that includes a variety of forms and genre and that provides samples from all phases of the writing process: brainstorming, drafting, revision, editing.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

8th-12th

Room 5

The Great American Novel: Revolution- Battle for Human Righ... The Great American Novel: Revolution- Battle for Human Rights and The Civil War - Through the theme of “revolution”, this year-long course examines American Literature at four pivotal, turbulent times in our nation’s history: Fights for Religious Freedom and Political Independence: America’s Settlement & Revolutionary War (first quarter); Battles over Human Rights:  The Civil War (second quarter); Campaign for Equality: Suffragists & Harlem Renaissance (third quarter); Struggles for Social Justice: Civil rights Era of 1950s-70s (fourth quarter)
Each quarter’s study will be “anchored” by a novel important to the era and will also explore a variety of nonfiction and fiction that influenced revolutionary thinking, culture and action of the times:  essays, letters, speeches, historical documents, court decisions, short stories, campaign material, advertising, songs, poetry, scripts. A natural outgrowth of this sampling of literature across eras will be an understanding of the development of form/genre through the development of media:  newspapers, magazines, mass-market novels, radio, film and television.
During the second quarter, students will examine the concept of civil rights through the study of Civil War Era American Literature. Using nonfiction genre such as letters, essays, speeches, articles, personal narratives and poetry, students will hear a variety of voices from diverse American perspectives:  presidents, slaves, men, women, soldiers, civilians.
Students will analyze the work of writers such as Harriet Tubman, Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Henry David Thoreau in order to understand civil discourse and civil disobedience.  As America’s emotions ran high, this era saw an emergence of poetic voices as well, and students will read Whitman, Dickinson, Longfellow, Whittier, Julia Ward Howe and other early American poets.
American literature of this period, as does most war-time literature, focused primarily on nonfiction.  As a class we will read The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain, published post-war in 1884, as our “Great American Novel”.
Emphasis in this class will be on critiquing literature, forming a thesis statement, writing literary commentary, and citing examples to defend the opinion. Literary criticism is one of the forms of higher-level writing needed for a student to transition from a casual writer to an academic and ultimately college-level writer. Criticism follows an analytical structure that parallels the way scientists approach problem-solving by selecting an area of study, developing a thesis or theory, and then supporting it with evidence.
Students will keep a reading journal and are expected to annotate and highlight passages in their personal copy of the novel as part of a college preparation experience.  They will have additional written assignments, some of which will be published as essays or presentations. Publishing is used to teach writing/revision and to share our learning with a wider audience beyond our class. Publishing allows students to develop polished writing and presentations that become part of their high school portfolio. In the process of creating portfolio pieces, students strengthen communication and organizational skills (writing, discussion, emailing, meeting deadlines, presenting) that have direct real world application.
The student should expect to spend 2-3 hours of homework per week on reading, investigation, and writing for this class. The class will meet twice a week with Wednesdays introducing the concepts and vocabulary of the literature and authors, and Friday serving as a writing lab to explore the mechanics of writing criticism.

10:00 am-10:55 am

11th-12th

Learning to Write Literary Criticism of Short Stories Learning to Write Literary Criticism of Short Stories - In this course series, students will learn to navigate the elements of literary criticism beginning with the more finite media of film (1st quarter) and transitioning through increasingly abstract media of short works (2nd quarter), poetry (3rd quarter), and art and music (4th quarter.) Short literary works are the next step in literary criticism. The visual story-telling experience of film is replaced by the written word. Critics transition from being watchers to readers, and students must pay more attention to chapter organization, paragraph development, sentence structure, word choice, narration, voice, inferences, and symbolism to grasp a similar understanding of characters, setting, plot, tone, etc. Students will use these newly acquired skills and vocabulary to write more complex literary criticisms. There will be a presentation or report that shares findings and defends a thesis. Publishing is used to teach writing/revision and to share our learning with a wider audience beyond our class. Publishing allows students to develop polished writing and presentations that become part of their high school portfolio. In the process of creating portfolio pieces, students strengthen communication and organizational skills (writing, discussion, emailing, meeting deadlines, presenting) that have direct, real world application. This class meets twice a week for 7 weeks with the Wednesday session focused on the concept and the Friday session serving as a writing lab format to explore the mechanics of writing criticism.

11:00 am-11:55 am

9th-10th

Algebra II and Trigonometry Algebra II and Trigonometry - This is a full high school level Algebra II class. In it, we will reinforce the problem solving skills and mathematical knowledge developed in Algebra I. The core topic areas include: linear systems and matrices, polynomial functions, rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, conic sections, and trigonometry.
We will delve more deeply into linear systems, generalizing from two equations/two unknowns to linear systems of arbitrary dimension. We will learn to represent and solve such systems using matrices, with support of appropriate computational aids. We will develop facility with exponential functions and their inverses, logarithmic functions. We will tackle application specific problems drawn from multiple subject areas, including physics, chemistry, biology, finance, and everyday life. Our study of polynomials will begin with a review of quadratic equations. Specific skills developed will include addition, subtraction, multiplication, long division and synthetic division of polynomials. We will learn to identify all possible rational roots for polynomials of arbitrary order, and then test them to find all rational roots. We will also study rational functions, which are ratios of polynomials, learning to add, subtract, multiply and divide them. Although our primary focus throughout the year will be on functions, we will also develop an understanding of conic sections, including parabolas, circles, ellipses, and hyperbolas. We will graph equations in all our areas of study both by hand and on graphing calculators.
The student should expect to do a substantial number of exercises outside of class with 5-6 hours of homework each week. Prerequisites: Students must have completed Algebra I successfully. No knowledge of geometry beyond the Pythagorean theorem is assumed.
Supplies: The text for this class has not yet been selected, but it will be a College Algebra book available from amazon.com. Students should purchase a high quality quadrille notebook for homework assignments. A TI-84 calculator is required for this course.

1:00 pm-1:55 pm

9th-12th

Music Room
Kitchen

Cooking for Teens: Inspired Indian Cuisine Cooking for Teens: Inspired Indian Cuisine - Students will enjoy a culinary tour of the world continuing in India! The menu features Indian-inspired menus featuring a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients that are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: Samosa (appetizer) , Sweet Corn Soup (soup), Egg Curry (curry), Paneer Kathi (rolls), Butter Chicken (entree), Aloo Tikka (side), Gajar Ka Halwa (dessert). Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week. Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. SUPPLIES: Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. MATERIAL FEE: There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day. Future topics in this series include: Italian (3rd quarter) and Chinese (4th quarter).

10:00 am-10:55 am

7th-12th

Cooking for Teens: Inspired Indian Cuisine Cooking for Teens: Inspired Indian Cuisine - Students will enjoy a culinary tour of the world continuing in India! The menu features Indian-inspired menus featuring a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients that are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: Samosa (appetizer) , Sweet Corn Soup (soup), Egg Curry (curry), Paneer Kathi (rolls), Butter Chicken (entree), Aloo Tikka (side), Gajar Ka Halwa (dessert). Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week. Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. SUPPLIES: Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. MATERIAL FEE: There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day. Future topics in this series include: Italian (3rd quarter) and Chinese (4th quarter).

11:00 am-11:55 am

7th-12th

Cooking for Teens: Inspired Indian Cuisine Cooking for Teens: Inspired Indian Cuisine - Students will enjoy a culinary tour of the world continuing in India! The menu features Indian-inspired menus featuring a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients that are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: Samosa (appetizer) , Sweet Corn Soup (soup), Egg Curry (curry), Paneer Kathi (rolls), Butter Chicken (entree), Aloo Tikka (side), Gajar Ka Halwa (dessert). Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week. Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. SUPPLIES: Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. MATERIAL FEE: There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day. Future topics in this series include: Italian (3rd quarter) and Chinese (4th quarter).

12:00 pm-12:55 pm

7th-12th

Social Hall

Mosaic Masterpieces: Fall Flora Mosaic Masterpieces: Fall Flora - Taking inspiration from nature, new and experienced mosaic artists will create a mosaic featuring an indigenous tree, a second mosaic of a garden scene, and a usable 3-D mosaic flower pot. Each project will expand student s learning to include use of a pattern, coordinating colors, glass cutting and fitting, and creating the illusion of something in nature. Students will be able to use their choice of glass tile colors to add individuality to each piece, and new for this quarter, students will be introduced to use of sheet glass and glass gems. Students will choose from a selection of beautiful glass gems, millifiori and shells, which will become the focal point of their final mosaic piece. Students will follow their own creativity to create patterns or waves of color to complete a rich 3-D composition. This course will cover design, layout, basic glass cutting and as time allows students will learn grouting and finishing methods. The number of projects completed depends on the student s work speed and attendance in class. There is no prerequisite for this class. Note that students new to mosaics class this quarter, will begin with a quick, small, pattern project to learn the process of spacing and clean lines, before jumping into these projects. Adults are welcome to register for the class to work alongside their teens. There is a $40.00 per student material and supply fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Homeschool families who are creating a high school transcript may want to count this class as a component, or partial, Fine Arts credit.

1:00 pm-2:55 pm

7th-Adult